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12/10/2013

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 133
LET’S GO NINERS!!
SPORTS PAGE 11
GOOD WEEK
FOR MARKET
BUSINESS PAGE 10
‘MAMA’ AN ELEGANT
LITTLE HORROR FILM
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17
49ERS LOOK TO FLY PAST ATLANTA AND INTO THE SUPER
BOWL
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Mavericks:
Beauty and the beast
Big wave contest harnesses nature’s best — and the danger that comes with it
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
A
bout a week ago, a roaring
storm boasting 60-70 knot
winds about 3,000 miles off the
San Mateo County coast came under
scrutiny by organizers of the Mavericks
International — a world-renowned and
famously local surf contest that will start 8
a.m. Sunday for the first time since 2010.
Twenty-four of the world’s most prominent
surfers will battle it out for the Mavericks title and a
chance at winning the Big Wave World Tour.
The contest is the brainchild of Jeff Clark, who first
surfed the breaks 38 years ago. Before this contest, big-wave
surfers had to compete elsewhere — but Clark’s dedication to this
monster break has put Mavericks on the map.
“Mavericks is really special. When I first thought about doing the
Mavericks contest, there were contests in Hawaii and other places in the
world, but there was nothing to showcase the big wave surfers in California.
Mavericks turned out to be the perfect venue and, as we’re finding out, Mavericks
produces big waves more than other big wave venues around the world. So for consistency
See SURF, Page 20
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A U.S. postal worker who stole
mail from Peninsula residents to
obtain credit cards for use by him-
self and friends — and who was dis-
covered with more than 3,000 unde-
livered pieces at his home — plead-
ed no contest to three felonies.
Romeo Maniulit Natan, 38, set-
tled his case on
charges of iden-
tity theft, com-
mercial burglary
and credit card
fraud. Although
other counts
were dismissed
as part of the
plea deal, they
can be consid-
ered for sentencing purposes at a
Feb. 21 hearing.
He faces up to three years in
prison which is “reasonable” con-
sidering his lack of criminal record,
said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
Most of the thefts linked to the
San Bruno man occurred in the
Devonshire Avenue area of San
Carlos. Natan was fingered as the
culprit after being caught on a sur-
veillance video at the Target store in
Colma using stolen cards and an
alleged accomplice caught using a
different stolen card implicated him
as the source. Natan reportedly dis-
tributed the stolen cards from sever-
al people including three men who
were also charged.
A Daly City police search of
Natan ’s San Bruno home reported-
ly turned up bags of undelivered
mail, including more than 2,000
pieces in a storage closet and more
than 1,000 pieces in the trunk of his
car.
Natan remains in custody in lieu
of $150,000 bail pending his sen-
tencing hearing.
Defense attorney Mike
Postal worker seals up deal over stolen mail
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
With plans to follow San Mateo
County in banning single-use plas-
tic bags, San Mateo will become the
most recent city to plan a public
hearing to discuss making the possi-
ble prohibition live on Earth Day.
San Mateo’s Department of
Public Works will be discussing the
anticipated reusable bag ordinance
and polystyrene ban with the City
Council 7 p.m. Monday, March 4 at
City Hall’s Council Chambers, 330
W. 20th Ave. San Mateo County led
the effort to study and adopt these
environmental policies that are
aimed at protecting the environment
by reducing litter and promoting the
use of reusable bags as an alterna-
tive to disposables. Implementation
is scheduled for Earth Day, April
22.
“From a city perspective, the
impacts to our coastline, and our
resources allocated to cleaning our
shoreline, is immense,” Public
Works Director Larry Patterson said
San Mateo looks to adopt plastic bag ban
Romeo Natan
See NATAN, Page 20
See BAG BAN, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Comedian Paul
Rodriguez is 58.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1953
CBS-TV aired the widely watched
episode of “I Love Lucy” in which
Lucy Ricardo, played by Lucille Ball,
gave birth to Little Ricky.
“Words have no power to impress the mind
without the exquisite horror of their reality.”
— Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)
TV chef Paula
Deen is 66.
Gold medal
gymnast Shawn
Johnson is 21.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Students perform in a street dance competition during the 15th Sikhyana festival in Santa Rosa city, Laguna province, south
of Manila, Philippines.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 40s. East winds 10 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph...Becoming 5
to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Sunday night: Clear. Lows in the mid 40s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Monday night and Tuesday: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid
40s. Highs in the mid 60s.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.
Lows in the mid 40s.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.
Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place; Whirl Win, No. 6, in second place;
and Gorgerous George, No. 8, in third place.The
race time was clocked at 1:49.00.
(Answers Monday)
STASH RODEO INDICT ITALIC
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Choosing to take the shortcut through the
poison ivy was — A RASH DECISION
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LITUG
CREMY
HINELA
FANNIT
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
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.
f
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ju
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” “
-
A:
3 3 8
8 18 25 42 49 14
Mega number
Jan. 18 Mega Millions
11 18 32 33 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 4 7 1
Daily Four
7 9 7
Daily three evening
In 1807, Confederate general Robert E. Lee was born in
Westmoreland County, Va.
In 1853, Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Il Trovatore” premiered in
Rome.
In 1861, Georgia became the fifth state to secede from the
Union.
In 1937, millionaire Howard Hughes set a transcontinental air
record by flying his monoplane from Los Angeles to Newark,
N.J., in 7 hours, 28 minutes and 25 seconds.
In 1942, during World War II, Japan invaded Burma
(Myanmar).
In 1955, a presidential news conference was filmed for televi-
sion for the first time, with the permission of President Dwight
D. Eisenhower.
In 1960, the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security
between Japan and the United States of America was signed by
both countries in Washington, D.C.
In 1966, Indira Gandhi was elected prime minister of India.
In 1970, President Richard M. Nixon nominated G. Harrold
Carswell to the Supreme Court; however, the nomination was
defeated because of controversy over Carswell’s past racial
views.
In 1977, in one of his last acts of office, President Gerald R.
Ford pardoned Iva Toguri D’Aquino, an American convicted of
treason for making wartime broadcasts for Japan.
In 1981, the United States and Iran signed an accord paving the
way for the release of 52 Americans held hostage for more than
14 months.
In 1992, German government and Jewish officials dedicated a
Holocaust memorial at the villa on the outskirts of Berlin
where the notorious Wannsee Conference had taken place.
Ten years ago: President Fidel Castro and millions of other
Cubans voted in parliamentary elections where all 609 candi-
dates ran uncontested.
Former U.N. Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar is 93.
Actress Jean Stapleton is 90. Actor Fritz Weaver is 87. Actress
Tippi Hedren is 83. Former PBS newsman Robert MacNeil is 82.
Movie director Richard Lester is 81. Singer Phil Everly is 74.
Actor-singer Michael Crawford is 71. Actress Shelley Fabares is
69. Country singer Dolly Parton is 67. ABC newswoman Ann
Compton is 66. Rock singer Martha Davis is 62. Singer Dewey
Bunnell (America) is 61. Actor Desi Arnaz Jr. is 60. Actress
Katey Sagal is 59. Conductor Sir Simon Rattle is 58. Reggae
musician Mickey Virtue (UB40) is 56. Rock musician Jeff Pilson
(Foreigner) is 55. Actor Paul McCrane is 52.
The largest glacier in the world is the
Lambert Glacier in Antarctica. The gla-
cier is 25 miles wide and 120 miles long.
***
“Meals to Die For” (2004) is a cookbook
written by Brian Price, a chef who spent
10 years cooking the last meals for
Texas’ death row inmates. Recipes in the
book include Post-mortem Potato Soup,
Rice Rigormortis and Chopping Block
cheeseburger.
***
Horses sleep standing up. So do flamin-
goes.
***
Suresh Joachim (born 1969) has likes to
break world records. Some of his
records include: balancing on one foot
for 76 hours and 40 minutes, rocking on
a rocking chair for 75 hours and travel-
ing up and down an elevator at a mall for
six days.
***
It is legal to duel in Paraguay, but only if
both parties are registered blood donors.
***
President Gerald Ford (1913-2006),
country singer George Strait (born
1952), former baseball commissioner
Peter Ueberroth (born 1937) and actor
Richard Gere (born 1949) were all Eagle
Scouts.
***
George Hansburg (1888-1975) invented
the pogo stick, a metal pole with foot-
pads and a spring, in 1919. As a publici-
ty stunt for his new invention, the actors
in the Ziegfeld Follies performed a mar-
riage on pogo sticks.
***
Do you know who originally wrote the
fairy tales “The Ugly Duckling,” The
Emperor’s New Clothes” and “The
Princess and the Pea?” See answer at
end.
***
Beefalo is a hybrid of cattle that is a
cross between the American buffalo and
domestic beef cattle. Beefalo yields very
lean beef.
***
Swiss chocolate maker Theodore Tobler
made the triangle-shaped Toblerone
chocolate bar in 1908. The name of the
chocolate is a combination of the last
name Tobler and the word torrone,
which is an Italian word for honey-
almond nougat.
***
The ingredient that controls dandruff in
Head and Shoulders shampoo is zinc
pyridinethione.
***
When Harry Lillis Crosby (1903-1977)
was a child, the “Bingville Bugle” was a
popular comic strip. In the strip, the
leading character Bingo had large ears.
So did Harry. So his friends called him
Bing and the nickname stuck.
***
The most needed organ for organ trans-
plants is the kidney, followed by liver.
***
The part of a jumper cable that connects
to a car battery is called an alligator clip.
The clip is made of bare copper, which
allows the transfer of energy from a
charged battery to an empty one.
***
Answer: Danish author Hans Christian
Anderson (1805-1875). Andersen also
wrote the classic stories “The Little
Mermaid” and “Thumbelina.” His first
book of fairy tales was published in
1835.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
26 30 32 37 45 16
Mega number
Jan. 16 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
“I voted” stickers were the ticket in to a pizza
lunch at Carlmont High School Friday.
Teens filed into the staff room anxious to get
access to pepperoni and melted cheese. But they
weren’t gathered just to eat. The about 130 stu-
dents were the inaugural honorees into the
Carlmont High School Vernon Dahmer Voter
Hall of Fame. Sponsored by the three govern-
ment teachers — Ashley Gray, Kris Weisman
and Karen Ramroth — students could earn a
spot in the hall of fame by doing one of three
things: voting, working in a polling place or get-
ting 10 registered voters to commit to voting.
Friday’s lunch was a celebration of the students
who took on the challenge.
Gray explained that, statistically, a person is
more likely to continue to be involved in elec-
tions if they start at 18. Ramroth added students
were bucking the trend of youth apathy when it
comes to politics.
“It’s so rewarding to see the level of interest
and commitment displayed,” said Weisman,
who added it helped her feel more confident
about the future knowing these young people
would be the leaders.
For students, the program was an encouraging
step to become involved.
Seventeen-year-old Kelly Ellis helped at her
local polling place. She was surprised at how
often people would ask for her help understand-
ing the propositions but also enjoyed seeing the
variety of people who came in, including immi-
grants who were proud first-time voters.
Among the first-time voters in the November
presidential election were 18-year-olds Jordi
Vasquez and Chris Batshon. Both seniors opted
for the voting route into the Hall of Fame.
Batshon said he didn’t know much about pol-
itics before taking economics. He watched the
debates at first for the offered extra credit in
class but found himself more interested. Now he
thinks it’s important to learn more about the
issues so he can start growing his political
knowledge as he gets older.
Vasquez agreed.
“Whether we like it or not, we’re the future
generation,” he said, adding the experience
solidified for him that he will vote in the coming
years.
Michelle Marsiske, 17, decided to chat with
neighbors who were mostly young voters,
around 18 to 19 years old. She was surprised
how motivating it was for people to learn how
easy it was to vote as well as how close the
polling places were to their home.
The Hall of Fame is named for Vernon
Dahmer, who lived in Hattiesburg, Miss. and
served several terms as president of the Forrest
County Chapter of the National Association for
the Advancement of Colored People. He led
voter registration drives in the 1960s. He kept a
voter registration book in his store in late 1965
to make it easier for others to register. Dahmer
also helped the local population pay a poll tax
for the right to vote. His mantra was, “If you
don’t vote, you don’t count.”
Going forward, all students, regardless of age
or citizenship status, will have an opportunity to
get their name added to this Hall of Fame by
participating in the democratic process.
Carlmont launches
voter hall of fame
SAN MATEO
Suspicious person. The owners of a home in
foreclosure were seen stripping materials from
the house on the 400 block of Midway Avenue
before 8:29 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 15.
Accident. A bicyclist and a person with a shop-
ping cart were involved in an accident on East
Third Avenue before 4:29 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan.
15.
Disturbance. A man was heard making threats
in a rest room on the 200 block of West 39th
Avenue before 2:46 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 15.
Disturbance. An intoxicated person was seen
outside a health and wellness center on the 1700
block of West Hillsdale Boulevard before 8:46
p.m. on Monday, Jan. 14.
Fraud. A person used a fake travelers check on
the 2900 block of Norfolk Street before 1:29
p.m. on Monday, Jan. 14.
Stolen vehicle. A woman witnessed a person
drive off with her vehicle on the 900 block of
East Santa Inez Avenue before 6:46 a.m. on
Monday, Jan. 14.
MILLBRAE
Vandalism. Property was vandalized on the
1000 block of Broadway before 1:49 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 14.
Theft. A purse was stolen on the 1300 block of
El Camino Real before 8:31 a.m. on Monday,
Jan. 14.
Burglary. A 25-year-old San Francisco woman
was arrested for burglary on the 800 block of
Broadway before 7:56 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 13.
Burglary. A 59-year-old Millbrae woman was
arrested for burglary on the 800 block of
Broadway before 5:03 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12.
BURLINGAME
Theft. Two men stole a yellow mountain bike
from the Caltrain station near the 400 block of
California Drive before 4:22 p.m. Sunday, Jan.
13.
Suspicious activity. Someone reported several
mailboxes had been pried open at an apartment
building on the first block of Lorton Avenue
before 4:43 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11.
Vandalism. Someone smashed a car window
and stole a computer from a parked vehicle on
the first block of Bay View Place before 2:50
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10.
Police reports
Burning man
A resident was seen burning trash in their
backyard on Surfbird Isle in Foster City
before 12:19 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 15.
4
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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property taxes and insurance
Margaret Merritt
Margaret Merritt, born May 9,
1923 to Francis and Minnie Raway,
died peacefully at home surrounded
by her family Jan. 1, 2013.
She was born in San Francisco
and was an only child. Margaret
worked at San Carlos City Hall as
the assistant city clerk for about 30
years. She loved collecting rocks,
gardening, camping, knitting, ani-
mals and her family.
She is survived by her three chil-
dren William Grant Merritt, James
Christopher Merritt and Frances
Margaret Connolly. She has five
grandchildren Will Merritt, Sam
Merritt, Max Merritt, Ivy
Fitzpatrick and
J e s s i c a
Connolly.
A mass will be
held at St.
Charles Catholic
Church in San
Carlos 1 p.m.
Jan. 25, 880
Tamarack Ave.,
San Carlos, CA 94070. Donations
to Pathways Hospice or Humane
Society in lieu of flowers would be
appreciated. Friends may sign the
guestbook at
www.crippenflynn.com.
Police release
image that may show
indecent exposure suspect
Belmont police have released a
security camera image that might
show a suspect who allegedly
exposed himself to a woman last
weekend.
The woman was walking on
Hiller Street near Marine View
Avenue around 3:30 p.m. Sunday
when a man pulled up in a car and
asked for directions, police Lt.
Patrick Halleran said.
When the woman walked over to
the car, however, she saw that the
driver had exposed himself. The
woman turned and walked away,
and the suspect drove away south on
Hiller Street, Halleran said.
The suspect is described as a
heavyset man in his early 20s who
has a medium complexion and was
clean shaven with short straight dark
hair. He spoke English without an
accent and wore oversized, square
black sunglasses.
The car was described as a dark
red, early 1990s model Toyota
Camry.
Investigators have obtained an
image of a driver and vehicle con-
sistent with the suspect description
from a security camera mounted on
a home in the neighborhood,
Halleran said.
The person in the photo is
described as a person of interest at
this time.
Anyone with information about
the suspect and vehicle is asked to
call Belmont police at (650) 595-
7400 or the crime tip line at (650)
598-3000.
Local brief
Suspect vehicle
Obituary
5
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 22-year-old woman who spent
several months in a state mental
hospital after her arrest for allegedly
stabbing a taxi driver transporting
her back home to Pacifica from a
Daly City shopping center says she
was insane at the time.
Amanda Jenille Aldeguer entered
twin pleas Friday of not guilty and
not guilty by reason of insanity in
the March 16, 2002 incident. The
dual pleas mean if a jury finds her
guilty of attempted murder, carjack-
ing and weapons charges, it will
then begin a second trial on her san-
ity. If jurors believe she was insane
at the time, she will be hospitalized
rather than imprisoned.
Pacifica police arrested Aldeguer
after her mother called 911 for med-
ical help after
seeing an injury
on her hand.
Authorities con-
nected it to an
earlier stabbing
and carjacking
report in the area
of West Manor
Drive and
E s p l a n a d e
Avenue. At that
call, they found a bleeding man, a
driver for Serra Yellow Cab, who
said a woman he picked up at
Serramonte Center pulled out a
knife during the trip to Pacifica and
stabbed him in the neck. As he resis-
ted, she continued to stab, he said.
After the driver stopped the car and
fled, the woman later identified as
Aldeguer got into the front seat and
drove away. Police found the car
near a Pacifica park with a knife
inside. The car’s video camera
recorded the attack, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
Aldeguer was apprehended in
South San Francisco.
Before Aldeguer could have a pre-
liminary hearing, her attorney
expressed doubts about her compe-
tence for trial and she was ultimate-
ly committed to Napa State
Hospital. She returned to San Mateo
County after hospital staff conclud-
ed she had been restored to compe-
tence.
On Friday, the court appointed
two new doctors to evaluate
Aldeguer’s sanity. Those reports are
due back March 1.
She remains in custody in lieu of
$500,000.
Cabbie stabbing suspect claims insanity
Amanda
Aldeguer
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A judge tried teaching a lesson to
an Oakland parolee with a lengthy
criminal record and a fondness for
pricey textbooks by sentencing him
to more than three years for a rash of
burglaries at the College of San
Mateo and Skyline and Foothill col-
leges.
Laurence Lamont Boone, 41,
received a three-year, four-month
term for three counts of felony bur-
glary but will not serve the time in
prison or be on mandatory supervi-
sion upon its completion. Boone
must also repay Skyline $431.60
and 14 other victims in amounts still
be determined.
Prosecutors pushed for four years
— which still would have been
served in jail rather than prison —
because of his long record and “mis-
erable” probation report, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Boone has 17 prior theft convic-
tions, 14 of which were felonies,
and had been sent to prison eight
separate times. He was released
from prison on community supervi-
sion under the state realignment
guidelines but in September burglar-
ized teacher offices at the three com-
munity colleges using a pry tool.
Boone stole science and math text-
books worth several hundreds dol-
lars each.
College surveillance tapes cap-
tured a man later identified as
Boone walking in the buildings
where the burglaries occurred and
later walking with books in hand or
a full backpack.
A search of his Oakland residence
turned up several textbooks identi-
fied by the burglarized teachers and
other property linked to other thefts.
Judge throws book at textbook thief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The
University of California system has
again received a record number of
applications for undergraduate
admission, attracting strong interest
from inside and outside the state,
school officials said Friday.
The number of students applying to
attend UC this fall rose nearly 9 per-
cent to 175,000, with all nine under-
graduate campuses reporting gains.
The total includes 140,000 freshman
applicants and 35,000 students seek-
ing to transfer, according to universi-
ty data.
“We’re humbled by the continued
demand and confidence that people
see in the University of California,”
said Michael Trevino, director of
undergraduate admissions. “It will be
more competitive, but we’ll continue
to have a place for outstanding
California applicants.”
The latest data shows robust
demand for a UC education even
though tuition has roughly doubled
over the past five years to about
$13,000 for California residents.
Record number of students apply for UC admission
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The number of older people hos-
pitalized with the flu has risen
sharply, prompting federal officials
to take unusual steps to make more
flu medicines available and to urge
wider use of them as soon as symp-
toms appear.
The U.S. is about halfway
through this flu season, and “it’s
shaping up to be a worse-than-aver-
age season” and a bad one for the
elderly, said Dr. Thomas Frieden,
director of the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
It’s not too late to get a flu shot,
and “if you have symptoms, please
stay home from work, keep your
children home from school” and
don’t spread the virus, he said.
New figures from the CDC show
widespread flu activity in all states
but Tennessee and Hawaii. Some
parts of the country are seeing an
increase in flu activity “while over-
all activity is beginning to go
down,” Frieden said. Flu activity is
high in 30 states and New York
City, up from 24 the previous week.
Nine more children or teens have
died of the flu, bringing the nation’s
total this flu season to 29. That’s
close to the 34 pediatric deaths
reported during all of the last flu
season, although that one was
unusually light. In a typical season,
about 100 children die of the flu and
officials said there is no way to
know whether deaths this season
will be higher or lower than usual.
The government doesn’t keep a
running tally of adult deaths from
the flu, but estimates that it kills
about 24,000 people most years.
So far, half of confirmed flu cases
are in people 65 and older. Lab-con-
firmed flu hospitalizations totaled
19 for every 100,000 in the popula-
tion, but 82 per 100,000 among
those 65 and older, “which is really
quite a high rate,” Frieden said.
“We expect to see both the num-
ber and the rates of both hospital-
izations and deaths rise further in
the next week or so as the flu epi-
demic progresses,”’ so prompt treat-
ment is key to preventing deaths, he
said.
CDC: Flu season ‘bad
one for the elderly’
REUTERS
Nurse Donna Riccardi administers a shot of Influenze virus vaccine to patient.
6
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
IS YOUR NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTION
TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS?
If you want to have your best year ever as a business owner or
executive, then keep an eye out for the Daily Journal's first ever
Business to Business Resource Guide.
This print and online feature will have lots of
informative resources to help you have a
profitable and productive 2013.
Later this month, only in the Daily Journal!
If you do business with other businesses and would like to
find out about advertising in this feature or contributing
content to it, please contact us.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
800 S. Claremont St. #210 San Mateo, CA 94402
PHONE: 650-344-5200 FAX: 650-344-5290
www.smdai l yj ournal .com • ads@smdai l yj ournal .com
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PAY’S PLACE CLINICS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An 18-year-old Foster City man
accused of peeping into girls’ bedrooms
and masturbating on a teen girl as she
slept pleaded not guilty Friday to
charges of residential burglary, peeping,
sexual battery and possession of burgla-
ry tools.
The Superior Court arraignment was
also the first appearance of a new attor-
ney for Justin Scott Shing since his pre-
vious lawyer was appointed judge by the
governor.
After entering his
plea, Shing was
scheduled for trial
June 24 to accommo-
date his college
school schedule.
Foster City police
arrested Shing Aug.
25, 2012 after the
father of a 9-year-old
girl reported finding
him inside the Matsonia Drive home at 3
a.m. staring at the girl’s empty bed while
on his hands and knees. The father
grabbed the man, later identified as
Shing, and called police.
Authorities say Shing also looked in
the window of a 17-year-old neighbor
girl at 2 a.m. in May. On Aug. 14, he
allegedly entered the same girl’s bed-
room after midnight as she slept,
pulled back her comforter and mastur-
bated.
Foster City police reported Shing
admitted entering the homes.
Shing is free from custody on a
$100,000 bail bond and is barred from
having any contact with the victims.
Accused peeper pleads not guilty
Justin Shing
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Allergic to
gluten? What about peanuts? Federal
disabilities law may be able to help.
The Justice Department said in a
recent settlement with a Massachusetts
college that severe food allergies can be
considered a disability under the law.
That gives those who suffer from such
allergies a new avenue in seeking menus
that fit their diet. But some say it goes
too far.
The decision leaves schools, restau-
rants and other places that serve food
more exposed to legal challenges if they
fail to honor requests for accommoda-
tions by people with food allergies.
Colleges and universities are especial-
ly vulnerable because they know their
students and often require them to eat on
campus, Eve Hill of the Justice
Department’s civil rights division says.
But a restaurant also could be liable if it
blatantly ignored a customer’s request
for certain foods and that person became
ill, though that case might be harder to
argue if the customer had just walked in
off the street and was unknown to the
restaurant, Hill says.
The settlement with Lesley University,
reached last month but drawing little
attention, will require the Cambridge
institution to serve gluten-free foods and
make other accommodations for stu-
dents who have celiac disease. At least
one student had complained to the feder-
al government after the school would not
exempt that student from a meal plan
even though the student couldn’t eat the
food.
“All colleges should heed this settle-
ment and take steps to make accommo-
dations,” says Alice Bast, president and
founder of the National Foundation for
Celiac Awareness. “To our community
this is definitely a precedent.”
Under the agreement, Lesley
University says it will not only provide
gluten-free options in its dining hall but
also allow students to pre-order, pro-
vide a dedicated space for storage and
preparation to avoid contamination,
train staff about food allergies and pay
a $50,000 cash settlement to affected
students.
Government: Food allergies
may be disability under law
E
very holiday cele-
bration is shaped by
traditions and one
tradition of The Bayside
S.T.E.M. ACADEMY is to
partner with the San Mateo
Rotary to hand out dictionar-
ies to third graders in San
Mateo schools. This year,
the Rotary Club of San
Mateo donated a record of
442 dictionaries to all third
graders at College Park,
Fiesta Gardens, Horrall, North Shoreview and Parkside
elementary schools.
Rotary and STEM team entertained and encouraged stu-
dents to learn many new words each week. Rotarians Tom
Thompson, Rosemary Azum, Martin Harband and Ron
Borelli lead an inspirational dictionary handout with the
school team. The entourage included singers and student coun-
cil officers from Bayside STEM, President Sean Radam,
Vice President Henry McNamara, Secretary Glyniss
McNamara and Secretary Tiana Periera. Third graders had
the unique experience of hearing “Jingle Words, jingle words,
jingle all the way ...” to the tune of Jingle Bells.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by
education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
Ex-New Orleans mayor Nagin charged with bribery
NEW ORLEANS — More than a decade ago, Ray Nagin was
elected mayor of New Orleans on a vow to root out corruption
in a city plagued by decades of it. On Friday, the former mayor
was indicted on charges he lined his pockets with bribe money,
payoffs and gratuities while the chronically poor city struggled
to recover from Hurricane Katrina’s punishing blow.
The federal indictment alleges that city contractors paid
Nagin more than $200,000 in bribes and subsidized his trips to
Hawaii, Jamaica and other places in exchange for his help secur-
ing millions of dollars in work for the city.
Around the nation
STATE/NATION 7
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Julie Pace and Nedra Pickler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama has been looking to historians for
guidance on how to shape his second inau-
gural’s words into a speech for the ages,
eager to make good use of his twice-in-a-life-
time opportunity to command the world’s
attention.
He will take the oath of office Sunday in an
intimate White House ceremony witnessed
by family, and then again Monday at the
Capitol before a crowd of hundreds of thou-
sands on the National Mall. Washington will
also play host to the traditional inaugural
parade and formal balls Monday, as well as a
day of service Saturday that kicks off the fes-
tivities.
But it’s Obama’s inaugural address that
will be the centerpiece of the three-day affair.
The president will seek to turn the page on a
first term consumed by economic turmoil and
set an optimistic tone for four more years that
will help define his legacy.
The president has been working on his
speech since early December, writing out
draft after draft on yellow legal pads, aides
say. He’s read several second-term inaugural
addressed delivered by his predecessors. And
last week, he invited a small group of histori-
ans to the White House to discuss the poten-
tial — and the pitfalls — of second-term
inaugurals.
Heading into his speech, Obama does have
history on his mind, particularly two of the
great American leaders he most deeply
admires, Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther
King Jr. The start of Obama’s second term
coincides with the 150th anniversary of
Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and
the 50th anniversary of King’s March on
Washington, and he has chosen to take the
public oath with his hand on both their bibles
stacked together.
“Their actions, the movements they repre-
sented are the only reason it’s possible for me
to be inaugurated,” Obama said of Lincoln
and King in a video released Friday by the
Presidential Inaugural Committee. “It’s also a
reminder for me that this country has gone
through very tough times before but we
always come out on the other side.”
Aides say the president will touch on some
of the challenges he’ll take on in a second
term but won’t delve deeply into the policy
objectives he’ll tackle in the next four years.
Those details will be saved for his Feb. 12
State of the Union address.
But the tone and theme of Monday’s
speech will set the stage for the policy fights
to come. Obama may in some way to refer-
ence the Connecticut elementary school
shooting that pushed gun control to the top of
his agenda. He may also speak of a need to
tackle comprehensive immigration reform,
another second-term priority, and to bring
U.S. troops home from Afghanistan.
Address: Obama looks to turn a pageon first term
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Barack Obama takes the Oath of Office as the 44th president of the United States from U.S.
Chief Justice John Roberts as his wife Michelle holds the Bible during the inauguration
ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 20, 2009.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Kelly Clarkson is a multi-
ple nominee at next month’s Grammy Awards,
but what she’s really excited about is another
event where she’ll be joined by Beyonce, Katy
Perry, Stevie Wonder, Alicia Keys, Usher and
Brad Paisley.
Oh, and the president.
President Barack Obama’s inauguration is
shaping up to be an event as star-studded as
any red carpet, with dozens of heavy hitters
lining up to perform — and the promise of a
few key surprises to liven up the weekend.
“I think it’s going to be the coolest thing
ever to look back with my grandkids and go, ‘I
was a part of that and I’m proud of that. I’m
not ashamed of that,”’ Clarkson said in a
recent interview.
Clarkson once said she was a fan of
Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul,
but she says she voted for Obama twice. She’ll
perform “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” at Obama
and Vice President Joe Biden’s swearing in
ceremony Monday after Obama takes the oath
of office.
Beyonce, Katy Perry star
at packed inauguration
By Don Thompson and Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California lawmakers
adjourned Friday for the long holiday week-
end, but they will keep getting daily expense
payments even while they’re not in
Sacramento.
Lawmakers adjusted their normal schedules
to hold floor sessions on Friday and Tuesday
to keep qualifying for the per diems. They typ-
ically meet Monday and Thursday.
Those who live outside the Sacramento area
are paid $142 a day for expenses so long as the
Legislature does not take a break for more
than three days. Switching the schedules will
cost taxpayers about $65,000 to cover the four
days starting Friday.
For most of the Legislature’s 120 members,
the payments add about $30,000 a year to the
nation’s highest legislative salaries. California
lawmakers are paid a base salary of $90,525
despite taking a 5 percent pay cut this year,
though unlike lawmakers in some other states
they do not receive pensions.
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg
said the schedule swap is justified because
members’ expenses, like renting a second
home in Sacramento, don’t disappear when
the members leave town.
“The per diem is not some, you know,
bonus. It’s to cover living expenses,” said
Steinberg, a Democrat who doesn’t collect per
diem because he lives in Sacramento.
He said the payments won’t further damage
the Legislature’s already poor showing in
opinion polls. Lawmakers have made tough
decisions in recent years that eliminated the
state’s multibillion budget deficit, he said,
actions that should raise their stature.
California lawmaker expense
payments flow over holiday
NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
*
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — House
Republican leaders Friday offered
President Barack Obama a three-
month reprieve to a looming, mar-
ket-rattling debt crisis, backing off
demands that any immediate exten-
sion of the government’s borrowing
authority be accompanied by stiff
spending cuts.
The retreat came with a caveat
aimed at prodding Senate
Democrats to pass a budget after
almost four years of failing to do
so: a threat to cut off the pay of
lawmakers in either House or
Senate if their chamber fails to
pass a budget this year. House
Republicans have passed budgets
for two consecutive years.
The idea got a frosty reception
from House Democrats but a more
measured response from the White
House and Democratic Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid of
Nevada.
Republicans hadn’t settled on full
details, but the measure would give
the government about three more
months of borrowing authority
beyond a deadline expected to hit as
early as mid-February, No. 2 House
Republican Eric Cantor of Virginia
said Friday.
The legislation wouldn’t require
immediate spending cuts as earlier
promised by GOP leaders like
Speaker John Boehner of Ohio.
Instead, it’s aimed at forcing the
Democratic-controlled Senate to
join the House in debating the fed-
eral budget.
“We are going to pursue strategies
that will obligate the Senate to final-
ly join the House in confronting the
government’s spending problem,”
Boehner told GOP lawmakers at a
retreat in Williamsburg, Va. “The
principle is simple: ‘no budget, no
pay.”’
But the move ran into opposition
from House Democrats, including
leader Nancy Pelosi of California,
who called it a gimmick because it
would set up another potential con-
frontation in just a few months.
Votes from Democrats may be need-
ed to help pass the measure if GOP
conservatives opposed to any
increase in the debt limit withhold
their support.
GOP leader: House to vote on debt limit increase
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner speaks to the media on Capitol Hill.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALGIERS, Algeria — The mili-
tants had filled five jeeps with
hostages and begun to move when
Algerian government attack heli-
copters opened up on them, leaving
four in smoking ruins. The fifth
vehicle crashed, allowing an Irish
hostage inside to clamber out to
safety with an explosive belt still
strapped around his neck.
Three days into the crisis at a nat-
ural gas plant deep in the Sahara, it
remained unclear how many had
perished in the faceoff between
Africa’s most uncompromising mil-
itant group and the region’s most
ruthless military.
By Friday, around 100 of the 135
foreign workers on the site had been
freed and 18 of an estimated 30 kid-
nappers had been slain, according to
the Algerian government, still leav-
ing a major hostage situation cen-
tered on the plant’s main refinery.
The government said 12 workers,
both foreign and Algerian, were
confirmed dead. But the extremists
have put the number at 35. And the
government attack Thursday on the
convoy — as pieced together from
official, witness and news media
accounts — suggested the death toll
could go higher.
In Washington, U.S. officials said
one American — a Texan — was
known to have died.
Meanwhile, the al-Qaida-linked
Masked Brigade behind the opera-
tion offered to trade two American
hostages for two terrorists behind
bars in the U.S., including the mas-
termind of the 1993 World Trade
Center bombing.
Algerian army takes hard line in militant battle
By Bradley Klapper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — One
American worker at a natural gas
complex in Algeria has been found
dead, U.S. officials said Friday as
the Obama administration sought
to secure the release of Americans
still being held by militants on the
third day of the hostage standoff in
the Sahara.
How Frederick Buttaccio, a
Texas resident, died was not noted
in a statement from State
Department spokeswoman Victoria
Nuland.
A spokesman for the Buttaccio
family in the Houston suburb of
Katy, Texas, declined to com-
ment.
“We express our deepest condo-
lences to his family and friends,”
Nuland said.
State Dept.: One American dead in standoff
OPINION 9
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Michelle Morales
A
s most, on Dec. 14, I awoke to the
news story of unbelievable horror
— the mass shooting at Sandy
Hook Elementary School. At that time they
reported, 18 children were shot and killed.
“WHAT?!” I yelled at the television and, as
if the reporter heard me, it was repeated. I
wasn’t hearing things. This had really hap-
pened. I sat down on my bed stunned and
amazed. Then I began to cry. Really?
Children? How could anyone do such a
thing? I don’t want to rehash all the gory
details because I assume by now you know
most or some of them. But I will tell you, it’s
not too often a news report will make me cry,
but I just couldn’t help it. And now we’re
watching the gun control debate but the topic
I wanted to see discussed is violence in our
movies and video games. Now don’t get me
wrong, the gun control discussion needs to
continue since this mass shooting and the
one at the Portland Mall in Oregon took
place with guns bought legally and that issue
needs to be addressed. Still, what disturbs me
is how increasingly violent our movies and
video games have become and I can’t help
but feel like we’re seeing the results of
allowing all this violence into the lives of
children for so long.
According to the Classification and Rating
Administration, movie ratings are voluntary.
The Motion Picture Association of America
states parents are the ones who rate movies.
So who are these parents? According to
MPAA, these parents belong to the National
Association of Theatre Owners. Is it just me
or do you see a conflict of interest here?
What’s even more concerning is it’s really no
joke about there being a
conflict of interest, and as
always, Congress is well
aware of the problem.
According to the 2007
report “Marketing Violent
Entertainment to
Children” by the Federal
Trade Commission creat-
ed for Congress, “Some
have argued that the level of violence in PG-
13-rated movies, in particular, has increased
over time, blurring the line between PG-13
and R-rated violent content … In recent
years, PG-13 films have comprised the
majority of top-grossing films for the indus-
try. It has been argued that studios have a
financial incentive to obtain a PG-13 rating, a
rating that does not restrict admission to any-
one but tolerates a substantial amount of vio-
lent content attractive to 12 to 17 year olds.”
Interestingly enough, this is easily verified on
NATO’s website that lists their top-grossing
films by rating. For the past four years, the
top grossing films were rated PG-13 or PG.
Then it seems this message of violence is
hammered in over and over again with vio-
lent video games. This same report states,
“the Entertainment Software Rating Board’s
chosen method for assigning content descrip-
tors may fail to reveal all of the content in a
game that might be of interest to parents.”
Yet there are still those who try to claim
that having our children grow up with all this
violence doesn’t affect them. On the con-
trary, that’s not true. There are several well-
documented reports that establish that chil-
dren imitate what they see and are more like-
ly to be aggressive when they witness
aggression. The American Psychological
Associations states that decades of psycho-
logical research confirms media violence can
increase aggression. It also refers to another
report by the surgeon general from way back
in 1972 that concluded children may become
less sensitive to the pain and suffering of oth-
ers, may be more fearful of the world around
them and may be more likely to behave in
aggressive or harmful ways toward others.
This same report admits that there isn’t as
much research in regards to video games but
that they could be more harmful than violent
television and movies because they are inter-
active, very engrossing and require the player
to identify with the aggressor.
So what do I suggest? Recalling games
would be a waste of resources. It seems it’s
time for the voluntary self-governing to end.
So I challenge the MPAA to put their money
where their mouth is. If you really want par-
ents to rate movies, how about getting some
real ones? It’s time we get real impartial
raters and not ones who have a vested inter-
est in their bottom line. Let’s have the PTA
rate movies and video games. Could you
imagine the new standard of entertainment?
Wow, what a whole new world it would be!
Michelle Morales is a freelance writer who
has a degree in mass communications from
Cal State Hayward and a blog at
http://michellemorales.blog.com.
Good reasons to ban plastic bags
Editor,
It was not surprising to read Cathy
Browne’s guest perspective “Everyone loses
under bag bans” in the Jan. 3 edition of the
Daily Journal against legislation to ban sin-
gle-use plastic bags since she is the general
manager of a plastic bag manufacturer. But
the argument that no one wins if we quit
using single use plastic grocery bags is sim-
ply not true.
Local governments throughout California
have been working hard to ban single-use
plastic bags for good reason. Bay Area resi-
dents use 3.8 billion plastic bags every
year, and only 5.2 percent of plastic bags
are recycled (EPA 2005). About 1 million
bags end up in the San Francisco Bay each
year.
It costs the state $25 million annually to
manage plastic bag pollution. The city of
San Francisco estimates that $8.5 million
annually is spent dealing with their plastic
bag litter. And that is just the cost to the
community to clean up the litter.
From spring 2007 to February 2011, Save
Our Shores cleanup volunteers removed
more than 26,000 plastic bags alone from
local beaches and rivers, and we know that
countless other plastic bags have made their
way onto San Mateo County beaches and
coastal ecosystems. Plastic is not
biodegradable. In the marine environment,
it breaks down into toxic microscopic parti-
cles that are ingested by wildlife, and enter
the food chain that we depend on.
Let’s not accept the argument that we
need to continue to pollute our environ-
ment, and pay more of our tax dollars to
clean it up, to save Southern California
manufacturing jobs. Instead, let’s urge Ms.
Browne and Crown Poly to change their
course to a sustainable solution by creating
jobs in reusable bag manufacturing.
Patricia Potter
San Carlos
That’s not the end of it
Editor,
I saw the movie “Django,” when it
opened up a couple of days ago. I saw
scenes so horrible I could barely stand to
sit and watch. Slavery was outlawed in the
United States by the 13th Amendment.
However, slavery still continues today in
the form of human trafficking. Because of
economic conditions in the world, people
are lured into captivity by criminals, and
others to work in the sex trade or other
forms of forced labor. This type of activity
even exists within the United States. I wish
our government would take a strong stand
again and abolish any form of slavery for-
ever.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Rating movies and video games
And in this
corner ...
By Christopher P. Conway
I
would like to introduce Daily Journal
readers to a civil rights attorney by the
name of Robert Rubin. In the event you
don’t know who he is I think it would be a
good idea for you to get to know him. He and
his high-powered, left-
leaning Lawyers
Committee to Civil Rights
is suing the county of San
Mateo at the moment. The
reason he is suing our
county is the fact that we
used to hold our elections
using an at large voting
system when electing our
county supervisors. At large worked great as
every voter in the county got a vote in select-
ing every supervisor seeking office. Citizens
were happy and satisfied with the leadership
over the years as we were doing better finan-
cially than most every other county in the
state. Apparently, at-large elections discrimi-
nated against Asians and Latinos as they
could not get someone of their own race
elected as a county supervisor. So, six local
people from three separate minority groups
partnered with Rubin and his group and sued
the county claiming it was discriminatory and
violated the California Voting Rights. County
supervisors understandably crumbled in the
face of this suit as no politician wants to be a
defendant in a civil rights lawsuit. It’s a no-
win situation. Rubin and his team of civil
rights attorneys know this and use our court
system to their advantage and get local and
state municipalities to cave to their liberal
demands.
As you may know, the matter went to a
vote and the county unfortunately is now
required to have district elections. I don’t
think that the electorate realized that they
were voting to decrease their power as a voter
by limiting the amount of supervisors they
could choose. In the past, you were able to
vote for all five county supervisors running
for office but now you can only vote for the
one supervisor in your smaller district.
Seemed like a dilution of voter choice to me
and an absolute terrible deal for those of us
who like more choice, not less. Nonetheless,
Mr. Rubin won and got what he wanted,
problem solved right?
Wrong. Mr. Rubin and his group of out-of-
town (San Francisco) attorneys refuse to give
up their lawsuit and, through the threat of
continued litigation, are determined to be a
leading force in guaranteeing districts get
carved up to benefit the various minority
groups they supported in the original lawsuit.
It is a divide-and-conquer agenda that they
have been very effective at over the years.
You need to look no further than his work in
reversing Proposition 187, the very popular
state proposition that passed in 1994 with 59
percent of the vote. This was an example of
his use of our courts to reverse laws passed
by the majority of voters but then successful-
ly overruled by our court system. The prob-
lem this time is he has got a hold of our
county and he is not about to let it go.
Mr. Rubin and his colleagues have made a
career out of bullying local and state govern-
ments through the use of our costly judicial
system all in the name of civil rights. These is
money our state and local governments don’t
have and can’t afford. I thought you all might
like to get to know a little about Mr. Rubin.
He is suing you and your county right now.
Christopher P. Conway is a sixth generation
Californian and a third generation Peninsula
resident. He attended Serra High School in San
Mateo and has a finance degree from San
Diego State University. He has been an inde-
pendent mortgage professional for the past 22
years. He lives in San Mateo.
Guest
perspective
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,649.70 +0.39% 10-Yr Bond 1.84 _1.71%
Nasdaq3,134.70 -0.04% Oil (per barrel) 95.80
S&P 500 1,485.98+0.34% Gold 1,683.50
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Better earnings from
General Electric and Morgan Stanley
helped the stock market inch higher
Friday, as major indexes closed out their
third straight week of gains.
GE led the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones
industrial average after the conglomerate
reported stronger quarterly earnings,
thanks to orders from Brazil, Angola and
other developing countries. Profits
increased at all seven of its industrial seg-
ments, including oil and gas, energy man-
agement, aviation and transportation. GE
climbed 74 cents to $22.04.
The Dow gained 53.68 points to end at
13,649.70.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
5.04 points to 1,485.98, while the Nasdaq
composite fell 1.30 points to 3,134.70.
Even though investors had plenty of
news to digest, trading was largely quiet.
“Earnings always matter,” said Rex
Macey, the chief investment officer of
Wilmington Trust Investment Advisors in
Atlanta. “But just because we’re in the
middle of earnings season doesn’t mean
we’re going to get huge market moves.”
This earnings season is off to a good
start so far. Of the 67 companies in the
S&P 500 that have reported, 43 have
trumped analysts’ estimates.
Solid results this week from JPMorgan
Chase and others, along with encouraging
news on housing and employment,
pushed the S&P 500 index to its latest
five-year high.
Morgan Stanley’s earnings surged
across its many business lines, as more
companies hired the investment bank to
help it raise money and line up mergers.
Morgan Stanley gained 8 percent, rising
$1.63 to $22.38.
Intel, the world’s biggest chipmaker,
said late Thursday that fourth-quarter net
income fell 27 percent. A growing prefer-
ence for smartphones and tablets, instead
of personal computers and laptops pow-
ered by Intel chips, have made investors
wary of the company’s stock. It lost $1.43
to $21.25.
Norwegian Cruise Line soared 30 per-
cent in its first day of trading, the top per-
formance of the three companies making
their public debut on Friday. Five compa-
nies raised a total of $1.8 billion through
initial public offerings this week, making
it the best week for IPOs since early
October, according to the data provider
Ipreo.
Stocks end week with gains
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
General Electric Co., up 74 cents at $22.04
The conglomerate said that its net income rose 8 percent in the fourth
quarter as earnings at all its industrial segments improved.
State Street Corp., up $2.98 at $53.36
The financial company said it plans to lower expenses by cutting 630
jobs, or about 2 percent of its worldwide workforce.
Morgan Stanley, up $1.63 at $22.38
The New York-based investment bank reported a profit in the fourth
quarter, reversing a loss in the same period a year ago.
Johnson Controls Inc., down 95 cents at $31.01
The heating and ventilation systems maker reported a 17 percent decline
in its first-quarter net income and posted a weak outlook.
Capital One Financial Corp., down $4.60 at $56.99
The lender said that its fourth-quarter net income grew more than
twofold, and revenue rose by 38 percent, but results missed analysts’
expectations.
Nasdaq
Intel Corp., down $1.43 at $21.25
The chipmaker said that its fourth-quarter net income fell 27 percent
from the previous year as PC sales continued to weaken.
Netflix Inc., up $1.47 at $99.17
A Janney Capital Markets analyst upgraded the video-streaming
company to a “Buy”and said it could see long-term growth.
Research In Motion Ltd., up 93 cents at $15.84
A Jefferies analyst upgraded the BlackBerry maker to a “Buy”rating ahead
of the launch of its long-delayed new smartphones.
Big movers
REUTERS
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market.
By Joan Lowy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It’s likely that
burning lithium ion batteries on two
Boeing 787 Dreamliners were caused by
overcharging, aviation safety and battery
experts said Friday, pointing to develop-
ments in the investigation of the Boeing
incidents as well as a battery fire in a
business jet more than a year ago.
An investigator in Japan, where a 787
made an emergency landing earlier this
week, said the charred insides of the
plane’s lithium ion battery show the bat-
tery received voltage in excess of its
design limits.
The similarity of the burned battery
from the All Nippon Airways flight to the
burned battery in a Japan Airlines 787
that caught fire Jan. 7 while the jet was
parked at Boston’s Logan International
Airport suggests a common cause, Japan
transport ministry investigator Hideyo
Kosugi said.
“If we compare data from the latest
case here and that in the U.S., we can
pretty much figure out what happened,”
Kosugi said.
In the case of the 787 in Boston, the
battery in the plane’s auxiliary power unit
had recently received a large demand on
its power and was in the process of charg-
ing when the fire ignited, a source famil-
iar with the investigation of the 787 fire in
Boston told the Associated Press. The
plane had landed a short time earlier and
was empty of passengers, although a
cleaning crew was working in the plane.
The source spoke on condition of
anonymity because he wasn’t authorized
to speak publicly.
The Federal Aviation Administration
issued an emergency order Wednesday
temporarily grounding the six 787s
belonging to United Airlines, the lone
U.S. carrier operating Boeing’s newest
and most technologically advanced airlin-
er. The Japanese carriers already had
grounded their 787s, and airlines and civil
aviation authorities in other countries fol-
lowed suit, shutting down all 50
Dreamliners that Boeing has delivered so
far.
Boeing said Friday it will stop deliver-
ing new 787s to customers until the elec-
trical system is fixed.
Batteries eyed in Boeing 787 mishaps
Jobless rates fall in less than half of U.S. states
WASHINGTON — Unemployment rates fell in less than
half of U.S. states last month, as steady but slow hiring is
making only gradual improvement in the job market.
The Labor Department said Friday that rates fell in 22
states in December and rose in 16. They were unchanged in
12.
The department’s monthly report also shows that steady
hiring nationwide in the past two years has lowered the
unemployment rate in many parts of the country. The rate is
now below 7 percent in 25 states. And some of the states
hardest hit in the recession have seen solid gains.
Nevada’s unemployment rate, the highest in the nation,
plummeted 0.6 percentage points last month to 10.2 percent.
Rhode Island’s rate, also 10.2 percent, fell from 10.4 percent
in November.
A year ago, Nevada reported an unemployment rate of 13
percent. Its 2.8 percentage point drop in 2012 was the biggest
in the nation.
Much of that decline stems from a smaller labor force.
Many of those in Nevada who were out of work have given
up looking for jobs or have left the state. People are only
counted as unemployed if they are actively looking for work.
Nevada’s workforce fell nearly 2 percent last year.
But some of the unemployed have found jobs. In the past
year, the state has gained nearly 20,000 jobs.
Disney CEO Iger sees 2012 pay rise to $37.1M
LOS ANGELES — Disney CEO Bob Iger’s pay package
got an 18 percent boost last year to $37.1 million as the com-
pany hit records for revenue, net income and earnings per
share.
That’s according to an Associated Press analysis of a secu-
rities filing made Friday.
The company also cited Iger’s leadership in the acquisition
of “Star Wars” creator Lucasfilm, which closed in December.
In the fiscal year through Sept. 29, shares of The Walt
Disney Co. rose 73 percent.
The Associated Press formula considers salary, bonuses,
perks, stock and options awarded to the executive during the
year, but not changes in the present value of pension benefits.
That makes the AP total slightly different in most cases
from the total reported by companies to the Securities and
Exchange Commission.
Honda issues recall because of airbag problem
TORRANCE — Honda says it’s recalling 748,000 Pilot
and Odyssey vehicles because of a possible problem with
their driver’s-side airbags.
Honda says that the airbags may have been assembled
without some of the rivets needed to secure their cover. That
could keep them from deploying properly in the event of a
crash and increase the possibility of injury.
No crashes or injuries have been reported related to the
issue.
The effected Pilot SUVs were made for the 2009 through
2013 model years, while the Odyssey minivans in question
were made for the 2011 through 2013 model years.
Business briefs
By Greg Risling
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — As Toyota Motor
Corp. chips away at settling lawsuits
claiming its vehicles suddenly acceler-
ate, the question remains whether attor-
neys who sued could prove to a jury
there was a design flaw.
The company maintains stuck acceler-
ator pedals, faulty floor mats and driver
error are the reasons for vehicles unex-
pectedly surging, while plaintiffs’ attor-
neys contend Toyota’s electronic throttle
control system is to blame.
Recent settlements totaling more than
$1 billion by Toyota to resolve numerous
lawsuits involving economic loss and a
few involving wrongful death claims
may signal that the automaker doesn’t
want to risk coming out on the losing
end of a potentially costly court deci-
sion.
“A bad loss in a jury trial would inflict
lasting damage to Toyota in loss of pub-
lic confidence,” said Los Angeles-based
attorney Christine Spagnoli, who has
won several multimillion-dollar verdicts
against automakers over safety defects.
“I believe Toyota will continue to look
for better opportunities to get a win.”
The company said Thursday it settled
a lawsuit with the family of two people
killed in a Utah crash that was set to go
to trial next month and serve as a test
case for hundreds of others that are
pending.
Terms of the agreement weren’t
released, but it comes just weeks after
Toyota agreed to pay more than $1 bil-
lion to settle lawsuits where vehicle
owners said the value of their cars and
SUVs plummeted after the company
recalled millions of vehicles because of
sudden-acceleration issues.
In the Utah case, Paul Van Alfen and
his son’s fiancee, Charlene Jones Lloyd,
were killed when their Camry slammed
into a wall near Wendover, Utah. in
2010. The Utah Highway Patrol con-
cluded based on statements from wit-
nesses and the crash survivors that the
gas pedal was stuck.
Toyota settlement may signal future legal strategy
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Researchers have chosen an experi-
mental drug by Eli Lilly & Co. for a
large federally funded study testing
whether it’s possible to prevent
Alzheimer’s disease in older people at
high risk of developing it.
The drug, called solanezumab (sol-ah-
NAYZ-uh-mab), is designed to bind to
and help clear the sticky deposits that
clog patients’ brains.
Earlier studies found it did not help
people with moderate to severe
Alzheimer’s but it showed some promise
against milder disease. Researchers
think it might work better if given before
symptoms start.
“The hope is we can catch people
before they decline,” which can come 10
years or more after plaques first show up
in the brain, said Dr. Reisa Sperling,
director of the Alzheimer’s center at
Brigham and Women’s Hospital in
Boston.
She will help lead the new study,
which will involve 1,000 people ages 70
to 85 whose brain scans show plaque
buildup but who do not yet have any
symptoms of dementia. They will get
monthly infusions of solanezumab or a
dummy drug for three years. The main
goal will be slowing the rate of cognitive
decline. The study will be done at 50
sites in the U.S. and possibly more in
Canada, Australia and Europe, Sperling
said.
Lilly drug chosen for Alzheimer’s prevention study
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Woodside High School’s latest
win, a 4-0 blitzing of San Mateo,
was a display of all that is good, bad
and downright exciting about
Wildcat girls’ soccer.
The score was good, there were
moments that head coach Jose
Navarrete found less than stellar,
but the exciting part revolves
around watching a young, talented
team in Woodside that may be 9-0-
2 so far this season but will proba-
bly be even better in years to come
— consider that three of
Woodside’s goals were scored by
freshman on Friday.
“All five freshmen have been
doing a great job for us,” Navarette
said. “So, we’re excited because
we’re an experienced team, but
we’re also a very young team. We
still have a lot to learn and we think
we can really get better.”
Woodside showed it has the abili-
ty to get better on the fly. They
jumped out to a quick 2-0 lead on
Friday, hit a bit of a lull near the end
of the first half but then righted the
ship and dominated play in the sec-
ond half, adding two more goals
and cruising to its fourth league win
in five games (4-0-1).
“They’re more aggressive than
<< Posey, Giants reach 1-year deal, page 12
• Cap girls pull away from Hillsdale, page 12
Weekend, Jan. 19-20, 2013
THEY’RE CIRCLING: FEW CHANGES FOR THE SHARKS AS THEY PREPARE FOR NEW SEASON >>> PAGE 13
By Paul Newberry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA — The Falcons are
well aware of just how desperate
this city is for its first Super Bowl
championship.
Mike Peterson sees and hears it
everywhere he goes.
“The city is hungry,” the Atlanta
linebacker said. “You can feel it
when you’re in the grocery store.
Everybody is saying, ‘Go Falcons.’
Everyone is wearing red and black.
The city is painted red and black.”
T h e
Falcons
will be
playing
in the
N F C
champi-
o n s h i p
game for only the third time when
they host the San Francisco 49ers
on Sunday, a matchup of teams that
come into this game from very dif-
ferent historical perspectives.
For the 49ers, this is a chance to
rekindle the franchise’s glorious
legacy, to follow in the footsteps of
those magnificent teams that cap-
tured five Super Bowls titles in the
1980s and ’90s, led by giants of the
game such as Joe Montana, Jerry
Rice and Steve Young.
The Falcons? They’ve never won
even a single Super Bowl. Heck,
they’ve only gotten that far one
time, during the 1998 season when
a charismatic bunch known as the
“Dirty Birds” shockingly made a
run to the big game — and was
promptly blown out by the Denver
Broncos in John Elway’s finale.
“They’re trying to recapture
See 49ERS, Page 16
NFC Championship :
49ers at Falcons
Sunday, Jan. 20
FOX, Noon
IF YOU WATCH
Battle of ‘Cats
goes to girls
from Woodside
See CATS, Page 16
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Burlingame girls’ basketball
team has been the talk of the Peninsula
so far this season. The Panthers went
into Friday night’s game against Mills
at Capuchino High having won 14 of
their first 15 games. Cal Hi Sports had
Burlingame on the bubble of a top-20
Division III ranking in the state.
So when Burlingame’s Dana
Michaels knocked down a 3-pointer to
put her team up 35-20 with 7:24 left in
the third quarter, it appeared the
Panthers were on their way to running
their Peninsula Athletic League South
Division record to 4-0.
Instead, Mills came storming back.
The Vikings outscored Burlingame 19-
0 the rest of the third quarter and then
held off the Panthers down the stretch to
record a shocking 47-45 victory.
“Usually the third quarter has killed
us this season,” said Mills coach Dave
Matsu. “All [our] hard work paid off
tonight.
“That was a great win for us. I’ve had
a lot of wins here. That’s the best win
I’ve had.”
Despite being among the smallest
teams in the league, Mills (2-2 PAL
South, 9-7 overall) held its own on the
Mills win
stuns the
Panthers
See MILLS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Domestic Violence Survivor
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Any head basketball coach will
tell you that Peninsula Athletic
League wins — North, South, Lake,
Ocean, Bay, doesn’t matter — are
difficult to come by.
So the grin flashed by Capuchino
High School girls’ basketball coach
Mike Trimble following a hard-
fought 50-36 win over Hillsdale
Friday night bared the resemblance
of a relieved man.
“It’s hard,” Trimble said of win-
ning in the PAL. “Hillsdale played a
great game. They came after us. We
never felt comfortable. At all.”
That’s because the Knights and
their patented hustle disrupted the
Mustangs just enough to keep the
game close well into the third quar-
ter. With three minutes left, the
deficit was only one point, 29-28.
But the Mustangs found six quick
points courtesy of Brianna and
Brittany Deckman to increase their
lead 35-28. It was that momentum
they carried during a fourth quarter
when they outscored the Knights 15-
8.
“It’s huge for us,” Trimble said of
the win.
Capuchino came out shooting a
not-spectacular 50 percent from the
floor in the first quarter. But the
Mustangs did connect on all three of
their long distance calls. The 3’s
came at point of the quarter when
Hillsdale (who was only 3 of 13
from the field) would narrow the
lead to a bucket, thus taking back
any momentum the Knights looked
to build.
Come the second quarter,
Hillsdale stayed true to the hustle
and behind Ashley Yakushi, Emily
Nepomuceno and what turned out to
be a huge night on the boards for
Kara Ronberg, the Knight stayed
with Capuchino through the second.
The lead was only four going into
recess.
“At halftime, we were getting beat
on our press, giving up some easy
baskets,” Trimble said. “So I decided
to go to the one, man-to-man, and
the Deckmans, Brittany and
Brianna, really came up with a lot of
good turnovers that sparked the
whole deal. That was the key. Our
man-to-man was solid. We gave up
too many layups early.”
The Deckmans keyed in on some-
thing defensively.
Early on, Hillsdale was finally
finding some offensive rhythm —
that and Capuchino simply could not
protect the basketball. The Mustangs
committed five turnovers in the first
three minutes of the quarter. The
score was tied at 25 just ticks into
the fourth minute of the third frame.
Capuchino pulled away, as men-
tioned, behind some key swipes
before the Knights clawed back 29-
28.
But a time out at a key juncture of
the game refocused the Mustangs —
mainly the sisters Deckman. Brianna
and Britanny exchanged steal-and-
llayup baskets late in the third quar-
ter to rebuild the Capuchino advan-
tage. As the fourth quarter wore on,
the Mustangs kept pressing the lead
grew and grew.
“We did a better job of passing
and cutting,” Trimble said, “some-
times we dribble it too much. We
pulled energy from our defense, we
were moving and cutting, spreading
them out a little bit and, yea,h we got
some more looks off of that.”
Ronberg finished with four points
and 13 rebounds for the Knights.
Yakushi and Victoria Montague
paced Hillsdale with nine points.
Cap’s Taylor Brazil led all scorers
with 17 points. Brianna Deckman
finished with 16.
Deckman sisters lead Cap to win over Knights
Hillsdale played a great game.They
came after us.We never felt comfortable. At all.
— Mike Trimble, girls’ basketball coach, Capuchino
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan
had 24 points and 10 rebounds, and
the San Antonio Spurs held off the
Golden State Warriors 95-88 on
Friday night to extend their home
winning streak to 14 games.
Tony Parker added 25 points and
eight assists for San Antonio (31-
11), which is an NBA-best 18-2 at
home. Tiago Splitter added 19
points and nine rebounds, and
Danny Green scored 13.
David Lee had 22 points, Klay
Thompson added 21 and Jarrett Jack
20 for Golden State (23-15).
The Spurs closed the game on a 9-
4 run after Harrison Barnes’ jumper
pulled the Warriors to 86-84 with 5
minutes left.
Duncan had eight points in the
final quarter, going 4 for 6 from the
field. He also had 10 points and five
rebounds in the opening period.
Golden State led for all but 34
seconds in the first half.
The teams combined to start the
game 2 for 12 from the field. The
Spurs’ first basket came 3 minutes
in on Duncan’s 19-foot jumper.
Golden State closed the first quar-
ter on a 13-4 run but Gary Neal
threw in a 3 at the buzzer to pull the
Spurs to 26-19. Carl Landry had six
points during the run.
Landry continued his dominance
in the second quarter, going 7 for 10
while scoring 15 points. He did not
score in the second half.
The Spurs had an opportunity to
take the first-half lead, but Green
missed a hurried 3-pointer after
Splitter almost dribbled the final 3
seconds off. San Antonio coach
Gregg Popovich stormed onto the
court, yelling at Splitter and Parker.
The start of the second half was
delayed 15 minutes while one rim
was replaced after officials noticed
it was bent.
The Spurs tied the game at 58
midway through the third quarter
when Stephen Jackson, Parker and
Duncan quickly rotated the ball
across the court to find an open
Green for a 3. Duncan hit a pair of
free throws on the following posses-
sion to give the Spurs a 60-58, their
first since early in the first quarter.
Too much Duncan and Spurs defense for Warriors
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — The San Jose Sharks
responded to their quickest playoff exit in a
run of eight straight postseason appearances
with tinkering instead of a roster overhaul.
There will be some changes on the third and
fourth lines as the Sharks plan to take a look
at some younger players and former first-
round pick Brad Stuart is back on defense
seven years after being traded away.
But the core of the team is still strikingly
similar to the group that got knocked out of
the playoffs early with a five-game loss to St.
Louis in the first round after two straight trips
to the conference finals.
“I’d like our players to
still have last year in the
back of their minds,”
coach Todd McLellan
said. “The memory of
what we did well and what
we didn’t do well. I’d also
like them to move for-
ward. Part of that is re-
establishing our identity.
Who are we and how do
we play, how do we want to play.”
McLellan wants the Sharks to be a faster
team that annoys opponents and supports each
other rather than playing as individuals. Those
characteristics were lacking at times last year,
especially during a midseason slide that
almost cost San Jose a playoff berth and then
in the early exit against a Blues team that was
quicker to the puck and vastly superior on
special teams.
The memory of that series is still fresh nine
months later, considering so many of the play-
ers here went through it. The top nine scorers
from last season led by captain Joe Thornton,
Patrick Marleau, Joe Pavelski, Logan Couture
and Ryane Clowe are all back. The six
defensemen who got the most ice time last
season, led by Dan Boyle, Marc-Edouard
Vlasic and Brent Burns, and goaltenders Antti
Niemi and Thomas Greiss are also back for
another run at that elusive Stanley Cup.
“We’ve had a few more changes before,”
Pavelski said. “We didn’t perform the way we
thought we could (last year). It’s always dis-
appointing. Hopefully, everyone got their rest
and got what they needed to be ready this
year. There’s a lot of work that has to go into
the process to get back to that point.”
In fact, only two of the 28 players in train-
ing camp were not in the organization last
year: Stuart and free agent forward Adam
Burish.
The Sharks are also hoping from bigger
contributions from young players like Tommy
Wingels and Andrew Desjardins and others
who got little time in the NHL last year, like
John McCarthy, Frazer McLaren and James
Sheppard.
“I’m not going to come in and try to do any-
thing special,” Burish said. “I’m not going to
come and try to save the day here. They don’t
need that. This team is an elite team in the
NHL and has been elite for a long time. I’m
excited and I feel fortunate that I will be a part
of it.”
Burish will be a part of the reconfigured
third and fourth lines as the Sharks plan to
start the season with the same two groups that
played together so much late last year with
Thornton, Marleau and Pavelski teaming on
the first line and Couture, Clowe and Marty
Havlat forming the second.
They hope that continuity will pay off early
in a season where teams have little time for
preparation.
“We just have to go over a little review,”
Thornton said. “There’s not too many new
faces in here. We know what’s expected of us.
We know what kind of game we’re supposed
to play. We just have to execute it. Hopefully
not having too many new faces will help us.”
The most significant change came on the
coaching staff, with McLellan bringing in for-
mer NHL defensemen and experienced coach-
es Larry Robinson and Jim Johnson as assis-
tants to shore up the penalty killing.
San Jose had the second-worst penalty-kill
unit during the regular season a year ago and
then allowed six goals in 18 power-play
chances over five games against the Blues.
The Sharks are looking to be much more
aggressive while short-handed this year after
admittedly being too passive last season. They
also want to get more players involved in
killing penalties to keep everyone fresher.
Even with an abbreviated training camp, the
players are responding to the new coaches,
especially a Hall of Famer like Robinson.
“Just his name alone speaks for itself. It
instantly gets respect,” defenseman Dan
Boyle said. “It’s always good to get fresh
ideas. Obviously, we’re going to tweak a few
things. But the language is the same and we
all understand what they’re talking about.”
Sharks re-sign James Sheppard
and defenseman Nick Petrecki
The San Jose Sharks are bringing back for-
ward James Sheppard and defenseman Nick
Petrecki on one-year contracts.
The Sharks announced both deals Friday,
one day before the start of the NHL season.
Sheppard has played 34 games this season
with Worcester of the AHL with eight goals
and 15 assists.
In 224 career NHL games with Minnesota,
Sheppard has 11 goals and 38 assists. He was
acquired by the Sharks on Aug. 7, 2011, for a
third-round pick in this year’s draft.
Petrecki played in 16 games this season
with Worcester and had one goal and two
assists. In 68 games last season with
Worcester, Petrecki had a goal and eight
assists.
Petrecki, chosen by San Jose with the 28th
pick in the 2007 draft, hasn’t played an NHL
game
Sharks made few changes after playoff flop
Todd McLellan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Police in San
Francisco said Friday they are investigating a
sexual assault allegation involving 49ers wide
receiver Michael Crabtree.
The alleged assault occurred in a city hotel
room early Sunday, after the 49ers’ playoff vic-
tory over the Green Bay Packers, police said in
a written statement.
Crabtree has been interviewed with his attor-
ney present and has cooperated with the probe,
the statement said. The receiver hasn’t been
detained or arrested, and he agreed to be avail-
able for more questions in the future.
The probe is being handled by the depart-
ment’s special victims unit.
When the investigation is done, the findings
will be forwarded to the district attorney’s
office, which decides if charges should be
filed.
Authorities didn’t release any further details.
49ers General Manager Trent Baalke said
the team is aware of the allegations.
“The 49ers take such matters very seriously,”
he said in a statement. “We will have no further
comment at this time as the legal process is
ongoing.”
San Francisco is preparing to play the
Atlanta Falcons in the NFC championship
game on Sunday. The winner goes to the Super
Bowl.
The 49ers said Crabtree made the trip to
Atlanta.
The team referred all other questions about
the matter to Crabtree’s attorney, who was not
immediately identified.
This season, Crabtree became the first San
Francisco wide receiver to log more than 1,000
years in a season since Terrell Owens in 2003.
He had a career-best 1,105 yards receiving,
including a single-game high 172 yards on
eight receptions in a win over Arizona.
49ers’ Crabtree questioned in sexual assault case
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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boards, out-rebounding the taller Panthers 18-16
in the second half. For the game, Burlingame (3-
1, 14-2) out-rebounded the Vikings by just four,
40-36.
“It came down to who wanted it more,” Matsu
said.
In the second half, it was definitely the Viking
who wanted it more. Mills killed the Panthers on
the offensive boards and they stepped up their
defensive pressure. Mills, defensively, started
picking up Burlingame full court and challenged
every Burlingame pass, every Burlingame look
at the basket and generally flustered the
Panthers.
“In the second half, we talked about more ball
pressure on their guards,” Matsu said. “Just
more ball pressure and we hit more shots in the
second half.”
Mills began its comeback when Bryana Sui
knocked down a shot, and Madison Sui and Julia
Gibbs hit three of four free throws, cutting the
Vikings’ deficit to 10, 35-25. Gibbs then hit a
jump shot and Bryana Sui nailed a 3-pointer and
just like that, Mills was down just five points,
35-30. Three more points from Gibbs got the
Vikings to within a point and when Taylor
Cormier drained a 3, the comeback was com-
plete and the Vikings had a 36-35 advantage and
led 39-35 going into the fourth quarter.
Burlingame, meanwhile, after scoring 30
points in the first half, managed only 14 in the
second half. The Panthers went more than eight
minutes without a point, bridging the third and
fourth quarters, and went nearly 13 minutes
between field goals.
Despite all their troubles, the Panthers found
themselves down just three points, 45-42, with
36 seconds left following a Lauren Rally buck-
et. Mills gave Matsu some gray hairs as the
Vikings missed three straight free throws before
Bryana Sui finally hit one to put the Vikings up
46-42 with 14 seconds to play.
Burlingame made one last run and made the
Vikings sweat as Rally converted a three-point
play, cutting the deficit to one, 46-45, with six
seconds left. Kristen Lastofka then hit 1 of 2 free
throws with five second remaining to give the
Panthers one last chance, but the opportunity to
get off a game-winning shot went by the boards
when Rally dribbled the ball off her foot bring-
ing the ball upcourt.
The second half was a far cry from the first
when the Panthers’ front line was nearly unstop-
pable. Nina Newman scored 10 of her 12 points
in the second quarter and Nora Gustafson added
six of her eight in the first half. That pair, along
with Katie Gutierrez, controlled the boards in
the first half, combining for 17 rebounds.
The Panthers, however, had been led by their
perimeter in Rally and the county’s leading scor-
er, Dana Michaels. Neither of those two really
could get off. Michaels’ eight points was her sec-
ond-lowest output of the season.
“The player of the game was Tiffany Chang,”
Matsu said. “She shut down Dana Michaels.”
Rally tried to pick up some of the slack, scor-
ing a team-high 15 points, but only five came
after halftime.
With the Burlingame guards struggling and
then the front line disappearing in the second
half, it all added up to an upset by the Vikings.
“I love being the underdogs,” Matsu said.
Mills was led by Bryana Sui’s 13 points, the
only Viking to score in double figures.
“They played better than us,” said Burlingame
coach Bill Lepeltak, who was in no mood to talk
after the game. “They out-coached us and that
cost us the game.”
Continued from page 11
MILLS
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Sarah Gogarty, left, and Mills’Tiffany Chang chase after a loose ball during the
Vikings’ 47-45 win over the Panthers.
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 25 13 .658 —
Brooklyn 24 16 .600 2
Boston 20 19 .513 5 1/2
Philadelphia 17 23 .425 9
Toronto 14 26 .350 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 26 12 .684 —
Atlanta 22 17 .564 4 1/2
Orlando 14 25 .359 12 1/2
Charlotte 10 29 .256 16 1/2
Washington 8 29 .216 17 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 25 16 .610 —
Chicago 23 15 .605 1/2
Milwaukee 20 18 .526 3 1/2
Detroit 14 25 .359 10
Cleveland 10 31 .244 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 31 11 .738 —
Memphis 25 13 .658 4
Houston 21 20 .512 9 1/2
Dallas 17 24 .415 13 1/2
New Orleans 13 26 .333 16 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 32 8 .800 —
Denver 24 18 .571 9
Utah 21 19 .525 11
Portland 20 19 .513 11 1/2
Minnesota 16 20 .444 14
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 31 9 .775 —
Golden State 23 15 .605 7
L.A. Lakers 17 22 .436 13 1/2
Sacramento 15 25 .375 16
Phoenix 13 28 .317 18 1/2
Friday’sGames
Chicago 100, Boston 99, OT
Philadelphia 108,Toronto 101, OT
Indiana 105, Houston 95
Charlotte 106, Orlando 100
Brooklyn 94, Atlanta 89
Memphis 85, Sacramento 69
San Antonio 95, Golden State 88
Washington 112, Denver 108
Oklahoma City 117, Dallas 114, OT
Saturday’sGames
San Antonio at Atlanta, 4 p.m.
Sacramento at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Memphis at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
@Calgary
3p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/20
@Edmonton
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/22
vs.Phoenix
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/24
vs.Colorado
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/26
vs.Vancouver
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/27
vs. Anaheim
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/29
vs. Edmonton
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/31
@Hornets
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/19
vs. Clippers
1p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/21
vs.OKC
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/23
@Chicago
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/25
@Bucks
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/26
@Toronto
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/28
@Cleveland
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/29
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Mills 47, Burlingame45
Burlingame1614410—45
Mills 1010198— 47
BURLINGAME (fg ftm-fta tp) — Michaels 2 3-4 8,
Gustafson 4 0-2 8, Rally 5 5-6 15, Gutierrez 1 0-1 2,
Newman 18 8-13 45. Totals 18 8-13 45. MILLS —
Lastofka 3 1-3 7, Chang 2 2-2 6, M. Sui 3 2-4 8, B. Sui
5 1-2 13, Gibbs 2 3-3 7, Cormier 1 0-0 3, Huffman 0
1-2 1. Totals 16 10-16 47. 3-pointers — Michaels
(B); B. Sui 2, Cormier (M). Records — Mills 2-2 PAL
South, 9-7 overall; Burlingame 3-1, 14-2.
SanMateo43, Aragon29
Aragon31376— 29
SanMateo1011715— 43
ARAGON (fg ftm-fta tp) — Phum 0 1-2 1,Reynolds
1 0-0 2,Murauga 1 1-2 3,Mangauong 1 1-2 4,Joyce
2 3-6 7, Collins 0 1-2 1, Stocker 2 1-2 6,Vaca 1 0-2 2,
Haupealaui 1 1-3 3. Totals 9 9-19 29. SAN MATEO
— Petelo 1 2-2 4, Simon 10 4-6 25, M. Lee 3 1-2 7,
Unga 1 1-2 3,Tuipulotu 2 0-3 4.Totals 17 8-15 43.3-
pointers — Mangauong, Stocker (A); Simon (SM).
Records — San Mateo 4-0 PAL South; Aragon 0-4.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Burlingame68, Mills 54
Burlingame19141223— 68
Mills 1211823—54
BURLINGAME (fg ftm-fta tp) — Baumgarten 0 2-
2 2,Haupt 5 6-7 19,Dobson 1 2-2 4,Paratte 6 4-6 21,
Loew 4 5-9 13, Graham 4 0-0 9.Totals 20 19-26 68.
MILLS — Wong 3 5-6 13, Worku 6 5-6 18, Nolan 2
0-0 5,Adkins 1 2-2 5,Hidalgo 0 1-2 1,Gibbs 4 1-1 12.
Totals 16 14-17 54. 3-pointers — Haupt 3, Paratte
5,Graham (B);Wong 2,Worku,Nolan,Adkins,Gibbs
3 (M). Records — Burlingame 4-0 PAL South, 9-7
overall; Mills 3-1, 10-6.
Menlo-Atherton38, Carlmont 34
Carlmont 86155— 34
M-A81596— 38
CARLMONT (fg-ftm-tp) — Prado 1-4-6, Malik 1-2-
5,Costello6-6-19,Moore0-1-1,Pitocchi 1-1-3.Totals
9-14-34. M-A — Gaddis 2-2-7, Olsen 1-0-2, Keare
1-0-2, Callahan 2-0-6, Latulo 1-1-3, Guegler 1-0-2,
Meacham 3-0-6, Bucka 1-0-2, Roberts 1-1-3, Hen-
niger 1-2-4. Totals 14-7-38. 3-pointers — Malik,
Costello (C); Callahan 2, Gaddis (MA). Records —
Menlo-Atherton 2-2 PAL South, 6-10 overall; Carl-
mont 3-1, 14-2.
SacredHeart Prep61, King’sAcademy42
King’sAcademy127914— 42
SacredHeart Prep14181217— 61
KING’S ACADEMY (fg ftm-fta tp) — Butelo 3 2-3
9,Peterson10-03,Cox21-15,Chen10-02,Hansen
1 0-0 3, Sabel 2 0-0 6, Shirey 1 1-1 3, Palumba 3 0-0
7,White 1 2-2 4.Totals 15 6-7 42.SHP — McLean 1
0-0 3, Koch 2 3-4 9, Barnum 2 0-0 6, Hruska 1 2-2 4,
Donahoe 2 0-0 5, Galliani 5 2-2 16, Galvin 2 0-0 4,
Bennett 3 7-8 14.Totals 18 14-16 61. 3-pointers —
Butelo, Peterson, Hansen, Sabel 2, Palumba (KA);
McLean, Koch 2, Barnum 2, Donahoe, Galliani 4,
Bennett (SHP). Records — Sacred Heart Prep 4-1
WBAL, 8-7 overall; King’s Academy 3-2, 10-5.
BOYS’ SOCCER
MenloSchool 2, EastsidePrep0
Halftime score — 1-0 Menlo. Goal scorer (assist)
— MS, Parker (Matsuda); MS, Parker (Baxter).
Records — Menlo School 5-0 WBAL, 8-2-1 overall.
Sacred Heart Prep 3, Harker 0
Halftime score — 1-0 SHP. Goal scorer (assist) —
SHP, Hellman (Segre); SHP, Hellman (Segre); SHP,
Segre (unassisted). Records — Sacred Heart Prep
5-0 WBAL, 8-2-1 overall.
COLLEGEBASKETBALL
WOMEN
CityCollegeSF68, CSM30
CCSF (fg ftm-fta tp) — Dashvevich 6 0-0 16,
Nguyen 6 1-3 18, Mariopousa 3 0-0 9, Hall 4 3-4 14,
Greene 2 7-11 11.Totals 21 11-18 68. CSM — Lee
2 2-6 6,Cooper 1 0-0 2,Price 0 2-4 2,Gibbs 4 2-2 10,
Larson 2 0-0 4, Fleres 0 0-2 0, Siegal 1 0-0 2, David 1
2-2 4. Totals 11 8-16 30. 3-pointers — Nguyen 5,
Dashkevich 4, Maripousa 3, Hall 3 (CCSF). Records
— CSM 1-2 Coast North,6-12 overall;CCSF 3-0,12-
7.
THURSDAY
WRESTLING
Half MoonBay69, Sequoia6
108 — Robles (S) p. Marschall, :45; 115 — Keller
(HMB) by forfeit; 122 — Boling (HMB) by forfeit;
128 — Velazquez (HMB) p. Shinshiro, 2:27; 134 —
Droubi (HMB) byforfeit;140— Casamina(HMB) p.
Medrano, 3:25; 147 — Pintarelli (HMB) d. Green,
18-11; 154 — Chee (HMB) p. Cardaris, 2:45; 162 —
Eggar (HMB) by forfeit; 172 — Lowman (HMB) by
forfeit; 184 — Hernandez (HMB) p.Martinez,2:44;
197 — Corona (HMB) p. Valrenzuela, 4:59; 222 —
Marcos Sarabia (HMB) by forfeit; HWT — Mario
Sarabia (HMB) by forfeit.Records — Half Moon Bay
2-0 PAL Bay.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Westmoor 66, SouthCity37
SouthCity1110610—37
Westmoor 21161415— 66
SOUTH CITY (fg ftm-fta tp) — Clayton 1 0-0 2,
Watkins 1 0-1 4; Bautista 2 0-1 4, Reyes 1 0-0 2, Lew
4 1-3 9, Ramos 1 0-1 2, Diosomito 0 0-1 0, Dizon 1
0-1 2.Totals 17 1-7 37.WESTMOOR — Mayuga 4 0-
0 9, Santos 1 0-0 2, Duong 2 0-0 5, Fernandez 6 0-0
12, Min 9 2-3 20, Chen 1 2-2 4, Liang 1 1-2 4, Cook
4-8 10. Totals 27 9-15 66. 3-pointers — Watkins,
Lim (SC); Mayuga, Duong, Liang (W). Records —
Westmoor 2-2PALNorth,13-3overall;SouthCity2-
2, 7-9.
GIRLS’ SOCCER
SacredHeart Prep57, Castilleja55
SacredHeart Prep10141815—57
Castilleja1591516— 55
SHP (fg ftm-fta tp) — Gannon 7 0-1 14, Meg. Hol-
land 5 0-1 11, Hemm 1 1-2 3, Cummings 1 0-0 2,
Mel. Holland 9 5-5 23; Koenig 1 0-0 3, Makoni 0 1-
2 1.Totals 24 7-11 57.CASTILLEJA — Nichols 3 0-0
7, Chen 5 5-6 18, Vermeer 4 0-2 10, Tarr 2 0-0 4, Af-
fifi 7 2-4 16. Totals 21 7-12 55. 3-pointers — Meg.
Holland, Koenig (SHP); Nichols, Chen 3, Vermeer 2
(C). Records — Sacred Heart Prep 2-2 WBAL
Foothill, 14-4 overall.
GIRLS’ SOCCER
MenloSchool 3, Castilleja0
Halftime score — 1-0 Menlo. Goal scorer (assist)
— MS, Karle (LaPorte); MS, Wickers (LaPorte); MS,
Stritter (McFarland).Records — Menlo School 4-0
WBAL Foothill, 6-2-4 overall; Castilleja 0-2-2.
SacredHeart Prep1, King’sAcademy1
Halftime score — 1-0 King’s Academy.Goal scorer
(assist) — KA, not reported; SHP, Jager (Callinan).
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
Te’o tells ESPN: Not
involved in creating hoax
NEW YORK — ESPN says Notre Dame line-
backer Manti Te’o maintains he was never
involved in creating the dead girlfriend hoax.
He said in an off-camera interview Friday night:
“I wasn’t faking it. I wasn’t part of this. When they
hear the facts they’ll know. They’ll know there is
no way I could be a part of this.”
The comments were Te’o’s first public remarks
since Deadspin.com reported that his girlfriend not
only didn’t die but, in fact, never existed.
Notre Dame and Te’o insist he was the victim of
a cruel joke. Still unanswered are questions why
the All-American never made it clear he knew the
woman only online and by telephone.
Earlier Friday, athletic director Jack Swarbrick
urged Te’o and his family to speak publicly about
the hoax.
Te’o was interviewed at the IMG Training
Academy in Bradenton, Fla., where he is prepar-
ing for the NFL draft. ESPN said a public relations
consultant was with him.
The Heisman Trophy finalist and his family had
planned to go public with the story Monday, but
Deadspin.com broke the news first on Wednesday.
Te’o led the Fighting Irish to a 12-0 regular sea-
son and the BCS title game, where they were rout-
ed 42-14 by Alabama and Te’o played poorly.
Sports brief
Alpine Meadows —Fri 6:02 am packed powder
machinegroomed66-95base90of 100trails 100%
open, 11 of 13 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 9a-4p;
Badger Pass—Thu 1:19 pm packed powder ma-
chine groomed 40-46 base 10 of 10 trails 100%
open,80acres,4of 5lifts,Mon-Fri:9a-4p;Sat/Sun:9a-
4p;
Bear Valley —Fri 6:30 am packed powder 69-69
base75of 82trails100%open,1680acres,7of 9lifts,
Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun: 9a-4p;
Boreal —Fri 9:37 am packed powder machine
groomed 94-137 base 36 of 41 trails, 100% open 8
of 8 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-9p; Sat/Sun: 9a-9p;
DodgeRidge —Fri 5:39 am packed powder ma-
chine groomed 33-44 base 67 of 67 trails 100%
open,852 acres,9 of 12 lifts,Mon-Fri:9a-4p;Sat/Sun:
9a-4p;
Donner Ski Ranch—Fri 7:42 am packed powder
machine groomed 34-84 base 52 of 53 trails 100%
open, 500 acres, 7 of 7 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun:
9a-4p;
Heavenly—Fri 6:09 am packed powder machine
groomed 42-72 base 94 of 97 trails,99% open 4760
acres,26of 29lifts,Mon-Fri:9a-4p;Sat/Sun:8:30a-4p;
Homewood —Fri 6:19 am packed powder ma-
chine groomed 54-79 base 62 of 62 trails 100%
open, 1260 acres, 8 of 8 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 9a-4p;
Sat/Sun: 9a-4p;
Kirkwood—Fri 6:13 am packed powder machine
groomed 86-106 base 72 of 72 trails 100% open,
2300 acres,15 of 15 lifts,Mon-Fri:9a-4p;Sat/Sun:9a-
4p;
Northstar—Fri 5:56 am packed powder machine
groomed 39-86 base 93 of 97 trails 96% open,3043
acres, 20 of 20 lifts, sm Mon-Fri: 8:30a-4p; Sat/Sun:
8:30a-4p;
SierraatTahoe—Fri 5:45 am packed powder ma-
chinegroomed39-96base44of 46trails96%open,
2000 acres, 9 of 14 lifts, Mon-Fri: 9a-4p; Sat/Sun:
8:30a-4p;
SodaSprings —Fri 9:34 am packed powder ma-
chine groomed 94-137 base 16 of 42 trails 100%
open,4 of 4 lifts,Mon,Thu/Fri:10a-4p; Sat/Sun:10a-
4p Open Thu-Mon;
SquawValley—Fri 6:02 am packed powder ma-
chine groomed 51-119 base 165 of 170 trails 90%
open, 25 of 30 lifts, Mon-Thu: 9a-4p; Fri: 9a-8p; Sat:
9a-8p Sun: 9a-4p;
SKI REPORT
NBA
MIAMI HEAT—Reassigned C Dexter Pittman to
Sioux Falls (NBADL).
PHOENIX SUNS — Announced the team has
agreedtomutuallypart wayswithcoachAlvinGen-
try.
NFL
ARIZONA CARDINALS —Named Bruce Arians
coach.
ATLANTAFALCONS —Promoted Steve Sabo to
director of college scouting and Shepley Heard to
regional scout.
CAROLINAPANTHERS—PromotedMikeShulato
offensive coordinator, Richard Rodgers to special
teams coordinator and Ricky Proehl to wide re-
ceivers coach.
CHICAGOBEARS—Named Mel Tucker defensive
coordinator, Matt Cavanaugh quarterbacks coach
and Skip Peete running backs coach.
CLEVELANDBROWNS —Named Michael Lom-
bardi vice president of player personnel and Ray
Horton defensive coordinator.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
2
0
1
3
2
0
1
3
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Senior Resources and Services
from all of San Mateo County
—over 40 exhibitors!
Fer mere ìn|ermcIìen cc|| ó50·344·5200 º www.smdcì|yjeurnc|.cemJsenìershewccse
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Free Services include
Refreshments
Door Prizes and Giveaways
Blood Pressure/Cholesterol Check
Health Screening Stations
FREE Document Shredding
by Miracle Shred
and MORE
Senior Showcase
Health &
Wellness Fair
Saturday, January 26, 2013
9:00am to 1:00pm
Millbrae Recreation Center
477 Lincoln Circle, Millbrae
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Goody Bags for first
250 attendees
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
greatness,” Falcons safety Thomas DeCoud
said. “We’re trying to break the ceiling on it.”
While the Falcons (14-3) are the NFC’s top
seed and playing at home, they opened as a
three-point underdog against the 49ers (12-4-1),
who looked unstoppable in last week’s rout of
the Green Bay Packers in the divisional round.
The most dynamic player on that field was a
quarterback who began the season as a backup.
Colin Kaepernick took over the starting job
when Alex Smith was injured, and coach Jim
Harbaugh made the bold decision to keep it that
way even when Smith healed. Never mind that
the former starter had led San Francisco to the
NFC title game a year ago and was one of the
top-rated passers in the league this season.
Harbaugh looked like a genius when
Kaepernick ran all over the Packers in a 45-31
victory, turning in one of the great performances
in playoff history.
It wasn’t so much that he passed for 263 yards
and two touchdowns. What really stood out was
what he did when he kept the ball himself.
Kaepernick scored two touchdowns — includ-
ing a 56-yarder in which he looked more like
Michael Johnson than a football player — and
finished with 181 yards rushing, a postseason
record for a quarterback.
He also showed plenty of flare, celebrating his
scores by flexing his right arm and kissing his
biceps — a move that quickly became a social
media sensation known as Kaepernicking.
“He’s super fast, athletic and he can throw the
ball,” 49ers running back LaMichael James said.
“But once he takes off, he’s faster than a lot of
running backs and linebackers. He’s an incredi-
ble athlete.”
While certainly aware of their team’s proud
background, most of these San Francisco play-
ers were molded by adversity. The 49ers went
eight straight seasons without a winning record
or trip to the playoffs under Harbaugh arrived in
2011 from nearby Stanford and immediately
turned things around.
The team went 13-3, won the NFC West and
advanced to the conference championship,
where a fumbled punt return in overtime led to a
wrenching 20-17 loss to the New York Giants.
San Francisco doesn’t want another chance to
get away.
“This opportunity is rare,” linebacker Patrick
Willis said. “It doesn’t come that often even if
we were here last year. The (eight) years before
that we were at home and didn’t make the play-
offs. Just to have that opportunity again to be
here is one of those things we don’t take for
granted. We know that window for chances like
that are slim and we have to take advantage of
the opportunity.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
are,” said San Mateo head coach Carlos
Bover. “They know their game plan and they
know how to execute it really well. We were
able to hold them a little bit but we gave them
two goals in the first 10 minutes and that
brought our game plan down. They are good.”
Woodside brought the pressure early and
following a San Mateo restart deep in
Wildcats’ territory, it took them two touches,
the latter a perfect through ball by Lauren
Holland, to spring Erika Negrete on a 1v1 she
executed to perfection to give the visitors a 1-
0 lead in the 10th minute.
Not too long after the junior scored,
Negrete gave back a little something by find-
ing Jillienne Aguilera on a cross inside the
penalty box. The freshman control the ball
and found herself all alone in front of the San
Mateo goalkeeper — and by all alone, no one
within 15 yards of her — before calmly fin-
ishing for the 2-0 lead.
Both coaches felt a shift in the game after
that score.
“Lack of discipline,” Navarrete said. “We
went away from our game. We thought we got
two quick goals and we were trying to get a
goal off of every single possession and that’s
not going to happen against anyone in this
league.”
“I thought actually towards the end of the
first half, I thought the game was pretty much
under our control,” Bover said, “they scored
two goals ... but they didn’t get many oppor-
tunities afterwards. So, I thought we were
able to actually play. But they were strong and
we haven’t played a team that is this strong.
They were able to out-run everywhere.”
San Mateo’s Brenda Flores almost made
things very interesting when she hit the far
post on a blazing shot that would’ve cut the
lead in half in the 26th minute. The opportu-
nity was one of the few that made Navarrete a
bit uneasy.
“Their forwards were doing a good job of
putting pressure on us,” he said. “And we just
kind of sat there and reacted to what they were
doing instead of playing with a little more
anticipation. The second half was much dif-
ferent. We set out to win every ball possible
and go from there.”
It was a focus on defense that saw more
than just the majority of chances go
Woodside’s way in the second half.
Freshman Sesayde Young capitalized on
her’s in the 57th minute while Aguilera was
gifted another in the 62nd and deposited that
into the San Mateo twine for the 4-0 result.
Low on offensive highlights, the Bearcats
did have their standout performances, accord-
ing to Bover.
“Kelly Ghiorso and Katie Wischer play so
hard every game,” he said. “And in games like
this, it really shows — when we play a more
defensive game, it really shows how hard they
work. They are a reference for us. We’ll
always look up to them.”
Continued from page 11
CATS
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Woodside’s Erika Negrete,left,goes around SanMateo Kitty Qu to score the Wildcats’first goal
in a 4-0 Woodside win to remain unbeaten in PAL Bay Division play.
By Rachel Feder
S
ince last summer, we high school sen-
iors have spent roughly six months
thinking almost exclusively about col-
lege. We have spent even
more time taking stan-
dardized tests, making
sure our grades are as
good as they can possibly
be and handing over
excessive amounts of
money to the College
Board.
We have researched,
visited, interviewed and
written. We have spent months counting
characters and words, making sure we say as
much as we possibly can in what little space
is provided. We have made ourselves think
that 1,000 words can accurately describe who
we are in a personal statement, and we have
figured out how to let a school know how
perfect they are for us, all in the under-200-
word space they provide for us. The past few
months have taught us how to be chameleons
as we shaped ourselves into the perfect appli-
cant for every individual school, spending the
better part of the fall in the process.
Now, we are done. The final deadline for
most applications was last Tuesday. We sen-
iors can finally stop obsessing over college
and start enjoying ourselves. We’re second
semester seniors; the next four months were
designed with slacking, I’m-so-ready-to-get-
out-of-here seniors in mind. But it’s not that
easy.
After devoting so much time to putting
ourselves out there, just letting go and
accepting the fact that we will be starting a
new life next fall is not so simple. Although
college is the logical next step for most sen-
iors, it can be hard to get all the uncertainty
surrounding the next four years out of your
head long enough to let the senioritis sink in.
We know we will be going somewhere, the
question is just where. Up until now, the path
Uncertainty
Gotta see ‘um
Souvenirs:
Tokens of Travel
SEE PAGE 18
Help with eBooks
A relaxed drop-in eBook session answers
any questions you have about
downloading library materials onto your
mobile device.The session is 10:30 a.m.
Saturday at the Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas in Belmont. Free.
Hillsdale Shopping
Center Education Expo
Representatives from local public and
private preschools, elementary and high
schools answer questions and provide
detailed information on school curriculum,
admission dates and requirements.The
expo is 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st Ave. in
San Mateo. Free.
Tips on ‘nailing’ an audition
Bay Area Educational Theater Company
Audition Workshop offers tips to young
actors on how to nail an audition for an
upcoming production of “Peter Pan.”
Guidance from expert artistic staff on
scene readings and character
development.The workshop takes place
Saturday 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Sunnybrae
Elementary School, 1031 S. Delaware St. in
San Mateo. www.bayareaetc.org. Free.
Best bets
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Mental illness hardly seems like a topic for
musical theater, but it is in “Next to Normal,”
and it’s quite affecting in the San Jose
Repertory Theatre production.
Although mental illness may afflict only
one member of a family, it affects the entire
family. That’s the situation with Diana
(Kendra Kassebaum), who has been strug-
gling with bipolar disorder for some 16 years.
Her loving, loyal husband, Dan (Joe
Cassidy), has tried to help in every way he
can, taking her to doctor after doctor in hopes
of finding someone who can at least stabilize
her.
Her teenage daughter, Natalie (Andrea
Ross), seeks more than just cursory attention
from her parents by being a perfectionist at
school and in her classical piano-playing.
Consequently, she’s stressed out.
The family’s fourth member is son Gabe
(Jonathan Shew), a constant presence in
Diana’s life and a probable catalyst for her ill-
ness.
In the show’s stinging rebuke at some in the
psychiatric profession, Dr. Fine (Mark
Farrell), treats her with an array of drugs, all
with unpleasant side effects but no psycholog-
ical relief. She next sees Dr. Madden (Farrell
again), who tries more conservative approach-
Mom’s mental illness pervades ‘Next to Normal’
TIM FULLER
Jonathan Shew, Kendra Kassebaum and Joe Cassidy star in ‘Next to Normal.’
See PLAY, Page 19
See STUDENT, Page 19
Playful horror film
‘Mama’ more teasing terror than shocking
By Todd McCarthy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — A playful,
elegantly made little horror film,
“Mama” teasingly sustains a
game of hide-and-seek as it tan-
talizes the audience with fleeting
apparitions of the title character
while maintaining interest in two
deeply disturbed little orphan
girls. Being sold primarily on the
name of its godfather, Guillermo
del Toro, this Canadian-Spanish
co-production from Universal is
refreshingly mindful of the less-
is-more horror guidelines
employed by 1940s master Val
Lewton, not to mention Japanese
ghost stories, but the PG-13 rat-
ing might prove too restrictive
for the gory tastes of male core
genre fans. Still, less bloodthirsty
female teens could make up the
difference at the box office, as the
film provokes enough tension
and gasps to keep susceptible
viewers grabbing their armrests
or the arms of those next to them.
In essence, “Mama” represents
a throwback and a modest delight
for people who like a good scare
but prefer not to be terrorized or
grossed out. With fine special
effects and a good sense of creat-
ing a mood and pacing the jolts,
Andy Muschietti shows a reas-
suringly confident hand for a
first-time director, pulling
off some fine visual coups
through smart camera place-
ment and cutting, and not
taking the whole thing so
seriously that it becomes
overwrought.
Prologue shows a distraught
father, apparently devastated
after a financial setback, driv-
ing his tiny daughters up
snowy mountain roads to a
vacant small summer house in
the woods. Just as he is about
to shoot the older girl, the man
is prevented from doing so by
some kind of beast which is
vaguely glimpsed by the young-
ster but not clearly; in an astute
subjective visual coup, she only
sees its indistinct outline because
she has her glasses off.
Five years later, Victoria
(Megan Carpenter) and Lilly
(Isabelle Nelisse) are discov-
ered; miraculously, they have
somehow survived by them-
selves, although they look like
feral beasts, hopping around
on all fours and the little one,
especially, scarcely seeming
human. Taking them in,
despite highly dubious quali-
fications to care for such
demanding cases, are the
dead father’s handsome
artist brother Lucas
See MAMA, Page 19
18
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
SOUVENIRS: TOKENS OF TRAV-
EL. As long as people have visited dis-
tant places, they have collected tokens of
their travels—from shells, rocks or
leaves, to postcards and handcrafted or
mass-produced souvenirs. Souvenirs:
Tokens of Travel, at the San Francisco
Airport Museum, highlights a variety of
these mementos from the 19th century to
the present. Sailors’ valentines, transfer
ware, ruby-stained glass, heraldic china
and even ashtrays, are a few of the many
souvenirs on display, some of which
viewers may recall collecting during
their own excursions.
Travel souvenirs have existed as long
as people have traveled. Since at least
the 14th century, peddlers have sold sou-
venirs at popular sites. Travelers on reli-
gious pilgrimages purchased trinkets
and collected found items to keep a
record of the journeys they made to holy
places. In the late 1600s to the 1800s, for
vacationers wealthy enough to travel for
extended periods of time, the Grand
Tour was the ultimate European excur-
sion. The itinerary, which typically last-
ed one year or more, included lengthy
stops in England, France and Italy, and
travelers returned with paintings, prints
and miniature monuments to proudly
display in their homes.
For those who could not afford the
extravagant trip, international fairs and
expositions brought the world to them.
Since the first World’s Fair, held in
London in 1851, hundreds of millions of
people have flocked from all over the
world to attend these exciting urban
events, which introduce new technolo-
gies and arts. Spectators enjoy acquiring
a variety of keepsakes to remember fairs,
such as glassware and souvenir spoons.
With the advent of steamships and
railroads, travel became more afford-
able. During the late 1800s, a burgeon-
ing middle class began to take vacations.
In the United States, the establishment
of national parks and renewed interest in
American history following the nation’s
Centennial in 1876 further encouraged
domestic travel. Tourists traveled to
cities, lakes, seaside resorts, mountains
From left, Temple of Vesta, c. 1860; Painting of Mount Vesuvius and Bay of Naples
at night, late 1800s; and Temple of Castor and Pollux, c. 1860, on view in Souvenirs:
Tokens of Travel, at the San Francisco International Airport, International Terminal,
through July 14.
See MUSEUM, Page 19
Cathy Rincon
Do you have everything in order?
Attorney Cathy Rincon discusses
the basics of estate planning. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.
23. San Mateo County Law
Library. 710 Hamilton St., Redwood
City. For more information and to reg-
ister call 363-4913.
Kathleen Putnam and Lisa Putnam
Certified Arborist Kathleen Putnam and Master Composter
Lisa Putnam explain how to use fruit tree pruning to maximize
tree health and fruit production. The class covers pruning tech-
niques, as well as timing. Sunday, Feb. 3 from 1 p.m. to 2:30
p.m. Kohl Pumphouse at Ninth and Palm avenue in San Mateo
Central Park. www.SanMateoArboretum.org or 579-0536.
Jon Nakamatsu
Free public master class with Jon Nakamatsu. In 1997, Jon
Nakamatsu won the Gold Medal at the Van Cliburn
International Piano Competition, the first American to win the
prize since 1981. On Saturday, Feb. 9, at the San Mateo Public
Library, Nakamatsu gives a free public Master Class, featur-
ing the Elara Piano Quartet, a Young Chamber Musicians
ensemble, and then has a musical conversation with Kohl
Mansion Musicologist Kai Christensen. The Master Class
begins at 1:30 p.m; the conversation begins at 3 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
has been pretty linear. Elementary school has
prepared us for middle school, middle school
has prepared us for high school and high
school has prepared us for college. There’s
not much deviation from the path. Though I
chose to study abroad in Israel during high
school, I continued with all my core classes
there, so I could return home and pick up on
the path the next year with all the rest of my
peers.
But this path is ending. It stops on May 31,
when I will graduate from the known path
and do the best I can to create a new path for
myself. We’ve been naturally oriented to
keep moving forward, always thinking about
what our next steps in life will be. Now, even
harder than applying to an absurdly high
number of colleges, is the adjustment to a
state of uncertainty. To accept the fact that
there are still too many unknowns to develop
a clear mental picture is not very easily done.
Yet despite all this uncertainty, I, for one,
find this phase extremely liberating. After
struggling for months with the questions of
where I want to be for the next four years of
my life, I can finally relax, put my fate into
an admissions committee’s hands and count
down the days until I start to hear back.
With all this free time, I’m finding myself
finally able to think. It’s strange to let my
mind wander to distant daydreams of what
I’ll be doing next year and to realize that I
haven’t a clue what that will be, or even
where I’ll be doing it. But that’s a blessing in
disguise. We’re at an exciting place in our
lives, we might as well enjoy it.
Rachel Feder is a senior at Burlingame High
School. Student News appears in the weekend edi-
tion. You can email Student News at news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
es like talk therapy and hypnotism before
resorting to a more drastic series of electro-
convulsive therapy sessions.
In the meantime, Natalie acquires a
boyfriend, Henry (A.J. Holmes), a genial ston-
er whose efforts to help her relax backfire as
she raids her mother’s medicine cabinet.
Ironically, Henry becomes a stable presence in
her life. Their relationship is a kind of parallel
to that between her parents.
In their case, however, Dan’s unwavering
love and support might keep Diana from
becoming more independent.
The conclusion is surprising and somewhat
encouraging even though a happy ending is far
from certain.
The book by Brian Yorkey, who also wrote
the lyrics, is so strong that it could almost
stand on its own. No doubt it played a major
role in the show’s winning the 2010 Pulitzer
Prize for Drama, along with three Tonys. Tom
Kitt’s rock-flavored score is pleasant, serving
mainly to allow the characters to express their
emotions.
The two-level set by John Ezell depicts the
family’s home, but a few quick changes of fur-
niture transform it into places like the doctors’
offices. The six-person band sits upstage
behind a scrim.
Director David Ira Goldstein, who also did
the musical staging, keeps the action flowing
smoothly and logically in this two-act work.
He also has an excellent cast of singer-actors.
The only caveat is that Kassebaum’s diction
makes Diana’s lyrics hard to understand at
times. Otherwise, she skillfully projects
Diana’s vulnerability, anxiety and unpre-
dictability. The others also make their charac-
ters believable and sympathetic. “Next to
Normal” tackles a tough but important subject
in an intelligent, adult manner, making for
compelling theater.
It continues at San Jose Repertory Theatre
through Feb. 3. For tickets and information,
call (408) 367-7255 or visit www.sjrep.com.
Continued from page 17
PLAY
(Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) and his punky grrrl
band girlfriend Annabel (Jessica Chastain,
sporting tats and a haircut that’s somewhere
between Joan Jett and Liza Minnelli).
Living in a loft in clearly tenuous financial
circumstances, the couple are of an age where
they might be well advised to consider life
pursuits that involve a measure of income.
Instead, they’re set up in a surpassingly luxu-
rious suburban home by a prominent doctor,
Gerald Dreyfuss (Daniel Kash), for the exclu-
sive right to study the girls and, presumably,
help them fill in what they’ve developmental-
ly missed through their human deprivation.
In expanding the story from a 2008 sort
film, Muschietti, along with co-writers Neil
Cross and Barbara Muschietti, has concentrat-
ed on the personal arc of Annabel, a self-
absorbed scenester who gradually discovers
something resembling a maternal instinct as
the girls’ emotional traumas are thrust upon
her. Victoria, a bright child who had learned
how to speak well before her father’s freak-
out, isn’t such a problem, but Lilly remains
more animal, or even insect, than human,
scurrying around like a spider in her own little
universe.
And, clearly, they are not alone. Weird
apparitions materialize: Large moths and web-
like patterns on the walls and, in a brilliantly
architectural fixed shot from a hallway, the
sight of little Lilly tugging playfully with an
mostly unseen presence through a door frame.
This may be a pristine, immaculate looking
house, but it’s also haunted.
With a couple of obviously expendable sup-
porting characters hanging around just so they
can be dispatched by frisky culprit lurking in
the walls, Muschietti does a pretty good job of
sustaining one’s interest until finally needing
to let the cat (or whatever it is) out of the bag.
What this very hairy thing turns out to be is
scarcely any surprise at all, but it’s still good
for a few more startling moments before being
revealed in its full and eerie glory.
The director cheapens his work’s feel by
overly relying upon loud and abrupt musical
cues to unsettle the viewer, but the enterprise
otherwise sports a classy profile thanks to
Antonio Riestra’s refined cinematography,
Michele Conroy’s expert editing and general-
ly top production values.
Playing a more downscale character than
usual, Chastain doesn’t seem entirely at one
with the more derelict sides of Annabel but
compensates by her gradual revelations of the
woman’s evolving sense of responsibility.
“Mama,” a Universal release, is rated PG-13
for violence and terror, some disturbing
images and thematic elements. 100 minutes.
Continued from page 17
MAMA
and deserts, where they acquired a host of
trinkets from indigenous crafts to ashtrays
and matchbooks acquired from hotels. In
later decades, the automobile encouraged
road trips, and the airplane allowed greater
access to remote areas.
From the late 1800s to the 1930s, transfer-
printed souvenir ceramics, which displayed
an infinite number of destinations, historic
sites and commemorative events, enjoyed a
golden age. Small paintings, souvenir pic-
ture books and stereographs also served to
remind travelers of their excursions. The pic-
ture postcard became popular in the 1890s.
This universal souvenir could be kept as a
visual record of one’s trip or mailed home to
friends and relatives. After World War II,
taking photographs while on vacation
became commonplace, and, like postcards,
photos have long served as the quintessential
souvenir. Additionally, during the postwar
period, snow globes, floaty pens and other
mass-produced items became ubiquitous at
souvenir stands. No matter what type of sou-
venir, these objects allow travelers to remi-
nisce about experiences long after the trips
end.
Souvenirs: Tokens of Travel is located pre-
security in the International Terminal Main
Hall Departures Lobby, San Francisco
International Airport. There is no charge to
view the exhibit. For more information, visit
www.flysfo.com/web/page/sfo_museum/exh
ibitions. Souvenirs: Tokens of Travel is on
view through July 14.
***
CITY BENEATH THE CITY@STAN-
FORD ARCHAEOLOGY CENTER. City
Beneath the City at the Stanford
Archaeology Center, Stanford University,
presents artistic displays of artifacts from
San Jose’s first Chinese community, the
Market Street Chinatown, which was
destroyed in an arson fire on May 4, 1887.
City Beneath the City, which explores the
historical tensions that underlie today’s
Silicon Valley, was originally organized by
the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art
in conjunction with the ZER01 art and tech-
nology biennial thematic, Seeking Silicon
Valley. This new installation at the Stanford
Archaeology Center brings the artwork out
of the gallery and into the public learning
and research spaces of the university.
Through April 30.
***
CLAY IN THE BAY. The de Saisset
Museum at Santa Clara University opens its
winter season with Clay in the Bay, an exhi-
bition that speaks to the legacy of ceramics
in Northern California by bringing together
12 contemporary artists from around the Bay
Area who work with clay in diverse ways.
The museum celebrates the opening of Clay
in the Bay with a reception on Thursday, Jan.
24 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Many of the
artists in the exhibition will be present and
available to discuss their work. The de
Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University is
located at 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara.
Clay in the Bay is on view through March
17.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susanci-
tyscene.
Continued from page 18
MUSEUM
WEEKEND JOURANL 20
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, JAN. 19
Filoli’s NewVolunteer Recruitment.
9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Filoli’s Visitor
and Education Center, 86 Cañada
Road, Woodside. Attendees will have
the opportunity to learn about the
many ways to volunteer at Filoli in
areas such as House and Garden Self-
Guided Docents, Member Services,
Visitor Services, Public Relations and
more. There will be coffee and tea.
Reservations are required by 4 p.m.
on Jan. 11. Free. For more information
and to register contact
volunteer@filoli.org.
Ragazzi BoysChorusHosts Singfest.
9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 20 N. San Mateo
Drive, Suite 9, San Mateo. Free. Boys
between ages 7 and 10 are invited to
participate in a day of singing games
and activities. At 12:45 p.m. parents are
invited to enjoy a short performance
by the boys. For more information and
to register go to www.ragazzi.org.
EBook Drop-In Session. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Drop in to this relaxed
session with your mobile device and
any questions you have about
downloading library materials. Free.
For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Rose Pruning Demonstration. 10:30
a.m. San Mateo Garden Center, 605
Parkside Way, San Mateo. Learn how
to prune for bigger, healthier roses.
Free. For more information call 342-
4956.
Hillsdale Shopping Center
Education Expo. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. Representatives from
several local public and private
preschools, elementary and high
schools who will be available to
answer questions and provide
detailed information on school
curriculum, admission dates,
requirements and more to parents.
Free. For more information contact
shelbi@spinpr.com.
Folger StableCommunityDayOpen
House. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Folger Stable,
Wunderlich County Park, 4040
Woodside Road,Woodside. Free stable
tours and refreshments, $5 pony rides
and $20 trail rides. For more
information call 529-1028.
Very First Concert: The Art of
Listening. 11:10 a.m. to 12:10 p.m.
Congregational Church of San Mateo’s
Youth Room, 105 N. Ellsworth Ave. San
Mateo. These 20-minute ‘mini
concerts,’ designed to prime the ears
of the youngest listeners, feature a
simple musical concept, short
selections of classical repertoire,
tumbling mats as an alternative to
chairs, hands-on musical activities, and
lively back-and-forth dialogue
between the performers and the
audience. Free. For more information
contact
nancy_tubbs@fullcalendar.com.
2009LonehawkReleaseandWinery
Open Day. Noon to 4 p.m. La Honda
Winery, 2645 Fair Oaks Ave., Redwood
City. $10 for five local wines with
snacks. Free for Wine Club Members.
For more information call 366-4104 or
go to lahondawinery.com.
Laurie Johnson Oil Portrait
Demonstration. 1 p.m. Society of
Western Artists Headquarters Gallery,
2625 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 737-6084.
Bay Area Educational Theater
CompanyAuditionWorkshop.1 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m. Sunnybrae Elementary
School, 1031 S. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Free. Tips will be offered to
young actors on how to nail the
audition for the production of ‘Peter
Pan.’ There will be scene readings,
character development guidance
from expert artistic staff and exclusive
worksheets.The auditions will be held
on Jan. 26 and 27, with callbacks on
Jan. 28. For more information go to
www.bayareaetc.org.
‘Somewhere.’ 2 p.m. Mountain View
Center for the Performing Arts, 500
Castro St., Mountain View. Come enjoy
a compelling tale of a 1960s Puerto
Rican family dreaming and dancing
its way toward show business.Tickets
start at $23 (students) and go to $73.
Performance runs until Feb. 10. For
more information call 463-1960.
Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration.
3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Unitarian Universalists
of San Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave.,
San Mateo. A celebration reception to
honor the legacy of Martin Luther
King Jr. and build on the dream. Free.
For more information call 342-5964.
Eric Van James Duo. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. Broadway Grill, 1400 Broadway,
Burlingame. Come enjoy jazz, blue
and adult contemporary music. For
more information call 343-9333.
SUNDAY, JAN. 20
Third Sunday Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free. Friends of the San
Carlos Library invite you to search
their collection of gently used books,
CDs and DVDs. An extensive variety
of items to choose from and a
monthly special will be offered. For
more information go to
www.friendsofscl.org.
TrioSolisti. 7 p.m. Kohl Mansion, 2750
Adeline Drive, Burlingame.The trio will
perform Beethoven’s 14 Variations,
Op. 44, Chausson’s Trio in G minor, Op.
3, and Mussirgsjy’s ‘Pictures at an
Exhibition.’ Meet the musicians at a
complimentary buffet reception after
the concert. Tickets $45 ($42 for
seniors, $15 for under 30) and can be
purchased beforehand or at the door
as of 5:45 p.m. For more information
call 762-1130.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
and just raw power, it emerged as the best
big-wave surf spot in the world,” Clark
said.
This is the first year Mavericks will be a
destination on the Big Wave World Tour
which comprises surf breaks from the
leading international waves in Chile, Peru,
Mexico and Oregon. Many contests end up
canceled, as reliable surf isn’t produced
during time-sensitive waiting periods.
Although Peru provided for a contest Aug.
14, the winner of Mavericks could become
the winner of the Big Wave Tour, Clark
said.
The Invitational is made up of four 45-
minute heats in which six surfers per heat
will navigate through the perilous breaks
and contend for the most profitable waves.
The surfers who prosper in their heats will
make it to the semifinals and potentially
the finals. The lineup was chosen by ran-
dom draw after the opening ceremony last
November. Should any of the pre-chosen
competitors become unable to surf or fail
to show, 17 alternates could have the
chance to participate in their absence.
Invitees from as far away as Brazil are
hustling toward Half Moon Bay to com-
pete. From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. the contestants
will battle in the water to win a title and a
piece of the $50,000 prize purse. The top
six will earn a hefty chunk of change, how-
ever, these figures are minimal compared
to the life threatening risks the competitors
face.
During the 2010 Invitational, spectators
along the beach were bombarded with a
wave that ran ashore causing several
injuries. Coordinators aren’t taking any
chances this year so the beach and bluffs
will be closed. Instead, the Mavericks fes-
tival will be held at the Oceano Hotel and
Spa where an expected 10,000 fans can
gather in anticipation and awe.
Festival admission costs $10 presale and
$20 at the door, assuming the event isn’t
sold out. Parking is available for $15 at the
Half Moon Bay Airport. Jumbo screens
will display the “greatest show on earth” in
real time so “you will know what’s going
on at any given moment,” Clark said. For
those who don’t feel like braving the
crowd, the event will be accessible online
at mavericksinvitational.com.
The Invitational remained absent last
season, as the unreliable surf conditions
wouldn’t have allowed for a fair competi-
tion.
“It wouldn’t have really been fair to hold
a contest because one heat might have
waves and then the next one there was
nothing,” Clark said.
Unlike many other sporting events, surf
competitions depend on earthly condi-
tions.
“Mother ocean just didn’t cooperate
with us; we’re held to her schedule, not
ours,” Clark said.
But hope has sprung in the wake of this
year’s billowing storm.
“Every year is different. We’re going to
take whatever we can get when the ocean
throws us a bone,” Clark said.
The nature of the ocean and size of the
waves can be intermittent. Sets of several
waves are broken up by 20 minutes, also
known as lulls, when the ocean is seem-
ingly dormant. Before a set hits “they’ll be
nothing and people will get lulled to sleep;
and all of a sudden, 30- to 40-foot walls of
water will be coming,” Clark said.
This Sunday, an expected interval of 20-
23 seconds displaces the waves within
each set; the longer the interval, the more
powerful the wave, Clark said. The danger
of the waves occur when a surfer is held
underwater unable to resurface during a
set. One can be trapped stories below the
water’s surface for several minutes.
“The hold downs are just something you
really don’t want to think about,” Clark
said.
Fellow professionals have become vic-
tim to Mavericks’ danger in recent years.
In 2011, Jacob Trette essentially drowned
after being held under for eight minutes.
Trette was found by kayaker in the bay
who flagged down a person on a personal
water craft (PWC). They were able to
bring him ashore where he was thankfully
resuscitated, Clark said. That same year,
35-year old pro Hawaiian surfer Sion
Milosky tragically died at the hands of the
fatal break.
“We’ve lost a lot of close guys out here.
I hope for a safe event,” said Santa Cruz’s
Peter Mel, champion of last year’s Big
Wave World Tour and a regular at
Mavericks.
The acute dangers the competitors will
face leave no room for error. Clark relates
the importance of the competition’s
resources being spent on those in the
water. The appearance of a crowd on the
beach only adds to the hazards of the event
and is an additional factor that should be
avoided, Clark said.
“If you want to go to the beach, go to the
beach on another day. If you want to come
watch the event and let the best big wave
surfers in the world come and compete,
then help us. As contest director, safety
first. We’re trying to keep everybody safe
and alive out in the ocean,” Clark said.
Clark won’t compete in the Invitational
but he will be in the water to watch and
assist. The San Mateo Sheriff’s Office,
U.S. Coast Guard, Department of Parks
and Recreation, National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, Fish and
Game, the U.S. Air Force, the California
Highway Patrol and the Harbor District
have collaborated in the coordination of
the Invitational, Clark said.
The 24 invited competitors are nothing
less than pros with experience at charging
the world’s biggest waves. Needless to say,
even the best must be acutely aware and
cautious to survive. But these risks are part
of the lifestyle and many surfers dedicate
their existence to scoring the perfect wave.
Clark’s heightened experience with
Mavericks led him to design a new surf-
board with a variously curved bottom
meant for charging the ocean’s giants so
one can, he said, “really harness the power
of Mavericks and not just survive it.” Five
competitors will be showcasing Clark’s
new design.
Needless to say, there will be more than
the competitors navigating the enormous
dangers that encompass Mavericks this
Sunday. The competitors will be shuttled
out toward the breaks via boat. Most of the
safety patrol will be on boat or PWCs to
more readily aid fallen riders. As conven-
ient as being towed by a PWC may sound
in comparison to manually paddling out of
danger, unless it’s an emergency, it’s actu-
ally a disadvantage to the surfers. If a com-
petitor requires mechanical help to get out
of danger, they will be towed to an outly-
ing buoy where they will have to paddle
back to the lineup, Clark said.
The immense strength in both body and
mind, along with mother ocean’s support,
will determine who walks away from the
contest with the glory of winning.
“These will be waves with hero rides,”
Clark said.
The Mavericks Invitational contest and
festival will start 8 a.m. Sunday. The festi-
val is located at the Oceano Hotel and Spa
at 280 Capistrano Road in the Princeton
Pier in Half Moon Bay. Tickets are $10
presale and $20 at the door. Event parking
is $15 at the Half Moon Bay Airport.
Continued from page 1
SURF
in a prepared statement. “We are proud to join our neighboring
cities in implementing these important environmental ordi-
nances and working with our business community on the tran-
sition to using more environmentally-friendly materials in
their operations.”
But plastic bag manufacturers contend reusable bags are
actually worse for the environment and that banning them will
lead to job losses. Paper bags, made from trees, require four
times as much energy to produce, according to the industry.
San Mateo County adopted its ban last year and several
Peninsula cities, which had been holding out for a template
model, are now following suit.
The county ordinance, which also begins in April and which
the city ban echoes, allows patrons without reusable bags to
request a single-use paper version from retailers for the price
of first a dime and, after Jan. 1, 2015, a quarter. Retailers can
voluntarily choose to give free bags to food stamp and WIC
participants.
Bags without handles for medicine or to segregate food that
might contaminate are exempt as are nonprofits such as
Goodwill. Restaurants can still send food in to-go bags as pub-
lic health officials have not yet ruled out the possibility of
reusable bags leading to cross-contamination.
More than 20 billion disposable plastic bags are used in
California annually — more than 500 bags per person per year
in the county — and less than 8 percent are recycled, Dean
Peterson, the county’s director of environmental health, told
the Board of Supervisors in October when it considered the
ban and an environmental impact report of a prohibition.
Twenty-four cities in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties
participated in the EIR process but each city council that has-
n’t already done so must adopt its own ban. Other interested
cities are Belmont, Brisbane, Burlingame, Colma, Daly City,
East Palo Alto, Foster City, Half Moon Bay, Menlo Park,
Millbrae, Pacifica, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Bruno,
San Carlos, South San Francisco, Woodside, Milpitas,
Cupertino, Los Gatos, Campbell and Mountain View.
Continued from page 1
BAG BAN
Hroziencik did not return a call for com-
ment.
Meanwhile, the other men arrested
are also working their way through the
court system. Edgar Suing Guinto, 41,
pleaded no contest to commercial bur-
glary and identity theft. He will receive
no prison and up to a year in the county
jail when sentenced Jan. 31. Marlo
Tubig Lacsamana, 41, and Joel Pineda
Lugtu, 31, are also similarly charged.
Lacsamana and Lugtu are in custody
in lieu of $150,000. Guinto is held on
$100,000 bail.
The case’s publicity also helped con-
clude a different case — that of the mys-
tery telegram.
Shortly after Natan and the others
were charged, a Daly City police detec-
tive wading through the purloined mail
found a 1938 Western Union telegram
from Reno, Nev. that read, “Arrived
safely, no snow but real cold nice trip be
back Monday Merry Xmas to all.
Minnie & Fred.”
Senior detective Joe Bocci asked the
media and public for help and by the
next morning learned the 74-year-old
piece of mail had been sent to a San
Carlos resident — the daughter of
Minnie and Fred — from a cousin but it
had never arrived. The family has since
been reunited with that piece of mail.
Continued from page 1
NATAN
SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Your associates
might be inclined to hold back some good ideas
if they sense you aren’t likely to appreciate them.
Don’t be a know-it-all.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- A matter you’ve
been anxious to fnalize can be concluded, but not
necessarily to the satisfaction of everyone involved.
Some might feel there is still a leak in the bucket.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- In order for you
to negotiate an important matter, some kind of
compromise might have to be reached. If you take
action, it won’t happen.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Two strong factors
could affect your chances of success: One is a
strong motivation for victory, and the other is a
sense of adventure.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- At times, it seems
like nothing ever changes. Those who are usually
supportive of you will remain so, while those who
tend to oppose you will be antagonistic once again.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Your chances for
success look pretty good, provided that what needs to
be done is fnished quickly and with a nominal amount
of effort. If more is required, you might not hold up.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you handle business
matters well, chance will play a very small role in
how your affairs play out. Be methodical and avoid
taking foolish risks.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Provided you operate along
traditional lines, the probabilities of generating
favorable returns are pretty good. Should you be
inclined to test out something new, everything
becomes iffy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- In order to maintain
good relationships with others today, you must be
willing to give them the same freedom to operate
independently as you want for yourself.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Unexpected changes
will work out to your ultimate advantage, provided
you are fexible enough to accept them. Resist any
urge to adjust events and control things.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Because you’ll
automatically instill harmony and a spirit of
cooperation, you’ll be a welcome addition to any
group. Good things happen when everyone gets along.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You’ll have a
great opportunity to accomplish much more than
you originally anticipated, mostly because your
industriousness will be challenged, and will rise to
the occasion.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
1-19-13
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
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kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

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the top-left corner.
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1 Knock -- -- loop
5 Wielded an ax
10 Black belt sport
12 Goofball
13 Funds for research
14 Pine products
15 Sing loudly
16 Kiddie’s ammo
18 -- kwon do
19 Crushed grapes
23 BTU kin
26 Rough shelter
27 Horrid tasting
30 Cover stories
32 Quartet members
34 Mountains and trees
35 Muse of astronomy
36 Jiffes
37 Social insect
38 Travel stopover
39 Mustiest
42 Sparkle
45 Ziegfeld nickname
46 Woodwind
50 Mark of shame
53 Like junk mail, usually
55 Nanny from abroad (2
wds.)
56 BLT need
57 Connection (hyph.)
58 Webbing
DOwN
1 Cab tab
2 By mouth
3 Declaims violently
4 LL.D. holder
5 Half a bray
6 Ice, to Fritz
7 Court order
8 Ms. Ferber
9 Prescribed amount
10 Frequent 007 foe
11 Adopt
12 Enfold
17 Rescue squad mem.
20 Parched feeling
21 Turns inside out
22 Ms. Merrill
23 Paint container
24 Sorrowful cry
25 Diet
28 Burt’s ex
29 Poet’s Ireland
31 Tampa Bay gridders
32 Ignore (2 wds.)
33 -- Andreas Fault
37 More than most
40 Remote
41 Smooth singer Mel --
42 Exam for jrs.
43 Needle case
44 Plumbing unit
47 Arthur and Lillie
48 Solemn promise
49 Old name for Tokyo
51 Moo goo -- pan
52 Opposite of max
54 -- de plume
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
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Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City
Clerk, City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, California,
until 2 P.M., on Feb 14, 2013 and will, at 2:00 P.M. on that
date, be publicly opened and read at the City Hall, in Confer-
ence Room "B" for:
NEIGHBORHOOD STORM DRAIN PROJECT #5, CITY
PROJECT NO. 82470 within the City of Burlingame, San Ma-
teo County, California.
Contract documents covering the work may be obtained at of-
fice of the City Engineer during normal working hours at City
Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, California. A non-re-
fundable fee of $50 will be charged for the Contract Docu-
ments.
The work shall consist of construction and/or replacement of
approximately 200 linear feet of storm drain mains by open
trench construction, 1,540 linear feet of curb and gutter re-
placement, storm drain manhole replacement, installation/re-
placement of 515 linear feet of concrete swales, and the re-
placement of existing and construction of new curb inlets.
Special Provisions, Specifications and Plans, including mini-
mum wage rates to be paid in compliance with Section 1773.2
of the California Labor Code and related provisions, may be
inspected in the office of the City Engineer during normal
working hours at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlin-game,
California.
A prebid meeting will be held at 10:00 A.M., City Hall, Con-
ference Room "B" on January 29, 2013.
The contractor shall possess a Class A license prior to submit-
ting a bid. All work specified in this project shall be completed
within 120 working days from date of the Notice to Proceed.
__________________________________
ART MORIMOTO, P.E.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR
DATE OF POSTING: January 17, 2013
TIME OF COMPLETION: (120) WORKING DAY
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Mid Peninsula
CNAs needed
Hiring now!
Hourly & Live-ins
Drivers encouraged
Call Mon-Fri 9am – 3pm
Reliable Caregivers
415-436-0100
(650)286-0111
CLEANING -
HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED
Excellent pay. Company Car. Must
have valid CDL. Bilingual preferred.
Call Molly Maids, (650)837-9788.
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #320, San
Mateo.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
HOUSEKEEPING, RETIREMENT com-
munity. Full time, understand, write &
speak English. Experience required
$10/hr + benefits. Apply 201 Chadbourne
Ave., Millbrae.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING Cooks, Busboys & Serv-
ers. Experience preferred, good pay
(D.O.E.). Apply in person: Neal’s Coffee
Shop, 1845 El Camino Real, Burlingame
(650) 692-4281, Neal’s Coffee Shop
OFFICE HELP needed, part time, col-
lege student welcome. 3 days a week for
tax office. Bookkeeping and tax experi-
ence preferred. (650)624-9583
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253794
The following person is doing business
as: WJL Consulting, 321 Sunfish Ct,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Wendi Jo
Labbie, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Wendi Jo Labbie /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/05/12, 01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/26/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-240131
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
1) Garage Door Repair and Sales, 2)
Econo-Doormasters, 3) Doormasters, 4)
Econo Garage Door, 1457 El Camino
Real, BELMONT, CA 94002. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 07/27/2010. The
business was conducted by: C. Jeffery
Whittaker, 1631 Notre Dame Ave., Bel-
mont CA 94002, and C. Kendall Whittak-
er, 745 Chestnut St., #2, San Carlos, CA
94070.
/s/ C. Jeffery Whittaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/27/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/29/12,
01/5/13, 01/12/12, 01/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253809
The following person is doing business
as: BZP Property Group, 30 Colorados
Dr., MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Barry
Wong, same address, Zhong Wang, 606
Pavo Ln., Foster City, CA 94404, Piu
Wong, 15 Heather Pl., MILLBRAE, CA
94030. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Barry Wong /
/s/ Piu Wong /
/s/ Zhong Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/23/13, 02/02/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 518256
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Andy Davis
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ronald Veronda, and Patricia
Ivester filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Andy Davis, aka Andy
Hongyi Davis, aka Andy H. Davis
Proposed name: Andrew Hongyi Dai
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 13,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/17/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/17/2012
(Published, 01/19/13, 01/26/13,
02/02/13, 02/09/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253730
The following person is doing business
as: 1) JW Doormasters of the Peninsula
INC, 2) Econo-Doormasters, 3) Door-
masters, 4) Econo Garage Door, 5) Ga-
rage Door Repair and Sales, 1457 El Ca-
mino Real BELMONT, CA 94002 is here-
by registered by the following owner: JW
Doormasters of the Peninsula, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ C. Jeffery Whittaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/29/12, 01/05/13, 01/12/13, 01/19/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 518464
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ashley Rose Meehan
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Eduardo Garcia Vera filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Ashley Rose Meehan,
aka Ashley R. Meehan
Proposed name: Ashley Rose Nelson
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on February 20,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 01/03/2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 01/03/2013
(Published, 01/05/13, 01/12/13,
01/19/13, 01/26/13)
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-236519
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
Idea Media International, 150 Irene Ct.,
Apt. 4, BELMONT, CA 94002. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 12/17/2009. The
business was conducted by: Liying
Duan, same address.
/s/ Liying Duan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/24/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/29/12,
01/5/13, 01/12/12, 01/19/12).
23 Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received at the office of the City
Clerk, City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlingame, California,
until 2:00 P.M., on 14 February, 2013 and will, at 2:00 P.M. on
that date, be publicly opened and read at the City Hall, in Con-
ference Room "B" for:
BURLINGAME HILLSIDE RESERVOIR INLET RELOCA-
TION PROJECT CITY, PROJECT NO. 82050, within the City
of Burlingame, San Mateo County, California.
Contract documents covering the work may be obtained AT
THE OFFICE of ARC, 1100 Industrial Rd, Unit 13, San Carlos,
CA 94070 (650-517-1895). ARC charges a non-refundable fee
of approximately $115 for Contract Documents.
The work shall consist of approximately 260 l.f. of 16” and 80
l.f. of 8” Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) water main and associated
work on Hillside Drive and near the Hillside Reservoir.
Special Provisions, Specifications and Plans, including mini-
mum wage rates to be paid in compliance with Section 1773.2
of the California Labor Code and related provisions, may be
inspected in the office of the City Engineer during normal
working hours at City Hall, 501 Primrose Road, Burlin-game,
California.
A prebid meeting will be held at 2:00 P.M, City Hall, Con-
ference Room "B" on 4 February, 2013. This meeting is
Optional.
The contractor shall possess a Class A license prior to
submitting a bid. All work specified in this project, shall be
completed within 60 working days from date of the Notice to
Proceed.
____________________
Art Morimoto, P.E.
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS
DATE OF POSTING: 31 January 14, 2013
TIME OF COMPLETION: (60) WORKING DAYS
REQUEST FOR ENTRY OF DEFAULT CLERK’S JUDGMENT
CASE NUMBER: CIV 513153
SUPERIOR COURT OF SAN MATEO COUNTY
400 Center Road, Redwood City CA
1. TO THE CLERK
On the complaint or cross-complaint filed on 8/14/12, by Danny White
Defendant Randy Pichi
I request a court judgement under Code of Civil Procedure sections 585(b), 585(c),
989, etc., against defendent: Randy Pichi.
2. Judgment to be entered.
AMOUNT CREDITS BALANCE
Statememt pf damages
(1) Special $174 $174
(2) General $100,000 $100,000
Interest
Costs $1,259 $1,259
Attorney Fees $4,170 $4,170
TOTALS $105,603 $105,603
PLAINTEIFF/PETITIONER: Danny White
DEFENDANT/RESPONDENT: Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers; Randy Pichi
5.Declaration under Code of Civil Procedure Section 585.5 (required for entry of
default under Code Civ. Prc., 585 (a)). This action
a. is not on a contract or installment sale for goods or services subject to Civ. Code,
1801 et seq. (Unruh Act).
b. is not on a conditional sales contract subject to Civ. Code, 2981 et seq. (Rees-
Levering Motor Vehicle Sales and Finance Act
c. is not on an obligation for goods, services, loans, or extensions of credit subject
to Code Civ. Proc., 398(b).
6. Declaraton of mailing (Code Civ. Proc. 587) A copy of this Request for Entry of
Default was not mailed to the following defendants, whose addresses are unknown
to plaintiff or plaintiff’s attorney (names): Randy Pichi.
I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the
foregoing items 4, 5, 6 are true and correct.James Sarrail
7. Memorandum of costs
a. Clerk’s filing fees $650
b. Process server’s fees $428
c. Other: Courtcall
d. photocopy charges $181
e. TOTAL $1,259
g. I am the attorney, agent, or party who claims these costs. To the best of my
lknowledge and belief this memorandum of costs is correct and these costs were
necessarily incurred in this case.
8. Declaration of nonmilitary status (required for a judgment. No defendant named
in item 1c of the application is in the military service so as to be entitled to the ben-
efits of the Servicemembers Relief Act (50 U.S.C. App. 501 et seq.)
date: 1/7/13
James A. Sarrail /s/ Monica Castillo for /
Pubvlished in the Daily Journal, January 19, 29, February 2, 9, 2013.
203 Public Notices
AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Jean Herman
Case Number 123018
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Jean Herman. A Peti-
tion for Probate has been filed by Rita
Herman in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Rita Herman be
appointed as personal representative to
administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to the
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: February 22, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo, 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. If
you object to the granting of the petition,
you should appear at the hearing and
state your objections or file written objec-
tions with the court before the hearing.
Your appearance may be in person or by
your attorney. If you are a creditor or a
contingent creditor of the decedent, you
must file your claim with the court and
mail a copy to the personal representa-
tive appointed by the court within four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters as provided in Probate Code sec-
tion 9100. The time for filing claims will
not expire before four months from the
hearing date noticed above. You may
examine the file kept by the court. If you
are a person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a Request for
Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing
of an inventory and appraisal of estate
assets or of any petition or account as
provided in Probate Code section 1250.
A Request for Special Notice form is
available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Trisha A. Vicario, Esq.,
Barulich Dugoni Law Group, Inc
400 S. El Camino Real, Ste 1000
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
(650) 292-2900
Dated: January 17, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on January 19, 26, February 2, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253678
The following person is doing business
as: Pacifica Chevron, 2095 Coast Hwy,
PACIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Keet Ner-
han, 210 San Mateo Rd., Half Moon Bay,
CA 94019. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Keet Nerhan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/29/12, 01/05/13, 01/12/13, 01/19/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253808
The following person is doing business
as: State Realty, 600 N. San Mateo Dr.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Rodney M.
Catalano, 14550 Moccasin Ranch Road,
C/O P.O Box 100 Moccasin, CA 95347.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Rodney M. Catalano /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/05/12, 01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253747
The following person is doing business
as: RL Arts, 1080 Westridge Dr., POR-
TOLA VALLEY, CA 94028 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Robin
Lazzara same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/01/2012.
/s/ Robin Lazzara /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/05/12, 01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253708
The following person is doing business
as: The Grout Expert, 308 Sheridan Dr.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Hoang
Nguyen, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/15/2008.
/s/ Hoang Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/05/12, 01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253815
The following person is doing business
as: Atelier Gray, 414 Laurel Ave., MEN-
LO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Sylvia Gray
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 12/01/2012.
/s/ Sylvia Gray /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/05/12, 01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253790
The following person is doing business
as: San Mateo Tennis, 50 E. 5th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Todd Dissly
Athletics, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Todd Dissly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/23/13, 02/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253635
The following person is doing business
as: Gattey Law Office, 261 Devonshire,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Scott Gat-
tey, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 09/27/2007.
/s/ Scott Gattey /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/23/13, 02/02/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253682
The following person is doing business
as: 1) GMDE Realty, 2) GDE Central Re-
al Estate Services, 1001 Bay Hill Dr., Ste
200, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: GMDE
Holdings, INC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/18/2012.
/s/ Felicito H. Desuasido /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/23/13, 02/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253860
The following person is doing business
as: LPG Sales, 120 El Dorado Ct., SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Larry Giannini,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Larry Giannini /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/23/13, 02/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253926
The following person is doing business
as: Kretiko Importing, 8 Seville Ct., MILL-
BRAE, CA 94030 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Kertiko, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Dorris Kautantos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/12/13, 01/19/13, 01/23/13, 02/02/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Jan. 8, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Dunia & Jose, Inc.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2616 Broadway St.
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
January 19, 26, February 2, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-241395
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Kreti-
ko Olive Oil Company, 8 Seville Ct.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 10/13/2010. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Dabko, LLC,
CA.
/s/ Dorris Kautantos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/11/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 01/12/13,
01/19/13, 01/26/13, 02/02/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-241929
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Kreti-
ko Olive Oil, 8 Seville Ct., MILLBRAE,
CA 94030. The fictitious business name
referred to above was filed in County on
11/15/2010. The business was conduct-
ed by: Dabko, LLC, CA.
/s/ Dorris Kautantos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/11/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 01/12/13,
01/19/13, 01/26/13, 02/02/13).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND CHIHUAHUA mix Terrier tan
male near West Lake shopping Center in
Daly City CLAIMED!
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Christmas Eve in the Broad-
way/Laguna Ave. area of Burlingame:
Diamond & emerald gold bangle brace-
let, Very sentimental. Reward Offered.
(650)347-0749
LOST RING at Tanforan Shopping Cen-
ter, Dec 13th at the Hop”N’Play. Reward,
(650)589-2520
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., SOLD!
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., SOLD!
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR (HOT Point) runs
good $95 (650)333-4400
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $50 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
$25 obo (650)515-2605
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
100 USED European (33) and U.S. (67)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $6.00, 650-787-
8600
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
298 Collectibles
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
24
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 World Series
components
11 Unleashes
15 Better
16 Hardware item
17 What good
debaters pounce
on
18 No longer tied
up
19 FBI employees
20 Fills
21 Too curious
22 Some grad
students
23 __-Tahoe Open:
annual PGA Tour
event
24 USCG VIP
25 File manager
menu option
27 Ancient Aegean
region west of
Lydia
30 Sweet-talk
33 Decking
35 “Hold your
horses!”
37 Ran out of
clothes?
38 Colors
39 Memorable
swimsuit model
Cheryl
40 Put a new cover
on, as a book
42 Space shuttle
astronaut
Jemison
43 It may be lost or
saved
44 Learning ctr.
47 “Sunset
Boulevard” genre
49 Better
51 TV’s “__-Team”
52 Not much
53 Loving way to
walk
55 Hypotenuse, e.g.
56 Helping people
57 Gp. with common
goals
58 Least helpful, as
a description
DOWN
1 Investigate, as a
toy mouse
2 Greek
horseshoe?
3 “Beauty is truth,
truth beauty” poet
4 Big bucks
5 Let-’er ender
6 Manipulable
lamp
7 Richards of
“Jurassic Park”
8 One-on-one
strategy
9 Kitchen add-on
10 Court period:
Abbr.
11 Erect
12 Hardly a
dreamer?
13 Sticks around the
pool hall
14 Vacation period
23 Cut free
24 Delta, but not
gamma
25 Metaphorical
dream world
26 Onetime Leno
announcer Hall
28 Learning ctr.
29 Forever, it seems
30 Pain from a
sticker?
31 Foe
32 Lamentations
34 Anatomical blind
spot site
36 Poetic location
word
41 Oater baddie
44 “A man has to be
what he is, Joey”
speaker
45 Single divisions
46 Possessed,
biblically
47 Curiosity org.
48 __ B. Driftwood,
Groucho’s “A
Night at the
Opera” role
49 Cries of clarity
50 41-Down’s
accessory
51 Pad __: stir-fried
noodles
54 Degree in
algebra?
By Steven J. St. John
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
01/19/13
01/19/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
303 Electronics
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair, SOLD!
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
4 FREE dining room chair with wheels
SOLD!
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BLACK LEATHER love seat $50.,
SOLD!
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$99 (650)315-5902
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
304 Furniture
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
SOLD!
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new SOLD!
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
306 Housewares
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 10x30”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor $99 (650)315-5902
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
11 4" recessed light kits (will e-mail pho-
to) $80 (650)365-6283
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
310 Misc. For Sale
1941 SAN Francisco News Dec. 22 to 31
Huge fifty pound black bounded book
$80 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, Best Offer,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, SOLD!
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
FOOD DEHYDRATOR made by
Damark, 5 trays, works good. $30.00
SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. Folds in half $99
(650)341-8342
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, SOLD!
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 SOLD!
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
SOLD!
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 (650)341-8342
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25 (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
(650)341-2181
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
25 Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
311 Musical Instruments
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
UKULELE: MAKALA Soprano $60,
Like new, Aquila strings (low G) gig bag,
Great tone. (650)342-5004
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
CANARY FOR SALE, $35 Female, $45
Male (650)345-2507
KENNEL - small size, good for small
size dog or cat, 23" long 14" wide &
141/2" high, $25. FIRM (650)871-7200
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. SOLD!
TOP PEDIGREE -yellow labs, extreme
hunters as well as loving house dogs
available 11/19/12 see at at www.mega-
nmccarty.com/duckdogs, (650)593-4594
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
316 Clothes
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$100.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE BIKE $20 (650)593-0893
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
HEAVY PUNCHING bag stand - made
out of steel, retail $200., used, $50.,
(650)589-8348
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
318 Sports Equipment
TREADMILL PROFORM Like new, $250
(650)588-5746
YAKIMA ROCKETBOX 16 Rooftop
cargo box. Excellent condition. $200
(650)593-5917
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4” by 4”
inches to 1” by 8”. All 12” to 24” in length.
Over 1 cord. $75, (650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
MOSS BEACH
MULTI FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
Etheldore St &
Cypress St,
Moss Beach
SATURDAY ONLY
Starting at 9am
Everything from collectibles,
sports cards, comic books,
toys, computer parts, com-
puters, dishes, luggage,
furntiure, artwork, kitchen
goods, and kids clothing,
more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
PACIFICA
$1,198,000
5 Connemara Dr. Sun 2-4
3,300 sq. ft. custom designed
home 5Bd/3Ba, fireplace, gour-
met chefs kitchen, great room,
master suite, views. CB Dena
Williams (415)407-4381
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exh01954613aust and tires. Well taken
care of. No low ballers or trades please.
Pink in hand and ready to go to next
owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$19000. obo, (650)465-6056
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95., SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry Contractors
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)548-5482
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Cleaning Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Construction
26
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
DON’T PAINT
– GO GREEN
Affordable, Natural,
Authentic Wall Finishes
to replace paint
888-391-2479
415-467-7009
www.sanfranciscoplaster.com
info@sanfranciscoplaster.com
• Non-toxic/Hypoallergenic
• Filters the air absorbing
carbon dioxide and odors
• Eliminates mold and fungus
• For both residential or commercial
• 80 selected colors
Please contact us
for custom color matches
Lic# 106426
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Computer
COMPUTER
PROBLEMS?
Software, hardware issues,viruses,
updates, upgrades, optimization &
tune-ups. data backup & recovery,
network-troubleshooting & installation
Residential and commerical,
Most consultations free,
NO CHARGE if not fixable.
Microsoft and Cisco certified,
Call Erik
(650)995-4899
$45 an hour
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR
NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
27 Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAXING MASSAGE
THERAPY
Enjoy a premium massage with
essential oils that relieves
stress and fatigue.
Come and pamper yourself.
Please call to book your session.
(408)796-9796
Sophia
Massage Therapy
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Weekend • Jan. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 1/31/13
WEBUY
$â0
OFF ANY
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OFF ANY

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