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www.theprincetonsun.

com
JAN. 2-8, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Rebuilding the shore
Local company donating
boulders for coastline. PAGE 3
KATIE MORGAN/The Princeton Sun
Mercer County residents gathered to watch Santa Claus land at the Princeton Airport on Christmas Eve. Santa visited with children
and delivered gifts. Everyone who wanted to participate had to bring a gift for the needy, unwrapped, and a wrapped gift for their child.
Santa Claus flies in
Princeton
Township,
Borough
merge
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
On Jan. 1, Princeton Township
and Princeton Borough officially
merged, becoming one consoli-
dated municipality.
Princeton Borough seceded
from the township in 1894 after a
dispute over school taxes. Consol-
idation was approved by a land-
slide vote of 3,542 to 604 in a his-
toric referendum on Nov. 8, 2011.
A Consolidation Commission
and Transition Task Force were
formed, and began working to-
ward consolidation at the begin-
ning of 2012. The Transition Task
Force consists of 12 members ap-
pointed from the township and
borough. Multiple subcommittees
were formed to make recommen-
dations on finances, community
affairs, infrastructure and opera-
tions, boards and commissions,
and multiple other facets of the
merge.
“It’s a huge undertaking,”
Transition Task Force chair
Mark Freda said recently. “Some
please see COUNCILMAN, page 4
2 THE PRINCETON SUN — JAN. 2-8, 2013
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Rebuilding the Jersey shore
Local developer, building company Hillier Properties, LLC
donates boulders to help protect coastline
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
A local developer and building
company is doing its part to re-
store the Jersey shore in the wake
of Hurricane Sandy. Boulders do-
nated by Hillier Properties, LLC,
will be used to restore the coast-
line, rebuild jetties and improve
protection for the beaches in the
event of future superstorms.
Ground was broken on the Cop-
perwood rental community, an ac-
tive adult community for resi-
dents aged 55 and over, in Novem-
ber.
Hillier Properties had previ-
ously acquired the property,
which consists of 20 acres on
Bunn Drive, from another devel-
oper.
“There’s 20 beautifully wooded
acres,” said Bob Hillier, principal
developer and architect. “When
we acquired it, it had recently
been approved for basically 75
percent of those acres to be dis-
turbed. What that means is the
trees come down and there’s con-
struction on the whole area. The
developer who got that approval
walked away.”
Hillier adapted the plans for
the portion of land, designing a
community that will encompass
between three and four acres of
the 20-acre site. Hillier said the
rest of the property will be left
undisturbed.
“The other 17 acres we’re giv-
ing off to conservation,” he said.
“That really satisfied a lot of the
town officials involved with the
approval process.”
Hillier said the company
looked at other sites being devel-
oped on Bunn Drive to determine
whether the ground was particu-
larly rocky, and they did not see
any evidence that they would ex-
perience any issues or problems
upon breaking ground.
However, once ground was bro-
ken on the site and digging began
for an underground parking
garage, Hillier said they almost
immediately began uncovering
huge boulders.
“When we looked at the other
buildings being put up on Bunn
Drive, there were not a lot of boul-
ders,” he said. “But our site was
just strewn with them.”
Hillier said the boulders are
the result of glaciers that moved
east from Wisconsin and south
from New Hampshire and melted
in the area.
“These glaciers melted and
dropped boulders,” he said. “It’s
actually fairly common in this
area to see boulders as a result of
glacier melts.”
The Princeton Regional Plan-
ning Board had concerns about
the use of dynamite to remove the
boulders, so Hillier was forced to
use jackhammers to remove the
boulders from the site.
“We had to use some of the
biggest jackhammers you have
ever seen,” he said.
As the area of possible site dis-
turbance was extremely limited
by the terms of the site plan ap-
proval, Hillier was unable to store
the boulders on the site.
“This was 400 tons of boul-
ders,” he said. “It was a pile – a
mountain, really – 30 feet high
and it took up a space the size of
half a football field. We had prom-
ised everyone we wouldn’t dis-
turb any more than the four or so
acres that we were building on.
We were very limited on where
we could put them.”
Hillier reached out to landscap-
ers, contractors, and road
builders, and was unable to find
anyone who was interested in
using the boulders.
“We were calling everyone,”
Hillier said. “We had this huge
mountain of boulders, and we
were about to spend a lot of
money to truck it out to rock min-
ing companies.”
