Knowing  Oneself  and  Helping  Another:     Strong  Cultural  Iden:ty  Predicts  Altruism  

Alissa J. Mrazek1,2  
1Department  of  Psychology,  Northwestern  University,  Evanston,  IL  USA.  2Department  of  Psychology,  Cornell  University,  Ithaca,  NY  USA.  

IntroducFon  
• Cultural  ideas,  beliefs  and  values  shape   human  cooperaFon  (Henrich  et  al.  2003)1.     • Degree  of  cultural  idenFficaFon  >  Culture   (Wayman  &  Lynch  1991)2.     • Clear,  posiFve  self-­‐concept                    confident,   construcFve,  and  effecFve  behavior   (BauFsta  et  al.,  1994)3.     • High  self-­‐esteem  (Penner  &  Fritzsche,   1993)4  and  low  need  for  approval  (Carlo  et   al.,  1991)5                    altruism.   • Cultural  idenFty  fusion                    altruism   toward  ingroup  members  in  trolley   dilemmas  (Swann,  et  al.,  2010)6.  
Self-­‐Reported  Altruism  
4.5   4   3.5   3   2.5   2   1.5   1   0.5   0   0  

Results:  Study  1  
Correla:on  Between  Cultural  Iden:fica:on  and   Altruism  
r  =  0.163     p  =  0.005  

Results:  Study  2  
 N  =  46       *p  <  .05     **  p  <  .01   ***p  <  .001    

1  

2  

3  

4  

5  

6  

7  

8  

Cultural  IdenFficaFon  
7  

Influences  on  Charitable  Dona:ons  

Self-­‐Reported  Altruism  

4.5   4   3.5   3   2.5   2   1.5   1   0.5   0   0  

Correla:on  Between  Cultural  Par:cipa:on  and   Altruism  

Replica:ng  results  from     Study  1,  behavioral    altruism  correlates  with:  
r =  0.262     p  <  0.001  
 

6  

5  

4  

(1  )Cultural  par:cipa:on   (2)  Cultural  iden:fica:on   (3)  Self-­‐Reported  Altruism  

3  

Donated   Did  not  Donate  

2  

1  

2  

3  

4  

5  

6  

7  

8  

Frequency  of  Cultural  ParFcipaFon  

1  

0  

Methods:  Study  2   QuesFon  
Do  degree  of  cultural  idenFficaFon  and   frequency  of  cultural  parFcipaFon   influence  global  altruisFc  behavior?   • 46  undergraduates  learned  about  4  prominent            chariFes   • ParFcipants  were  paid  $8  for  parFcipaFng   •   Opportunity  to  donate  money  to  charity  of  choice  

Cultural   ParFcipaFon  

Degree  of  Cultural   Self-­‐Reported   IdenFficaFon   Altruism  

Discussion  
• Cultural  idenFficaFon  (and  frequency  of  cultural  parFcipaFon)  significantly   predicts  self-­‐reported  altruism  in  a  large  cross-­‐cultural  sample  and  behavioral   altruism,  as  measured  by  donaFons  to  chariFes   • Builds  upon  exisFng  literature  showing  that  group  idenFty  fusion  predicts   hypotheFcal  altruism  for  ingroup  members   • These  effects  of  altruism  are  global  rather  than  strictly  for  ingroup  members  

Hypothesis  
Individuals  with  greater  cultural   iden:fica:on  will  report  greater     altruis:c  tendencies  and  will  donate     more  money  to  chari:es  

Methods:  Study  1  
300  culturally   diverse  Cornell           undergraduates   completed  a     mulF-­‐ dimensional   quesFonnaire  

Hello   H   H   H   H  

Doctors  Without  Borders  

Cornell  Annual  Fund  

Local  Animal  Shelter  

UNICEF  

• Results  may  be  due  to  strong,  stable  self-­‐concepts  (rather  than  sense  of   community),  but  future  empirical  work  is  necessary  

References   Acknowledgements    
1)  Henrich,  J.  et  al.,  (2001).  CooperaFon,  reciprocity  and  punishment  in  fieeen  small-­‐scale  socieFes.  American  Economic  Review,  91,  73-­‐78.   2)  Wayman  &  Lynch  (1991  ).  Home-­‐based  early  childhood  services:  Cultural  sensiFvity  in  a  family  systems  approach.  Topics  in  Early  Childhood  Special   Educa:on,  10,  56-­‐75.   3)  BauFstsa,  Y.B.,  Crawford,  I.,  &  Wolfe,  A.S.  (1994).  Ethnic  idenFty  and  self-­‐concept  in  Mexican-­‐American  adolescents:  Is  bicultural  idenFty  related  to   stress  or  beher  adjustment?  Child  and  Youth  Care  Forum,  23,  197-­‐206.   4)  Penner  &  Fritzsche,  (1995).  Measuring  the  prosocial  personality.  In  J.  Butcher  &  C.D.  Spielberger  (Eds.)  Advances  in  Personality  Assessment.  (Vol.   10).  Hillsdale,  NJ:  LEA.   5)  Carlo,  G.  et  al.,  (1991).  The  altruisFc  personality:  In  what  contexts  is  it  apparent?  Journal  of  Personality  and  Social  Psychology,  61  (3),  450-­‐458.   6)  Swann,  W.B.  et  al.,  (2010).  Dying  and  killing  for  one’s  group:  IdenFty  fusion  moderates  responses  to  intergroup  versions  of  the  trolley  problem.   Psychological  Science,  21,  1176-­‐1183.  

I  would  like  to  thank  my  thesis  commihee  for  their   support  on  this  project:  Dr.  David  Pizarro,     Dr.  James  Maas,  and  Dean  Ken  Gabard  

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer: Get 4 months of Scribd and The New York Times for just $1.87 per week!

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times