P. 1
Adobe-Photoshop for photographers

Adobe-Photoshop for photographers

|Views: 236|Likes:
Published by Taylor Cubbie
tutorials for photographers on photoshop
tutorials for photographers on photoshop

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Taylor Cubbie on Jan 19, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/15/2013

pdf

text

original

The cross-processing technique has long been popular among
fashion and portrait photographers for distorting the colors in a
picture and bleaching out the skin tone detail. There are two basic
cross-processing methods: E-6 transparency film processed in C-41
chemicals and C-41 negative film processed in E-6 chemicals.
You can simulate cross-processing effects quite easily in
Photoshop and do so without the risk of ‘overdoing’ the effect or
losing important image detail. One simple way to cross-process an
image is to use the Split Toning panel sliders found in Camera Raw
working with a raw, a JPEG or a flattened TIFF image (see Figure
10.2). This is a fast and effective method and the Balance slider
gives you that extra level of control whereby you can adjust the
bias between the shadow and highlight coloring effects.
The technique that’s shown over the next two pages aims to
replicate the cross-curve effect you typically get when using a

Figure 10.2 Here you can see an example of how to use the Split Toning sliders in
Camera Raw to apply a color cross-processing effect to a raw or flattened TIFF image.

365

Cooking with Photoshop

Chapter 10

Luminance blending tip

One way to preserve the luminosity in
an image is to always set the ‘coloring’
adjustment layer to the Color blend
mode. Some techniques described in this
chapter involve a series of extreme image
adjustments or multiple adjustment layers.
Therefore, if you are not careful, you may
lose important highlight and shadow
detail. One solution to this is to make a
copy of the original Background layer and
place it at the top of the layer stack, and
set the layer blending mode to Luminosity.
This will produce the same result as
setting a single adjustment layer to Color
mode, but by adjusting the layer opacity
of the duplicate layer in Luminosity mode
you can restore varying amounts of the
original image luminance.

C-41 film processed in E-6. In this example you’ll notice how
I managed to make the shadows bluer and gave the highlights a
yellow/red cast. This is a technique that I have adapted over the
years so as to make it more flexible. As with all the other coloring
effects described in this chapter, the main coloring adjustments are
applied as adjustment layers using the Color blend mode. This helps
preserve the original luminosity, but if you want to simulate the
high contrast cross-processed look, then use the Normal blend mode
instead. In addition to this, you might want to consider deliberately
increasing the contrast in the RGB composite channel (this also
boosts the color saturation). You may also wish to experiment with
using different color fills and layer opacities.

1 Here are the steps used to create a cross-processing effect that simulates C-41 film
processed in E-6 chemicals. You can adapt this technique by using different channel Curve
adjustments and different fill colors.

Martin Evening & Jeff Schewe
Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers: The Ultimate Workshop

366

2 I added a Curves adjustment layer that used the Color blend mode and then adjusted
the curves in the individual color channels as shown in the screen shots on the left. The
Curves channel adjustments added a blue/cyan cast to the shadow areas and a red/yellow
cast to the highlights. Because the Curves adjustment layer was set to the Color blend
mode, the luminosity was unaffected.

3 I then added a Color Fill layer (which was also set to Color mode), set the opacity to
15% and selected a strong yellow fill color.

367

Cooking with Photoshop

Chapter 10

4 I then double-clicked the Color fill layer and adjusted the Underlying Layer blend
options. I O A-clicked on the Underlying Layer shadow point triangle slider and
dragged to separate the dividers, splitting them in two, and dragged the right-hand
shadows slider (circled) across to the right.

Double-click in this area
of the layer to open the
Layer Style dialog.

5 Here you can see the finished result in which
I had created a transitional blend between the
underlying layers and the yellow Color fill
layer above.

PPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPh
Pho
Pho
Pho
Pho
Phoo
PPPPho
Pho
Phooo
PPPhoo
Phooo
PPh
PPPPho
PP o
PPPhooo
P o
Phooo
PPP to:
tttto:
to:
to:
to:
ttto:
ttto:
toto:
tttotto:
ttotto:
toototto:
oo:
toto ©
©©©©©©©
©©©©
©©©©©©© Mar

Mara tintinintintininintintininnninninntiiin Ev
Ev
Ev
E eni

eninng
ng
ng
ng
ngg
ng
ng
ng
ngg
nngg
ng
ngg
n

Martin Evening & Jeff Schewe
Adobe Photoshop CS5 for Photographers: The Ultimate Workshop

368

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->