Hillier said he was surprised
when a contractor from the Jer-
sey Shore, representing Lyons
please see COMPANY, page 5
of the subcommittees are still
working up to this very late date.
There are so many details and so
many things that need to be
worked out.”
A new mayor and council were
elected in Nov. 2012 to lead the
municipality.
Bernie Miller, former township
committeeman and member of
the new council, said consolida-
tion is nearly complete.
“From a functioning municipal
standpoint, we’re 95 percent
there,” he said. “We’re well on
our way to feeling the benefits of
consolidation.”
All departments in the town-
ship and borough have been reor-
ganized to work in tandem. The
two separate police departments
began working together in early
December.
“We’ve been trying to imple-
ment it gradually so all the quirks
would be worked out,” said Police
Captain Nick Sutter. “It’s like two
families coming together under
one roof. There are things we do
differently on a daily basis. The
ways we conduct patrols and fill
out paperwork are different. We
have to standardize those things.”
The department has combined
operational procedures, and is
working from the same building
at 1 Valley Rd.
“The overall function is getting
done very well now,” Sutter said.
“As we go along, sometimes we’re
finding the way a township offi-
cer documents something is bet-
ter or maybe there’s a third way
to do it.”
Sutter said the department is
holding daily meetings with pa-
trols and compiling suggestions
and problems.
“As an administrative staff
we’re addressing these things
daily,” he said. “Eventually we’ll
get to all of them.”
Sutter said the consolidation of
the two departments has already
increased the efficiency of the of-
ficers’ day-to-day responsibilities.
“I totally believe we’ll be able to
more efficiently provide a better
service to the public as a whole,”
Sutter said. “We’ll have fully func-
tional traffic and safe neighbor-
hood units, and a bigger detective
department. We didn’t have the
manpower for these services be-
fore. Service will be drastically
increased.”
Sutter said the new consolidat-
ed department will include spe-
cialty units devoted to traffic, safe
neighborhoods and community
policing.
“These units are responsible
for identifying specialty needs in
the community,” he said. “They’ll
hold meetings and conduct sur-
veys. The public will be able to
call with problems that weren’t
traditionally police-related. But
with all this additional manpow-
er we can have an officer go and
not be tied to the radio. When offi-
cers on the road aren’t answering
one call after another we can pro-
vide much better service to our
community.”
Residents in need of police as-
sistance can still dial either the
borough and township numbers
at 609-921-2100 or 609-924-4141. All
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — JAN. 2-8, 2013
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COUNCILMAN
Continued from page 1
please see COUNCIL, page 6
Councilman: We’re on our way to feeling benefits of consolidation
JAN. 2-8, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 5
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Trucking, came to the Copper-
wood site and inquired about the
boulders.
“One day this guy walks onto
the site and says, ‘what’re you
going to do with those boulders?’”
Hillier said. “He asked if we’d be
interested in donating them to the
rebuilding effort down at the Jer-
sey shore.”
The boulders were trucked
from the Copperwood site to Jer-
sey shore beaches. In addition to
donating the boulders, Hillier
Properties agreed to contribute
$25,000 toward the cost of truck-
ing.
“We were going to have to
spend a lot more than that to get
rid of them,” Hillier said. “And
this way it’s a win-win for every-
one.”
Trucking the 400 tons of boul-
ders off the site was an enormous
undertaking that required 70
truckloads over the course of a
week. Hillier said he was ulti-
mately thrilled to be able to con-
tribute to the rebuilding effort in
such an unconventional way.
“Sandy was a horrible experi-
ence for a lot of people in New
Jersey, including ourselves,” he
said. “We had to stop construc-
tion for a week after the storm.
We couldn’t get any trucks to the
site because all the trees were
down, and that was just up here.
When you see the devastation at
the Jersey shore you can appreci-
ate how bad it really was there.
We were really just pleased to be
able to give something to them.”
COMPANY
Continued from page 3
Company also contributed
$25,000 toward trucking cost
Visit us online at
www.theprinceton
sun.com
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — JAN. 2-8, 2013
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08042 and 08540 ZIP
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The Sun welcomes comments from readers –
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tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
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T
here are all kinds of great rea-
sons to replace the $1 bill with a
$1 coin.
For example, the government says it
would save taxpayers billions of dol-
lars over the next several decades. And
who doesn’t want to save billions of
tax dollars?
Vending companies, too, would like
to see the switch. Anyone who has
tried unsuccessfully to jam a dollar bill
into a machine that is, well, less than
perfect, understands the vending com-
panies’ sentiments.
The problem is that we’ve tried this
before, and it didn’t end well. Remem-
ber, about a decade ago, the Sacagawea
coin? Before that, the Susan B. Antho-
ny? Before that? Well, there have been
dollar coins in the United States pretty
much since the Continental Congress
met.
Americans just don’t seem to like
the $1 coin. Some complain that they
are too hard to distinguish from the
quarter. Others note that it’s much eas-
ier to cram 10 $1 bills into your wallet
than it is to carry 10 $1 coins in your
pocket.
Whatever the reason, Americans
have rejected a move to the $1 coin. Re-
peatedly and resoundly.
So let’s forget about this idea and
focus on a few other monetary
thoughts that make more sense.
How about making $1 bills that last
longer than five years? That reduces
the need to pull old ones from circula-
tion and replace them with new ones.
And let’s figure out a way to make
producing a penny cost less than a
penny, and make producing a nickel
cost less than a dime. Switch metals, or
just do away with them altogether. Es-
pecially the pennies. Not much you can
get for a penny these days.
But keep the $1 bill. At least for now.
At least until inflation puts it into the
category of the penny: not really worth
producing any longer.
in our opinion
The $1 coin
Haven’t we tried this already? And failed?
Dollar bill blues
Yes, removing the $1 bill from circula-
tion and replacing it with a $1 coin
would save tax dollars. Except, nobody
really wants to use $1 coins. We’ve tried
to use them in the past, but society has
rejected them. So why bring up the
idea again?
calls to 911 will be transferred to communi-
cations at the 1 Valley Rd. location. All mu-
nicipal court matters will be handled there
as well. A new website for the consolidated
department is still in developmental
stages.
“What we really need is for the public to
provide us with feedback,” Sutter said. “In
a lot of ways it’s like we’re starting from
scratch. We definitely need to hear from
the public.”
At a reorganization meeting Jan. 1, the
new governing body planned to approve
consultants and appoint residents to
boards. The council also planned to ap-
point a new president, and draw lots to de-
termine the length of their terms. State
statute says “terms shall be arranged, by
lot if necessary, so that the terms of two
councilmen shall expire at the end of each
year.”
Mayor Liz Lempert said the new council
will depend on resident feedback at the be-
ginning of their term.
“One of the first things we’re going to do
is have a goal-setting session,” she said.
“We’ll probably take at least two meetings
to do that. The meetings will be open to the
public, and we’ll have portions where
members of the public can give us their
ideas on what they think we need to be pri-
oritizing.”
The first of those meetings will be held
Jan. 3 at the old township building at 400
Witherspoon St.
Lempert said the new council would
focus on the financial aspects of consolida-
tion.
“We’ll be looking at our budgets, and
looking at the savings of consolidation,”
she said. “We want to make sure we’re tak-
ing full advantage.”
Lempert said another major priority
would be evaluating the town’s emergency
response capabilities.
“In light of hurricanes Sandy and Irene,
we need to focus on making sure we have
an excellent emergency response plan in
place,” she said. “Because we’re consoli-
dated we can do an even better job of keep-
ing the community safer.”
Lempert said the newly elected council,
with former members of the Borough
Council and the Township Committee, was
a strong council whose members bring
unique skills to the table.
“Everyone works really well together,”
said Miller. “We expect to keep moving for-
ward, implementing all recommendations
from the task force subcommittees.”
Consolidation of the borough and town-
ship was largely proposed as a cost-saving
COUNCIL
Continued from page 4
please see PUBLIC’S, page 7
Council will review town’s emergency response
JAN. 2-8, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 7
measure.
The most recent estimates
place transition costs between
$2,226,000 and $2,336,000 to be
amortized over the next five
years. Including these costs, total
consolidation savings are esti-
mated close to $2.5 million.
Scott Sillars, vice chair of the
Transition Task Force and head
of the Finance subcommittee,
said much of the savings is a re-
sult of changes in staffing.
“We don’t need as large a work-
force when we combine the two
municipalities,” Sillars said.
“That’s where we’re saving
the money. It’s very straightfor-
ward.”
Freda said the Transition Task
Force undertook the issue of
staffing changes early in the con-
solidation process.
“I think early on people didn’t
appreciate how quickly decisions
related to personnel would need
to be made,” Sillars said. “The
problem was if we didn’t make
those recommendations until Au-
gust or September, people whose
careers were about to be impact-
ed wouldn’t know. We made that a
high priority and acted on them
quickly.”
Sillars said many staff mem-
bers left their positions voluntari-
ly.
“We tried to treat people with
respect and integrity and put to-
gether modest severance pack-
ages,” he said. “A lot of people
found other great opportunities,
and it worked out really well for
both parties in the end.”
Freda said some details of con-
solidation are still being worked
out.
“One of the first decisions we
made was about trash collection,”
Freda said. Prior to consolida-
tion, township residents used pri-
vate contractors for trash collec-
tion.
“We said early on we’d have
municipal trash collection
throughout the consolidated mu-
nicipality,” Freda said. “So a bid
was created to cover all the differ-
ent options of trash collection
you could have.”
When the bids came back in
October, Freda said there was one
apparent low bid, but one of the
bidders contested the legality of
the bid.
“It was about how the section
of the bid concerning bulk pick-
up was written,” Freda said. “So
we had to rewrite it and put the
bid back out. The bids just came
back last week, so we had to fig-
ure out a temporary solution.”
Until municipal trash pickup
begins in the consolidated town,
former township residents will
continue with their private con-
tractors. Under state law, they can
cancel service with seven days’
notice. Freda said residents who
currently use “backdoor” pickup
services may continue paying a
private company for the service.
Sillars said changes in state
law that allow for two municipali-
ties to consolidate without chang-
ing all ordinances right away
eased the transition.
“Over the next five years we’ll
review all the ordinances,” Lem-
pert said. “Some are different be-
tween the township and borough.
We can carry some over but ulti-
mately we’ll adopt ordinances
that are standardized.”
Lempert attributed the success
of consolidation to the staff in all
departments that worked toward
merging in 2012.
“The staff has worked incredi-
bly hard this past year,” she said.
“A lot of departments have al-
ready moved. A lot of administra-
tive work has either been accom-
plished or groundwork has been
laid out to make the transition as
easy as possible.”
Freda said the Transition Task
Force and Consolidation Commis-
sion would meet throughout Jan-
uary with the governing body,
and would continue to make rec-
ommendations through June.
“We’ll look at things and say,
‘here’s what’s working,’ and we’ll
find the things we didn’t think
of,” Freda said. “We’ll be sure
we’re keeping the public in-
formed.”
Freda said the public’s com-
ments throughout the transition
process were invaluable.
“This is the result of efforts
from so many people,” he said.
“The governing body, all our sub-
committees, and especially the
members of the public who came
to meetings to speak. We got such
a mix of viewpoints and perspec-
tives on what residents felt need-
ed to be addressed and how.”
Freda said the efforts of the
Transition Task Force, the Con-
solidation Commission, and the
staff of various departments re-
sulted in a smooth transition on
Jan. 1.
“This was a lot of hard work by
a lot of people and a lot of time,”
he said. “As the details were
worked out and things came to-
gether it really reinforced that
when the people voted in favor of
this they made the right deci-
sion.”
PUBLIC’S
Continued from page 6
Public’s comments invaluable, says Freda
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WEDNESDAY JAN. 2
Story Time: 10 to 10:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library Story Room,
third floor. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children 16 months and
older. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
The Buzz: 11 a.m. to noon at Prince-
ton Library Welcome Desk. At
these weekly discussions, library
staff members discuss new
books, recordings and download-
able content available at the
library and learn what our cus-
tomers are reading, listening to
and watching. Follow along on
Twitter using the hashtag
#PPLBuzz.
PEFF: The Animal House: 11 a.m. to
noon at Princeton Library Com-
munity Room. Skyscrapers tower-
ing over major cities or elaborate
bridges often come to mind when
we think of great feats in archi-
tecture and engineering. Howev-
er, some of the most amazing,
creative, and innovative struc-
tures on earth are not man-made,
but built by animals in the natural
world. Guided by instinct, animal
architects gain shelter and pro-
tection from a remarkable variety
of elaborate dwellings they build
with simple supplies. Part of the
Nature series, a production of
THIRTEEN for WNET. Learn more
about the film at pbs.org.
Baby Story Time: 11 to 11:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library Story Room.
Stories, songs, rhymes, finger-
plays and movement for children
up to 15 months. All children must
be accompanied by an adult.
Baby Playgroup: Ages newborn to
15 months. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
Princeton Library Story Room,
third floor. Socialize and interact.
Library provides playmats and
simple toys. Caregiver must
attend.
Help Desk for Holiday Gadgets: 2
to 3 p.m. at Princeton Library
First Floor. Did you get a new
gadget for the holidays? Stop by
the Help Desk from 2 to 3 p.m. for
assistance downloading ebooks
and to learn how to use other
great programs like Mango Lan-
guages, TumbleBookLibrary,
OneClickDigital and Freegal on
them.
THURSDAY JAN. 3
Story Time: Ages 2 and older. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Princeton Library
Story Room. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children 16 months and
older. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Widows Support Group: 10:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at Princeton Library, Qui-
et Room. Susan M. Friedman
facilitates a widow support group.
If you would like to join the group
please call (609) 252-2362. All
widows are welcomed but please
call to register.
Help Desk for Holiday Gadgets: 2
to 3 p.m. at Princeton Library
First Floor. Did you get a new
gadget for the holidays? Stop by
the Help Desk from 2 to 3 p.m. for
assistance downloading ebooks
and to learn how to use other
great programs like Mango Lan-
guages, TumbleBookLibrary,
OneClickDigital and Freegal on
them.
SATURDAY JAN. 5
10 Things to Know About Your
New Android Tablet: 10:30 a.m.
to noon at Princeton Library Tech
Center. In this session, John
LeMasney will walk you through
getting the most out of your
Android tablet by showing you
how to get around, sharing his
favorite applications, talking
about some of the differences
between Android and other com-
puting experiences, and some
tips for everyday use and effi-
ciency with Android.
Story Time: Ages 2 and older. 10:30
to 11 a.m. at Princeton Library
Story Room. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children 16 months and
older. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Stories in Russian: 12 to 12:30 p.m.
at Princeton Library, Story Room.
A special story time where all the
books, songs and rhymes are in
Russian. For children ages 3 to 6
with their grown ups.
SUNDAY JAN. 6
Concert: The George Quintet: 3 to
4:30 p.m. at Princeton Library
Community Room. Composer and
bassist George Quinn leads an
ensemble featuring members of
Princeton High School’s top jazz
groups. Part of the Crescendo
series, featuring young and
emerging musicians.
Sunday Stories: 3:30 to 4 p.m. at
Princeton Library, Story Room.
Stories, songs and rhymes for
children 2 to 8 years old and their
families.
MONDAY JAN. 7
Flavors of Princeton: Chef Evan
Blomgren: 10 to 11 a.m. at Prince-
ton Library Community Room.
The chef from the Rocky Hill Inn
visits during National Soup
Month to demonstrate how to
make hearty and delicious soups
to keep you warm all winter. Sam-
ples will be provided.
Stories in Japanese: 3 to 3:30 p.m.
at Princeton Library, Story Room.
A special story time where all the
books, songs and rhymes are in
Japanese. For children ages 2 to
4 with their grown ups.
Mystery Book Group: Discuss “Zoo
Station” by David Downing from
7:30 to 9:10 p.m. at Princeton
Library Quiet Room. Led by
librarian Gayle Stratton.
TUESDAY JAN. 8
Story Time: 10 to 10:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library, Story Room,
third floor. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children 16 months and
older. All children must be accom-
panied by an adult.
Baby Story Time: 11 to 11:30 a.m. at
Princeton Library, Story Room,
third floor. Stories, songs,
rhymes, fingerplays and move-
ment for children ages newborn
to 15 months.
Baby Playgroup: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Princeton Library, Story Room,
third floor. Stay for playgroup
afterwards. No big kids allowed.
Chess Club: 4 to 5 p.m. at Princeton
Library, Teen Center. Members of
the Princeton High School Chess
Club lead these after-school ses-
sions for young people of all ages
and abilities. Some instruction
will be available in addition to
matches. The library provides
chessboards.
Estate Planning and Surrogate
Decision Making: 7 to 9 p.m. at
Princeton Library Conference
Room. Attorney Rebecca Esmi
discusses wills, durable powers of
attorney and advanced direc-
tives. Part of the Next Step
Speaker Series.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JAN. 2-8, 2013
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 108 Kings Highway
East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email: news@theprinceton-
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.theprincetonsun.com).
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