ASSIGNMENT  1  

04.09.2012  

QUESTION  2  
Answer:   a. 3,  1,  2   b. they  are  the  same   Explanation:   The  spheres  are  conducting.    When  they  touch,  the  charges  are  free  to  move.     Like  charges  will  attempt  to  move  away  from  each  other  as  far  as  possible.    For   pair  (1),  three  positive  charges  will  move  from  left  to  right,  and  two  negative   charges  will  move  from  right  to  left.    The  total  number  of  charge  that  is   transferred  is  3+2=5.    The  net  charge  on  the  sphere  on  the  left  is  3-­‐2=+1.      

  Following  similar  reasoning  with  pairs  (2)  and  (3)  will  give  the  following  result:     Magnitude  of   charge   transferred   Charge  left  on  the   positively  charged   sphere     (1)   5   (2)   1   (3)   13  

1  

1  

1  

      QUESTION  3   Answer:   (a)  and  (b)  are  the  only  situations  where  an  electron  will  be  in  equilibrium  in   some  location  left  of  both  particles.    This  circle  will  have  to  be  larger.    Where  the   two  circles  intersect  (if  they  do  intersect)  is  where  the  forces  are  the  same.   One  way  you  can  convince  yourself  is  to  do  several  test  scenarios.  so  the  force  will  be   weaker.   So  the  only  remaining  question  is  in  which  situations  will  there  be  a  location  left   of  the  two  charges  where  an  electron  will  experience  two  forces  of  equal   magnitude.    This   means  that  the  two  forces  on  the  electron  will  always  be  opposite  in  direction.    Start  by   drawing  a  small  circle  around  the  left  particle.    Equilibrium  means  that  the  sum  of  all  the  forces  must  equal  to  zero.    This  circle  represents  places   where  the  force  from  the  left  particle  on  an  electron  will  be  equal  in  magnitude.  so  the  force  will  be  larger.A  student  pointed  out  that  in  reality.    That  equilibrium  situation  is  when  both  spheres  have  the   same  net  charge.    But  it  is  also  further  away.   In  all  four  situations.  but  it  changes  how  you   understand  the  question  a  little  bit.  will  always   be  smaller.  you  will  find  that  the  circle  on   .  we  are  looking  for  situations  where  the  two  forces  are  equal  in   magnitude  and  opposite  in  direction.  it  should  be  fairly  clear  that  there  is  no  location  left  of   the  two  particles  where  the  two  forces  will  be  equal.    The  question  is  whether  or  not  there  is  any  location  where  the  larger   charge  will  compensate  for  the  larger  distance.    The  particle  on  the  right  has  larger   charge.   Explanation:   We  are  looking  for  situations  where  the  electron  will  be  in  equilibrium  on  the   left.   For  situations  (c)  and  (d).    The  force  from  the  particle  on  the  right.     Because  in  all  the  situations  there  are  only  two  forces  that  will  act  on  the   electron.  only  electrons  (and  therefore  negative   charges)  move.     This  is  because  not  only  is  the  magnitude  of  the  charge  smaller.  therefore.     Now  draw  a  circle  around  the  right  particle  that  represents  a  force  of  equal   magnitude  as  the  previous  circle.    This  doesn’t  change  the  answers.    If   you  keep  doing  this  for  larger  and  larger  circles.  one  charge  is  negative  and  one  charge  is  positive.  we  have  to  think  of  the  electrons  moving  to  satisfy  some  overall   equilibrium  situation.   Situations  (a)  and  (b)  are  less  obvious.     Now.  but  the  distance   is  always  larger.    Before  we  thought  of  the  positive  charges   and  the  negative  charges  satisfying  their  own  individual  equilibrium  conditions.    The  force  from  the  right   most  particle  will  always  be  weaker  than  the  force  from  the  particle  on  the  left.

   By  applying  Coulomb’s  law.  use  the  following  equation.the  right  will  catch  up  with  the  circle  on  the  left  and  eventually  intersect  it  on  the   left  side.   𝑟 ! QUESTION  7   Answer:   (b)  and  (c).  (a)   Explanation:   .   2𝑘𝑞!  𝑖𝑛  𝑡ℎ𝑒  𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑡𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑙  𝑑𝑖𝑟𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛.  r  is  the  distance  from  the  electron  to  the  left   particle.    You  should  be  able  to  prove  that  there  exists  a  positive  value  for  r  that   satisfies  this  equation.  so  just  use  a  number  instead   of  d.  the  values  of  y1  and   y2  are  equal.     QUESTION  5   Answer:   𝐹 = Explanation:   Charges  that  have  the  same  charge.  y2  begins  to  exceed  y1  in   magnitude.  and  d  is  the  distance  between  the  two  particles.   and  are  on  opposite  sides  of  the  circle  cancel  each  other  out.   𝑘𝑞𝑒 𝑘3𝑞𝑒 =   𝑟 ! 𝑟 + 𝑑 ! e  is  the  charge  of  an  electron.  are  the  same  distance  away  from  the  center.   If  you  are  still  not  convinced.  they  exert  forces  of   equal  magnitude  but  opposite  direction  on  the  charge  in  the  center.   It  is  difficult  to  find  a  nice  analytic  solution  for  this.  we  can  find  the  magnitude  of  the   force  and  the  direction.    You  can  also  tell  that  after  that  point.    At  the  intersection.    The  only   charge  that  doesn’t  get  cancelled  out  is  the  charge  of  +2q  a  distance  r  vertically   from  the  center.    What  you  are  looking   for  is  the  intersection  of  the  two  graphs.   Another  way  to  convince  yourself  is  to  graph  the  following  to  equations:   𝑦! = 𝑦! = 1   𝑥 ! 1   𝑥 + 1 ! You  may  have  to  change  the  window  size  to  see  the  effect.

   Therefore  the   force  on  6q  in  (a)  is  0.Inside  a  spherical  conductor.  the  net-­‐force  on  any  particle  is  0.     .  the   !!" !!" force  in  (b)  is   !! .    The  force  in  (c)  is   !! .    Note  that  the  distance  between  the   center  of  the  sphere  and  the  particle  is  always  d.    Therefore.  the  spherical  distribution  of  charge  can  be   modeled  as  a  point  charge  located  at  the  center  of  the  sphere.   Outside  a  spherical  conductor.    We  never  have  to  use  R.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful