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Brief biographies of people of distinction associated with the parishes of Askeaton, Rathkeale, Croagh, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, Ireland.

Aristocrats, landed gentry, clergy, soldiers, teachers, public representatives, medical doctors, veterinary surgeons, athletes, centenarians.

Compiled by

John M Feheney
1

Eleanor Fitzgerald, Countess of Desmond (1545 - 1638). Eleanor Butler was born into a branch of the Ormond Butlers, a family less Gaelicised than most other Old English families and generally loyal to the English crown at this period. Yet both Eleanor's mother and Butler grandmother were McCarthys from Cork and of Gaelic stock. At age nineteen, Eleanor married Gerald Fitzgerald, 15th Earl of Desmond, and entered on an eventful and tragic career as the terrible Munster Rebellions coincided with the prime of her life and child-bearing years. Like his ancestors, the Earl of Desmond practised a combination of Gaelic and Anglo Norman leadership. He was immensely rich and powerful claiming overlordship of about half a million acres in Munster and of several Gaelic sub-chiefs as well as ownership of the port towns of Youghal and Kinsale. Eleanor and Gerald had several castles and lived mainly at Askeaton Castle, Co. Limerick with servants, a magnificent hall, orchards, gardens and fishponds.

CONTENTS
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ARCHITECTS CLERGY
CHURCH of IRELAND

ARISTOCRATS CLERGYMEN
CATHOLIC

BISHOPS COUNCILLORS
LIMERICK COUNTY

CENTENARIANS GENTRY

FRIARS LAWYERS
PARLIAMENTARIANS

ENTREPRENEURS MAGISTRATES

MILITARY
COMMANDERS

PARLIAMENTARIANS

MPs SCHOOL
PRINCIPALS

TDs VETERINARY
SURGEONS

RELIGIOUS

SISTERS PHYSICIANS

SPORTSPEOPLE REFERENCES
2

MISCELLANEOUS

Biographical Dictionary of Lower Connello


Foreword..3 Dictionary..4 References..132 Foreword Encouraged by the reception given to two of my earlier biographical dictionaries (Askeaton Ballysteen and Adare and the Barony of Kenry), I now present a corresponding volume for the barony of Lower Connello. Readers will remember that this now almost-forgotten name includes four parishes: Askeaton, Cappagh, Croagh and Rathkeale. None of the parishes in the corresponding barony of Upper Connello are included in this volume. To make this volume complete, I have included material dealing with the parish of Askeaton, because, as explained above, it is part of the barony of Lower Connello, but I have omitted material connected with Ballysteen, since it is in the barony of Kenry. To avoid arbitrariness, I have used the same criteria for inclusion as in previous analogous volumes. Thus I have included: public representatives at local and national level; members of the aristocracy and landed gentry; clergy and religious; school principals; medical and veterinary practitioners; prominent sports people, especially those who have represented their county or country; centenarians; people who are noted for some rare or distinguished quality or achievement. Within these categories, I have included those who worked/ served in the barony, as well as those native to the barony. Of course, availability of appropriate information was also an important determining factor. As usual with reference works like this one, biographies of deceased people only are included. Though not precluding subsequent publication in hard copy, I have decided to make this volume available initially online only. I have included sources of information at the end of each entry, with full citations at the back. I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness to a large number of people who helped me, either directly or indirectly, in the preparation of this volume. The names of most of these people will be found in the citations at the back of the book. I am particularly indebted to John OConnor and Kelli De Franco for help in getting this version of the book online. I welcome suggested amendments and hope my readers will find this material useful and interesting. John M Feheney, Mardyke House, Cork, Ireland November, 2012 Copyright: 2012 The moral right of the author has been asserted. First published 2012 on www.iverusresearchfoundation.com jmfeheny@iol.ie

CLERGY

CHURCH of IRELAND
Abbot, Rev Thomas (1870-1946), Clergyman CoI

Ludlow, Shropshire, and had issue, including, sons, Rev Edward, William and Henry Ashe, together with a daughter, Mary Anne. Rev Ashe Snr died on 24 June, 1846. (Www.ashefamily.info/ashefamily/93.htm)

Balfour, Rev Will (1801-1888), Clergyman CoI

homas Frank Abbot, son of Rev Kingsmill Abbot, was born about 1870. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1891, BD 1896), where he proved himself an outstanding scholar, winning prizes in Near-Eastern languages, especially, Hebrew, Chaldaic and Syriac. He was elected a Fellow of Trinity College. He passed his Divinity Test in 1894, being placed in the First Division. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1895 and Priest in 1896. One of his first appointments was as Curate and Vicar at St Mary=s Cathedral, Limerick (1895-1900), after which he was Rector in Kilkeady (1900-08). He was then appointed Succentor in St Mary=s Cathedral, Limerick (1908-15), before his appointment as Rector of the Church of Ireland, Askeaton, from 1915 onwards. During this period, he also served as Prebendary of Ardcanny and Treasurer of the Diocese of Limerick (1919). On 25 July, 1900, he married Isabel Steuart White, second daughter of Dr H. White, Edenville, Castletown Conyers. He had a daughter, Phoebe. He retired in 1940 and died on 8 May, 1946. His widow, who lived in Limerick after his death, died on 11 May, 1960 (Leslie, 1936).

illoughby William Townley Balfour, second son of Blayney Townley Balfour, Townley Hall, Drogheda, Co. Louth, was born at Townley Hall in 1801. He was educated at Harrow School and entered Trinity College, Dublin, in November, 1819. He obtained his BA in 1823 and was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1829 and priest in 1832. He was appointed resident Vicar of Askeaton in May 1833 and held this post until 1837, when he became Vicar of Stone Flanville, Leicester, where he remained until 1878. On his retirement, he settled in Rostrevor, Co. Down, where he died on 29 June, 1888. (Leslie, 1936).

Bateman, Rev Henry (c1758-1822), Clergyman CoI

Ashe, Rev William (1747-1836), Clergyman CoI

illiam Ashe, son of Nicholas Ashe and his wife, Mary Smith, was born at Croagh, Co. Limerick, in 1747. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he obtained an MA degree. He was ordained clergyman of the Church of Ireland and was appointed Rector of Kilfergus (Glin), before becoming Rector of Croagh, as well as Vicar Choral of St Mary=s Cathedral, Limerick, and Prebendary of Croagh. He married Elizabeth Jeffries, daughter of Rev Edward Jeffries, of

enry Bateman, son of John Bateman, and his second wife, Grace Brooke, was born in Alta Villa House, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, about 1758. He entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 2 July, 1775, at the age of 17, and graduated in the Spring of 1780, with a BA degree. In 1806, he was rector in the Church of Ireland parish of Abbeyfeale. He gave evidence in an inquiry on Rockite disturbances in West Limerick in 1820 (NAI, SOCP 1, 2185/51). His eldest son, Henry, died in Newcastle West in 1821 (FJ, 17.x.1821). The major part of the Bateman property was in county Kerry, especially in the neighbourhood of Tralee. The Altavilla estate, though running to about 500 acres was only a tenth of what the family had in county Kerry. (Leslie, 1936, 158, 347)

Bourchier, Rev James (1815-1850), Clergyman CoI

ames Henry Bourchier was born in county Limerick about 1812 and educated in Mr Griffith=s private school. He entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 19 October, 1829, at the age of 17. He graduated with a BA degree in 1834. He then took orders in the Church of Ireland. He was curate in Rathkeale from 1836-1843. He was appointed Prebendary of Ballycahane, Kilcornan, on 12 June, 1848. He resigned this post in 1850 to take up the post of rector of Ardcanny, Pallaskenry. He did not long survive this change, however, and died on 2 October, 1850, at the early age of 35. (Leslie, 1936, 99, 130, 301, 320).

of Limerick. In 1732, he was appointed Archdeacon, and in 1740, Chancellor, of the diocese of Limerick. In 1740, he also became rector of Rathkeale. He inherited a farm, Redfield, in east Clare from his father, William, and he also held an appointment as turnpike commissioner. He lived at Danesfort, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. Among his children was John Brown (qv) (Brown Papers, IPA, Rathkeale)

Campion, Rev John (c.1895-1951), Clergyman CoI

Brien, Rev Edward (1812-), Clergyman CoI

dward Henry Brien, son of Edward Brien, surgeon, was born in Devon on 17 November, 1812. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1835) and ordained Deacon (1836) and priest of the Church of Ireland on 6 January, 1837. His first appointment (after ordination as a Deacon) was Askeaton, where he worked as a Curate from 1836 to 1837. Subsequent appointments included Curate in Powerscourt (1837-38), Curate in Midleton, Co. Cork (1839-46), Curate Waterford Cathedral (1846-50) and Vicar in Ballinakill, Waterford (1849-58). (Leslie 1936).

Brown, Rev John (b.1684- ), Clergyman CoI

ohn Robert Campion, son of John Alfred Campion and his wife, Mary, was born in Woodville, St Laurence Road, Clontarf, Dublin, around 1895. Educated at Mountjoy School, he entered Trinity College, Dublin, where he passed his BA examination and Divinity Test in 1915. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1916 and Priest in 1917. Initially, he served in the Archdiocese of Armagh (1916-1919), before taking up posts as curate in Shanagolden (1919-1921), during which he helped part-time in Askeaton, St John=s Cathedral (1921-1922), Ballycastle (1922-1925) and Rathkeale (1925-1926). He was appointed Rector of Kilcolman (1926-1932), and transferred later as Rector of Kilcooley (1932-1934). From 1934 to 1951, he was rector in Kilmacow (Ossory). He married (4 October, 1922) Ethel Haddon of Leicester and they had one son, Brian Haddon (who was also ordained), and one daughter, Joyce Elaine Haddon. He died in 1951. (Crockford, 1950; Leslie, 1940, 105; Leslie and Wallace, 2001, 460).

ohn Brown, son of William Brown and his wife, Elizabeth Rock, was born in Belfast in 1684. His father was a soldier in the army of William, Prince of Orange, and saw action in several counties in Ireland. John, the only surviving child of a family of six, entered Trinity College, Dublin, in 1701, obtaining his BA and MA (1712) degrees. He was ordained a deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1708 and priest in 1709. In 1717, he married Ann, daughter of John Vincent, who became Mayor

Clarke, Rev Frederick (1815-), Clergyman CoI

ev Frederick James Clarke, son of Peter Clarke, was born in Antrim in 1815. He was educated at the Belfast Institute, before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 15 June, 1834. He obtained his BA degree in 1841, was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland the same year and priest on 18 September, 1842, in Limerick. He came to Askeaton on 28 February, 1842, but did not remain for long. He

resigned his curacy in December, 1842, returning to Northern Ireland, where he subsequently worked in Derry. Later, he settled in England, and was appointed permanent curate in Reddal-hill, Staffordshire, where he resided in 1865. (Leslie, 1936; Crockford, 1865).

Collis, Rev Thomas (c.1694-1765), Clergyman CoI

Clarke, Rev Thomas (c.1884-1935), Clergyman CoI

homas Clarke was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, (BA 1906, Divinity Test 1907, MA 1916) and ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1906 and Priest in 1907. After ordination, he served as curate in Ballinrobe, Co. Mayo (1906-08), before taking up a post as curate in Holy Trinity/ St Lawrence, Limerick, from 1908 to 1909. He served as Rector in Kilcornan (1909-22). In 1922, he was appointed Rector of the Church of Ireland in Tralee, but later moved to Askeaton. He died on 26 May, 1935. (Leslie, 1936)

homas Collis, son of William Collis, and Mary Cross, daughter of Rev Benjamin Cross, Precentor of Cloyne, was born at Lisodoge, Co. Kerry, about 1694. He entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 28 April, 1712, and graduated with a BA degree in 1716 and an MA in 1719. He married Avis Blennerhasset of Tralee and had three daughters and a son, William, who also attended Trinity College, Dublin. He was Vicar of the Church of Ireland in Askeaton in 1731, and is listed Rector of Toomdeely in 1734. He was rector of Ballynacourty Union and Vicar of Kilflynn, 1747-65. He died in Ventry in 1765 and his will was proved in 1766. (Leslie 1936 and 1940)

Delany, Rev Solomon (c.1654-1731), Clergyman CoI

Collis, Rev Henry (1707-1786), Clergyman CoI

enry Collis, son of William Collis, was born in County Kerry about 1707. He entered Trinity College, Dublin on 11 June, 1725, and obtained his MA in 1729. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1732 and Priest for the diocese of Limerick on 24 September, 1732. He was installed as Rector of the Church of Ireland, Askeaton (including Lismakeery and Toomdeely), on 28 August, 1734 and remained in this post until 1757. He subsequently moved to Nantenan, where he is listed as Rector in 1766. He was also Prebendary (a senior clerical post, usually with an attached income) of Effin. He died in 1786 and his Will is dated 5 April, 1786. He had three sons, William, Henry and John, and at least two daughters (Albina and Mary, who married Richard Taylor, Ballynort). His will shows that he was relatively wealthy, since each of his daughters received ,420, and his grandson was scheduled to receive all his books, provided that he took Holy Orders in the Church of Ireland. (Leslie 1936)

olomon Delany, son of John Delany, was born about 1654. An able student, he was relatively old (24) when he entered Trinity College. This was probably due to the inability of his parents to send him to a suitable Preparatory School, since the College register (Trinity College, Dublin) describes his father=s occupation as >shepherd= and notes that the boy was a >sizar= (a student exempted from University fees). Nevertheless, young Delany proved himself an able student, obtaining a University scholarship in 1682, a BA in 1683 and an MA in 1686. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland on 5 August, 1683, and Priest on 6 November, 1687. Two of his sons, Solomon and Denis (who became a famous actor) also graduated from Trinity College, Dublin. Rev Solomon Delany was installed as Rector of the Church of Ireland in Askeaton (including Lismakeery and Toomdeely) on 11 June, 1689. He also held the additional post of Vicar of Kildimo at the same time. He died in 1731 and probably held his substantive post until then. (Leslie, 1936).

Delmege, Rev John (1794-1874), Clergyman CoI


ohn Delmege, 5th son of Johann Adam Dolmage (qv) and his wife, Elizabeth Powell, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, and baptised in Rathkeale on 9 November, 1794. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he obtained a BA in 1819 and an MA in 1832. He was ordained priest for the Church of Ireland and held the rectorship of Youghalara, Co. Clare, and, subsequently, Rathbranagh, Croom, Co. Limerick. He was also Prependary of Droughta and Island Edy. On 21 July, 1825, he married Mary Anna Barry, daughter of Colonel Thomas Barry, and grand-daughter and co-heiress of Lord Carbery. They had a family of 3 boys (Adam, Julius and John Evans) and five girls (Maria, Emily, Margaret, Henrietta and Eveline). He belonged to the Rathkeale Palatine community, the family name in the Rhine Palatinate being Dolmetsch, but, in Ireland, it went through various adaptations until it became Delmege. John died 19 April, 1874, aged 79 years. He was a brother of Julius (qv) and Christopher (qv) Delmege. (BILG, 1899, 112)

Fletcher, Rev Richard (1836-1900), Clergyman CoI

ichard Edward Fletcher, son of William Fletcher, a saddler, was born in Dublin in 1836. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA and Divinity Test 1859, MA 1876). He was ordained a priest of the Church of Ireland in 1861 in Cork for the diocese of Limerick. His first appointment was as curate in Askeaton, where he remained until 1864. He was afterwards curate in Tallow, Co. Waterford (1864-1868), Incumbent in Cappoquin (1868-1873), Curate in St James, Dublin (1873-1889), before becoming Rector at St Barnabas, Dublin (1889-1900). He was a brother of Rev James S Fletcher, who was also a Church of Ireland clergyman. Richard died 10 October, 1900, in Dublin. (Leslie, 1936)

Foley, Rev William (c.1856-1944), Clergyman CoI

Eves, Rev Edmund (c.1845-1930), Clergyman CoI

dmund Lombard Eves was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1862, MA 1865). After passing his Divinity test, he was ordained a Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1864 and priest in 1865. Appointed curate in Askeaton in 1864, he was later appointed Vicar (1870-1874). He was appointed Rector of Maryborough (now Portlaoise) in 1874 and is also listed as Church of Ireland Prison Chaplain there. He married a daughter of Rev George Maxwell, his predecessor as Rector of Askeaton. His three children (Anne Maxwell, George Maxwell and Catherine Margaret) all died of diphtheria in January, 1860. Edmund Eves, himself, died on 14 July, 1930. (Leslie, 1936).

illiam Malcolm Foley, son of Rev Peter Foley, Rector of Dunfeeny, Co. Mayo, was born about 1856. Educated privately, he entered Trinity College, Dublin, where he distinguished himself as a scholar (BA, 1877, Bishop Forster=s Prize, 1876, Divinity Test, 1877, Theology Exhibition, 1878, BD 1880). He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1877 and Priest in 1878. He held several posts as curate in the West of Ireland, before taking up a post as Rector in Askeaton in 1885, in succession to Rev James Sullivan. He remained in that post until 1896. Other appointments included, lecturer at Trinity College, Dublin (1892-1893), Rector in Tralee and Examiner for the Bishop of Limerick (1907-1920); Chancellor of the diocese of Ardfert (1911-1915); Archdeacon of Ardfert (1915-1922); Rector of Drumcar (1924-1930), Editor of the Church of Ireland Gazette (1931-1934). He married (27 August, 1879) Elizabeth Pauline, daughter of Thomas Hackett Armstrong, and they had a son, Thomas William Foley. He was author of books on theology and contributed to Hasting=s Dictionary of Religion and Ethics (1908, 1915). He died on 19 October, 1944. (Leslie, 1936)

Hackett, Rev Samuel (c.1858-1915), Clergyman CoI

Haydn, Rev John (1845-1920), Clergyman CoI

amuel John Hackett, son of Thomas Hackett, Justice of the Peace, born about 1858 in Castletown, Co. Laois, was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1878, MA 1882). He was ordained for the Church of Ireland in 1879 and served initially as curate in Shankill, Co. Down (1879-1884). After this, he served in the Diocese of Down and Connor (1884-1896). In 1896, he took up an appointment as Rector of the Church of Ireland in Askeaton. He was made a Canon of the Cathedral (Limerick) in 1911 and served in Askeaton until his death on 10 October, 1915. He was a blood brother of Rev Thomas A.P. Hackett, also a clergyman of the Church of Ireland and Dean of Limerick. He never married and was described as >a scholar, a gentleman and an ideal clergyman= (Leslie, 1936).

Hassard, Rev Edward (1800-1886), Clergyman CoI

dward Hassard, second son of George Hazzard, was born in Skea, Fermanagh, and baptised on 31 August, 1800. He was educated in Mr Martin=s private school, from where he entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 6 February, 1816, aged 15. He graduated with a BA (1819) and an MA (1829). He was successful in both his divinity test and his BD in 1826. He was ordained deacon of the Church of Ireland (diocese of Cloyne) on 19 December, 1830, and priest on 23 February, 1834. His first appointment was as curate in Timoleague, Co. Cork (1830-1832), after which he was made curate in Collon, diocese of Armagh (1832-1843). He then moved to the diocese of Limerick where he was curate in Rathkeale (1843-1850) and Prebendary of Ballycahane, Kilcornan (1850-1856), in succession to Rev James Bourchier. Hassard resigned this post in 1856 to take up a position as Rector of Rathkeale and Chancellor of the diocese of Limerick (1856-1872). On 15 September, 1855, he married Mary Anne Gibb from Brighton, Surrey. He died without issue on 17 July, 1873. His widow, Mary Anne, died on 2 July, 1886. (Leslie, 1936, 99)

ohn Armour Haydn was born in Tallow, Co. Carlow, in 1845. He was educated in Youghal and Fermoy, before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 1 July, 1872, aged 17. He obtained his BA degree in 1866, his MA in 1870 and both LLB and LLD in 1871. Having passed his divinity test in 1867, he was ordained deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1868 and priest in 1869 (for the diocese of Limerick). His first appointment was as curate in St Michael=s. Limerick (1868-1869), after which he was appointed vicar and rector of Chapelrussel, Pallaskenry (1869-1872). He was rector in Nantenan for several years (1873-1918), during which time, he also held the posts of Prependary of St Munchins and Treasurer of the diocese of Limerick (1906-1912). He also held the post of Chancellor of the diocese of Limerick (1912-1913). On 29 April, 1873, he married Louise Young of Coalisland, Co. Tyrone, and they had a family of two sons and one daughter. Haydn was a skilled musician and composer of sacred music. In 1918, in the face of declining health, he resigned the post of Archdeacon, which he had held since 1913. He died on 21 May, 1920. (Leslie, 1936 )

Hewson, Rev Henry (c1794- ), Clergyman CoI

enry George Hewson, son of George Hewson and his wife, Barbara Purcell, was born in Enniscouch, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, about 1794. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he graduated with a BA in Spring, 1817. He was ordained a deacon of the Church of Ireland in Cloyne 14 April, 1822, and a priest the following year and was then appointed rector of Kilflynn, Co. Kerry. He was listed as living in Rathkeale in Piggott=s Directory, 1824. (BIFR, 586; Piggott, 1824, Rathkeale)

Hunter, Rev Alex (c.1732-1793), Clergyman CoI

lexander Hunter, born about 1732 in County Longford, entered Trinity College, Dublin, as a sizar (exempted from fees) in 1750. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland on 31 July, 1868, and Priest on 20 November, the same year. Before coming to Askeaton as curate on 1 August, 1785, he was curate in Croagh (1773-1785). He moved to Limerick as curate in St Munchin=s on 27 February, 1792. His health declined, however, and he died at Pump Lane, Limerick, in January, 1793. His obituary was carried in the Waterford Herald of 29 January, 1793. (Leslie, 1936).

Jones, Rev Joseph (c1767-1843), Clergyman CoI

oseph Jones, son of Samuel Jones, a merchant, was born in County Clare and entered Trinity College, Dublin, in 1784. He obtained his BA degree in 1788 and his MA in November, 1832. He was licensed as a Curate in the Church of Ireland, Askeaton, on 21 October, 1795. Subsequent appointments included curate Rathkeale (1798) and curate Ardfert (1805). He died in 1843. (Leslie, 1936)

eorge Maxwell, eldest son of Arthur M. Maxwell, Brookend, Co. Tyrone, was born on 27 August, 1809, in Dublin. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, (BA 1830) and ordained deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1832 and priest on 25 March, 1834. Early in his ministry, he became curate in Askeaton (1833-1838), after which he became Rector and remained in this post until his death in 1870. He ministered in Askeaton for a total of 37 years. It was while he was Rector that the present Church of Ireland was completed and consecrated on 23 August, 1840, and the Church of Ireland school house at Beigh Cross, Ballysteen, was licensed for public worship in 1844. He married (1840) Margaret Anne Hewson of Ennismore, Listowel, Co. Kerry (a relative of the Hewsons at Castlehewson) and they had a family of two boys (Arthur and John Francis) and two girls. Many of George Maxwell=s descendants still live in Ireland. He was secretary of the Famine Relief Committee in Askeaton in 1847. He died in Askeaton on 8 January, 1870, and is buried, beside his wife (d. 5 March, 1881) in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton. (BIFR 1976; Leslie 1936)

McCann, Rev George (1899-1974), Clergyman CoI

Martin, Rev Nicholas (1813-1888), Clergyman CoI

icholas Columbine Martin, son of Captain Nicholas Martin, an army officer, was born in Cork in 1813. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, (BA 1836) and ordained priest of the Church of Ireland on 31 December, 1838. After his ordination he was appointed curate in the Church of Ireland, Askeaton. Subsequently he immigrated to Manitoba, Canada, where he got married and had thirteen children. He died on 6 October, 1888, in Mapleton, Manitoba, Canada. (Leslie 1936).

Maxwell, Rev George (1809-1870), Clergyman CoI


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eorge McCann, son of James McCann, Principal of Queen=s Place School, Lurgan, was born in Lurgan, Co. Armagh, in 1899. He was educated at Marlborough School and Trinity College, Dublin, where he was Bedell Scholar in 1928 and winner of the Kyle Irish Prize in 1929. He obtained his BA degree in 1930 and his MA in 1935. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1930 and Priest in 1931. His first appointment was as Curate in St Patrick=s Cathedral, Dublin (1930-1934). After this, he was Curate in Oldcastle (1934-1938), followed by a post as Chaplain-in-Charge at Kilmacshalgan, Co. Sligo (1938-1944). Subsequently, he was Incumbent of Dingle (1944-1954), before taking up the post of Rector of Askeaton and Kilcornan (1954-73). He married (7 August, 1935) Saragh Maude, daughter of Robert Stephens, and they had a daughter, Grinne. He died February, 1974. (C.o.I Archives)

McLean, Rev Richard (1860-1948), Clergyman CoI

ichard Arthur McLean was born in Tralee, Co. Kerry, on 25 November, 1860. He attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he proved himself to be an outstanding scholar. He obtained a BA in 1891, and the higher degrees, LLB and LLD, in 1894. He sought Orders in the Church of Ireland and was ordained deacon and priest in 1892 in Kilmore. His first appointment was as curate in St John=s, Sligo (1892-1895), where he devoted himself to nature studies, submitting several important contributions to the journal, The Irish Naturalist. Afterwards, he served as a missionary in the US (1895-1897). He then did missionary work in Australia, where he was rector in Caernarvon (1895-1896) and in Swan (1896-1899). In 1899, he returned to Ireland, where he was curate, successively, in Ballymacarrett, Belfast (1900-1901), and Rathkeale (1901-1905). In 1905, he was appointed Rector of Rathkeale, a post which he held until 1924. In 1907, he was appointed Prebendary of Dysart (1907-1911), after which he obtained the position of Prebendary of Ballycahane, Kilcornan (1911-1925). He served as chaplain in the 1914-1918 war and was twice mentioned in dispatches. He received the Military Cross in 1918 and the Order of the British Empire in 1921. Among other decorations, which he received, were the Order of St Sava and the Medal for Valour (Serbia), 1921. He was made a Companion of the British Empire in 1922. He retired from the active ministry in 1925. In 1911, he married Mary Louise Doveston, widow of John Sampson, Exeter. He died 18 June, 1948. His widow died at Tralee on 3 June, 1954, and was buried in Dingle, Co. Kerry. (Leslie, 1936, 100).

appointment was the storm of controversy aroused by the proselytisation campaign of Rev Money=s predecessor, Rev Richard Murray, whom Sir Matthew adroitly >removed= in 1829 by getting him appointed Dean of Ardagh. Rev Murray was one of the leaders of the >Protestant Crusade= in Ireland, which aimed at the conversion en masse of Catholics to Protestantism. Protestant Mission >colonies= were established in certain areas, including Mayo, Galway, Kerry, Cork, but most notably in Dingle and Achill. Naturally, this put the proselytisers on a collision course with the Roman Catholic clergy. In Askeaton, the main protagonists were Rev Richard Murray (qv) and Archdeacon Michael Fitzgerald (qv). Rev Money seems to have restored calm on his appointment. On 28 April, 1850, he married Clara Maria Burnett, daughter of Sir Francis Burnett, Bart. Rev Money then seems to have settled in Stodham Park, Hampshire, where he died in 1875. His son, Sir Francis, became 5 th Baron Latymer. (Leslie 1936).

Murray, Rev Richard (1777-1854), Clergyman CoI

Money, Rev James (d.1875), Clergyman CoI

ev James Drummond Money was >presented= with the Rectorship of Askeaton by Sir Matthew Blakiston Bart., owner of the seignory of Askeaton, on 25 November, 1830. The background to this

ichard Murray, Church of Ireland rector of Askeaton during the years 1824-30, was born in 1777. While in Askeaton-Ballysteen, he stirred up considerable religious controversy because of his aggressive attempts to proselytise Roman Catholics. In these attempts he seemed to be notably successful. In his evidence to a Commission of Inquiry in 1837, he stated >the number of converts in Askeaton are in number between 160 and 170 adults, besides about 300 young persons and children= (BPP, 1837, 435-9). All the members of his own flock, however, were not so happy with his approach and moves were made behind the scenes to find an alternative appointment for him. This became a reality in 1830 when the Duke of Northumberland offered him the post of Dean of Ardagh (Co. Longford). He had obtained the >living= in Askeaton through the grace and favour of Sir Matthew Blakiston, owner of the manor of Askeaton. Murray was a member of the militant Protestant Association and was the author of several books, including tracts attacking the Catholic Church (Ireland

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and Her Church, 1845, Outlines of the history of the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1840). In his evidence before the 1837 Commission of Inquiry, Murray also expressed his disappointment with the Protestants in the Askeaton area for their lack of zeal in following his own example in proselytising. He died in Ardagh, Co. Longford, in 1854. [Leslie 1936; HCPP 1837 (543-I; 543-II)].

Perrott, Rev Joseph (1919-1999), Clergyman CoI

oseph John Perrott, son of Joseph Perrott and Jane Doupe, was born in Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 11 February, 1919, and baptised in the Church of Ireland, Askeaton on 16 March, 1919. He attended Dromlohan Church of Ireland School and later entered the Civil Service, Postal Division. He was promoted through the service and was made Post Master in Roscrea, Co. Tipperary. Feeling drawn to the sacred ministry, he attended St Aidan=s Ecclesiastical College, Birkenhead, in 1963. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in 1964 and Priest in 1965. He served as curate in St George=s Parish, Dublin (1964-1971); Dromcondra (1971-1972); Drimoleague Union (1972-1975); Rural Dean Cork City (1975-1978). Subsequently, he served as Rector in Ballydehob (1978-1793), from where he retired. He was made a Canon of both Cork and Cloyne Cathedrals in 1985. He spent his retirement years in Kingston College, Mitchelstown, Co. Cork. After his death on 29 January, 1999, his personal library, including a valuable collection of theological works, was presented to the Library of the University of Limerick by his cousin, Ms. Alberta Callender. He is buried in the family grave in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton. (Leslie & Wallace, 2001, 968; Callender. A, 2007)

homas Royce, son of Rev Henry Royce, rector of Nantenan, and his wife, Susan Hunt, was born in Nantenan House in 1704. He was educated at the private academy of Rev Cashin, in Limerick, before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 21 April, 1723, at the age of 18. He graduated with a BA in 1727, and after passing the Divinity Test, was ordained, first, deacon, and then priest, of the Church of Ireland. He married Annabelle Russell of Co. Galway, and had issue, including a son, Thomas Henry Royce; a daughter, Mary Royce. He succeeded to the parish of Nantenan, but died in 1747, at the early age of 43 years. Ballinvirick House, then the home of Rev Thomas Royse, burst into national newspaper headlines in 1743, when a celebrated kidnapping took place there. The events may be summarised as follows: On the night of 13th November 1743, Hugh Fitzjohn Massy, his brother-in-law, John Bourchier, and some others gained entry to Nantenan rectory, where Ms Frances Ingoldsby was residing under the guardianship of Reverend Thomas Royse, whose wife was a relative of Frances. Under threat of violence, the young men kidnapped Frances Ingoldsby and made off with her to the safety of Massy lands in the Galtee Mountains. A reward of ,200 was placed on Massy and Bourcher=s heads by the government. Massy, accompanied by Frances, made his escape to Bordeaux in France. At some stage a marriage ceremony took place and Frances seems to have accepted the situation. It is clear that the objective of the abduction was to secure an income for Hugh Massy. The guilty parties eventually returned, Ms Ingoldsby having meantime married Massy, and he, using the great influence of his extended family, managed to get the charge of kidnapping dismissed in

Royce, Rev Thomas (1704-1747), Clergyman CoI


11

court. This was as big a scandal as the original kidnapping. (Toby Barnard, 1998; Leslie 1936)

Royse, Rev Henry (1663-1743), Clergyman CoI

enry Royce, son of Rev Henry Royce (d.1689), rector of Kilcornan, was born in Kilcornan, Co. Limerick, in 1663. He was educated at Mr Wilson=s Preparatory school before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 7 May, 1681, at the age of 18. He graduated with a BA and an MA (1688) and was ordained priest of the Church of Ireland. He became rector of Nantenan parish. He acquired Nantenan House and estate in 1704 and Ballinvirick House and estate in 1720. From these two houses, two different branches of the Cappagh Royce family evolved. He married Susan Hunt, daughter of John Hunt of Glengoole, Co. Limerick, and his wife, Anne Hicks, and had issue, including Rev Thomas Royce (1704-1747), Henry Royce, who became a lawyer, and Vere Royce of Ballinvirick. Rev Henry was rector of Nantenan. He died in 1743.

Royse family for at least three generations i.e the son and grandson of the present Henry. The Royse family built Ballinvirick House in the 1700s. The estate going with the house was modest by landed-gentry standards, containing only about 120 acres. The house and land remained in the Royse family until 1919, when it was purchased by Mrs Mary Hewson.

Studdert, Rev George (1653-1738), Clergyman CoI

Royse, Rev Henry (d.1689), Clergyman CoI

ev Henry Royse was installed as Rector of the Church of Ireland in Askeaton (including Lismakeery and Toomdeely) on 10 September, 1668. He continued in this appointment until his death in 1689. During at least part of this period, he also held the appointment of Prebendary of Ardcanny. Earlier (1663), he was installed as Rector of both Kildimo and Kilcornan. Both his son and grandson were also named Henry. Henry belonged to the Ballinvirick branch of the Royse family, which was in this area for hundreds of years. There were clergymen of the Church of Ireland in the

eorge Studdert, son of George Studdert from Cumberland, was born in County Antrim in 1653. The father, George, had been sent to Ireland by King Charles I to raise troops for the British army. He was rewarded for this work with land grants in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, and along the Cashin river, Co. Kerry. Young George was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he obtained a BA in 1675 and an MA in 1678. He was ordained priest of the Church of Ireland and appointed rector of the parishes of Rathkeale and Kilpeacon. He held the post of Chancellor of Limerick from 1685 to his death in 1738. He married Millicent Rose, daughter of George Rose of Morgans, Askeaton, and sister of the Rt Hon Henry Rose PC MP, Lord Chief Justice of the King=s Bench, Ireland, and had issue, including five sons (Thomas, George Richard, Maurice and Henry) and two daughters (Millicent and Agnes). George died in 1738 and was buried in Rathkeale. In later years, the family lived in Elm Hill, Rathkeale, the accompanying estate being listed as comprising 423 acres in 1876. (Studdert Genealogy; Cd.1492)

Sullivan, Rev James A (1815-1888), Clergyman CoI

J
12

ames Ashe Sullivan, son of Major James Sullivan was born in Chesterfield, Limerick, in 1815. He attended Mr Baillie=s school and

entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 17 January, 1834. He obtained his BA in 1840 and passed his Divinity Test in 1843, and, in 1844, entered Wells Theological College, England. He was ordained priest in 1845 and served as curate in Armagh from 1845-1846. He then had a variety of appointments including Melbourne (Australia) 1850-1854 and 1857-1862; Ballymore Eustace, 1866-1872; Bristol 1874-1875. He was appointed Incumbent in Askeaton in 1875 and remained in this post until 1884. He married Georgina Luie Owen, only daughter of George Annesley Owen and his wife, Catherine Moore. Their son, Ponsonby AM Sullivan was Vicar of St Giles, Durham (1891-1901), while their daughter, Georgina, married (1899) Lt Commander Arnold Claud Lancaster Ellis, RNR (1869B1948). Rev Sullivan died in 1888. (Leslie 1936).

Church of Ireland and was initially appointed Archdeacon of Tuam in 1806. In 1813, he was appointed Chancellor of the diocese of Limerick, residing in Rathkeale. On 3 June, 1854, he married Alicia Bunburry Isaac and had issue, including two sons (Charles and Augustus-Frederick) and a daughter (Maria). He died at the Glebe House, Rathkeale, on 12 December, 1855, aged 75 years, and was buried in the Church of Ireland cemetery, Rathkeale. (Burtchaell & Sadleir, 856; Descendants of Dominic O=Mungin, 8)

Warren, Rev Chris (1936-2002), Clergyman CoI

Warburton, Rev Charles (1780-1855), Clergyman CoI

harles Warburton, son of Most Rev Charles Warburton, Church of Ireland Bishop of Cloyne, and his wife, Frances Marston, was born in New York in 1780. His father, whose baptismal name was Dominic O=Mungin, was trained as a Catholic priest in France, but changed his name to Warburton and his religion to Anglican. Bishop Warburton served as chaplain to the British armed forces in the American War of Independence and married Frances Marston, from a prominent family in New York. His son, Charles, was born there. An able and ambitious man, on his return from the USA, Warburton senior made rapid progress in the Anglican Church and was consecrated Bishop of Limerick in 1806 and translated to the See of Cloyne in 1820. His son, Charles, born 1781, entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 1 November, 1799, and graduated with a BA (1893), MA (1807), LLB and LLD (1826). He was ordained priest of the

hristopher Bruce Warren, son of Bruce and Norah Warren of Sutton, Co. Dublin, was born in Sutton in 1936. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, (BA 1958, HDE 1960, MA 1961, Divinity Test, 1962). He won the Carson Prize for academic achievement in 1961. He was ordained Deacon of the Church of Ireland in Cashel on 23 September, 1962, and priest on 7 July, 1963. He served as curate in Waterford (1962-1964) and as Bishop=s Curate in Askeaton (1964-1966). Following this, he was Incumbent of Kilcolman Union with responsibility for Askeaton (1966-1972) and acting Curate in St Waldeburga=s, Dublin (1973-1974). He was Rural Dean in Ossory (1984-1988) and Anglican chaplain in Finland (1988-1994). He returned to Ireland and became Incumbent of Omey (Tuam). He married Elsa Poyry, in Karuna Church, Helsinki, on 21 June, 1973, and had two sons. He was the author of The Clifton Setting: Music for the Holy Communion (1996). He retired in 1996 and went to live in Hartola, Finland, the home of his wife. He died in 2002 and is buried in Hartola. (C.o.I Archives).

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White, Rev Frederick (c.1894-1965), Clergyman CoI

rederick Alexander Howard White, son of Rev James Stuart White, rector of Killtallagh, Co. Kerry, was born about 1894. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he passed his divinity test in 1912, obtained his BA degree in 1917 and his MA degree in 1931. He was ordained deacon of the Church of Ireland for the diocese of Clogher in 1912 and priest in 1917. He was appointed curate in Desertcreat, Co. Tyrone, in 1912, and remained there until 1919. He was then appointed curate in Rathkeale (1919-1924), before his appointment as rector in Castleisland (1924-1929). In 1929, he was appointed rector in Askeaton. From 1940 to 1963, he had responsibility for the Askeaton union, including Kilcornan. For much of that time, he also held the appointment of Precentor at St Mary=s Cathedral Limerick (1951-1963). He died in 1965. (Leslie, Ardfert, 77)

nearby Church of Ireland, erected by his stepsons, Arthur and Forbes Champagne. He had seven children, with only one boy, Stephen, who died unmarried. Of his six daughters, the eldest, Mary-Anne, married (1823) Colonel William Middleton and had children. The second, Alice, married (1815), Rev Edward Herbert, Archdeacon of Aghadoe and their descendants married into the aristocracy. Gustavus= wife, Mary, is listed as the teacher in the >free= Protestant school, under the patronage of the Kildare Place Society, in Milltown (Iverus) in 1826. Though Mrs Wybrants was Protestant, all 36 girls attending the school were Roman Catholic. (BIFR 1976; O Cahan Coat of Arms; Leslie, 1936; Brady, 1864, II, 97)

CONTENTS

Wybrants, Rev Gus (1758-1824), Clergyman CoI


ustavus Wybrants, 5th son of Stephen Wybrants (whose forbear came from Antwerp in 1622) and Alice Cane ( Cathin), was one of twelve children and was born in Rutland Square, Dublin, in 1758. He entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 6 May, 1776, obtained his BA in 1781 and MA in 1793, he was ordained as a clergyman of the Church of Ireland in 1781 and was inducted into the Diocese of Limerick in 1783. He became Vicar of Askeaton in 1793 and remained there until his death in 1824. He married (1793) Mary Homan after the death of her husband, Rev Arthur Champagne, in 1790, and moved to Askeaton. Gustavus died at Miltown House (Iverus) on 23 March, 1824, and is buried in a vault in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton. There is also a plaque to his memory in the

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CLERGYMEN ROMAN CATHOLIC


Ambrose, Rev Robert (1851-1818), Clergyman RC

Barry, Rev David (1879-1937), Clergyman RC

obert Ambrose was born in Dunganville, Ardagh, Co. Limerick, in 1851. Together with his older brother, Stephen, he was involved in the attack on the Royal Irish Constabulary barracks in Ardagh during the Fenian Rising on 6 March, 1867. Stephen was wounded in the attack and it was left to his younger brother, Robert, to get him to safety. Travelling by night, they finally reached the safety of Ballysteen, where Robert=s aunt, Mary Ambrose, was married to the Principal of Ballysteen National School, James Moran. Robert was eventually arrested and brought before the local magistrate, Rev John T Waller, who dismissed the charge against him of being a Fenian. Rev Waller is also said to have given him a gift of five shillings. Subsequently, Robert Ambrose went to college and entered St Patrick=s seminary Maynooth, where he matriculated on 28 August, 1872. He was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 22 August, 1880. He was appointed curate, successively, at Manister (1880-1881), Ballyagran (1881-1883), St Patrick=s, St John=s (1883-1886), Ardagh-Carrickerry (1886-1891), Knockaderry (1891-1896), Athea (1896-1898), Bruff (1898-1900), Abbeyfeale (1900-04), Glenroe (1904-1906). His appointment to Ardagh-Carrickerry brought him to national prominence, when he followed Fr William Casey=s example in Abbeyfeale and used the Land League to organise the tenants of Glensharrold to protest about the >rack rents= being charged by the local landlord, John Christopher Delmege. In 1906, he was appointed Parish Priest of Glenroe, where he remained until shortly before his death at St John=s Hospital, Limerick, following an accident, on 8 April, 1926. He is buried in the Glenroe church grounds (Feheney, 1998, 130-32; Tobin, 2004, 2).

avid Barry was born in Effin, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 18 May, 1879. He attended Effin National School and entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, to study for the diocesan priesthood. He was ordained for the diocese of Limerick at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 28 June, 1903. After ordination, he was sent to the Dunboyne Institute, Maynooth, for advanced studies (1903-1905). His first diocesan appointment was as curate in Parteen (1905-1907), after which he was appointed curate, successively, in St Munchin=s (1908); Templeglantine (1908-1911); Bruff (1911-1931) and Patrickswell (1931-1933). On 11 May, 1933, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh, where he remained until his death on 10 January, 1937, at the Mater Hospital, Dublin, at the early age of 57 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Cappagh, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 2)

Begley, Rev John (1861-1941), Clergyman RC

ohn Begley was born in the parish of Monagea, Newcastle West, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 1 August, 1861. He attended the local National School, after which he attended St Munchin=s College, Limerick, followed by St Patrick=s Seminary, Maynooth. He was ordained priest at Maynooth on 24 June, 1888. Following ordination, he was sent on loan to the diocese of Argyll and the Isles in Scotland, where he was stationed in the island of Bute. On his return to Ireland, he was curate, successively, in: Coolcappa (1891-1893); Tournafulla (1893-1898) and St Munchin=s (1898-1915). On 14 May, 1915, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh (1915-1917), after which he was Parish Priest of Dromcollogher/ Broadford (1917-1927), Kilmallock (1927-1932) and Bruff (1932-1941). He held the following ecclesiastical appointments: Canon (1915); Vicar Forane (1927); Archdeacon (1932); Vicar General (1937). He published three volumes of the History of the Diocese of

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Limerick. He died on 10 June, 1941, aged 79, and was buried in the church grounds, Bruff. (Tobin, 2004, 3)

where he died on 25 May, 1892. (Feheney, 2007, 7; Spellissey, 1998, 142-44; Hammell, 1982, 35).

Bluett, Rev James (1902-1974), Clergyman RC

Bourke, Rev Patrick (1873-1899), Clergyman RC

ames Bluett, son of John Bluett and Helena Carroll, was born in Effin in 1902. He was educated at St Munchin=s College and the Irish College, Rome, where he was ordained on 12 June, 1927. His first appointment was as curate in Kilmeedy (1927), after which he served in Kileedy (1929) and Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1930-33). On 26 May, 1933, he was transferred from Askeaton to Patrickswell in the same capacity. Subsequently, he was Parish Priest in Kilcornan (1953-62) and, later, he was transferred to Feenagh/Kilmeedy in the same capacity. He was made a Canon of the Limerick Cathedral Chapter in November, 1974. He died in an accident in his home in Kilmeedy on 30 December, 1974, and is buried in the church grounds, Kilmeedy. He had two brothers who were also priests: Fr. John Bluett in the archdiocese of Southwark and Fr. Patrick Bluett in the diocese of Middlesborough. He was also an uncle of Frs. Garrett and James Bluett of the Limerick diocese (LDA).

atrick Bourke was born in Rathkeale and baptised in his local parish church on 24 March, 1873. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 11 July, 1897. After ordination, he was granted permission by Bishop O=Dwyer to go to South Africa for health reasons and he ministered in Port Elizabeth for two years (1897-1899). His health continued to decline, however, and he died in Port Elizabeth in 1899, aged 26 years. He was buried in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. (Tobin, 2004, 4)

Cahill, Rev Edward (1868-1941), Clergyman RC

Bourke, Rev Joseph (c.1840-1892), Clergyman RC

oseph Bourke was born in St Mary=s parish, Limerick, about 1840. He matriculated at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 25 August, 1858. On completion of his priestly studies, he was ordained for the Limerick diocese in June, 1864. He became an important figure in the educational life of Limerick, founding Crescent College and Mungret College, both of which he owned and administered. These colleges, at the time, also catered for young men preparing for the priesthood. Both colleges were subsequently acquired by the Jesuits. Father Bourke served as curate in Bruff (1865-1867) and Rathkeale (1867) and as Administrator in the parish of Cratloe, before his appointment as Parish Priest of Askeaton on 2 October, 1886. On 25 March, 1890, he was transferred to Limerick as Parish Priest of St Patrick=s parish,

dward Cahill, son of Patrick Cahill and his wife, Lucy O=Dea nee Culhane, was born in Callow, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 19 February, 1868. He was educated at Cappagh National School, before entering Mungret College, Limerick, where he completed his secondary schooling. He then entered St Patrick=s Seminary, Maynooth, where he studied for the priesthood. After obtaining minor orders, he decided to enter the Society of Jesus on 8 June, 1891. On completion of his novitiate, he made his congregational promise. He was ordained priest in the Jesuit church, Gardiner Street, Dublin, in 1897. He was then sent to teach at his alma mater, Mungret College, where he was successively teacher, rector and superior. In 1924, he was appointed Professor of Church History and lecturer in sociology at the Jesuit scholasticate, Milltown Park, Dublin. He was a dedicated scholar and researcher and wrote many articles and several books. He was a regular contributor to the journals, The Irish Ecclesiastical Record and The Irish Monthly. Among his books were Freemasonry and the Anti-Christian Movement (1929), which gave rise to a major controversy; The Truth about Freemasonry (Australia); Capitalism and its Alternatives; Ireland and the

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Kingship of Christ. His book, The Framework of a Christian State (1932), was regarded as his most important work. In 1926, he founded the Catholic study circle, An Rioghact, in Dublin. He was also associated with the organisation, Muintir na Tre. He died on 16 July, 1941, after a long illness and was buried in Dublin. The Taoiseach and members of the Oireachtas, including Mr Eamonn DeValera, leader of the opposition, attended his funeral. His scholarly achievements, and his contribution to higher education in Ireland, were somewhat overshadowed by what some regarded as his extreme and controversial views on topics, such as Freemasonry. (SJ archives, 2009; The Standard, 18/7/1941)

on 21 June, 1925. He served for a short time in the archdiocese of Southwark before being appointed curate in Ballyhahill (1926), Ardagh (1928) and Bruff (1936). He was appointed Parish Priest of Glenroe in 1949. He was transferred to Askeaton-Ballysteen as Parish Priest on 14 January, 1964, where he ministered until his sudden death on 10 September, 1969. He is buried in the church grounds, Askeaton. (LDA).

Carroll, Rev Martin (1865-1934), Clergyman RC

Carrick, Rev John (1840-1915), Clergyman RC

ohn Carrick, a native of St Michael=s parish, Limerick, was born about 1840. He was ordained on 22 April, 1862. His first appointment was as chaplain to St Vincent=s Orphanage, Limerick (1862-1863). After that, he was curate, successively, in Adare (1863-1864); Rathkeale (1864-1865); Kilmallock (1865-1871); Newcastle West (1871-1878); Kildimo/ Pallaskenry (1878-1879). On 23 April, 1879, he was appointed Parish Priest of Kilfinane/Ardpatrick, where he remained until 1885. On 4 November, 1885, he was transferred, as Parish Priest, to Killeedy, but remained there only two years. On 30 July, 1887, he was transferred to Monagea as Parish Priest and remained there until 1892. On 13 September, 1892, he received his final transfer to Kilfinane, where he was Parish Priest until his death on 19 April, 1915, at the age of 75. In 1892, he was honoured with the appointment of Vicar Forane and, on 10 June, 1912, three years before his death, he was appointed a Canon of the cathedral chapter. (Tobin, 2004, 7)

artin Carroll was baptised on 28 December, 1865. He studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 16 November, 1890. Following ordination, he was sent to the Dunboyne Institute, Maynooth, for advanced studies (1890-1891). Following these studies, he was assigned to St Munchin=s College, the diocesan junior seminary, as a teacher (1891-1892). He was then appointed curate, successively, in Bruff (1891-1892), Mahoonagh (1892-1894), St Munchin=s (1894-1898) and Croagh (1898-1900). He then experienced health problems, as a consequence of which his ministry was either limited or completely interrupted. He did, however, have the following periods of ministry: St Munchin=s College (teacher, 1902-1903); Knockaderry (curate, 1918-1920); Monagea (curate, 1923-1927). He died at St John=s Hospital, Limerick, on 7 October, 1934, aged 68 years. (Tobin, 2004, 10)

Carroll, Rev Patrick (1857-1903), Clergyman RC

Carroll, Rev John (c.1900-1969), Clergyman RC

ohn Carroll was born around 1900 and was educated for the priesthood in St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained

atrick Carroll was born in Bruff and baptised in his local parish church on 16 August, 1857. He studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 15 July, 1883. He was then sent to the Dunboyne Institute, Maynooth, for advanced studies (1882-1884). Following this, he was appointed chaplain at Laurel Hill Convent, Limerick (1884-1885) and acting Dean at St

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Patrick=s College, Maynooth (1885-1886). He was then appointed chaplain at Presentation Convent, Limerick (1886-1888) and teacher at St Munchin=s College (1888-1891). After this, he was appointed curate, successively, in Monagea (1891-1892), Croom (1892-1898) and Croagh (1898-1903). He died on 15 November, 1903, aged 46 years. (Tobin, 2004, 11)

Carroll, Rev Patrick (c.1838-1887), Clergyman RC


Patrick Carroll, born about 1838, was ordained priest for the diocese of Limerick on 12 July, 1863. After ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Cappagh (1863-1864), Tournafulla (1864-1865), Dromcollogher (1865-1867) and St Munchin=s (1867-1876). On 18 December, 1876, he was appointed Parish Priest of Colmanswell, where he remained for seven years. On 11 July, 1887, he was transferred as Parish Priest to Croagh, where he ministered until his death on 23 August, 1887. (Tobin, 2004, 11)

appeared in 1943. The success of Patch, however, gave rise to a mini-series of books, all featuring the adventures of the eponymous schoolboy hero, Patch. Thus, in addition to several editions of the book, Patch, the series included Patch and Fan, which appeared in 1946, and Patch Scatters Culture, which was first published in 1953. Fr Carroll was editor of the national Catholic journal, Ave Maria, for several years and was also vice-president of the University of Notre Dame. He died in Notre Dame on 18 November, 1959, and was buried in the community cemetery there. He was a brother of Sr Brigid Carroll (1869-1904) (qv). (CHC archives, Notre Dame, USA)

Carroll, Rev William (1889-1964), Clergyman RC

Carroll, Rev Patrick J (1875-1959), Clergyman RC

atrick Joseph Carroll, son of Joseph Carroll and his wife, Johanna Moloney, was born in Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 15 August, 1875. He attended Cappagh National School, where he distinguished himself as a bright and diligent student. In 1896, he went to the USA and joined the Holy Cross congregation, which conducted the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, IN. He made his religious profession on 15 August, 1898, and underwent his seminary training and university education at Notre Dame University, IN. He was ordained priest in Washington DC on 12 August, 1900, after which he returned to Notre Dame, where he spent the remainder of his life. His first book about his native Cappagh was, Round About Home (1914), soon to be followed by a book of poems, Songs of Creelabeg (1916). His most popular book, however, which was immensely popular with Limerick people at home and in the USA, was Patch, first published in 1946. A precursor of this, Patch of Askeaton Days, had

illiam Carroll was born in Bruree, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his parish church on 12 February, 1889. He attended St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 22 June, 1913. His first appointment was as curate in St Mary=s, Chorley, in the archdiocese of Liverpool (1913-1916), after which he was seconded to the British army as a war-time chaplain in France and North Africa (1916-1919). On his return to Ireland after World War I, he was curate, successively, in Fedamore (1919-1921), Feenagh (1921-1922), Ballingarry (1922-1927) and St Michael=s (1927-1938). In 1938, he was appointed Administrator in St Michael=s and, four years later, Parish Priest of Glin in 1942. On 6 August, 1948, he was appointed Parish Priest of Rathkeale (1948-1964). His ecclesiastical appointments included: Canon (1948), Vicar Forane (1948) and Archdeacon (1962). He died on 1 June, 1964, at the age of 75, and was buried in the church grounds, Rathkeale. He was a brother of Rev James and Rev Patrick Carroll, both priests in the diocese of Limerick (Tobin, 2004, 13)

Casey, Rev Patrick (1876-1946), Clergyman RC

P
18

atrick Casey was born in Ardpatrick in 1876 and was educated at St Munchin=s College, Limerick. He matriculated at St

Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 5 September, 1894, enrolling in the philosophy class. On completion of his priestly studies, he was ordained on 17 June, 1900. After an initial ministry in Liverpool, his first appointment in the diocese of Limerick was as curate in St Munchin=s (1906-08). After this he was curate in Ballingarry (1908-19), Bulgaden (1919-20), Askeaton (1920-21) and Mahoonagh (1921-28). In 1928 he was appointed Parish Priest in Loughill, where he remained until his transfer to Askeaton as Parish Priest on 1 June, 1940. He died in a tragic shooting incident at the presbytery, Askeaton, on Sunday 6 January, 1946. He is buried in the church grounds, Askeaton. (Hammell, 1984, 40; Tobin, 2004, 13).

(1898-1907). He died on 21 December, 1912, at the early age of 50 years. (Tobin, 2004, 17)

Conway, Rev. John (c.1851-1929), Clergyman RC

Clifford, Rev John (1820-1880), Clergyman RC

ohn Clifford was born in Bulgaden, Co. Limerick, on 25 February, 1820, and ordained in 1845. His first appointment was as curate in Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1845-1846), after which he served in the same capacity in Knockaderry (1846-1847), Domin/ Athlacca (1847-1849), Manister (1849-1850), Kilmallock (1850-1858), Shanagolden (1858-1861), Rathkeale (1861-1862) and Newcastle West (1862-1863). In 1863, he was appointed Parish Priest of Stonehall (Kilcornan), but was transferred, in the same capacity, to Monagea within the year. He remained in this latter post until his early death on 1 August, 1880, at the age of 59 years. He is buried in the church at Monagea, Co. Limerick. (Feheney, 2007, 15; Tobin 2004, 15).

ohn Conway was ordained at Presentation Convent, Limerick, on 25 July, 1876. He spent the first year after ordination on loan to the diocese of Clogher (1876-1877), after which, he was appointed curate, successively, at Templeglantine (1877-1878); Tournafulla (1878-1880): Manister (1880); Parteen (1880-1881); Knockaderry (1881-1884); Glenroe (1884-1887); Croom (1887-1892); Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1892); Effin (1892-1895); St Munchin=s Limerick (1895-1903); Croagh (1903-1908); Tournafulla (1908-1918); Bulgaden (1918-1919) and Mahoonagh (1919-1929). He died at Mahoonagh on 12 September, 1929, and is buried there in the church grounds. (Tobin 2004, 19-20).

Corkery, Rev Timothy (c.1811-1891), Clergyman RC

Connolly, Rev John (1862-1912), Clergyman RC

imothy Corkery, born around 1811, was educated for the priesthood in the Irish College in Paris. Following ordination was appointed curate, successively, in Croom (1837-1845), Croagh/ Kilfinny (1845-1848); Croom (1848-1850); Glenroe (1850-1853) and Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1853-1859). In 1859, he was appointed Parish Priest of Tournafulla and remained there until 1867, when ill-health forced him to retire. He died 28 December, 1891. Timothy was a brother of Rev Patrick Corkery, also in the diocese of Limerick, who died 13 April, 1890. (Tobin, 22)

ohn Connolly was born in Bruff and baptised in his parish church on 8 May, 1862. He was ordained for the diocese of Limerick on 27 February, 1887, after which he ministered for two years in the diocese of Liverpool. On his return to Ireland, he was curate, successively, in Killeedy (1889), St Patrick=s (1889-1890), Ballyagran (1890-1891), Bruree (1891-1896), Kilmallock (1896-1898) and Rathkeale

Cregan, Rev James (1938-2010), Clergyman RC

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ames Cregan, son of James Cregan and Katherine Ryan, was born in Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 1 August, 1938. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 9 June, 1963. He joined the diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee, USA, and spent 46

years ministering there. In addition to serving in parishes in Montgomery, Ala., Starke and Quincy, he also served as chaplain to the National Guard and Florida State Prison. He died in the Catholic rectory in Lanark village, Florida, on 3 April, 2010, and was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, Pensacola, FLA. (The Times, Apalachicola & Carrabelle, 5/4/2010)

1980. He is buried with members of his Spiritan Congregation in Dublin (Farragher, Irish Spiritans Remembered)

Cronin, Rev William (d.1818), Clergyman RC

Cronin, Rev James (1914-1980), Clergyman RC

ames Cronin was born on 4 February, 1914, son of Patrick and Annie Cronin, at the Quay, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. He attended Askeaton National School, after which, he completed his secondary education at Blackrock College, Dublin. He entered the Holy Ghost Congregation in 1932 in Kimmage Manor, going on to complete his philosophy course at Blackrock Castle. He was then assigned to St Mary=s College, Port of Spain, Trinidad (1935-37), where he spent two years of his prefecture teaching. In 1937, he was sent to study theology in Rome, where was ordained on 23 June, 1940. He then continued postgraduate studies in theology, taking a Doctorate in Divinity (DD) at the Gregorian University in 1942. The next year he joined the Holy Ghost mission in Nigeria, landing on a stretcher, and continuing to be a sick man during his entire stay in Nigeria. Nevertheless, he struggled to do his share of ministry. He taught theology at St Paul=s, the senior seminary, and contributed a weekly article to the Nigerian Catholic Herald. In 1947, he returned to Ireland, following a serious illness and taught theology at the Holy Ghost Missionary College, Kimmage Manor, Dublin. He then moved to Rockwell College, Tipperary, where he taught mathematics and science. He completed a Higher Diploma in Education at UCD in 1958, after which he returned to teach in Rockwell. In 1971, he began attending Cuan Mhuire Clinic, run by Sister Consilio Fitzgerald, in Athy Co. Kildare. He stayed on as chaplain to the clinic and began to promote Alcoholics Anonymous. In the 1970s, he was diagnosed as suffering from cancer and he died at St Luke=s Hospital, Dublin, on 18 August,

ev William Cronin was, according to Begley (III, 602), Parish Priest of Askeaton from 1814 to April, 1818. Previous to this time, he had been curate in Rathkeale. Begley also states that Cronin died of a >lingering illness= at Ann Street, Limerick=. There is no record of his burial place. (Begley, III, 602)

Crotty, Rev Daniel (1843-1913), Clergyman RC

aniel Crotty was born in Carheeny, Kildimo, Co. Limerick, around 1846. He was educated at the Jesuit College, Limerick (1862-1866), and ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 6 October, 1872. After ordination he served as a curate in St Munchin=s (1872), Banogue (1872-1873), Ballyagran (1873-1874), Cratloe (1874-1878), Feenagh (1878), Killeedy (1878-1879), Glenroe (1879-1881), Tournafulla (1881-1883), Croagh (1883-1888), Askeaton (1888), Donaghmore (1888-89), Manister (1889-90), Donaghmore (1890-92), Ballyagran (1892-1902), Donaghmore (1902-1907). His faculties were withdrawn in 1907 and he went to live with his sister in Carheeny, Kildimo, where he is listed in the 1911 census. He was an active supporter of the Land League and voiced his support for Limerick priests, like Father Eugene Sheehy, who was imprisoned, under the terms of the Coercian Act, for his part in agrarian reform. Crotty died in 1913. (Tobin, 2004, 24; NAI Census, 1911; Limerick Jesuit Centenary Record, 1859-1959; Ireland CRI, LDS).

Crowley, Rev David (c.1914-1998), Clergyman RC

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avid Crowley, born about 1914, was ordained on 18 June, 1939. After ordination, he was appointed curate,

successively, in Banogue (1940), Bruree (1940-1941), Tournafulla (1941-1943), Kilfinane (1943-1955) and Kilmallock (1955-1967). On 23 January, 1967, he was nominated Parish Priest of Cappagh and formally inducted in that post by the Bishop of Limerick on 27 January, 1967. On 14 October, 1969, he was transferred to Donoghmore as Parish Priest, where he remained for eleven years. On 23 August, 1990, he was transferred to Kildimo/ Pallaskenry, as Parish Priest. The same year he was appointed a Canon of the cathedral chapter. He died in Kildimo on 7 November, 1998, and was buried in the church grounds. (LDA).

2002. He is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. (Farragher, S, Irish Spiritans Remembered)

Crowley, Rev Timothy (1912-2002), Clergyman RC

Crowley, Rev Edward (1922-2002), Clergyman RC

dward Crowley, son of John Crowley and Zita O=Connell, was born in West Square, Askeaton, on 11 January, 1922. He was educated at Askeaton National School and Rockwell College. He entered the Holy Ghost Congregation (like his older brother, Tim) in Kilshane and made his profession on 8 September, 1941. He then began his philosophical studies and was awarded a BA in Philosophy by UCD in 1944. He was assigned to Trinidad and taught at St Mary=s College, Port of Spain, from 1944 to 1947. From 1947 to 1951, he studied theology at the Holy Ghost Scholasticate, Kimmage Manor, Dublin. He was ordained to the priesthood at Clonliffe College, Dublin, on 23 December, 1950. His first overseas appointment was in the diocese of Owerri, Nigeria, where he taught in secondary schools and held the post of Principal. In 1963, he took up a post at the Teacher Training College, Mbulu Newa. Owing to ill-health, Father Eddie returned to Ireland in 1965 and, subsequently, undertook ministry in the dioceses of Nottingham and Southwark England. In 1970, he went to the USA and had some thirty years of fruitful ministry in New Orleans, California, Arizona and Arkansas. In 2000, he celebrated his Golden Jubilee of Ordination. Around this time, his health began to fail and he returned to Ireland in September, 2002. He died at the Limerick Regional Hospital on 5 November,

im Crowley, son of John Crowley and Zita O=Connell, was born in Ballingarry, Co. Limerick, on 30 August, 1912. His family subsequently moved to Askeaton, where they have lived ever since. He was educated at Blackrock College, Dublin, and entered the Holy Ghost Congregation, making his profession on 8 September, 1932. He completed his ecclesiastical studies at Kimmage Manor, Dublin, and was ordained to the priesthood on 25 June, 1939. His first mission overseas was in Nigeria, where he worked in the diocese of Owerri. He remained in Nigeria until 1967, when, like many other missionaries, he had to leave because of the civil war. He then took up ministry in the USA, first in New Orleans and, subsequently, in Brooklyn. During his time in New York, he completed a Diploma in Counseling at St John=s University. He subsequently served in Sierra Leone. In 1988, he retired to the Kimmage community. Due to ill-health, he spent his remaining years in Marian House, Kimmage Manor. He died there on 14 September, 2002, two months before his brother, Fr. Eddy Crowley. He is buried in Dardistown cemetery, Co. Dublin. (Farragher, S, Irish Spiritans Remembered)

Culhane, Rev George (1856-1934), Clergyman RC

eorge Culhane was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 30 December, 1856. After attending the National School, Cappagh, he studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 31 March, 1888. After ordination he was sent on loan to the archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh for three years. There he served in Perth and Edinburgh. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Ardagh (1891-1892), Feenagh (1892-1896), Killeedy (1896-1904), Abbeyfeale (1894) and Effin (1904-1916). On

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22 September, 1916, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cratloe (1916-1923) and transferred to Bulgaden in the same capacity seven years later (1923-1934). He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1923 and he died on 23 March, 1934, aged 77 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Bulgaden, Co. Limerick. He was a brother of Rev Stephen Culhane (qv). (Tobin, 2004, 25)

the church grounds, Croom. He was appointed Canon of the Limerick Cathedral Chapter in 1925. (Tobin, 2004, 28)

Cussen, Rev Edward (c.1800-1860), Clergyman RC

Culhane, Rev Stephen (1858-1920), Clergyman RC

tephen Culhane was born in Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 4 November, 1858. He was educated at the local national school, Cappagh. On completion of his seminary training, he was ordained on 8 June, 1884. Following his ordination, he served brief periods as curate in St John=s and St Patrick=s, Limerick, before being seconded temporarily to the Archdiocese of St Andrews, Edinburgh. He continued working in Scotland until 1889, when he was recalled to Limerick. In the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in St John=s (1989); Fedamore (1898-1890), Ballingarry (1890-1908); Bulgaden (1908-1918) and Stonehall/ Kilcornan (1918-1920). Early in 1920, his health declined and he died in Stonehall on 4 November, 1958. He was a brother of Rev George Culhane (qv). (Tobin, 2004, 26)

Curtin, Rev Timothy (1856-1936), Clergyman RC

dward Cussen is thought to have been born near Charleville, Co. Cork, in the diocese of Cloyne. This may explain why there is virtually no information about him in the Limerick diocesan archives. Before his arrival in Askeaton, he was curate in Croom. He came to Askeaton as curate in 1837 and became Parish Priest in 1839, in succession to Archdeacon Michael Fitzgerald. Father Cussen=s organisational skills came to the fore when the old parish church in Askeaton was accidentally burned down, following a fire at the corn mills of John Norris Russell, in 1847. Though still at the height of the Great Famine, he began collecting money and, in 1850, he completed the present St Mary=s church in Askeaton. He died on 8 February, 1860, and was buried under the aisle of St Mary=s Church, Askeaton. He was succeeded by Father James Raleigh. Some of Father Cussen=s relatives, including his brother and mother, also moved from Charleville and purchased a farm in Aughinish. From there, the family came to Askeaton, purchasing Rockabbey and the accompanying farm, where the family continued to live up to the 1950s. (www.limerickdiocese.com; Catholic Directory, 1836).

imothy Curtin was born in Tournafulla, Co. Limerick, on 18 July, 1856. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained priest in Rome on 12 March, 1881. His first appointment was as temporary assistant priest in Ballingarry in 1881. He was then appointed curate, successively, in Cratloe (1881-1882), Ballingarry (1882-1886), Abbeyfeale (1886-1895), Effin (1895-1898) and Kilmallock (1898-1902). On 16 November, 1902, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh and on 8 January, 1908, he was transferred to Croom in the same capacity. He ministered in Croom until his death on 24 August, 1936, aged 80 years. He was buried in

Danaher, Rev Stephen (1839-1918), Clergyman RC

tephen Danaher was born on 8 September, 1839. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained in November, 1866. Following his ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Fedamore (1866-1867), Loughill (1867-1869), Croagh (1869-1874), Ardpatrick (1874-1877) and Shanagolden (1878-1885). On 22 June, 1885, he was appointed Parish Priest of Colmanswell, where he remained for two years (1885-1887), before being transferred, in the same capacity, to

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Croagh (1887-1892). Five years later, he was transferred as Parish Priest to Loughill/ Ballyhahill, where he remained until his death on 16 October, 1918, aged 79 years. He was buried in the church, Ballyhahill, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 28)

Doody, Rev John (1849-1884), Clergyman RC

ohn Doody, born around 1849, was educated at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and the Irish Ecclesiastical College, Paris. He was ordained to the priesthood at Presentation Convent, Limerick, on 25 July, 1874. He was then appointed curate in the following parishes: Banogue (1874-1875); Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1875); St Patrick=s (end of 1875); Parteen (1876-1880); St John=s Limerick (1880-1884). While at St John=s, he was also chaplain to the Presentation Convent (1880-1882) and to the Good Shepherd Convent (1882-1884). He died on 27 March, 1884. (Tobin, 2004, 30).

After ordination, he was sent, on loan, to the diocese of St Augustine, Florida (1912-1919). On his return to Ireland in June, 1919, he was curate, successively, in: Effin (1919-1920); Bruff (1920-1924); Effin, a second time (1924-1926); Knockaderry (1926-1930); Dromcollogher (1930-1937). On 5 July, 1937, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh, where he remained until his transfer to Feenagh in the same capacity on 7 March, 1945. On 5 August, 1948, he was transferred as, Parish Priest, to Adare, where he died on 23 February, 1963. He was buried in Adare, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 30)

Enright, Rev James (c.1816-1886), Clergyman RC

Doupe, Rev Stephen (1905-1972), Clergyman RC

tephen Doupe, son of Thomas Doupe and Johanna Collins, was born in Askeaton, Co. Limerick, in 1905. He attended Cappagh National School before entering Copsewood College, Pallaskenry. He completed his seminary training in England and was ordained Catholic priest in 1941 for the diocese of Northampton. He ministered in the parishes of Bedford, Luton, St Ives (Cambridge) and Hundington. He retired because of ill-health in 1970 and died suddenly in 1972. He is buried in the Roman Catholic section of the public cemetery in Hunstanton, Norfolk. (Mulcair, S., 2007).

ames Enright was ordained around 1840, possibly in the diocesan College, Carlow. After ordination, he served in the diocese of Glasgow (1840-1843) before coming to Askeaton/ Ballysteen as curate (1843-1844). He subsequently served as curate in Bulgaden (1844-1846), Croom (1846-1848) and a second term in Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1849-1851). In 1851 he was appointed Parish Priest of Ballingarry (1851-1874), after which he was transferred to Parteen (1874-1878) in the same capacity. In 1878, he was transferred to Bruree as Parish Priest, where he remained until his death. During his final two years in Bruree, he is listed at Administrator, not Parish Priest (1884-1886). He died on 7 October, 1886, and is buried in Bruree, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 32).

Ferguson, Rev Charles (1808-1845), Clergyman RC

Dunworth, Rev Robert (1886-1963), Clergyman RC

obert Dunworth was born in Bruree, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his native parish on 1 August, 1886. On completion of his ecclesiastical studies, he was ordained at St John Lateran Basilica, Rome, on 6 April, 1912.

harles Ferguson, son David Ferguson and his wife, Mary O=Connor, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 23 June, 1808. He joined the Society of Jesus, entering the Society=s scholasticate in Rome on 26 August, 1832. He completed his novitiate and then embarked on higher studies at the Irish College in Rome. After ordination, he returned to Ireland, where he was appointed to teach at the Jesuit scholasticate in Tullabeg, Rahan, Co. Offaly. Afterwards, he was stationed in Dublin,

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where he ministered for some years. He was then appointed Rector of the College of St Francis Xavier. He took his Fourth Vow on 2 February, 1845. He then began to experience poor health. On 24 December, 1845, he suddenly went blind and one of his colleagues went for the holy oils to administer the last rites. Unfortunately, however, Charles died before his colleague returned. He was buried in the >old= Jesuit burial plot in Glasnevin cemetery, Dublin 11. He was said to be a man of great energy and eloquence. He was a brother of David (qv), John (qv), James (qv) and Robert (qv) Ferguson. (SJ Archives, 2011)

(1882-1887). On 14 September, 1887, he was appointed Administrator of Glin, where he remained until his transfer to Manister as Parish Priest on 6 April, 1891. He remained in this post until his death on 27 April, 1914. He is buried in the church grounds, Glin. (Tobin, 2004, 36).

Fitzgerald, Rev Michael (1788-1863), Clergyman RC

Fitzgerald, Rev David (1884-1963), Clergyman RC

avid Fitzgerald, a native of Ballingarry, was baptised in his own parish church on 22 November, 1884. He attended St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 19 June, 1910. After ordination, he served in the Archdiocese of Liverpool (1910-1914), before returning to Ireland to take up a post as curate in Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1914-1918). He subsequently served as curate in Abbeyfeale (1918-1922), Croom (1922-1924), Knockaderry (1924-1926) and Bruff (1926-1936). On 14 March, 1936, he was appointed Parish Priest of Stonehall (Kilcornan), where he remained until his transfer to Coolcappa in the same capacity (1942-1953). He was then transferred to Kildimo/ Pallaskenry, where he remained until his death on 7 December, 1963. He was made a Canon of the Limerick Cathedral Chapter on 13 April, 1956. He is buried in the church grounds in Kildimo. (Tobin, 2004, 35).

Fitzgerald, Rev John (c.1840-1914), Clergyman RC

ohn Fitzgerald was ordained on 1 January, 1869, after which he took up an appointment as curate in Abbeyfeale (1869-1871). He was subsequently curate in St Patrick=s (1871-1872), Loughill (1872-1874), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1874-1875), Banogue (1875), Bulgaden (1875-1881), Kilmallock (1881-1882) and, for a second time, Bulgaden

ichael Fitzgerald, son of Thomas Fitzgerald and Mary Meehan, was born in Ballydoorty, Castlemahon, Co. Limerick, in 1788. He was educated at the Irish College, Rome, where he was ordained and, subsequently, served as a member of the seminary staff. His first appointment in Ireland was as Parish Priest of Broadford/ Dromcollogher in 1818. There he purchased a field and built a Church in 1824. Soon afterwards, he was transferred to Askeaton, where he remained until 1837. He then became Parish Priest of Ballingarry, before his transfer to Rathkeale in the same capacity in 1849. In Askeaton, Fitzgerald came up against Rev Richard Murray (qv), Church of Ireland Rector in Askeaton, who was pursuing a very active campaign of proselytisation there. According to Murray=s own evidence (BPP 1837, [543-I, 543-II], 836-38), he succeeded in converting some >160 to 170 adults, besides about 300 young persons and children= from Roman Catholicism. Fr Fitzgerald led a vigorous campaign against this proselytisation. It ceased when Rev Murray accepted an offer of the deanery of Ardagh from the Duke of Northumberland. Moreover, many of Murray=s converts subsequently immigrated to the US and Canada. The Bishop of Limerick then made Fitzgerald an Archdeacon, possibly as a reward for his successful campaign. In 1838, Archdeacon Fitzgerald was transferred to his native parish, Ballingarry. He gave evidence to the Royal Commission on the Poorer Classes in 1835 and to the Royal Commission on the State of Law and Practice in Respect of Occupation of Land in Ireland in 1844. He died in Ballingarry on 6 February, 1863, and is buried in Castlemahon, Co. Limerick. (LDA; HCPP 1837, [543-I, 543-II], 836-38; HCPP 1835

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(369), 689; HCPP 1845 [616] [617], 788-92).

Fitzgerald, Rev Mortimer (c.1829-1889), Clergyman RC

ortimer Fitzgerald, born around 1829, and was ordained 29 July, 1857, in the Convent of Mercy, Limerick. He was appointed curate, successively, in Kilfinane/ Ardpatrick (1857-1859), Bruff (1859-1861), Kilfinane/ Ardpatrick (1861-1865) before his appointment to Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1865-1872). On 20 January, 1872, he was transferred from Askeaton/ Ballysteen as curate to Kilmallock (1872-1876), before his appointment as Parish Priest of Ballyagran on 5 December, 1876. He died in that post on 26 July, 1889, and is buried in Ballyagran. (Tobin, 2004, 37).

being >Rockites=, who were hanged in the >square= in Adare in 1922. At that time, since the parishes of Stonehall and Cappagh were united, Father Foley served both places. Though he retired in 1835, owing to ill-health, he resumed his parochial duties again in 1841. He died in 1859, at the age of 52. He is buried in the church in Kilcornan. (Feheney, 2010)

Gleeson, Rev Luke (c.1830-1902), Clergyman RC

Fitzgerald, Rev Patrick (1917-1978), Clergyman RC

atrick Fitzgerald was born in Dromcollogher, Co. Limerick, in December, 1917. He was educated at Dromcollogher National School and St Munchin=s Diocesan College, Limerick. He studied for the priesthood in the Irish College, Rome, where he was ordained in 1942. He then remained in Rome to complete postgraduate studies, at the end of which he was awarded a doctorate in Canon Law. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate in Rathkeale, before his appointment as Parish Priest of Cappagh in 1968. He died suddenly while on holiday in Tramore on 8 August, 1978, aged 60 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Cappagh, Co. Limerick. He was a keen student of local history. (Whelan, n.d., 33)

uke Gleeson was ordained on 21 May, 1853. Following his ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Glin (1853-1855); Croom (1855-1857); Rathkeale (1857-1863); Bruff (1863-1866); Glin (1866-1873). On 27 November, 1873, he was appointed Parish Priest of Stonehall (Kilcornan), where he remained for five years. On 21 March, 1878, he was transferred, as Parish Priest, to Parteen, where he remained until his death on 22 June, 1902, aged 72 or 75 years. The diocesan records note that he was offered the post of Parish Priest of Glenroe, but opted for Stonehall (Kilcornan), instead. (Tobin, 2004, 41)

Guinane, Rev Thomas (1888-1965), Clergyman RC

Foley, Rev Timothy (c.1797-1859), Clergyman RC

imothy Foley was born in Cowpark, Kilcornan, and, following ordination, became Parish Priest of Stonehall (Kilcornan) in 1827, after a short period as curate in Adare. While he was curate in Adare, he had the sad duty of comforting four men, convicted of

homas Guinane, son of Daniel Guinane and his wife, Margaret Kiely, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 23 July, 1888. He attended Rathkeale National School and St Munchin=s College, Limerick. On deciding to become a priest, he studied at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 22 July, 1913. After ordination, he was sent on loan to New Zealand, where he worked with Father O=Shea from Kildimo. After ministering for several years in New Zealand, especially in the Archdiocese of Wellington, he formally requested a transfer to New Zealand. His request was granted and he was incardinated into the Archdiocese of Wellington on 17 January, 1923. He spent the remainder of his life in New Zealand and died at the Mercy Hospital, Palmerstown, North, Wellington, on

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29 July, 1965, aged 77 years. He was buried in Wellington, New Zealand. (Tobin, 2004, 43)

Hallinan, Rev John (1844-1917), Clergyman RC

Hickey, Rev James (c.1825-71), Clergyman RC

ev James Hickey, born about 1825, was Parish Priest of Askeaton in succession to Father Raleigh, who was transferred to Rathkeale in 1863. Though Begley describes him as a >Cashel Priest=, Hammel does not confirm this and it is more likely that Begley is confusing him with a younger Cashel priest of the same name (matriculated 19 October, 1858, ordained 1863). Our James Hickey had previously been Parish Priest of Donoghmore. He matriculated at Maynooth on 3 November, 1843, entering the Humanities class. He was a nephew of Dr. Ryan, Bishop of Limerick (1828-64), and his appointment as Parish Priest of Askeaton in 1863 is said to be related to a misunderstanding between Bisop Ryan and his coadjutor and successor, Bishop Butler. Father Hickey died 20 July, 1871. (Begley, III, 602; Toomey and Greensmyth, 1991, 129-30)

ohn Hallinan was born in Coolcappa, Co. Limerick, on 7 September, 1844. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained priest in Rome in April, 1873. His first appointment after ordination was as temporary assistant priest in Rathkeale in 1873. Subsequently, he was appointed curate, successively, in Fedamore (1873-1876), Croagh (1876-1883) and Kilmallock (1883-1892). On 18 January, 1892, he was appointed Parish priest of Cappagh. He remained in this post for ten years, after which he was transferred to Ardagh on 10 December, 1902. He retired from this post, owing to illness, on 6 September, 1916, and died some months later on 7 May, 1916. He was buried in the church grounds in Ardagh, Co. Limerick. He was a cousin of Most Rev Denis Hallinan (qv), Bishop of Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 44)

Halpin, Rev John (1820-1894), Clergyman RC

Higgins, Rev William (1837-1917), Clergyman RC

illiam Higgins was baptised on 24 December, 1837, and matriculated at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 9 September, 1864, into the Physics class (an unusual subject of study in a seminary at that period). After completing of his philosophy and theology, he was ordained on 14 June, 1868, and then appointed curate in Knockaderry (1869-1883), and St John=s Limerick (1883-1886). On 15 December, 1886, he was appointed Administrator of St John=s and remained there until his appointment as Parish Priest of Askeaton- Ballysteen on 25 March, 1890. He remained only two years in Askeaton, however, before being transferred on 15 February, 1892, to Effin as Parish Priest. He died in Effin on 2 February, 1917, and is buried there (Begley, III, 602; Tobin, 2004, 50).

ohn Halpin was born in Donaghmore, Co. Limerick, about 1820. He was ordained on 23 September, 1848, for the diocese of Limerick. His early ecclesiastical appointments included curate, successively, in Cratloe (1848-1850) and St John=s (1850-1861). In 1861, he was appointed Parish Priest of Kilfinane/ Ardpatrick and remained there until 1877. On 19 January, 1877, he was appointed Parish Priest of Rathkeale, where he remained until his death. He was chaplain to the Rathkeale Workhouse (1877-1894) and held the posts of Vicar Forane from 1864 and Vicar General from 1877. In 1885, he was appointed Archdeacon of the diocese of Limerick, a coveted honour. He died on 30 April, 1894, aged 73 years. He was a brother of Rev Jeremiah Halpin (1837-1904), Parish Priest of Banogue, and Rev Timothy Halpin (1825-1900), Parish Priest of Donaghmore, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 44-45)

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Halpin, Rev Joseph (1911-1988), Clergyman RC

oseph Halpin, son of Patrick Halpin and Catherine Murphy, was born (according to Spiritan records) in Askeaton on 1 January, 1911 (ABC News, 2004, 94, however, lists the date as 11 September, 1910). He attended Askeaton National School before going on to complete his secondary schooling at Blackrock College, Dublin. He entered the Holy Ghost Congregation and was professed in the Holy Ghost Scholasticate, Kimmage, in 1931. After completing his philosophical studies, he was assigned to Trinidad, where he served as a teacher at St Mary=s College, Port of Spain, from 1932 to 1935. On returning to Ireland, he completed his theological studies at Kimmage and was ordained in 1939, after which he was assigned to the Nigerian Mission in Onitsha-Owerri. It was a period of great activity in the missions and the days were too short for the ministry to which Joe felt called. He subsequently became Head of the Teacher Training College in Nsukka. Ill-health, however, in the form of skin cancer, forced him to quit the tropics in 1957. He returned to Blackrock College and continued teaching in spite of his ailment. During his last years, despite regular visits to hospital for treatment, he continued to participate fully in community life. He died peacefully on 17 July, 1988, and is buried in Dean=s Grange cemetery, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. (Farragher, S, Irish Spiritans Reemembered)

appointed curate in St Michael=s (1905-1926). In 1926, he was appointed Administrator in St Michael=s and on 10 December, 1927, he was appointed Parish Priest of St Mary=s (1927-1938). On 25 August, 1938, he was transferred to Newcastle West as Parish Priest, where he remained until his death on 12 November, 1964, aged 90 years. His diocesan appointments included: Canon of the Cathedral Chapter (1932), Vicar General (1938), Vicar Capitular (1945) and Dean (1961). He was buried in the church grounds, Newcastle West, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 46)

Harty, Rev William (1885-1954), Clergyman RC

Hannon, Rev Michael (1873-1964), Clergyman RC

ichael Hannon was born in Croagh, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 10 December, 1873. He attended Croagh National School and St Munchin=s College, Limerick. On deciding to study for the priesthood, he entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained on 18 Jun, 1899. Following his ordination, he was sent on loan to Scotland, where he spent six years as assistant priest in Dumfries, Wigtown and Kirkcudbridge in the diocese of Galloway. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was

illiam Harty was born in St John=s parish, Limerick, and baptised in the parish church on 4 March, 1885. He was educated at St Munchin=s College, Limerick, and St Patrick=s, seminary, Maynooth, where he was ordained priest on 20 June, 1909. After ordination, he served for some time in the archdiocese of Westminster, London, before returning to Limerick to take up appointments as curate, successively, in Effin (1912-1917), Glenroe (1917-1918), Mahoonagh (1918), Ballingarry (1918-1921), Rathkeale (1921-1924) and St Michael=s (1924-1932). In 1932, he was appointed Administrator in St Michael=s and he was appointed Parish Priest of Bulgaden in 1937. Subsequently, he was Parish Priest in St Mary=s (1938-1946), before his appointment as Parish Priest of Askeaton/ Ballysteen on 7 February, 1946. He fell into bad health, however, and resigned his post as Parish Priest of Askeaton/Ballysteen on 14 April, 1948. He then retired to Waterford, where he lived with his brother. He died in Waterford on 14 March, 1954, but was returned to Limerick for burial. (Tobin, 2004, 47)

Hayes, Rev Robert (1867-1926), Clergyman RC

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obert Hayes, son of Thomas Hayes, and his wife, Ellen Feeney was born in Toomdeely, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised in Askeaton Catholic church on 4 April, 1867. He studied for the priesthood at

All Hallows College, Dublin, where he was ordained for the diocese of Salford in 1893. He was assistant priest at St Ann=s, Blackburn (1894-1898) and Parish Priest of Mount Carmel, Blackley, Manchester (1899-1926). Here he supervised the building of a new church in 1908. In 1911, he suffered a bad fall off a ladder, from which he never fully recovered. He died in 1926 and was buried in St Joseph=s Catholic cemetery, Moston, Manchester. (White, M, Liverpool, 2011).

January, 1880, he was appointed Parish Priest of Mahoonagh and he continued in this post until his death on 30 January, 1919, aged 81. He was buried in the church grounds, Mahoonagh, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 51). He was an uncle of Rev John Irwin (qv, 1938-2002) and Rev Michael Irwin, both in the diocese of Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 51)

Keating, Rev Joseph (1842-1879), Clergyman RC

Irwin, Rev John (1938-2002), Clergyman RC

ohn Irwin, a native of Ballingarry, was born in April, 1938. He attended St Munchins= College, Limerick, after which he decided to study for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth. He was ordained on 21 June, 1953. After ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Kileedy (1953-1859), Kildimo/ Pallaskenry (1959-1969) and Rathkeale (1969-1978). On 23 August, 1978, he was appointed Administrator of the parish of Cappagh and remained in this post until he was appointed Parish Priest of Kilcornan on 7 July, 1982. On 21 August, 1987, he was transferred to Dromin/ Athlacca as Parish Priest, and he remained in this post until his transfer to Monagea as Parish Priest on 13 September, 1997. He died, after a short illness, on 8 January, 2002. (Feheney, AKBD, 76; LDA)

oseph Keating, baptised on 24 March, 1842, was ordained priest on 17 July, 1866. His first appointment after ordination was as curate in Cappagh (1866-1867), after which he was appointed curate, successively, in Rathkeale (1867-1868) and Cappagh (1868-1869). He was then appointed a teacher in St Munchin=s College, the diocesan seminary, where he remained for three years. In 1872, he was appointed curate in St Patrick=s (1872-1875). He then served as curate in Bruff for a short period before returning to St Patrick=s as curate (1875-1879). There are no further details about him in the Limerick diocesan archives. (Tobin, 2004, 52)

Kelly, Rev John (c.1830-1891), Clergyman RC

Irwin, Rev Michael (1837-1919), Clergyman RC

ichael Irwin, son of James Irwin and his wife, Sarah McCarthy, was born in Frankfort, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick, on 10 April, 1837. He was educated at the local National school and at St Munchin=s College, Limerick. He completed his ecclesiastical studies at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained priest at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 14 May, 1863. He was appointed curate, successively, in Tournafulla (1863-1864); Cappagh (1864-1865), Coolcappa (1865-1870), St Munchin=s (1870-1873), Banogue (1873), Effin (1873-1877), Mahoonagh (1877-1880). On 17

ohn Kelly was born about 1830. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 2 June, 1855. His first appointment, after ordination, was as assistant priest in Loughill (1855B1857). He was then appointed curate, successively, in Ardagh (|1857-1860), Rathkeale (1860-1861), Mahoonagh (1861-1863), Effin (1863-1865), Domin/ Athlacca (1865-1866), Tournafulla (1866-1867) and Shanagolden (1867-1875). In 1875, he was appointed Parish Priest of Banogue and, the following year, transferred to Glenroe in the same capacity. On 12 July, 1889, he received a further transfer, this time to Ardpatrick, as Parish Priest. He died on 2 August, 1891 after a long illness, and was buried in the church, Ardpatrick, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 53)

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Kelly, Rev John J (1871-1943), Clergyman RC

ohn J Kelly was born in Bruree, Co.Limerick, on 13 March, 1871. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 8 June, 1895. Following ordination, he was assigned to teach at St Munchin=s College, the Limerick diocesan junior seminary, where he remained until 1904. He was appointed curate, successively, in Templeglantine (1906-1908), Rathkeale (1908-1909), Monagea (1909-1910) and Newcastle West (1910-1924). On 8 September, 1924, he was appointed Parish Priest of Templeglantine, where he remained until his death on 25 July, 1943, aged 72 years. (Tobin, 2004, 53)

baptised at St Mary=s (RC) church, Askeaton. He attended Askeaton National School and, later, became a priest in Australia. He was a brother of the two Presentation nuns, Sisters Elizabeth Kelly (1907-1991) (qv) and Hanora Kelly (1899-1988) (qv). He died on 6 April, 1980, and was buried in St Mary=s Cemetery, Tenterfield, New South Wales. (Presentation Archives, Victoria; D&B Index, Australia)

Kirby, Rev Thomas (1905-1985), Clergyman RC

Kelly, Rev Michael (1906-1988), Clergyman RC

ichael Kelly was born about 1906 and attended St Munchin=s College, Limerick, followed by St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained priest on 5 June, 1932. After ordination, he was sent on loan to the archdiocese of Liverpool for two years. On his return to Ireland, he was appointed curate, successively, in Banogue (1934-1936) and Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1936-1941). After a short period as a teacher in St Munchin=s College, he was appointed chaplain to the Good Shepherd Convent, Limerick (1941-1944). He was then appointed curate, successively, in Ardpatrick (1944-1945) and Newcastle West (1945-1964). In 1964, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh (1964-1967), after which he was transferred in the same capacity to Bulgaden (1967-1971) and then to Kilcolman (1971-1988), also as Parish Priest. He died on 5 September, 1988, and was buried in the church grounds, Kilcolman, Co. Limerick. (Feheney, 2007, 64; LDA)

homas Kirby was born in Bermondsey, South London, in 1905. He was the son of John Kirby and his wife, Nora Mulcahy, from Killeedy, Co. Limerick. When his parents returned to Ireland, he began his education at Broadford National School, and continued it at Copsewood College, Pallaskenry, followed by St Munchin=s College, Limerick, and St Patrick=s College, Maynooth. He was ordained on 29 June, 1928, after which he served for some time in Hastings, in the south of England. On his return to Ireland, he held appointments as curate in Templeglantine (1930), Manister (1931) Fedamore (1934) and Croom (1938). He was appointed Parish Priest of Banogue in 1958. He was transferred to Donaghmore in the same capacity in 1961 and, on 14 October, 1969, he was inducted as Parish Priest of Askeaton/ Ballysteen. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1974. He died in office on 19 August, 1985, and is buried in the church grounds, Askeaton. While in Askeaton/ Ballysteen, he was responsible for the refurbishment of the churches in both places. (LDA).

Lane, Rev John (1880-1938), Clergyman RC

Kelly, Rev Vincent (1902-1980), Clergyman RC

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incent Kelly, son of Patrick Kelly and Catherine Nolan, was born in 1902 in Main Street, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and

ohn Joseph Lane was born in Croom, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his parish church on 30 August, 1880. He entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, to study for the priesthood and was ordained there on 19 June, 1904. After ordination, he was sent to the archdiocese of Liverpool on loan and remained there for three years. On his return to Ireland, he was

appointed curate, successively, in Ardpatrick (1907-1908), Banogue (1908), Monagea (1908-1909), Fedamore (1909-1911), Killeedy (1911-1916), Cratloe (1916B1918), Glenroe (1918-1920), Donaghmore (1920-1922), Loughill (1922-1925) and Rathkeale (1925-1933). On 23 June, 1933, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cratloe, where he died on 4 July, 1938. He was buried in the church grounds, Cratloe, Co. Clare. (Tobin, 2004, 56)

Rathkeale (1879-1898); Parish Priest of Feenagh/ Kilmeedy (1898-1909); Parish Priest of Shanagolden (1909-1921). On 14 September, 1915, he was appointed Canon of the Cathedral Chapter by the Holy See. He died at St John=s Hospital, Limerick, on 10 December, 1921, and is buried in the church grounds, Shanagolden. (Tobin, 2004, 60)

Leahy, Rev Michael (1878-1949), Clergyman RC

Lee, Rev John (1858-1932), Clergyman RC

ohn Lee was born in Glenroe, Co. Limerick, on 5 February, 1858. He completed his ecclesiastical studies at the Irish College in Rome, where he was ordained on 8 April, 1882. His early years after ordination were spent ministering in the Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh: Kelso (1878-1879), Linlithgow (1879-1883), Midlothian (1883-1884) and Loanhead (1884-1887). He returned to Ireland in 1887, taking up posts of curate in Pallaskenry (1887-1892), St Mary=s (1892-1894) and St Michael=s (1894-1906). On 8 December, 1906, he was appointed Administrator at St Michael=s and on 2 December, 1908, he was appointed Parish Priest of Askeaton/ Ballysteen. He was subsequently transferred to Kilfinane as Parish Priest (1915-1926) and, later, to Bruff (1926-1932). He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in June, 1924, and Vicar Forane in 1926. He died as Parish Priest of Bruff on 22 April, 1932, and is buried in the church grounds. (Tobin, 2004, 58)

ichael Leahy was born in Charleville, Co. Cork, and baptised in his local parish church on 1 July, 1878. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 20 July, 1902. Following ordination, he was assigned to the archdiocese of Westminster, London, where he ministered for five years. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Monagea (1907-1908), Croagh (1908-1913), Fedamore (1913-1918), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1918-1920), Bulgaden (1920-1924), Newcastle West (1924-1925), Croom (1925), Feenagh (1927-1928) and Dromin/ Athlacca (1928-1936). In February, 1936, he was appointed Administrator in Knockaderry and transferred to Bulgaden in the same capacity in 1940. In February, 1946, he was appointed Parish Priest of Bulgaden, where he remained until his death on 9 April, 1949, aged 70 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Bulgaden, Co. Limerick. He was appointed a Canon of the Limerick Cathedral Chapter in 1948. (Tobin, 2004, 57)

Liston, Rev Thomas (1848-1921), Clergyman RC

Lynch, Rev Patrick (1886-1964), Clergyman RC

homas Liston was born in Mungret on 13 October, 1848. He was educated locally and then at the Irish College in Rome, where he was ordained in 1874. On his return to Ireland, he was appointed curate in Ballingarry (1874-1877), after which he was transferred to Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1877-1879) in the same capacity. Subsequent appointments included curate and chaplain to the Workhouse at

atrick Lynch, son of Michael Lynch and his wife, Maria Burns, was born in Ballydoole, Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick, and baptised in Pallaskenry on 22 April, 1886. He attended Pallaskenry National School and St Munchin=s College, Limerick, before entering St Patrick=s Seminary, Maynooth, where he was ordained in June, 1920. After ordination, he served as curate, successively, in Athea, Kilmeedy and St Patrick=s before his appointment as a teacher at St Munchin=s College, Limerick (1921-1929).

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On 25 October, he was appointed curate in Kilfinane (1929-1936), after which he served as curate in Rathkeale (1936-1942). On 2 December, 1942, he was appointed Parish Priest of Stonehall/ Kilcornan (1942-1953), where he served until his transfer, in the same capacity, to Coolcappa (1953-1959). On 24 August, 1959, he was transferred to Abbeyfeale as Parish Priest. He was nominated a Canon of the cathedral chapter on 6 October, 1959. While Parish Priest of Kilcornan, he was instrumental in initiating the erection of a shrine at St Bridget=s Well, Kilbreedy. He was a keen nationalist and an enthusiast for Irish language and culture. He died at St John=s Hospital, Limerick, on 4 May, 1964. (Feheney, 2007, 90; LDA).

(Tobin, 2004, 72)

McCarthy, Rev Denis (c.1830-1890), Clergyman RC

Lyons, Rev Patrick (1920-1962), Clergyman RC

atrick Lyons was born in Granagh, Co. Limerick, in 1920. He attended Ahalin National School, before entering St Munchin=s College, Limerick, in 1935. He went on to St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained in June, 1947. His first appointment was as a temporary curate in Askeaton (1947-48). Other appointments included curate at Glenroe (1948-51); Granagh (1951-1953); St Michael=s Limerick (1953-1959); Donoughmore (1959-1961) and Our Lady Queen of Peace, Limerick (1961-1962). He died on 11 June, 1962, and is buried in the church grounds, Our Lady Queen of Peace, Limerick. (LDA).

enis McCarthy was born in Croagh, Co. Limerick, about 1830, and ordained at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 15 October, 1857. After ordination, his first appointment was as curate in Cappagh (1857-1862), after which he was curate, successively, in St Patrick=s (1862-1866), Bulgaden (1866-1869), Kilfinane (1869-1871), Ballingarry (1871-1872) and Patrickswell (1872-1877). On 26 January, 1877, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh and remained there until his transfer to Knockaderry in the same capacity on 6 January, 1886. He died while he was Parish Priest of Knockaderry on 14 February, 1890, and was buried in the church, Knockaderry, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 72)

McCarthy, Rev Dermot (1919-1993), Clergyman RC

McCarthy, Rev Con (c.1823-1885), Clergyman RC

ornelius McCarthy was ordained priest in June, 1848. His whereabouts for the first nine years after his ordination is unknown, but we know that, in 1857, he was appointed curate in Kilmallock (1857-1861) and thereafter in Ardagh (1861-1862), Croagh (1862-1863) and Ballingarry (1863-1868). In 1868, he was appointed Parish Priest of Knockaderry, where he remained until his death on Christmas Day, 25 December, 1885. He was buried in the church grounds, Cloncagh, Co. Limerick.

ermot McCarthy was born in Abbeyfeale in 1919 and attended the local National school. After this, he entered St Munchin=s College as a boarder and then went on to St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained in June, 1943. Always a keen sportsman, he represented his native Abbeyfeale in football. Subsequently, he was selected for Limerick and won a Munster Junior Football Championship medal in 1939. His early appointments included: curate in Tournafulla (1943-1946); Glenroe (1946-1948); Knockaderry (1948-1958); Croom (1958-1964); Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1964-1968) and Athea (1968-1971). He suffered a heart attack in 1971 and was appointed bursar at St Munchin=s College, Limerick, in 1974. In December, 1983, he was appointed curate in Ballingarry. While he was curate in Askeaton, he played an important part in fostering Gaelic football. It was during his time in Askeaton that Askeaton- Ballysteen won the senior county championship, with Tony Fitzgerald as captain. This team provided several players for the Limerick Senior team,

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including the captain, Tony Fitzgerald. Father McCarthy served both as chairperson of the West Limerick Board (1951-1957) and, later, as chairperson of the Limerick County Board. He died in the Limerick Regional Hospital from a stroke on 10 August, 1993. (LDA).

McCoy, Rev Mortimer (1851-1927), Clergyman RC

McCarthy, Rev Michael (1850-1919), Clergyman RC

ichael McCarthy was born in Ardpatrick on 27 September, 1850. On completion of his ecclesiastical studies, he was ordained priest in Rome on 27 March, 1875. His early appointments, after ordination, were in the diocese of Clogher, where he was curate in Rosslea (1875-1876) and Kiskeery (1876). He came to the diocese of Limerick in December, 1876, and was appointed curate, successively, in Rathkeale (1876-1877); Glenroe (1877); Tournafulla (1877) and Monagea (1877-1878). On his return from sick leave (1878-1879), he was appointed curate in Adare (1879-1900). On 3 July, 1900, he was appointed Parish Priest of Donaghmore, where he remained until his death on 12 February, 1919, aged 68 years. He was buried the church, Donaghmore, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 73)

ortimer McCoy was baptised in his native Coolcappa on 2 March, 1851. He completed his ecclesiastical studies at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained in the Convent of Mercy, Limerick, on 30 June, 1878. He served as curate in Donaghmore (1878-1881), Ardagh (1881-1883), Fedamore (1883-1887), Dromin/ Athlacca (1887-1888), Mungret (1888-1890), St Munchin=s (1890-1892), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1892-1893) and Ballingarry (1893-1919). He was eventually appointed Parish Priest of Ardpatrick (1919-1927). He died in Ardpatrick on 30 September, 1927, and is buried there. His brother, Rev James McCoy (qv) was also a priest in the diocese of Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 74).

McEniry, Rev John (1616-1658), Clergyman RC

McCoy, Rev James (c.1836-1906), Clergyman RC

ames McCoy was born in Coolcappa, Co. Limerick, about 1836. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained in Newcastle West on 17 August, 1862. Following his ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Cappagh (1862-1863) and St John=s (1863-1874). He then served Administrator of St John=s (1874-1886), before his appointment as Parish Priest in Bulgaden. He served in this post for twenty years, until his death on 20 November, 1906, aged 70 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Bulgaden, Co. Limerick. He was a brother of Rev Mortimer McCoy (qv), who was also a priest in the diocese of Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 73)

ohn McEniry came from an old Irish family, members of which were chieftains of Corcomohide, or present-day Castletown Conyers. He joined the Canons of St Augustine, Rathkeale, in 1642, making his vows in 1645. He went to Europe to study theology and became professor of Theology and Director of Studies in the mother house of the Canons of St Augustine in Paris. He was appointed to the chair of theology in a newly-founded College in Genoa about 1657. The previous year, however, plague had broken out in the Kingdom of Naples, which included Genoa. The plague seemed to begin in southern Spain, but, largely through shipping, spread to the island of Sardinia, and thence to Naples. By 1658, it was raging in Genoa and Father John McEniry, while ministering to the dying, became infected and was soon dead himself. He was 42 years of age. He was buried hastily in Genoa, the city where Daniel O=Connell subsequently died, while on his way to Rome, on 15 May, 1847. (Davitt, 2006, 449)

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McNamara, Rev John (1845-1870), Clergyman RC

ohn McNamara, son of Michael McNamara and his wife, Bridget Fennell, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised on 18 February, 1845. He was educated at Cappagh school and at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, which he entered on 26 August, 1863. He completed his ecclesiastical studies and was ordained deacon in 1869. Unfortunately, however, he fell victim to Tuberculosis, then an incurable disease, and died before ordination on 5 May, 1870, aged 25 years. He was buried in Cappagh cemetery. He was an uncle of Brigid (qv), Ellen (qv), Elizabeth (qv), Jane (qv), Margaret (qv) and Mary McNamara (qv), all six of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; Hammell, 1982, 114)

acquired good >people= skills. Despite declining health, he insisted on being involved in pastoral work until his final illness. He died in Mombasa on 21 February, 1994, aged 80 years, and was buried in Kenya. He was a half-brother of Sr Anne Madigan (qv) (Farragher, 296)

Mangan, Rev Cornelius (1865-1948), Clergyman RC

Madigan, Rev Michael (1913-1984), Clergyman RC

ick Madigan, son of James Madigan, was born in Derragh, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, in 1913. He attended Cappagh National school, before entering Rockwell College, Co. Tipperary, where he completed his secondary schooling. A keen sportsman, he distinguished himself both in hurling and rugby. He entered the Holy Ghost (Spiritan) congregation and, on completion of his novitiate, he made his religious profession in 1933. He completed his philosophy in Dublin and spent two years (1935-1937) teaching at St Mary=s College, Port of Spain, Trinidad. He was then diagnosed as suffering from tuberculosis and was sent to Montana, Switzerland, for treatment. While there, he began studying theology, subsequently continuing his course at Louvain University. The outbreak of World War II, interrupted his studies in Europe and he was forced to return to Ireland, where he completed his studies in Kimmage Spiritan scholasticate. After ordination in 1951, he was sent to Kenya, where he laboured for the next 52 years. He spent periods in Bura, Lushangonyi, Marfakani, Nairobi, Kalimoni, MwabayaNyundo and Mombasa. He learnt and became fluent in the Kidawida language and

ornelius Mangan was born in Shanagolden, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his own parish church on 8 May, 1865. He was educated at St Munchin=s College and St Patrick=s seminary, Maynooth. He matriculated on 9 September, 1886, entering the philosophy class. On completion of his theological studies, he was ordained priest in Maynooth on 21 June, 1891. After ordination, he was sent, on loan, to the archdiocese of Westminster, where he remained until 1894. On his return to Ireland, he was appointed curate in the following parishes: Kilmallock (1894-1895); Fedamore (1895-1896); Stonehall (Kilcornan) (1896-1900); Bulgaden (1900-1907); Kilfinane/ Ardpatrick (1907-1920); Kilmallock (1920-1924). On 26 June, 1924, he was appointed Parish Priest of Coolcappa, where he remained until his transfer, as Parish Priest, to Kildimo/ Pallaskenry on 23 November, 1926. On 8 August, 1937, he was transferred, as Parish Priest, to Rathkeale, where he remained until his death on 26 June, 1948, aged 83. He was nominated a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in March, 1936, and Vicar Forane in 1937. It would appear that Fr Mangan had influential friends at the Vatican, because his appointment as Parish Priest of Rathkeale was a Papal appointment, this post being, arguably, more prestigious than that of Parish Priest in Kildimo/ Pallaskenry. He was buried in the church grounds, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. (Hamell, 1982, 120; Tobin, 2004, 63)

Mangan, Rev Thomas (1851-1885), Clergyman RC

T
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homas Mangan was baptised on 2 October, 1847. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at Presentation Convent, Limerick, on 23 July, 1876. Following his

ordination, he was sent on loan for a year to Tydavnet in the diocese of Clogher. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Rathkeale (1877) and St Munchin=s (1877-1878). On 21 October, he sought exclaustration from the diocese of Limerick in order to join the Redemptorist Congregation. This was granted and he ceased his ministry in the Limerick diocese. As a Redemptorist, he ministered in Liverpool (1878-1879) and Teignmouth, where he died on 6 April, 1885, aged 34 years. He was buried in England. (Tobin, 2004, 63)

Moloney, Rev James (1882-1957), Clergyman RC

Meehan, Rev John (1830-1899), Clergyman RC

ohn Meehan was ordained in June, 1830. Following ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Croom (1830-1841), Dromcollogher (1841-1842), Adare (1842-1844) and Croom (1844-1848). In 1848, he was appointed Parish Priest of Croagh, where he remained until 1883. He died on 5 September, 1899, aged 69 years. (Tobin, 2004, 64).

ames Moloney was born in Bulgaden, Co. Limerick, on 31 May, 1882, and baptised in his local parish church on 2 June of that year. He attended St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained priest on 23 June, 1907. After ordination, he was sent to the Archdiocese of Glasgow on loan and served as curate in St Patrick=s parish, Coatbridge, Glasgow. On his return to Ireland in 1909, he was appointed curate, successively, in Dromcollogher (1909), Manister (1909-1910), Kilfinane (1910-1915), St Munchin=s (1915-1926), Kilmallock (1926-1933) and Rathkeale (1933-1936). On 28 January, 1936, he was appointed Parish Priest of Fedamore. He remained in this post until his transfer to Effin in the same capacity on 1 July, 1948. He died on 25 October, 1957, aged 75 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Effin, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 66)

Moloney, Rev John (1875-1957), Clergyman RC

Moloney, Rev James (1843-1904), Clergyman RC

ames Moloney was born in Manister, Co. Limerick, and baptised there on 27 December, 1843. He was ordained priest on 28 July, 1867. His appointments included curate in Fedamore (1867-1868); Rathkeale (1868-1871); Donaghmore (1871-1877); Shanagolden (1877-1878) and St Munchin=s (1878-1886). On 6 January, 1886, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh, where he remained until his transfer, as Parish Priest, to Kildimo/ Pallaskenry on 13 January, 1892. He remained in Kildimo until his death on 15 July, 1904, aged 60 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Pallaskenry. James Molony had a brother, William (qv), who was also a priest in the diocese of Limerick. (Feheney, 2007, 110; Tobin, 2004, 65)

ohn Moloney was born in Abbeyfeale, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 21 March, 1875. He studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 18 June, 1899. Following his ordination, he was sent on loan to the archdiocese of Liverpool, where he remained for five years. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Fedamore (1904-1907), Manister (1907-1908), St Munchin=s (1908-1910), Ardpatrick (1910-1911), Croagh (1911-1915), Parteen (1915-1918), Mahoonagh (1918-1921), Croom (1921-1922), Ardagh (1922-1925) and St Mary=s (1826-1827). In July, 1827, he was appointed Parish Priest of Parteen (1827-1849). He died on 5 October, 1957, aged 82 years. (Tobin, 2004, 65)

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Moran, Rev James (1826-1879), Clergyman RC


James Moran was born in 1826 and ordained a priest in September, 1853. His first appointment, after ordination, was as curate in Knockaderry (1853-1855), after which, he was curate, successively, in Rathkeale (1855-1856); Knockaderry (1856-1857); Croagh (1857-1859); Bruff (1859-1862); Rathkeale (1862-1864); Adare (1864-1865); Mahoonagh (1865-1868); Ballingarry (1868-1874); Rathkeale (1874-1875). On 16 October, 1875, he was appointed Parish Priest of Mahoonagh, where he remained until his death on 31 December, 1879, at the age of 53. He was buried in the church grounds, Castelmahon, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 67)

diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Templeglantine (1919), Ballingarry (1919-1920), Croagh (1920-1922), Abbeyfeale (1922-1926) and St Munchin=s (1926-1939). On 24 May, 1930, he was appointed Parish Priest of Banogue, where he remained until his death, which took place on 8 October, 1946, in Milford Hospice, Limerick. He was buried in the church grounds, Banogue, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 67)

Mulcahy, Rev Cornelius (1870-1961), Clergyman RC

Moloney, Rev William (c.1827-1901), Clergyman RC

illiam Moloney was born in Manister, Co. Limerick, about 1827. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 15 July, 1852. Following ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in St Munchin=s (1853-1857), St Michael=s (1857-1863) and St John=s (1863-1864). In 1864, he was appointed Parish Priest of Donaghmore (1864-1878) and, on 25 September, 1878, he was transferred to St Munchin=s in the same capacity. In May, 1894, he was appointed Parish Priest of Rathkeale, where he remained until his death on 7 November, 1901. He was appointed Vicar General of the diocese of Limerick in 1887. He was a brother of Rev James Moloney, 1843-1904 (qv), who was also a diocesan priest in Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 66)

ornelius Mulcahy was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, and baptised at his local parish church on 7 July, 1870. He was ordained priest at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 24 February, 1895. Following ordination, he taught for one year at St Munchin=s College, after which he was appointed Professor of English at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he remained for 38 years (1896-1934). On 3 June, 1932, he was appointed Parish Priest of Kilmallock, where he remained until his death on 6 July, 1961, aged 91 years. His diocesan appointments included: Chancellor of the diocese (1924), Vicar Forane (1932) and Dean of the diocese (1938). He was buried in the church grounds, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 67)

Mulcahy, Rev William (1848-1927), Clergyman RC

Mortell, Rev Thomas (c.1890-1946), Clergyman RC

homas Mortell was born in Bulgaden, Co. Limerick, about 1890. He studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 20 June, 1915. Following ordination, he went on loan to the USA and served as assistant priest in Brooklyn, New York, for four years. On his return to the

illiam J Mulcahy was baptised on 10 November, 1848. He entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, in 1867, to study for the priesthood and, on completion of his ecclesiastical studies, he was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 3 August, 1873. Following ordination, he was sent on loan to the diocese of Clogher, where he was temporary curate in Clones for two years. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Killeedy (1875-1877), Abbeyfeale (1877-1879), Ardagh (1879), Ballingarry (1879-1881), St Munchin=s (1881-1885), Mungret (1885-1887), Dromin/ Athlacca (1887-1889), Shanagolden

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(1889-1891) and St Mary=s (1891-1892). On 4 October, 1892, he was appointed Parish Priest of Croagh, where he remained until his death on 7 December, 1927, aged 79 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Croagh, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 69).

Murphy, Rev Timothy (1871-1961), Clergyman RC

Murphy, Rev James (1917-1984), Clergyman RC

ames Murphy, second son of Thomas Murphy and Annie Hart, was born in Milltown, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 9 July, 1917, and baptised in St Mary=s church, Askeaton, a couple of days later. He attended Askeaton National School before entering Salesian College, Pallaskenry. On deciding to become a priest, he attended Mount Melleray for a short period before entering St John=s Seminary, Camarillo, California, where he was ordained on 17 March, 1945, for the diocese of Monterey-Fresno by Bishop Philip G Scher. Fresno subsequently became a separate diocese and Fr Murphy ministered in several parishes in that diocese, including Yossemite. After his retirement, he lived at Watsonville, San Luis Obispo, CA. He died on 19 November, 1984, and is buried in St Peter=s Cemetery, Fresno, California. (Feheney, 2007, 82)

imothy Murphy was born in Dromcollogher, Co. Limerick, and baptised in the local parish church on 24 September, 1871. He attended St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained priest there on 17 June, 1900. After ordination, he was sent to work in England for five years and, on his return to Ireland, he was appointed curate, successively, in Fedamore (1905-1907, Coolcappa (1907), Fedamore (1907-1908), Bruree (1908-1922) and Rathkeale (1922-1927). On 14 December, 1927, he was appointed Parish Priest of Croagh, where he remained until his death on 22 December, 1961. He was buried in the church grounds, Croagh, Co. Limerick. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1946. He was a brother of Rev Jeremiah Murphy (qv) and Rev Michael Murphy, who were also diocesan priests in Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 71).

Nolan, Rev Thomas (d.1882), Clergyman RC

Murphy, Rev Jeremiah (d. 1936), Clergyman RC

eremiah Murphy was born in Dromcollogher, Co. Limerick, and studied for the priesthood. He was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 6 May, 1883. After ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in St John=s (1883), Tournafulla (1883-1885) and Rathkeale (1885-1908). On 31 January, 1908, he was appointed Parish Priest of Killeedy (1908-1912), after which he was appointed Parish Priest, successively, in Coolcappa (1912-1924) and Abbeyfeale (1924-1936). He died on 12 February, 1936. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter and Vicar Forane in 1924. He was a brother of Rev Michael Murphy and Rev Timothy Murphy (qv), both diocesan priests in Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 70)

homas Nolan was born in Shanagolden, Co. Limerick, and was ordained priest on 17 March, 1861. After ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Donaghmore (1861-1863), Monagea (1863-1864), Croom (1864-1865), Ardagh (1865-1866), Rathkeale (1866-1867 and 1868-1870), St Mary=s (1870B1879) and Banogue (1879-1880). He fell into bad health and sought and received excardination from the diocese of Limerick on 19 April, 1880. He died in London on 15 October, 1882. (Tobin, 2004, 77)

Noonan, Rev Patrick (1914-1979), Clergyman RC

P
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atrick Noonan was born in Loughan, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 11 April, 1914. He was educated at Cappagh National School and Rockwell College. On completion of his secondary schooling, he entered the Holy Ghost/ Spiritan congregation, undergoing his novitiate at Kilshane, Co. Tipperary, and

making his vows on 12 September, 1934. He entered UCD and studied science, graduating with a BSc degree in 1937. He then spent the next two years as a >prefect= at Rockwell College, after which he returned to UCD, where he obtained a BA in philosophy in 1941. He studied theology at Kimmage and was ordained priest on 16 July, 1944. His first appointment was to the post of bursar in Kilshane. In 1951, he was appointed to the missions in Kenya, where he served as a teacher at St Mary=s College, Nairobi. In 1976, ill-health forced him to return to Ireland. Subsequently, he entered Tall Trees Nursing Home, Askeaton, where he died on 21 September, 1979. He was interred in the cemetery attached to Rockwell College, Cashel, Co. Tipperary. (Farraghar, Irish Spiritans Remembered)

(1926-1928), Mahoonagh (1928-1940), Kildimo/ Pallaskenry (1940-1942) and Rathkeale (1942-1946). On 21 September, 1946, he was appointed Parish Priest of Knockaderry/ Cloncagh, where he served happily for several years. On 31 October, 1956, he became ill and was confined to Bon Secours Hospital, Cork. He failed to respond to treatment, however, and died there on 2 November, 1956. He was buried in the church grounds, Cloncagh, Co. Limerick. (Feheney, 2010, 121; LDA)

O=Cleary, Rev Marcus (1812-1886), Clergyman RC

O=Brien, Rev Michael (1887-1959), Clergyman RC

ichael O=Brien was born in Ballingarry, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 11 August, 1887. He entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 23 June, 1912. After ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Glenroe (1912-1915), Coolcappa (1915-1926), Glin (1926), Coolcappa (1926-1927) and Rathkeale (1927-1937). On 7 August, 1937, he was appointed Parish Priest of Mahoonagh, where he remained until his death on 28 March, 1959, at the age of 71. He was buried in the church grounds, Mahoonagh, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 78)

arcus O=Cleary was born in Bulgaden in 1812 and ordained in December, 1840. After ordination, he served as curate, successively, in Bruff (1841-1842), Bulgaden (1842-44), Shanagolden (1844-1847), Newcastle West (1847-1850), St Mary=s Limerick (1850-1854), Killeedy (1854-1857), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1857-1860) and Adare (1860-1862). In 1862, he was appointed Parish Priest of Bulgaden, where he remained until his death on 8 December, 1886. He is buried in the church grounds, Bulgaden. He became an active supporter of the Land League, while Parish Priest of Bulgaden. He also advocated public works, such as road construction, to prevent labouring people, who could not find work, becoming dependent on the Poor Law Guardians. (Tobin, 2004, 14, 213).

O=Connor, Rev Daniel (1820-1886), Clergyman RC

O=Callaghan, Rev Dan (1897-1956), Clergyman RC

aniel O=Callaghan, born about 1897, was ordained, together with his brother, Patrick, at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 19 June, 1921. After ordination, Daniel was sent to the Irish College in Rome for postgraduate studies. On his return to Ireland, he served as curate, successively, in Cratloe (1922-1924), Glenroe/Ballyorgan (1924-1926), Askeaton/Ballysteen

ather Daniel O=Connor studied for the priesthood in the Irish College, Rome, and was ordained priest of the diocese of Limerick in March, 1845. He also obtained a doctorate in Divinity from the Pontifical University in Rome. On his return to Ireland, he served as curate in St Munchin=s (1846-1853) and Parteen (1853-1863). He was appointed Parish Priest of Ardagh on 13 April, 1863, and transferred to Askeaton-Ballysteen in the same capacity on 25 July, 1871. He remained in this post until he became ill in 1885. He is listed in Bassett=s Directory of Munster (1886) as living

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at Shannonview (Courtbrowne), Askeaton. Some time before his death he went to Cork for medical treatment, where he died on 24 September, 1886. (Tobin, 2004, 79; Bassett, 1886)

O=Donnell, Rev Henry (1864-1925), Clergyman RC

O=Connor, Rev Michael (1924- 2000), Clergyman RC

ichael O=Connor, a native of Ballygiltinan, Glin, Co. Limerick, was born on 22 February, 1924. He was educated at St Michael=s College, Listowel, and later at St Munchin=s College, Limerick. From there, he entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 20 June, 1948. He served as curate in Athea (1949), St Mary=s Limerick (1956), Knockaderry (1961), Ardagh (1962) and Newcastle West (1968). On 9 May, 1976, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cratloe. He was transferred to Askeaton-Ballysteen as Parish Priest on 27 August, 1985. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1991 and retired on 14 September, 1997. In the 1960s, Father O=Connor was one of the lecturers in the UCC Extra-mural Diploma in Social Studies, which a number of people from West Limerick completed. He died on 9 November, 2000, and is buried in the grounds of St Mary=s Catholic Church, Askeaton. (Culhane, Sr. J., 2007).

enry O=Donnell, a native of St Patrick=s parish, Limerick City, was educated at the Irish College, Rome, and ordained 19 June, 1886. After ordination, he spent an additional year in Rome, before taking up temporary duty in the archdiocese of Westminster (1886-1890). He returned to Ireland in 1890 to take up a post as curate in Askeaton (1890-1892) before being transferred in the same capacity to St John=s Limerick (1892-98). Feeling called to the religious life, he obtained excardination from the Bishop of Limerick in 1898 and joined the Redemptorist Congregation in Limerick. He died at the Redemptorist House in Esker, Athenry, Co. Galway, on 25 September, 1925, and is buried in the cemetery there. (Tobin, 2004, 81)

O=Donnell, Rev Michael (1854-1937), Clergyman RC

O=Donnell, Rev Denis (c.1896-1953), Clergyman RC

orn about 1896, Denis O=Donnell was educated at St Munchin=s College, Limerick, followed by St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 19 June 1921. He served as curate in Fedamore (1921-1924), Croom (1924-1934) and Bruree (1934-45) before his appointment as Parish Priest of Cappagh on 8 March, 1945. He was transferred to Askeaton-Ballysteen as Parish Priest on 11 May 1948 and remained there until his death on 11 July, 1953. He is buried in the grounds of St Mary=s church, Askeaton. (LDA).

ichael O=Donnell was born in Croom, Co. Limerick, on 25 October, 1854. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 13 June, 1880. After ordination, he served as curate in Ardpatrick (1881-1882), before he was appointed chaplain to Laurel Hill Convent, Limerick, for two years. After that, he was appointed curate, successively, in Ardpatrick (1884-1887), Fedamore (1887-1888), Bruff (1888-1892) and St Michael=s (1892-1895). He then spent six years as Administrator in St Michael=s (1895-1901), before his appointment as Parish Priest of Rathkeale in November, 1891. He continued as Parish Priest of Rathkeale until his death on 17 May, 1937, aged 82. He was buried in the church grounds, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. He held several diocesan appointments, including Vicar Forane (1901), Canon of the Cathedral Chapter (1912), Vicar General (1918), Monsignor (1920), Vicar

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Capitular (1923) and Dean (1927). (Tobin, 2004, 83).

O=Donoghue, Rev Ed (c.1823-1883), Clergyman RC

dmund O=Donoghue, born around 1823, was educated at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and ordained in September, 1848. After ordination, he served as a curate in Ballyagran (1848-1849), Donaghmore (1849-1850), Shanagolden (1850-1859), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1859-1865), Kilfinane (1865-1869), Bulgaden (1869-1872) and St Munchins Limerick (1873-1875). From 10 August, 1875, he was on sick leave, with a stipend from the diocese of Limerick. He died on 27 April, 1883. (Tobin, 2004, 84)

December, 1874. He was an uncle of Rev Patrick O=Dea, who was curate in Askeaton-Ballysteen 1949-64, and of Rev Edmund O=Dea. Ordained at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 23 June, 1901, Father Stephen served as assistant priest in the diocese of Portsmouth for some years (1901-1907). On his return to Ireland, he served as curate in Ardpatrick (1907-1908), Parteen (1908-1913), Ardagh/Carrickerry (1913-1919), Croom (1919-1921), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1921-1924) and Kildimo/ Pallaskenry (1924-1930). He was appointed Parish Priest of Kildimo/ Pallaskenry in September, 1930, and transferred to Dromin/ Athlacca in the same capacity on 21 January, 1936. He retired in 1963 and died at Milford House Hospice on 24 November, 1968, at the age of 93. (Tobin, 2004, 81)

O=Dea, Rev Patrick (c.1914-1990), Clergyman RC

O=Driscoll, Rev David (1858-1923), Clergyman RC

atrick O=Dea was a native of Bulgaden parish. He was educated at St Munchin=s College and St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 18 June, 1939. His first appointment as curate was to Feenagh/ Kilmeedy (1939), after which he served in Glenroe (1943) and Croagh/Kilfinny (1946). He was transferred to Askeaton on 3 June, 1949, and remained there until his transfer to Newcastle West on 15 January, 1964. He was subsequently Parish Priest of Loughill (1968), Kileedy (1973) and Kilfinane (1979). He was made a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1986 and died on 2 June, 1990. He was a nephew of Fr Stephen O=Dea (1874-1968) and a cousin of Fr Edmund O=Dea. (Feheney, 2007, 90; Hammel, 1984, 46)

O=Dea, Rev Stephen (1874-1968), Clergyman RC

tephen O=Dea was baptised in his home parish of Effin, Co. Limerick, on 30

avid O=Driscoll, a native of Kilmallock, was baptised in his own parish church on 6 December, 1858. He studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained in St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 1 January, 1882. After ordination, he spent some time as a professor at St Macartan=s seminary, Clones, before taking up duties as curate in Glin (1884). From there he came to Askeaton/ Ballysteen as curate (1884-1888). His other curacies include St John=s Limerick (1888), Bruff (1888-1889), Mungret (1900-1892), Bruff (1892-1898). On 5 September, 1898, he was appointed President of St Munchin=s Diocesan College, Limerick, where he remained until 1908. He was then appointed Parish Priest of St Patrick=s (1908-14), after which he was transferred to St Munchin=s Limerick in the same capacity. He died there on 8 December, 1923, and is buried in the Church grounds. He was also associated with St Patrick=s Seminary school, Bruff.

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(Tobin, 2004, 85)

O=Dwyer, Rev William (1866-1945), Clergyman RC

(1892-1905). He died in St John=s Hospital, Limerick, on 14 February, 1911. (Tobin, 2004, 88)

illiam O=Dwyer was born in Bruree, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local church on 27 April, 1866. He entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 24 June, 1890. After ordination he went on loan to the diocese of Galloway, Scotland, where he served as assistant priest at St Margaret=s, Ayr. On his return to Ireland, he was appointed a teacher at St Munchin=s diocesan college (1892-1902). After ten years, he was released from his teaching duties and appointed curate, successively, in Parteen (1902-1905) and Shanagolden (1905-1907). He was then recalled to teaching duties at St Munchin=s College for another three years (1907-1910), after which he was appointed curate in Rathkeale (1910-1921). On 8 September, 1921, he was appointed Parish Priest of Templeglantine (1921-1924), after which he served as Parish Priest of St Patrick=s (1924-1926) and St Munchin=s (1926-1945). He died on 14 January, 1945, aged 78 years, and was buried in the grounds of St Munchin=s church, Limerick. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter and Vicar Forane in 1926. (Tobin, 2004, 86)

O=Leary, Rev Arthur (1863-1940), Clergyman RC

rthur O=Leary was born in Bruree, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local church on 3 October, 1863. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 24 June, 1891. After ordination, he was sent on loan to Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan, in the diocese of Clogher. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed a teacher at St Munchin=s College (1892-1895), after which he served as President of that college for four years (1905-1909). He was then appointed curate in Rathkeale (1909-1921). On 16 December, 1921, he was appointed Parish Priest of Mungret (1921-1926) and transferred to St Patrick=s in the same capacity in 1926. He continued as Parish Priest of St Patrick=s until his death on 18 August, 1940, aged 76 years. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1929. He was a brother of Rev Edward O=Leary, also a diocesan priest in Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 89)

O=Shea, Rev James (1813-1877), Clergyman RC

O=Keeffe, Rev Denis (c.1851-1911), Clergyman RC

enis O=Keeffe, born around 1851, studied for the priesthood in St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained in St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 20 February, 1876. His early appointments as curate included Fedamore (1876-1877), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1877), Ballingarry (1877), Banogue (1877-1879), Knockaderry (1879-1880), Mahoonagh (1880-1892) and Ballyagran

ames O=Shea, son of Michael O=Shea and Bridget Fitzgerald, was born in Ballyvareen, Kildimo, Co. Limerick, on 20 June, 1813. He received his early education in a local >hedge= school and entered St Patrick=s Seminary, Maynooth, on 4 February, 1832. He was ordained priest in 1839. After ordination, he served as curate in a number of parishes in the diocese of Limerick, before his appointment, in1865, as Parish Priest of Rathkeale. It was he, who initiated, and completed, the building of the present church in Rathkeale. The fine building, designed by JJ

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McCarthy, was blessed and opened on 18 August, 1873. Fr O=Shea personally contributed the money for the stained-glass window at the right hand side of the altar. In 1867, he was nominated a canon of the Limerick cathedral chapter and Vicar General of the diocese. He died on 11 January, 1877. James also had four nephews who were priests in the diocese of Limerick. (Feheney, 2007, 149; Tobin, 2004, 118; O=Shea family archive, 2009)

(1873-1877) and Rathkeale (1877-1885). At this stage, his health deteriorated rapidly and he died on 5 June, 1885, aged, 41 years. He was buried in the church grounds, Coolcappa, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 95)

Quaid, Rev David (1817-1890), Clergyman RC

O=Shea, Rev Jeremiah (1863-1928), Clergyman RC

eremiah O=Shea was born in Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local church on 6 June, 1863. He entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, to study for the priesthood and was ordained there on 24 June, 1889. Following his ordination, he was sent on loan to the Archdiocese of Liverpool, where he ministered for four years (1889-1893). On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was curate, successively, in Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1893-1898), St Munchin=s (1898-1899), St John=s (1899-1905), St Michael=s (1905-1912) and Athea (1912-1917). In June, 1917, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh, where he remained for seven years. In March, 1924, he was transferred to Glin as Parish Priest and he died there on 29 October, 1928, aged 65 years. He was appointed a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter in 1928. (Tobin, 2004, 94)

avid Quaid, a native of Knockaderry, Co. Limerick, was born on 11 July, 1817. He studied for the priesthood in the Irish College, Rome, and was ordained on 15 August, 1843. His early appointments as curate included Knockaderry (1843-1844), Monagea (1844-1846), Glin (1846-1847), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1847-1853), Coolcappa (1853-1854), Bulgaden (1854-1858), Kilmallock (1858-1859), Bulgaden (1859-1865) and Newcastle West (1865-1866). On 26 June, 1866, he was appointed Parish Priest of Dromin/ Athlacca (1866-1889). He died there on 29 November, 1890, and is buried in the church grounds. (Tobin, 2004, 96)

Raleigh, Rev James (1810-1864), Clergyman RC

Potter, Rev Michael (1843-1885), Clergyman RC

ichael Potter was born in Bruree, Co. Limerick, on 9 October, 1843. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at the Irish College, Rome, on 21 February, 1869. On his return to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Cappagh (1869), Rathkeale (1869-1872), Coolcappa

ather James Raleigh, previously Parish Priest of Donaghmore, was transferred to Askeaton/ Ballysteen on the death of the Parish Priest, Fr Edward Cussen, in 1860. One of Fr Raleigh=s first tasks as Parish Priest was the building of St Patrick=s church, Ballysteen, and the erection of a new National School in Ballysteen. The school was completed in 1861 and the church in 1863. Spacious sites for both buildings were provided by Edwin Wyndham-Quin, 3rd Earl of Dunraven, who was landlord for the town land of Ballinvoher, where the buildings were located. In 1864, owing to an unfortunate administrative misunderstanding between Bishop Ryan (1829-1864) and his co-adjutor and successor, Bishop Butler (1864-1886), Fr Raleigh was

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transferred to Rathkeale, though it subsequently transpired that he would have preferred to remain in Askeaton/ Ballysteen. Providence decreed, however, that he would not have time to settle into Rathkeale. He died there some months later on 24 November, 1864. (Begley, III, 602; Toomey and Greensmyth, 1961, 129; LC, 1864)

Rea, Rev David (c.1908-1983), Clergyman RC

avid Rea, born around 1908, was educated at St Munchin=s College, Limerick, and St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 8 June, 1933. His first appointment was as curate in Templeglantine (1933), after which he served in Tournafulla (1936) in the same capacity. He came to Askeaton- Ballysteen as curate on 1 March, 1941, and remained there until his appointment as Parish Priest of Parteen on 9 June, 1949. He was transferred to St Patrick=s as Parish Priest in 1961 and to Croom in the same capacity on 3 September, 1974. He was made a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter on 16 April, 1981. While in Askeaton/ Ballysteen, Father Rea was very active in fund-raising to build a separate house for the curate in the parish. To this end, he helped organise concerts and was instrumental in setting up dramatic societies in Askeaton and Ballysteen. He died in Croom, Co. Limerick, on 12 August, 1983, and is buried in the church grounds there. (LDA).

curate, successively, in Newcastle West (1850-1854), Feenagh/ Kilmeedy (1854-1858), Killeedy (1858-1860), Croagh/ Kilfinny (1860-1862), Ardagh/ Carrigkerry (1862B1865), Donaghmore (1865-1871), St Patrick=s (1871). On 15 November, 1871, he was appointed Parish Priest of Colmanswell. On 17 November, 1873, he was transferred to Ballyagran in the same capacity and, on 4 December, 1876, he was transferred to Loughill/ Ballyhahill as Parish Priest. He died there on 14 September, 1892, aged 68 years. (Tobin, 2004, 99)

Reidy, Rev Timothy (1860-1940), Clergyman RC

imothy Reidy, a native of Effin, Co. Limerick, was baptised in the local parish church on 20 January, 1860. He studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, and was ordained at St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 12 April, 1885. After ordination, he went on loan to the diocese of Middlesboro (1885-1887). On his return to Ireland, he was curate successively in Kildimo/ Pallaskenry (1887-1892), Mungret (1892-1902) and Kilmallock (1902-1908). On 11 January, 1908, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh (1908-1915), where he remained until his transfer to Askeaton on 14 May, 1915. In 1930, he was made a Canon of the Cathedral Chapter. He died at Milford House Hospice on 13 May, 1940, and is buried in the church grounds, Askeaton. (Tobin, 2004, 100).

Reeves, Rev John (c.1824-1892), Clergyman RC

Roche, Rev James (c.1823-1920), Clergyman RC

ohn Reeves was born in the parish of Croom, Co. Limerick, about 1824. He entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 3 November, 1843, and, on completion of his ecclesiastical studies, was ordained on 11 July, 1850. Following ordination, he was appointed

J
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ames Roche was born in Kilmallock, Co. Limerick, about 1823. He was ordained priest on 20 July, 1851. He was appointed curate, successively, in Effin (1852-1853), Ballingarry (1853-1859), Croom (1859-1861), Rathkeale (1861-1863), Coolcappa (1863-1865) and Rathkeale (1865-1868). On 8

January, 1868, he was appointed Parish Priest of Banogue, where he remained for eight years. On 9 September, 1876, he was transferred to Dromcollogher/ Broadford in the same capacity, and remainded for five years. On 6 April, 1891, he was transferred to Glin as Parish Priest, and remained there until his death on 13 May, 1920, aged 97 years. In 1900, he was appointed Archdeacon. (Tobin, 2004, 102)

Parish Priest, on 29 March, 1924. He died in Monagea on 5 May, 1942, and is buried in the church grounds there. (Tobin, 2004, 105-06).

Russell, Rev Edward (1842-1928), Clergyman RC

Ryan, Rev Daniel (c.1839-1881), Clergyman RC

aniel Ryan, born about 1839, studied for the priesthood and was ordained for the diocese of Limerick on 29 June, 1864. After ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Croagh/ Kilfinny (1864-1865), Adare (1865-1866), St Patrick=s (1866-1867), Ardagh/ Corrikerry (1867-1868), Tournafulla (1868-1871), Kilmallock (1871-1879) and Mungret (1879-1881). He died on 29 October, 1881, at the early age of 42 years. (Tobin, 2004, 104).

Ryan, Rev Patrick (1863-1942), Clergyman RC

atrick Ryan, born on 2 May, 1863, entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, on 5 September, 1888, to study for the priesthood. On completion of his ecclesiastical studies, he was ordained in St John=s Cathedral, Limerick, on 22 January, 1893. After ordination he was seconded for seven years to the diocese of Middlesborough, England, where he served as assistant priest in St Charles, Hull (1893-1896) and Holy Sacrament parish, Marton (1896-1900). On his return to Ireland, he was appointed curate, successively, in St Mary=s (1900-1904), Feenagh/ Kilmeedy (1904-1911), Fedamore |(1911-1913), Croagh/ Kilfinny (1913-1920). On 25 January, 1925, he was appointed Parish Priest of Ballingarry and remained there until his transfer to Monagea, as

dward Russell, a native of Bruree, was born in 1842. He studied for the priesthood in the Irish College, Rome, where he was ordained on 7 August, 1870. His early appointments included curacies in Ballyagran (1870-1871), Drumcollogher (1871-1875), Rathkeale (1875-1879), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (as curate, 1879-1884, and as administrator, 1884-1886); Bruff (1886-1887) and Effin (1887-1892). On 14 June, 1892, he was appointed Parish Priest of Stonehall (Kilcornan) and transferred to Killeedy in the same capacity on 12 February, 1895. On 7 July, 1902, he was transferred to Parteen as Parish Priest, where he remained until his retirement on 12 April, 1926. He died at St John=s Hospital, Limerick, on 29 February, 1928. He was a member of the Cathedral Chapter until his retirement (1920-1926). Father Russell had a keen interest in agrarian reform and was chairperson of the Askeaton branch of the Land League. In a speech in Askeaton in December, 1880, he said that the Land League meetings were not only intended to benefit Irish farmers, but to let >every homestead in England= know about the deprivations suffered by the Irish. Earlier, while in Dromcollogher, he assured the people that the Church would support them as long as their struggle for land reform lasted. (Tobin, 2004, 103, 209, 221)

Shanahan, Rev Denis (1844-1924), Clergyman RC

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enis Shanahan was born about 1844. He studied for the priesthood in All Hallows College, Dublin, where he was ordained on 24 June, 1868. Though ordained for the

Archdiocese of Melbourne, Australia, he was subsequently permitted to opt for his native diocese of Limerick. His early appointments as curate included the diocese of Waterford and Lismore (1868-1869), Glenroe (1869-1870), Coolcappa (1870-1872), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1872-1874), Ballingarry (1874-1879), St John=s (1879-1882), St Michael=s (1882-1889), Coolcappa (1889-1890), St Michael=s (1890-1892). He was appointed Parish Priest of Askeaton/Ballysteen on 18 February, 1892. A few months later, however, he was transferred to St Patrick=s, Limerick, as Parish Priest, in succession to Rev Fr Bourke, who had died there on 25 May, 1892. He remained in St Patrick=s until 1898, when he was transferred to St Mary=s as Parish Priest (1898-1917). He died at St John=s Hospital, Limerick, on 28 June, 1924. Father Shanahan is on record as taking an active part in local politics. In the election campaign of 1880, he compared Mr Spaight, a >Tory= election candidate, to >a drownded (sic) fly, giving his last kick=. On the other hand, he endorsed the candidature of the sitting MP, Mr Richard O=Shaughnessy, of Rathkeale, who was successful. Fr. Denis was a brother of Fr. Timothy Shanahan (c.1830-1915), also in the diocese of Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 95, 101, 106).

have spent some time as curate in Cappagh. In 1884, he was appointed Administrator, and, in 1886, Parish Priest of Bruree. In 1894, he again went to the USA to collect money to build a church in Bruree. He remained in the USA for nine years (1894-1903). On his return to Ireland, in 1903, he continued as Parish Priest of Bruree. In 1907, he was suspended from the priesthood for leaving his parish without permission. While he was curate in Kilmallock, he was arrested by the authorities in 1881 and imprisoned for four months, under the provisions of the Coercion Act. He became a symbol of opposition to British rule in Ireland, but, in so doing, incurred the displeasure of the Catholic ecclesiastical authorities. He died on 15 July, 1917, aged 76 years. (Tobin, 2004, 108)

Stritch, Rev James (d.c.1719), Clergyman RC

Sheehy, Rev Eugene (c.1841-1917), Clergyman RC

ugene Sheehy was born in Dromcollogher, Co. Limerick, about 1841. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained on 12 July, 1868. Following his ordination, he was appointed curate in Croagh. He then became involved in fund-raising to build a new church in Bruree, and, towards this end, travelled to the United States, where, it was alleged, his sermons and speeches were more political than religious. On his return to Ireland, he was appointed curate, successively, in Monagea (1874-1875), Knockaderry (1875-1876) and Kilmallock (1876-1884). He is also reported to

ames Stritch, was the son of Thomas Stritch, Mayor of Limerick, who was hanged, drawn and quartered by General Ireton, after the capture of Limerick city in 1691. James escaped from Limerick, making his way to St Malo, France, with his uncle. In a letter, which he wrote to Rev O=Brien of the Vincentian congregation at that time, he mentioned that, following the capture of the city, other members of his family, including his grandmother, mother, brothers and sisters, had taken refuge in Aughinish island, Askeaton. James was ordained priest in 1666 and administered the affairs of the diocese of Limerick for a time, between the death of Bishop James Dowley (1685) and the appointment of Bishop John Moloney (1689). Following the Treaty of Limerick, Fr Stritch returned to Ireland and was Parish Priest of Rathkeale from 1704 until his death, about 1719.

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Thornhill, Rev Patrick (1878-1948), Clergyman RC

atrick Thornhill was born in Kilmallock and baptised in his own parish church on 23 March, 1878. He attended his local National school, before entering St Munchin=s College, whence he proceeded to St Patrick=s College, Maynooth. On completion of his seminary training, he was ordained on 22 June, 1902. Following ordination, he was sent on loan to the archdiocese of Westminster, where he ministered for five years. After his recall to the diocese of Limerick, he was appointed curate, successively, in Rathkeale (1907-1910), St John=s (1910-1912) and St Michael=s (1912-1927). On 10 December, 1927, he was appointed Administrator at St Michael=s and, five years later, on 11 June, 1932, he was appointed Parish Priest of Mungret. He also served as part-time chaplain at St John=s Hospital (1910-1911) and Sarsfield Military barracks (1912-1918). After four years in Mungret, on 28 April, 1936, he was transferred to Adare as Parish Priest. He was nominated a Canon of the cathedral chapter in 1940. In 1948, his health deteriorated and he was transferred to the Mater Hospital, Dublin, where he died on 15 July, 1948, and was buried in the Catholic church, Adare, Co. Limerick. (Feheney, 2010, 183; Tobin, 2004, 109; LDA)

Maynooth (1927-1952). He died in the Mater Hospital, Dublin, on 19 May, 1954, and is buried in St Patrick=s College, Maynooth. In later years (1920), he changed his name to the Irish version, Micel Treara. (Tobin, 2004, 110).

Treacy, Rev Edmund (c.1853-1908), Clergyman RC

Tracy, Rev Michael (1891-1954), Clergyman RC

ichael Tracy studied for the priesthood at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 18 June, 1916. He served as curate in Monagea (1916-1917), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1917-1918) and St Michael=s (1918-1924). An outstanding musician, he was sent to Rome to study music (1924-1927) and, on his return, he was appointed Professor of Organ and Gregorian Chant in St Patrick=s College,

dmund Treacy was born in Hospital, Co. Limerick, around 1853. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at the Redemptorist Church, Mount St Alphonsus, Limerick, on 20 September, 1868. His early appointments as curate included Banogue (1868-1869), Ballyagran (1869-1870), Feenagh (1870-1873), Rathkeale (1873-1874), Knockaderry (1874-1875), Askeaton/ Ballysteen (1875-1877), Glenroe (1877-1879), Bruff (1879), Croom (1879-1880), St Patrick=s (1880), Ardagh (1880-1881), Parteen (1881-1887), Shanagolden (1887) and Newcastle West (1887-88). On 31 January, 1888, he was appointed Parish Priest of Stonehall/ Kilcornan (1888-1892), and transferred to Askeaton/ Ballysteen on 14 June, 1892, where he remained until his death on 25 November, 1908. For much of his life, he suffered from health problems, especially in his later years. He is buried in the church grounds, Askeaton. During the Land League era, Father Treacy was chairperson of the Ardagh branch of the League and, at a >monster= meeting on Easter Sunday, 1881, he called for the >death and burial of the landlord system, and the crushing of land-grabbers f or ever=. These words were received with acclamation (Tobin 2004, 110, 169).

Wall, Rev David (d. 1984), Clergyman RC

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avid Wall was a nephew of Canon Thomas Wall (1858-1901) and of Sen

Wall LCC, leader of the East Limerick Brigade of the old IRA. David attended St Munchin=s College, Limerick, and St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained in 1944. He served as curate in Donoghmore (1944-1953), Kilmurry (1953-1964) and Rathkeale (1964-1973). On 15 February, 1973, he was appointed Parish Priest of Kilcornan and remained there for nine years. On 7 July, 1982, he was appointed Parish Priest of Kilmallock. He was nominated a Canon of the cathedral chapter on 8 October, 1982. By then, however, his health had begun to deteriorate and he died at Mallow Hospital on 13 October, 1984. He was buried in the church grounds, Kilmallock. (Feheney, 2010, 187; LDA).

born in Nantenan House, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 4 February, 1870. On 7 September, 1889, at the age of nineteen, he entered the English province of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and began his novitate, followed by his seminary training. He was ordained priest on 20 September, 1903, and made his final vows on 2 February, 1908. He kept close contact with his two sisters, Eileen (qv) and Emily (qv), who were members of the Sisters of the Holy Child Jesus. When he died on 4 May, 1932, aged 62 years, he was buried in the Holy Child Convent, St Leonards-on-sea, East Sussex. (Jesuit archives UK)

Woulfe, Rev Patrick (1872-1933), Clergyman RC

Walsh, Rev Richard (d.1849), Clergyman RC

ather Richard Walsh, Parish Priest, died at the presbytery, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 4 December, 1849. Previous to his appointment to Rathkeale, he had ministered at St Munchin=s, Limerick. His death was rather unfortunate for the Sisters of Mercy, since it was at Fr Walsh=s specific request that they agreed to set up a convent in Rathkeale. They had already committed themselves to coming to Rathkeale when he died. However, even in the days before his death, he was mindful of his commitment to the Sisters and, in his Will, he left them his own house, which they used as their first convent, when they arrived in Rathkeale on 19 August, 1850. Fr Walsh, who was uncle to Rev Richard Shanahan, also in the diocese of Limerick, had been Parish Priest of Rathkeale for only two years before his death. (Galvin, 2000, 15)

White, Rev Thomas (1870-1932), Clergyman RC

homas White, son of Colonel John P White and his wife, Emily McMahon, was

atrick Wolfe, son James Woulfe and his wife, Hanora Maher, was born in Cratloe, Athea, Co. Limerick, and baptised on 10 March, 1872. He was educated at Newcastle West National School, St Ita=s College, Newcastle West, and St Munchin=s College, Limerick. When he decided to become a priest, he was sent to the Irish College in Rome, but ill-health forced him to return to Ireland, where he completed his ecclesiastical studies at St Patrick=s College, Maynooth. He was ordained there on 19 June, 1898. After ordination, he was sent on loan to Wigan, Lancs, England, where he remained until he received an appointment as Curate at St Munchin=s in 1902. During this time he also served as chaplain to the Workhouse, Limerick. In 1905, he was appointed curate in Kilmallock (1905-1925). On 25 November, 1925, he was appointed Parish Priest of Cappagh, where he remained until his death on 3 May, 1933, aged 61 years. During his time as chaplain in the Limerick Workhouse, he began a study of Irish surnames and published a seminal work on this topic in 1923, entitled, Slointe Gaedheal is Gall (Irish Names and Surnames). This

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volume was formerly to be found in every National School in Ireland, where it was consulted when determining the Irish version of children=s surnames. Fr Wolfe also contributed articles to a number of journals. He was buried in the church grounds, Cappagh, Co. Limerick. (Tobin, 2004, 112; Note: N Mhurch, 3, 159, states that he was born on 27 March, 1872)

CONTENTS

BISHOPS
Hallinan, Most Rev Denis (1849-1923), Bishop

enis Hallinan was born in Coolcappa, Co. Limerick, on 14 November, 1849. He studied for the priesthood and was ordained at the Irish College, Rome, in 1874. Following his ordination, he was appointed curate, successively, in Rathkeale (1874), Ballingarry (1874-1875), Newcastle West (1875-1886) and St Michael=s (1886-1892). On 13 June, 1892, he was appointed Administrator at St Michael=s, and, two years later, he was appointed Parish Priest of St Mary=s (1894-1898). On 8 September, he was appointed Parish Priest of Newcastle West (1898-1916) and, on 10 March, 1918, he was appointed Bishop of Limerick. Earlier diocesan appointments included: Vicar General (1898), Monsignor (1900), Chancellor of the Cathedral Chapter (1912) and Vicar Capitular (1917). He died on 2 July, 1923, aged 73 years. He was a cousin of Rev John Hallinan (qv). (Tobin, 2004, 43)

O=Donnells, chiefs of Tirconnell, and his forbears had come south with their chieftain to take part in the battle of Kinsale in 1601. After the defeat at Kinsale, his forbears remained in the south of Ireland, where his family prospered. Nihil, who is believed to have completed his ecclesiastical studies on the continent, came from a highly educated family. His Uncle, Sir John Higgins, was personal physician to King Philip V of Spain and his brother, James, was an eminent physician, who had trained and practiced on the continent. James, who was author of several books on medicine, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on the basis of one of his medical treatises, published in London in 1742. Laurence was also a scholar and published a philosophical treatise in Limerick in 1770, entitled Rational Self Love. He was installed as Parish Priest of Rathkeale in 1762, but subsequently moved to Limerick city, where he became Parish Priest of St Nicholas. He was consecrated Bishop of Kilmacduagh on 23 December, 1783. Soon afterwards, however, he began to suffer from ill-health and requested a co-adjutor in 1793. He died in office on 29 June, 1795, and was buried in the chancel of the old cathedral in Kilfenora, Co. Galway, where there is an inscription in Latin to his memory. (Fahy, 1893, 361-363)

O=Dwyer, Most Rev Edward (1842-1917), Bishop

Nihil, Most Rev Laurence (1727-1795), Bishop

aurence Nihil was born in Cork in 1727. His family was connected with the

dward Thomas Dwyer, a native of Cullen, Co. Tipperary, was baptized in his own parish church on 30 January, 1842. When his father was transferred to Limerick, he attended the Christian Brothers School, Doon, where he was a scholarship winner. He transferred to the diocesan college, at the time operated by the Jesuits, and then entered St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained priest on 10 February, 1867. Though never a Parish Priest, he was curate in many parishes, including Rathkeale (1867) and Cappagh (1867-1868). Appointed bishop of Limerick in 1886, his episcopate was rarely far from controversy. Though he forbade his priests to become

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involved in the activities of the Land League and Plan of Campaign, he was one of the few bishops to affirm the actions of the 1916 leaders. Overnight, he became a national hero when he refused the request of General Maxwell, Commander of the British Forces, to discipline two Limerick priests, whom Maxwell termed a >dangerous menace=. He received the Freedom of Limerick City on 14 September, 1916. He died on 23 September, 1923, aged 81 years. (Crone, 1928, 185; Tobin, 2004, 97)

invoking Martial Law. Both were tried without a jury or defence and condemned to hang. The sentence was executed outside the gates of Kilmallock on 13 September, 1579. Both were subsequently interred in the Chapter Room, Askeaton abbey. O=Hely and O=Rourke were included in the list of Irish Martyrs beatified by Pope John Paul II on 27 September, 1992. (Catholic Encyclopedia, 2007)

Tuohy, Most Rev Charles (1754-1828), Bishop

O=Hely, Most Rev Patrick (c.1543-79), Bishop

atrick O=Hely was born in County Leitrim or Sligo about 1543. In 1561 he joined the Franciscans and, as a novice, he was sent abroad to the University of Alcal for his ecclesiastical training. He proved himself to be a gifted student, and he was duly ordained. He was summoned to Rome in 1576 and appointed Bishop of Mayo (now merged with the Archdiocese of Tuam), with power to operate in neighbouring dioceses, if no local bishop were available. Soon afterwards, he left with James Fitzmaurice (of the House of Desmond) for Spain and Portugal to organise a crusade. In 1578 O=Hely went to Paris to prepare for his spiritual mission in Ireland. He spent almost a year there. Early in 1579, he set out with Fr Con O=Rourke (qv), another Franciscan, for Brittany to catch a ship to Ireland. They both landed in Smerwick harbour, Co. Kerry, in the summer of 1579. They proceeded to Askeaton where Eleanor, Countess of Desmond (qv), received them in the absence of the Earl. However, she betrayed them to the Mayor of Limerick, James Goold, who arrested them and sent them to Sir William Drury, Lord President of Munster, then with his army in Kilmallock. When they refused the Oath of Supremacy, and declined to give information about the Fitzmaurice expedition, Drury short-circuited their trial by

harles Tuohy was born in Nicholas Street, Limerick, in 1754. He studied at the Irish Colleges in Toulouse and Paris. Ordained in Paris in 1780, he continued his studies, receiving a Doctorate in Divinity in 1784. He returned to Limerick that year and was appointed a curate in St. John=s Parish. In 1796, Bishop Young appointed him to Newcastle West. After ten years he was appointed Parish Priest of Rathkeale and subsequently went to St. Michael=s in 1812. On the death of Bishop Young, he was appointed Bishop of Limerick. He was a tireless worker in Limerick and also on the national political and ecclesiastical scene. He died in Newtown Villa, his residence in Sexton Street, Limerick, on St. Patrick=s day, 17 March, 1828, and is buried in the same tomb as his predecessor, Bishop Young. (LDA)

CONTENTS

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CLERGYMEN FRIARS
Fitzgerald, Rev Bonaventure OFM (c.1562-), Clergyman Friar

ather Bonaventure Fitzgerald, went to the continent for his ecclesiastical studies and returned to Ireland in 1687, following his ordination. He was elected Assistant to the Franciscan Provincial for the period 1697-1700. After this, he returned to Belgium, where he was appointed Guardian at St Anthony=s College, Louvain. He later worked in Kilcrea (outside Cork), Nenagh and Limerick and, in 1727, was appointed Guardian of the Askeaton Friary. In 1719, he got a chalice made for the Askeaton Friary. This is now in St Mary=s, Limerick. It is thought that, while Guardian of the Askeaton Friary, he continued to reside in Limerick, because there was no permanent Franciscan community in the Friary in Askeaton after the Treaty of Limerick. (Conlan, 2007).

r Anthony McEniry is listed as Guardian of the Franciscan Friary in Askeaton in the period 1699-1701 and 1711. The McEniry sept was prominent in county Limerick at one time, especially in the barony of Upper Connello. Their stronghold was in Corcomohid, later called Castletown McEniry, and still later Castletown Conyers. MacLysaght notes that the McEnirys belonged to the Ui Cairbre group, which includes the O=Donovans. A member of this family is listed as being in possession of the castle in Toomdeely, Askeaton, at one time. (Westropp, 1901, >Notes=, 170; MacLysaght, 1991, 82)

O=Cahan, Rev Eugene OFM (d.1652), Clergyman Friar

Herbert, Rev Jerome OFM (c.1620-), Clergyman Friar

erome Herbert was elected Guardian of the Franciscan Friary, Askeaton, in 1645 and re-elected in 1647 and 1648. It was while he was Guardian that the bodies of martyrs, Bishop O=Hely and Fr Con O=Rourke, were brought to the Friary and buried there. It is not clear whether Fr. Jerome Herbert and Fr. Jeremiah Herbert was one and the same person, since not only does spelling vary in different documents, but, moreover, the contemporay notes may be in either, Latin, Irish or English. In any case, Fr Jeremiah Herbert is listed as Guardian in Askeaton in 1670, 1675, 1676, 1681, 1683 and 1687. (Westropp, 1901, >Notes=, 169).

native of County Clare, Eugene O=Cahan joined the Franciscans Order in Ennis, Co. Clare, and, subsequently, went to Rome to study for the priesthood. On completion of his studies, he was awarded the degree STL and sent as Professor of Philosophy to Barletta, on the Adriatic coast of Italy, and later to teach theology in Pontoise, Paris. Soon after his return to Ireland in 1641, he set up an important school in Quinn, Co. Clare, and subsequently taught in Ennis. In 1650 he was appointed Guardian of the Franciscan Friary in Askeaton. Captured in 1651, he was later released. In 1652, however, he was captured a second time and put to death somewhere in the Sliabh Luachra region, Co. Kerry. (Conlon, 2007; Westropp, 1901, >Notes=, 169).

O=Rourke, Rev Con (c.1549-1579), Clergyman Friar

McEniry, Rev Anthony OFM (c.1699), Clergyman Friar


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on O=Rourke, son of Brian Bachach O=Rourke, Chief of the Breifne O=Rourkes, is said to have been of Royal Birth. In his teens, he entered the Order of Franciscan Observants in Dromoheir, Co Leitrim, this Friary having been founded by his grandfather, Eoghan O=Rourke, in 1508. He was sent to France to finish his studies in 1576. In the summer of 1579, he joined Bishop Patrick O=Hely (qv) And sailed to Ireland. With

O=Hely, he was betrayed by Eleanor, Countess of Desmond (qv), arrested by James Goold, Lord Mayor of Limerick, and, after torture, condemned to death by Sir William Drury, Lord President of Munster. After his execution in Kilmallock on 13 September, 1579, his body (together with that of Bishop O=Hely) was interred in the Chapter Room, Askeaton Abbey. His name was included in the list of Irish Martyrs beatified by Pope John Paul II on 27 September, 1992. (Catholic Encyclopedia, 2007)

ARISTOCRATS
Boyle, Richard, Earl (1566-1643), Aristocrat

Purcell, Rev Patrick OFM (c.1652-1719), Clergyman Friar

ather Patrick Purcell joined the Franciscan Order and was sent to the continent to study for ordination. He returned to Ireland around 1678. He was appointed Guardian in the Askeaton Friary 1677-1679 and again 1703-1711. He was appointed Guardian in Adare 1716-1717. It was he who purchased for the Franciscan Friary in Askeaton the chalice, which is now preserved in the Presbytery, Askeaton. It is dated 1719 and the legend reads: >Pro Convtu. ff min. de Askettin me Super permissu fieri curavit fr. Pat Purcel anno quo mortuus est 1719=. Translation: >For the convent of the Friar=s Minor at Askeaton, with the Superior=s permission, Fr. Patrick Purcell had me made in the year of his death 1719=. (Conlon, 2007; Westropp, 1901, >Notes=, 170)

CONTENTS

ichard Boyle was one of the most talented and shrewd Englishmen, ever to settle in Ireland. He was also unusually lucky, though he had many enemies, nearly all of whom envied him his social, political and financial success. His friends called him >The Great Earl of Cork=, while to his enemies he was >the Upstart Earl=. Educated at the King=s School, Canterbury, and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, Boyle studied law at the Middle Temple, London, but left for Ireland before completing his course. It is said that he arrived in Dublin on 23 June, 1588, with only ,23 in his pocket. At the end of his life, he was the first millionaire in Ireland and he and his children had many titles. Through advantageous marriages to heiresses, the patronage of Queen Elizabeth I, and political appointments, such as the posts of Lord High Treasurer and Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, he became the richest man in the country. One part of his estate was the 42,000 acres, which he purchased from Sir Walter Raleigh for a mere ,1,500. He built the town of Bandon, and also helped to develop the towns of Clonakilty, Midleton, Castlemartyr, Charleville and Doneraile. In several of his estates, he also developed industries and employed up to 4,000 people. Both he and his sons, together with armies partly made up of their own employees, helped defeat the Irish Confederate forces during the Nine Years War, including the battle of Liscarroll (1641), in which one of Boyle=s sons was killed. Some of his children were unusually gifted, especially Sir Robert, founder of the Royal Society and discoverer of Boyle=s Law, and Sir Roger, Earl of Orrery, who was one of the most gifted of the Parliamentary Commanders. Cromwell is reported to have said that if there were an Earl of Cork in every province, it would have been impossible for the Irish to raise a rebellion. The Earl of Cork built up an enormous estate in Ireland. It started when he was appointed deputy escheator to Sir Geoffrey

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Fenton. Part of Boyle=s duty was to allocate confiscated and >concealed= land, much of which he either purchased for small sums or allocated to himself. His Limerick holdings came initially from his marriage to Joan Apsley, co-heir to a large landowner in Limerick. He continued to secure more and more land during the Cromwellian confiscations, including hundreds of acres in and around Askeaton. Even a cursory reading of O=Donovan=s Ordinance Survey Letters (1840), will reveal frequent references to ownership of properties in the barony of Connello by his descendants. Boyle=s second wife was Catherine, daughter of Sir Geoffrey Fenton, whom he married 25 July, 1603, and by whom he had seven sons and eight daughters. His descendants are connected with several British aristocratic families, as well as with Queen Elizabeth II. Richard Boyle died at Youghal on 15 September, 1643, and is buried in the Boyle Family Tomb, St Mary=s Abbey, Youghal, Co. Cork. (Barnard, T., ODNB)

Boyle, Roger, Earl (1621-1679), Aristocrat


oger Boyle, son of Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, was born in Lismore Castle, Co. Waterford, on 25 April, 1621. His mother, the Earl=s second wife, was Catherine Fenton. Educated at Trinity College, Dublin, he was created Baron Broghill on 27 February, 1627, when only six years of age, thanks to the fact that his father, Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, was the largest landowner and richest man in Ireland. Sir Roger first came to prominence as a playwright. His special talent, however, was as a military commander and this was first demonstrated when he and his brothers fought and defeated the Irish Confederate forces at the battle of Liscarroll in 1642 Broghill was initially suspicious of Cromwell and began to associate with groups planning the restoration of Charles II. In a private interview, however, Cromwell changed Broghill=s mind and offered him command as Master of Ordnance in Munster. Broghill accepted and proved to be a gifted commander. He was largely responsible for the triumph of Cromwellian forces in the south of Ireland, defeating the south Munster rebels at Macroom

and Lord Muskerry=s forces at Knocknaclashy in 1651. The latter were on their way to relieve the Irish under attack by General Ireton in Limerick. Finally, he aided Ireton in capturing Limerick. Cromwell heaped honours on him. After the death of Cromwell, however, Boghill saw that the reign of the Parliamentarians was coming to an end, so he took control of the Irish army and pledged his support for the restoration of Charles II. As a reward, he was made 1st Earl of Orrery. He acquired a good deal of property, both in England and Ireland, including thousands of acres in Munster, not least through the Cromwellian confiscations. This property included the well-known estates at Blarney Castle, Ballymaloe and Charleville. Much of this estate, including, townlands in Askeaton (such as Courtbrowne and Lismakeery), remained in the possession of the Boyle family until the end of the nineteenth century. In 1712, when one of his successors requested a grant of ,500 to repair the Desmond castle, Askaton, it was stated that the family owned three quarters of the 12,000 acre-seignory of Askeaton (Westropp, 1902, >Notes=, 172), Multi-talented himself, Roger Boyle also came from a very talented family, his brother, Robert Boyle, being the founder of the Royal Society and discoverer of Boyle=s Law in physics. Roger Boyle married Lady Margaret Howard, daughter of the Earl of Suffolk, and had five daughters and two sons, the eldest, Roger (1646-81), succeeding him as 2nd Earl of Orrery. The first Earl died at his seat in Castlemartyr, Co. Cork, on 26 October, 1679. (Westropp, 1902, >Notes=, 172 ff; Barnard, T., ODNB)

Devereaux, Robert (1566-1601), Aristocrat

obert Devereux, son of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex, and Lettie Knollys, was born on 19 November, 1566, at Netherwood, Hertfordshire. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, and became a favourite at Queen Elizabeth=s court. He was a brave, though possibly impetuous, soldier and was knighted on the field of battle at Zutphen by his mentor and father-in-law, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. Devereaux led the land forces that

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stormed Cadiz in 1596. He was a bitter rival of Sir Walter Releigh for the favour of Queen Elizabeth. In 1599, at his own request, the Queen gave him command of an expedition to Ireland, which proved disastrous. He concluded an unauthorised truce with Hugh O=Neill, Earl of Tyrone, and, on his return to England, was imprisoned. Though later set free, he foolishly joined the Earl of Southampton in a conspiracy against the Crown and was arrested and sent to the Tower of London. He was beheaded on 25 February, 1601. In his journeys through Munster in 1599, Essex came to the relief of Francis Berkeley (qv) and the English garrison defending Askeaton from attack by the forces of the Sugn Earl (qv). Essex knighted Berkeley (apparently deservedly) for his brave defence of Askeaton but was reprimanded by Elizabeth for being too profligate in bestowing knighthoods during his Irish campaign. Essex is said to have slept in the Abbey ruins and unconfirmed reports say that, during the night, he saw the ghosts of slain monks. Next morning, he is said to have left hurriedly for Limerick. In 1583, Essex married Frances Walsingham, daughter of Sir Francis Walsingham, and widow of his friend, Sir Philip Sidney. (Hammer, ODNB)

FitzGerald, Maurice 1st Earl (1293-1355), Aristocrat

aurice Fitzthomas FitzGerald, son of Thomas Fitzmaurice FitzGerald and Margaret de Berkeley, was born in 1293. His father died while he was still a child. He was married three times, firstly (5 August, 1312) to Lady Katherine de Burgh, daughter of Richard >The Red= de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, in Greencastle, Co Antrim, and their sons were Sir Maurice (2nd Earl) and Sir John. He became Lord Justice (Justiciar) of Ireland and was created 1st Earl of Desmond by King Edward III on 22 August, 1329. In 1330, he introduced the practice of quartering soldiers in the homes of the people they were sent to protect. He married, secondly, Lady Aveline (or Eleanor) Fitzmaurice, the daughter of his brother, Nicholas Fitzmaurice, 3rd Lord of Kerry, and their children were Sir Gerald and Sir Nicholas

(an embicile, who died c.1338). It has also been said that he married, thirdly, Lady Margaret O=Brien, daughter of Conor O=Brien of Thomond, but modern historians question the evidence for this. He died in Dublin Castle on January, 25, 1355. Maurice was described as the most turbulent noble of his time. In 1332 Munster Juries accused him of conspiracies with Anglo-Irish and Gaelic lords to become king of Ireland. In 1346, he was indicted for treasonable correspondence with Scotland and France, and of offering to rule Ireland as Papal deputy. He was imprisoned in 1331-1333 and was outlawed from 1345 to 1349. But he was restored to favour by Edward III and made Justiciar of Ireland in 1335. He fought for the Crown during the Bruce invasion and fought in Scotland in 1335. His main problems were connected with land. Royal ministers were upholding the land interests of absentee lease-holders within his domains, especially in county Cork (Frame, ODNB). Note: The inclusion of all the Earls of Desmond in a Lower Connello Biographical Dictionary may, at first sight, seem arguable, since only some of them actually resided in Askeaton. On the other hand, the fact is that Askeaton was one of the main castles of the House of Desmond, and, from a strategic point of view, was, in a very real sense, the centre of the domain of the Earls of Desmond. This domain, it must be remembered, was the largest in Ireland, containing more than 574,000 acres, including the entire barony of Lower Connello, and stretching from Castlemaine, Co. Kerry, in the west, to the Glen of Aherlow, Co. Tipperary, in the east, and from the Shannon in the north to the sea at Youghal, Co. Cork, in the south. The towns of Rathkeale and Askeaton, therefore, belonged to the Earls of Desmond just as much as they later belonged to Elizabeth >undertakers= who go possession of them. It should be noted that there is a difference of opinion as to the total number of Earls of Desmond (first creation) and the method of numbering them. In this volume, we adopt the system used in Burke=s Peerage. Altogether, there have been four creations of the title Earl of Desmond. Only the first two, relating to the FitzGerald family, are of concern here. In the first creation, we had the

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FitzGerald Earls 1st (Sir Maurice Fitzthomas FitzGerald) to the 15th (Rebel Earl, Sir Gerald FitzGerald, who was killed in 1583). The first creation was dissolved on the death of Sir Gerald, 15th Earl. The second creation was arranged specifically for Sir James FitzGerald, only son of the 15th Earl, and was intended for the duration of his life only. In fact, it lasted only one year (1600-01), because he died one year after being created Earl. Sir James FitzGerald, popularly known as the >Sugan Earl=, was not recognised by the Irish Government of the time and, consequently, was not in the FitzGerald Earls of Desmond line, though he was of their blood, being a nephew of the 15th Earl. James assumed this title himself and was >confirmed= in it by Sir Hugh O=Neill, Earl of Tyrone, Moreover, there is little doubt that this was done for political purposes, especially to rally a following of supporters to the cause of the Geraldine rebellion. The Earls are listed in numerical order, 1st to 15th, not in the usual alphabetical order, to help the reader keep track of them.

FitzGerald, Maurice 2nd Earl (1336-1358), Aristocrat

aurice Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, son of Maurice Fitzthomas FitzGerald, 1st Earl, and Lady Katherine de Burgh, succeeded his father as 2nd Earl of Desmond in 1356. He was born in Newcastle West on 31 July, 1336, and baptized in the Catholic Church, Newcastle West, on 1 August, 1336. He married Lady Beatrice Stafford, daughter of Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford. He died by drowning, while crossing the Irish Sea, in 1358 or 1359. (FitzGerald of Desmond)

Edward III in 1359 on condition that he marry Lady Eleanor Butler (daughter of James, 2 nd Earl of Ormond, and his wife, Elizabeth Darcy), and also that he would look after his embecile brother, Sir Nicholas, for life. He married Eleanor after 20 July, 1359, and she died in 1395. Gerald was charged with various governmental duties, culminating in his being appointed Justiciar of Ireland on 20 February, 1367. He held this office until 1369. He was again invited to become Justiciar in January, 1382, but he declined the offer. He was, however, the Munster representative of the King=s Lieutenant in Ireland, as well as a Justice in Kerry. He was also a cultivated man, being both a mathematician and a poet, one of his poems being, >Mairg adeir olc ris na mnaibh= (>In defense of Women=). Gerald, known in Irish as Garid Iarla, is important in the history of the Gaelic inculturation of the Anglo-Irish. Some say that it was his cultural influence, through his Gaelic poetry, that led to the Anglo-Irish community replacing French with Irish as its first language. Added to this was the local legend which grew up linking Garid Iarla romantically with the Celtic Goddess ine. This recalled a long-standing theme of love between a hero and an otherworldly maiden, which was traditional in the courtly poetry of continental Europe. Garid Iarla died, some say disappeared into the waters of Lough Gur, in 1398. According to fable, he can be seen riding his steed, shod with silver shoes, over the water every seven years when he comes to visit his castle, nearby. Children of Gerald and Eleanor Butler were: Sir James; Lady Catherine (married Sir John Fitzthomas); Sir John (4th Earl); Sir Maurice (disappeared in 1410); Lady Joan (married Sir Maurice Fitzjohn); Lady Elizabeth (married John Lord of Barry); Sir James (6th Earl). (Mac Niocaill, ODNB)

FitzGerald, Gerald 3rd Earl (c.1338-1398), Aristocrat

erald Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, younger son of Maurice Fitzthomas FitzGerald, 1 st Earl, and Lady Aveline Fitzmaurice, was born about 1338. He succeeded as 3rd Earl of Desmond on the death, by drowning, of his elder brother, Sir Maurice. The title and lands were formally transferred to him by King

FitzGerald, John 4th Earl (d.1399), Aristocrat

J
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ohn FitzGerald FitzGerald, son of Gerald Fitzmaurice FitzGerald (Garid Iarla) and Eleanor Butler, became the fourth Earl of Desmond in 1398. He married Joan Roche, a beautiful >peasant= girl, and abandoned his Irish

lands, settling in Rouen. He drowned at Bal-tha-an-Droiched, in the river Suir, on 4 March (some say on 11 October), 1399, and was buried in the South Friary, Youghal. They had two children, a son, Sir Thomas, who succeeded him, and a daughter, Lady Joan. (Fitzgerald of Desmond).

FitzGerald, Thomas 5th Earl (c.1386-1420), Aristocrat

homas Fitzjohn FitzGerald, son of John FitzGerald FitzGerald and Joan Roche, was born about 1386. He acceded to the Earldom in 1400 but was deposed by James (>the Usurper=) in 1411. He married Catherine McCormac and had one son, Sir Maurice (d.1452). Earl Thomas died in Paris in 1420. (Fitzgerald of Desmond).

FitzGerald, James 6th Earl (c.1385-1463), Aristocrat

ames >The Usurper= FitzGerald FitzGerald, son of Gerald Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, 3 rd Earl, and Eleanor Butler, was born around 1385. He earned his nickname by expelling John Fitzthomas FitzGerald, and was recognised 6th Earl of Desmond in 1422. He married Lady Mary Burke, daughter of William Fitzrichard Burke. James founded the Franciscan Friary in Askeaton. He died at Mocollop, Lismore, Co. Waterford, in 1463. He was buried in Youghal. His children included Sir Thomas (7th Earl); Lady Jane, Sir Garret Fitzgerald and Lady Hanora. Earl James was godfather to the Duke of Clarence, brother of King Edward IV. (Fitzgerald of Desmond).

Sir Thomas, Sir John, Sir Garret g and Lady Ellen. One of the keys to understanding the significance of Earl Thomas in Irish history is the fact that he (and the House of Desmond) was a supporter of the House of York in the long struggle for the Crown of England. Thomas=s role became pivotal when, in 1462, he defeated the great traditional enemies of the House of Desmond, the Butlers of Ormond, at Pilltown, to crush a Lancastrian rebellion. The Yorkist Edward IV rewarded Thomas by appointing him to act as Lord Deputy of Ireland, in place of the Duke of Clarence, the King=s brother, from 1462-1467. By conferring the governorship of the country on the most remote of the three Irish Earls, Edward has been seen as attempting to extend the influence of the Dublin administration far beyond the Pale. Thomas used his position to found Ireland=s first University in Youghal, Co. Cork, in 1464. He made the mistake, however, of introducing Irish practices, including the detested Acoyne and livery@ into the Pale and the local gentry, especially those in Meath, resented this and fomented opposition to him. His successor, the Earl of Worchester, attainted him of treason, accusing him of siding with the Irish against the English and he was arrested and condemned to death. In addition to beheading the Earl in Drogheda, on 15 February, 1468, Worchester also cruelly put to death the Earl=s two infant sons. Worchester, himself, was arrested in 1470 and executed at Tower Hill, London, during the Lancastrian restoration. Earl Thomas, known as Thomas of Drogheda, was initially buried in St Peter=s Church, Drogheda, but, a century later, Sir Philip Sidney removed his tomb to Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin (Connolly 1988, 143).

FitzGerald, Thomas 7th Earl (c.1426-1468), Aristocrat

FitzGerald, James 8th Earl (1459-1487), Aristocrat

homas Fitzjames FitzGerald, son of James FitzGerald FitzGerald (>The Usurper=) and his wife, Mary, daughter of Ulick Burke, Lord of Clanricarde, succeeded his father in 1463. He married Eils (Elizabeth) Barry, daughter of William Barry, 8th Lord Barrymore, on 22 August, 1455, and they had five sons and one daughter: Sir James, Sir Maurice Bacach,

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ames Fitzthomas FitzGerald, son of Thomas Fitzjames FitzGerald, 7th Earl, and his wife, Eils Barry, was born in 1459. He succeeded his father as Earl of Desmond on the latter=s execution in 1468. He received immunity for any act committed to avenge his father=s death. He is regarded as a man of singular prudence

and he increased significantly the estate he had inherited. King Richard III tried to get James on his side and, to this end, sent him a gift of a collar of gold, weighing 20 ounces, with an emblem of a white boar, pendant from a circlet of roses and suns. The Earl, however, strengthened and augmented his Irish alliances. James married Margaret O=Brien, daughter of Turlough O=Brien, King of Thomond, and they had one child, a daughter, Lady Joan, who, subsequently, married Sir Maurice Roche, 2nd Lord Fermoy. Earl James was murdered at Courtmatrix, Rathkeale, on 7 December, 1487, at the age of 28. His brother, John Montagh FitzGerald, was suspected of instigating the murder. James was buried in Youghal, Co. Cork. (Fitzgerald of Desmond).

FitzGerald, Maurice 9th Earl (d.1520), Aristocrat

aurice >Bacach= Fitzjames FitzGerald, son of Thomas FitzGerald, 7th Earl, and Eils Barry, his wife, became Earl of Desmond on the death of his brother, James, 8 th Earl, in 1487. Being lame, he was usually carried on a litter, but he was also reported to be brave. He married Ellen Roche, daughter of Sir Maurice Roche, 2nd Lord Fermoy, and had a family of two boys (Sir James and Sir Thomas) and two girls (Lady Ellen and Lady Joan). On the death of his first wife, he married Lady Honora Fitzgibbon, daughter of the White Knight. Though initially irritating the English King by siding with the Pretender, Perkin Warbeck, during the siege of Waterford, the King later forgave him and showed him with favours by granting him, on 26 August, 1497, all the >customs, cockets, poundage and prize-wines of Limerick, Cork, Kinsale, Baltimore, and Youghal, with other privileges and advantages=. Maurice died in 1520 and was buried in the Dominican Church, Tralee. (FitzGerald of Desmond).

his wife, Ellen Roche, succeeded his father, Maurice, as 10th Earl of Desmond in 1520, though he took responsibility for a good deal of administration from about 1510 onwards, while his father was still alive. Born about 1495, he married Amy O=Brien Ara, daughter of Toidealbhreach O=Brien, Bishop of Kildare, and, with her, had one daughter, Lady Joan. By another woman, he had two sons (James and James Elagh >McNamara=). He is best known for his contacts with foreign powers. When England went to war with France, James entertained French agents in Askeaton in 1523. He also agreed to support the Yorkist Pretender, Richard de la Pole, for the English throne. After the Ormond Butlers, his traditional enemies, defeated the Desmond client, Richard Power, and established themselves in Dungarvan, James approached the Emperor Charles V, declaring himself willing, in 1520, to enter into a league against England. The Emperor commissioned his Chaplain to visit Ireland and report on the Earl and circumstances in Ireland. A summary of this report is given by Froude in his History of England: >The Earl, himself, is from thirty to forty years old, and is rather above middle height. He keeps better justice throughout his dominions than any other chief in Ireland. Robbers and homicides find no mercy, and are executed out of hand. His people are in high order and discipline. They are armed with short bows and swords. The Earl=s guard are in mail from neck to heel, and carry halberds. He has also a number of horse, some of whom know how to break a lance. They all ride admirably, without saddle or stirrup=. In respect of this latter report, it should also be mentioned that some feel Earl James gave an exaggerated account of his military prowess to the Chaplain and that at least some of the latter=s report to the Emporer was based on what the Chaplain heard from the Earl, rather than what he saw for himself. James died on 18 June, 1529, and was buried in the Dominican Priory, Tralee. (Connolly 1988, 143)

FitzGerald, James 10th Earl (1495-1529), Aristocrat

ames Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, son of Maurice >Bacach= Fitzgerald, 9th Earl, and

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FitzGerald, Thomas 11th Earl (1454-1534), Aristocrat

homas Fitzgerald, son of Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl, and his wife, Eils Barry, was born in 1454. He became 11 th Earl of Desmond on the death of James 10 th Earl in 1529. He married Sheila McCarthy, daughter of Cormac Lidir McTeige McCarthy, Lord of Muskerry, with whom he had one son, Sir Maurice. Earl Thomas subsequently married Catherine FitzGerald, daughter of Sir John FitzGerald, Lord of the Decies, and known to historians as >the Old Countess= of Desmond (qv). Thomas was aged about 75 when he succeeded to the Earldom and spent the greater part of his remaining life trying to ensure that his grandson, Sir James Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, would succeed him. (FitzGerald of Desmond).

March, 1540. He was buried in Youghal. Earl James married Mary McCarthy, daughter of his grand-uncle, Cormac g Lidir McCarthy, Lord of Muskerry. They had one daughter, Lady Judith FitzGerald. (McCormack, AM, ODNB)

FitzGerald, John 13th Earl (d.1536), Aristocrat

FitzGerald, James 12th Earl (d.1540), Aristocrat

ir James Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, son of Sir Maurice Fitzthomas FitzGerald, and Lady Joan Fitzgibbon, daughter of Sir John Fitzgibbon, 7th White Knight, was given as a hostage to King Henry VIII for his grandfather at the Royal Court, Windsor. When the Earldom became vacant on the death of Thomas, 11th Earl, in 1534, Henry VIII loaded James with honours and sent him to Ireland, with a bodyguard, to take up the Earldom. His title to the Earldom was, however, disputed by his grand-uncle, Sir John FitzGerald, and a large Desmond faction. Sir James= opponents had a valid case, for James was technically illegitimate, his parents, being first cousins, having married without a Papal dispensation. Many of the Geraldines, therefore, regarded him as illegitimate and not qualified to succeed as 12th Earl. Sir John Fitzgerald, however, died around Christmas, 1536. James, derisively nicknamed the >Court Page=, is said to have been a page boy to King Henry VIII. Earl James did not enjoy his honours for long, because he was murdered by his cousin, Maurice an Toiten, son of his late opponent, Sir John FitzGerald, near Youghal, Co. Cork (some say at Leacanscail, Co. Kerry), on 19

ohn FitzGerald FitzGerald, son of Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl, and his wife, Eils Barry, was the Sir John FitzGerald, who opposed the 12th Earl, James, the >Page Boy=. Sir John was popular with his Gaelic followers, who regarded him as the valid and >de facto= 13th Earl of Desmond. It will be noted, however, that he died before the 12th Earl and was 75 years of age when he assumed the Earldom, partly with a view to securing it for his son, Sir James. Sir John married Maud (Mr) O=Brien, daughter of Donough O=Brien of Carrigagunnell, Lord of Pubblebrien, and they had four sons (Thomas, James, Maurice an Toiten and John g). He died around Christmas, 1536. (FitzGerald of Desmond; (McCormack, AM, ODNB).

FitzGerald, James 14th Earl (d.1558), Aristocrat

ames FitzJohn FitzGerald, son of John FitzGerald, 13th Earl, and his wife, Maud (Mr) O=Brien, of Carrigagunnell, assumed the Earldom on the death of his grandfather, the de-facto 13th Earl, in 1536. He married Joan Roche, daughter of Maurice Roche, Lord Fermoy and, with her, had three children, Sir Maurice Ruadh of Conna, Lady Joan (d.1596) and Lady Eleanor (d.1569). He married, secondly, More O=Carroll, daughter of Sir Maolrony McShane O=Carroll, Lord of Ely O=Carroll, and, with her, had six more children: Gerald (15th Earl), Sir John, Lady Margaret, Lady Joan, Lady Ailish and Lady Hanora. He married, thirdly (before February, 1549), Catherine Butler, daughter of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormond, but did not have children with her. Finally, he married, for the fourth time, Evelyn Mr McCarthy, daughter of Donal McCarthy Mr, and, with her, had two children, Lady

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Eleanor and Sir James FitzGerald (c.1580). He was very active in Irish political affairs, having cordial relations with both Henry VIII and his Irish Deputy, Sir Anthony St Leger. In March, 1547, James was appointed Lord Treasurer of Ireland, one of the highest offices in the land. The following year, he was appointed Admiral of the south coast of Ireland, between Waterford and Galway. He was also appointed to several Government commissions, including one charged with the dissolution of religious houses in Ireland. He benefited enormously from the dissolution of the monasteries, receiving thousands of acres of monastic land all over Ireland, including parcels in Kilmallock, Limerick, Dublin, Waterford and south Cork. He also received some of the lands of Silken Thomas of the Kildare Fitzgeralds, which had been declared forfeit following this young man=s revolt. These lands included the manors of Adare and Croom. Though, at a personal level, James was very successful and increased the Desmond holdings to 300,000 acres, he failed to tackle broader underlying issues, which surfaced after his death to plague his successor, Gerald, who had less foresight, political talent and shrewdness. Some of these problems ultimately led to the dissolution of the Desmond heritage a quarter of a century later. Earl James died at his castle in Askeaton on 27 October, 1558, but he was taken to the Dominican Friary in Tralee for burial on 1 November, 1558. (McGurk, JJN, ODNB)

Chambers (Dublin, 1986). However, it was Eleanor who betrayed the two Franciscan Friars, Father Con O=Rourke (qv) and Bishop Patrick O=Hely (qv), when they called to Askeaton Castle in 1579 on their journey from Smerwick Harbour to Limerick. As the Desmond Rebellion continued to falter, more and more of his allies deserted Gerald. His traditional enemy, the Earl of Ormond, put a price on his head. After a period of great hardship and suffering, while on the run from his enemies, Gerald was killed by a member of the Moriarty Clan in Glenaginty Wood, near Tralee, on 11 November, 1583. The killing has traditionally been regarded as a great act of betrayal, especially since the Moriartys were also the Earl=s foster brothers. Some historians have not hesitated to say that the Earl was killed for >head money=, since one of his executioners, Daniel O=Kelly, beheaded him and received a reward from Sir Walter Raleigh, who sent the head to London to Queen Elizabeth, as a Agoodly gift@. This is why one of the Knights of Glin, when he had a few drinks, would walk into a hotel and ask in a loud voice, >Is there a Moriarty here?= If there happened to be one, he would run the risk of being horse-whipped by the Knight. The title Earl of Desmond (first creation) was declared extinct by the Act of Attainder passed by the Irish Parliament in 1586. (McCormack, AM, ODNB; Gaughan 1978)

FitzGerald, Gerald 15 and Last Earl (c.1533-1583), Aristocrat

th

FitzGerald, James 1st Earl (2nd Creation) (1571-1601), Aristocrat

erald FitzGerald, son of James FitzGerald, 14th Earl, and his wife, More O=Carroll, was born about 1533. He became known as the >Rebel Earl=. He married, firstly (c.1551), Joan Fitzgerald, and, by her, had one daughter, Margaret FitzGerald. He married, secondly (1565), Eleanor Butler, and by her, had seven children: Sir James (the >Queen=s Earl=), Lady Catherine, Lady Jane, Lady Ellen, Lady Elizabeth, Lady Margaret and Lady Ailish. His second wife, Lady Eleanor Butler (qv), a sister of Gerald=s great enemy, >Black= Tom Butler, Earl of Ormond, was a strong character and has had a sympathetic biographer in Anne

ames FitzGerald FitzGerald, son of Lord Gerald FitzGerald, 15th Earl, and his second wife, Lady Eleanor Butler, was born in England on 6 June, 1571. He is known as the >Queen=s Earl= and the >Tower Earl=. He spent much of his life imprisoned in the Tower of London and also suffered from chronic ill-health. Though James was initially heir to an immense estate, the Irish Parliament in 1586 declared his father=s property attainted and the Desmond Earldom (First Creation) extinct. Around 1600, however, the Irish government grew alarmed at the anti-plantation violence in Munster, the initial success of the Sugan Earl and the growing military threat of Hugh O=Neill. This

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time there was also danger that Munster rebels would receive help from the Spanish, who were then at war with England. It was in this context that the British Monarch prepared a new patent, signed 1 October, 1600, for the creation of a new title of Earl of Desmond (second creation), but without restoration of the confiscated Desmond lands and restricting any inheritance of the title. A sum of ,500 was, however, granted to the new Earl. He was sent to Ireland in the custody of two >protectors=, Captain Price and Miler McGrath, Archbishop of Cashel. He landed at Youghal, after being dreadfully seasick, and journeyed to Kilmallock, where he was given lodgings by the English Commander, Sir George Thornton. The following Sunday, he made his way, some say ostentatiously, to the Protestant Church. His followers, however, were waiting at the Catholic chapel. They were bitterly disappointed in him and showed their derision by jeering him. Seeing the failure of the new Earl to win over a Desmond following, the Government discarded him and, in March, 1601, he returned to London, with a letter from Lord Carew recommending him for a land grant and a fixed income. His health continued to deteriorate, however, and he died (unmarried) in London early in November, 1601, but the Government did not announce his death until January, 1602. He is buried in London (McCormack, AM, ODNB).

worked for reconciliation. During the second Desmond Rebellion, she came out of hiding and tried, though in vain, to negotiate the Earl=s pardon. When he was murdered in 1583, she was left a widow without means of support, but she managed to secure another Royal audience and a pension. She married, secondly, O=Connor of Sligo. He died a loyal subject in 1609 and she lived comfortably for the rest of her life on income from his estate. She died in 1638. Though Countess Eleanor emerges as wiser, shrewder and more accommodating to the Government=s demands than her more mercurial husband, it is doubtful whether she shared the Gaelic and Catholic aspirations of her Desmond subjects. She seems to have had no hesitation in betraying the two Franciscan Friars, Father Con O=Rourke and Bishop Patrick O=Hely, when they visited her in Askeaton in 1579 on their way from Smerwick harbour to Limerick. Anne Chambers, however, draws a sympathetic picture of Eleanor in her book, As Wicked a Woman (Chambers, Dublin, 1986).

FitzGerald, Countess Joan (1509-1565), Aristocrat

FitzGerald, Countess Eleanor (1545-1638), Aristocrat

leanor Butler, daughter of Edmund Butler, 1st Baron Dunboyne, and Julia McCarthy, his wife, was born in 1545. In 1565, she became the second wife of Gerard, 15 th Earl of Desmond. Eleanor was a sister of >Black Tom= Butler, Earl of Ormond, a traditional enemy of the Desmonds. Tom was also a particular enemy of Earl Gerard. Eleanor bore Gerald seven children: James, (1st Earl, New Creation), Catherine, Jane, Ellen, Elizabeth, Margaret and Ailish. After her husband=s imprisonment in the Tower of London, she ran the estates, contained rivals and secured an audience with Queen Elizabeth, which led to the Earl=s release from prison and his subjection, instead, to house arrest. On their return to Ireland, Eleanor

oan FitzGerald, daughter of James Fitzmaurice FitzGerald, 10th Earl of Desmond, and Amy O=Brien Ara, was born in 1509. Before December 21, 1532, she married, firstly, James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormonde, and they had seven children. These were Sir Thomas (>Black Tom=), who became 10th Earl of Ormond (and an implacable enemy of Joan=s third husband); Sir Edmund, Sir James, Sir John, Sir Walter, Sir Edward and Sir Pierce Butler. Her husband, Lord James Butler, died of poison on 28 October, 1546, in London, along with his steward and sixteen of his servants. Before 28 August, 1548, she married, secondly, Sir Francis Bryan, Lord Justice of Ireland, who also died suddenly of mysterious causes. About 1551, she married, thirdly, Lord Gerald FitzJames FitzGerald, the 15th Earl of Desmond. They had one daughter, Lady Margaret. Partly because, in the course of her life, she was married to three of the most influential members of the aristocracy, she became a very influential woman in Ireland.

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Queen Elizabeth recognised Joan=s skill as a peacemaker and called upon her to keep >the quiet= in Munster, when Earl Gerald was detained in England. She lived in the castle in Askeaton and died on 2 January, 1565. She was buried in the Franciscan Friary, Askeaton. (Holland, 1996)

FitzGerald, >Old= Countess Catherine (c.1510-1604), Aristocrat

atherine FitzGerald, daughter of Sir John FitzGerald, Second Lord of the Decies in Waterford, and Ellen Fitzgibbon, daughter of the White Knight, was born in Dromana, Co. Waterford, probably around 1510. In 1529, she married, as his second wife, Thomas, 2 nd Earl of Desmond (1454-1534), who was her first cousin, once removed. She was granted a life tenancy of Inchiquin Castle, near Youghal, by her late husband, with the remainder to pass to the line of the Earls of Desmond upon her death. By deed, dated 1575, she passed title to the castle and lands in trust to the incumbent Earl, Gerald 15th Earl, who then passed it in trust to his servants. Following the Earl=s attainder in 1582, his entire estate fell to the Crown, as one of the consequences of the Desmond Rebellion. Inchiquin Castle and its lands were granted to Sir Walter Raleigh, as part of his grant of 42,000 acres. In 1588-1589, he granted certain leases of the lands, at the same time reserving the life interest of Lady Desmond, assuming that she would soon pass away of old age (she was then about 78 years of age). In 1602, Raleigh sold his entire estate (42,000 acres) to Sir Richard Boyle, 1 st Earl of Cork, for ,1,500, before his return to England. But Boyle was not as considerate as Raleigh and he immediately instigated legal proceedings to evict the Countess. In an attempt to save her inheritance, the old lady, now in her nineties, set out from Cork in 1604, sailing to Bristol, to lobby King James I to intercede and guarantee her a home until her death. She, herself, walked from Bristol to London, and pushed her infirm eighty-year old daughter in a little cart. In London, her petition was presented to King James I. The same year, she returned to Ireland and died. The Countess is reported to have been lively just before her death, walking every week 4-5 miles for her

supplies. It is said that her death was caused by falling from a tree while picking fruit. Her thigh was injured in the fall and she caught fever and died. She is reported to be buried beside her husband in the Franciscan Friary, Youghal. Two influential writers make reference to her story and, mistakenly, state that she lived to be 140 years of age. These are Sir Walter Raleigh (History of the World, 1614, 3 vols, Vol.1, p.60) and Fynes Morryson (Itinary, 1617), both of whom seem to have been misinformed. (McCormack, AN, ODNB)

Greenall, Edward Baron (1902-1990), Aristocrat


dward Greenall, son of Gilbert Greenall, 1st Baron Daresbury of Walton, Chester, United Kingdom, and his wife, Frances Griffith, was born on 18 July, 1953. He came from a brewing family, that had diversified into the provision of leisure facilities. He was educated at Eton College and, after school, joined the British army, attaining the rank of lieutenant in the Life Guards. His great love, however, was for horses and hunting. He became Joint Master of Foxhounds at Belvoir in 1934, retaining this post until the outbreak of World War II. He succeeded to the family titles, 3rd Baronet Greenhall, and 2nd Baron Daresbury, on the death of his father in 1938. He became Master of the Limerick County Foxhounds in 1947, retaining this post until his death in 1990. He married, firstly, Joan Sherriffe, who died one year later, in 1926. He married, secondly, Josephine Laycock, by whom he had a son, Edward Greenall (1928-1996), who succeeded him as 3rd Baron Daresbury. He married, thirdly, Lady Helena Wentworth-Fitzwilliam (better known as Lady Hilton Green), who was also devoted to hunting. Lord Daresbury purchased the old Bateman residence, Altavilla, Cappagh, and restored it, at considerable cost. He played a leading part in reorganising the Limerick County Foxhounds at Clonshire, Adare. Among his innovations was the practice of importing foxhounds from England to strengthen the Clonshire pack. He died in 1990, aged 88 years. (Www.thepeerage.com)

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Southwell, Thomas 1st Baronet (d.1681), Aristocrat

homas Southwell, son of Edmund Southwell and his wife, Catherine Herbert, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick in the first half of the seventeenth century. He became sheriff of counties Kerry, Clare and Limerick in 1654 and was knighted for his services to the crown. On 4 August, 1662, he was created 1st Baronet of Castle Mattress in Ireland by King Charles II on 4 August, 1662. He married Elizabeth Starkey of Dromoland, Co. Clare, and they had two daughters (Gertrude and Joan) and an only son, Richard, who predeceased his father. He died in Castle Matrix, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in May, 1681. The family title was inherited by his grandson, Thomas Southwell (qv). (http://www.thepeerage.com/p31826.htm)

one of the four commissioners of revenue in Ireland. He was appointed a member of the Irish Privy Council in 1710 and created 1st Baron Southwell of Castle Mattress in 1717. He had already succeeded to the title, 2nd Baronet Southwell, in 1680. He promoted the Irish linen industry, for which there was a factory in Rathkeale and, with a view to increasing the number of Protestant inhabitants in Rathkeale, he made arrangements for the settling of Palatine emigrants from the German Palatinate on the Rhine on his estate in Rathkeale. He died suddenly in Dublin on 4 August, 1720, and was buried in Rathkeale. His son, Thomas, succeeded him to the title; his son, Henry, entered the British army and became an MP for Limerick; his son, Robert, joined the Royal Navy and was killed in a duel; his son, Richard, became a clergyman in the diocese of Cloyne. (Kilburn, M, ODNB)

Southwell, Thomas 1st Baron (1667-1720), Aristocrat

Southwell, Thomas 2nd Baron (1698-1766), Aristocrat

homas Southwell, son of Richard Southwell and Lady Elizabeth O=Brien, daughter of Morrogh O=Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin, was born at Castle Mattress, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1667. He was the grandson of the 1st baronet Southwell. He married, Lady Meliora Conningsby on 8 August, 1695, and had issue, including six sons. He came to prominence during the Jacobite War in Ireland, when, together with his brother Richard, he formed a war party in Rathkeale and marched northwards to attack the Earl of Tyrconnell, who led the forces of King James. On the way, they were betrayed by false guides, led into an ambush, and forced to surrender to the Jacobite forces. Though sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered, for high treason, Southwell managed to escape and made his way to England. After King William=s victory at the battle of the Boyne, honours were heaped upon him. He was made

homas Southwell, son of Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron, and his wife, Lady Meliora Conningsby, was born on 7 January, 1698. He married Mary Coke in March 1719 and they had a family of one son, Thomas George, and one daughter, Melliora. He succeeded to the family titles, 3rd Baronet and 2nd Baron Southwell of Castle Mattress, on the death of his father, 1st Baron, on 4 August, 1720. The 2nd Baron was Member of Parliament for Leitrim from 1717 to 1720. He was also appointed a member of the Irish Privy Council in 1726. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1734 and was a Governor of Limerick. He died on 19 November, 1766, aged 68 years. (http://www.thepeerage.com/p31826.htm)

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Southwell, Thomas 1st Viscount (1721-1780), Aristocrat

homas George Southwell, son of Thomas, 2nd Baron Southwell, and his wife, Mary Coke, was born on 4 May, 1721. He was educated at the University of Oxford and at Lincoln=s Inn, London. In 1728, he was commissioned as an officer in the 2nd Foot Guards. He was a Member of Parliament for Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford, from 1747 to 1760 and he held the appointment of Constable of Limerick from 1749 to 1780. Between 1761 and 1766, he represented Limerick as a Member of Parliament. He also held the office of Governor of County Limerick between 1762 and 1780. He succeeded to the family titles, 4th Baronet Southwell and 3rd Baron Southwell, both of Castle Mattress, County Limerick, on 19 November, 1766. He was made 1 st Viscount Southwell of Castle Mattress, County Limerick, on 18 July, 1776. He married Margaret Hamilton on 18 June, 1741, and they had three boys (one of whom died young) and a girl (who died unmarried). Viscount Southwell died on 29 August, 1780, aged 59 years. He was succeeded by his son, Thomas Arthur Southwell (qv) (Cracrofts Peerage, Southwell, b. 1721)

county Limerick as a member of parliament during the period 1767-1768. He died on 15 February, 1796, aged 53 years, and was succeeded by his son, Thomas Anthony Southwell, 3rd Viscount (qv). (Cracrofts Peerage, Southwell, b.1742)

Southwell, Thomas Anthony 3rd Viscount (1777-1860), Aristocrat

homas Anthony Southwell, son of Thomas Arthur Southwell, 2nd Viscount, and his wife, Sophia Walsh, was born on 25 February, 1777. He married Jane Berkeley on 14 May, 1799. They had two sons, neither of whom survived to inherit the family titles, and five daughters. Thomas Anthony inherited the family titles, 6th Baronet, 5th Baron and 3rd Viscount Southwell, of Castle Mattress on the death of his father in 1796. He was also invested as a Knight, Order of St Patrick, in 1837. He died 29 February, 1860, aged 83 years and was succeeded by his nephew, Thomas Southwell (qv). (Cracrofts Peerage, Southwell, b.1777)

Southwell, Thomas Arthur 4th Viscount (1836-1878), Aristocrat

Southwell, Thomas Arthur 2nd Viscount (1742-1796), Aristocrat


homas Arthur Southwell, son of 1st Viscount Southwell, and his wife, Margaret Hamilton, was born on 16 April, 1742. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and succeeded to the family titles, 5 th Baronet, 4th Baron and 2nd Viscount Southwell, on the death of his father, in 1780. He married (1774) Sophia Walsh, daughter of Francis Walsh, Count de Serrant of Angjou, France. They had a family of three sons (Thomas, Charles and Arthur) and two girls (Margaret and Paulina). Thomas Arthur represented

homas Arthur Joseph Southwell, son of Lt Col Arthur Southwell and his wife, Mary Anne Dillon, was born on 6 April, 1836. He obtained a commission in the British army, reaching the rank of lieutenant in the 13th Hussars, before his early retirement in 1858. He succeeded to the family titles, 7th Baronet, 6th Baron and 4th Viscount Southwell of Castle Mattress in 1860. He was invested as a Knight, Order of St Patrick (KP), in 1871. He held the title of Lord Lieutenant of county Leitrim in 1872. He married Charlotte Mostyn, daughter of Sir Pyers Mostyn, Bart in 1871. They had one son, Arthur Robert (qv), who succeeded him and one daughter, Frances Mary. He died

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26 April, 1878, at the early age of 42. (Cracrofts Peerage, Southwell, b.1836).

Spring-Rice, Sir Thomas (1849-1926), Aristocrat


homas Spring Rice, 2nd Baron Monteagle of Brandon, son of the Hon. Stephen Edward Spring Rice and his wife, Ellen Mary Frere, was born on 31 May, 1849. A grandson of the 1st Baron, he succeeded to the title when his father (1814-1865) predeceased him. The 2nd Baron had, unfortunately, to live in the shadow of his more famous grandfather, who was not only popular and influential in Ireland, but who also rose to the position of Chancellor of the Exchequer in the British Parliament. In 1899, the 2nd Baron Monteagle put himself forward as a Unionist candidate for the Askeaton seat in the first election for the Limerick County Council. He was opposed by Michael J. Feheney, Aghalacka, Askeaton, who was a Nationalist candidate. Fortunately for the Baron, the Nationalist vote was split, and he was a surprise winner of the seat. At the next election in 1902, however, Feheney defeated the Baron and retained the seat until he retired in 1911. The 2nd Baron Monteagle married Elizabeth Butcher and they had a family of three children (Stephen Edward and Thomas Aubrey, who became 3rd Baron, and Mary Ellen. He died on 24 December, 1926. (Frere Family History; Ferriter 1998, 206)

Southwell, Arthur Robert 5th Viscount (1872-1944), Aristocrat

rthur Robert Pyers Southwell, son of the 4th Viscount Southwell (qv) and his wife, Hon. Charlotte Mostyn, was born on 16 November, 1872. He was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Engineers and reached the rank of captain. Subsequently, he joined the Machine Gun Corps, in which he reached the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He succeeded to the family titles, 8th Baronet, 7th Baron and 5th Viscount Southwell of Castle Mattress in 1878. He married Hon Dorothy Walrond in 1897 and they had three sons (Robert, Francis and John) and two daughters (Elizabeth and Joan). He died on 5 October, 1944, aged 71 years. He was succeeded by his son, Robert Southwell (qv). (Cracrofts Peerage, Southwell, b.1892)

Southwell, Robert 6th Viscount (1898-1960), Aristocrat

obert Arthur William Joseph Southwell, son of 5th Viscount Southwell (qv) and his wife, Dorothy Walrond, was born on 5 September, 1898. He fought in World War I and gained the rank of lieutenant commander (1927) and commander (1938). He married Violet Walshe in January, 1926, but they were divorced in 1931, having had one daughter, Susan. He married Josephine de la Mole in 1943. He succeeded to the family titles, 9 th Baronet, 8th Baron and 6th Viscount Southwell of Castle Mattress, in 1944. He died 18 November, 1960, aged 62 years. He was succeeded by his nephew, Pyers Anthony Southwell (b.1930), the present Viscount (qv). (Cracrofts Peerage, Southwell, b.1898)

Hilton-Green, Lady Helena (1906-1970), Aristocrat

ady Helena Alfreda Marie Gabriella Wentworth-Fitzwilliam, daughter of William, 7th Earl Fitzwilliam, and his wife, Lady Maude Dundas, was born on 25 May, 1907. She married, firstly, Chetwode Charles Hamilton Hilton-Green, with whom she had a daughter, Julia Hamilton Hilton-Green, who married the champion jockey, Martin Moloney. Lady Helena married, secondly, Edward Greenall, 2nd Baron Daresbury, on 16 June, 1966. She lived at Altavilla, Cappagh, and was a familiar figure among the hunting fraternity. She played an active part in supporting Lord Daresbury during his long spell as Master of

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the County Limerick Foxhounds. She died from a fall from a horse, on 14 September, 1970, aged 63 years, while out hunting with the Limerick County Foxhounds. When Lord Daresbury, who was leading the hunt that day, was informed of the accident, he replied, That is how she would like to go=. (Www.thepeerage.com, 5735)

CONTENTS

RELIGIOUS SISTERS
Blackwell, Sr Ellen (1859-1937), Religious Sister

Co. Limerick, on 26 July, 1862. Four years later, her family moved to Rathkeale, when her father was appointed medical officer at the Workhouse in Rathkeale and Dispensary Doctor in the town. She attended a boarding school in England conducted by the Society of the Sacred Heart at Roehampton, London, after which she entered the Loreto Congregation, beginning her novitiate at Loreto Abbey, Rathfarnham, Dublin, on 20 October, 1885. On completion of her novitiate, she made her religious profession on 15 May, 1888. She was then transferred to Loreto Convent, Wexford, where she began teaching. She continued teaching until her retirement. She died at Loreto Convent, Wexford, on 13 January, 1941, aged 78 years, and was buried in the cemetery attached to the convent. She was a sister of Dr John (qv), Dr Stephen (qv), Dr Henry (qv), Dr Charles (qv) and Thomas Bourchier-Hayes (qv). (Carnduff, 2011, BH FT)

Bourchier-Hayes, Sr Geraldine (1902-1982), Religious Sister

llen Blackwell, daughter of Henry Blackwell and Mary Sheehy, was born in Greenish Island and baptised at St Mary=s Church, Askeaton, on 8 February, 1859. She attended the National School, Askeaton, before entering the Convent of Mercy, Abbeyfeale, on 7 September, 1888. She received the habit on 4 March, 1889, taking the name of Sister Josephine. She was professed on 19 March, 1891. She held the posts of bursar (1899-1920) and sacristan (1920-37) in the convent. She died on 16 March, 1937 and is buried in the convent grounds, Abbeyfeale. (RSM Lk, 2007).

Bourchier-Hayes, Sr Alice (1862-1941), Religious Sister

lice Bourchier-Hayes, daughter of Dr Thomas Hayes (qv) and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Bourchier, was born in Shanagolden,

eraldine Bourchier-Hayes, daughter of Dr John Bourchier-Hayes and his wife, Alice Bourchier, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 14 February, 1902. On completion of her primary and secondary education, she entered the Canonesses of St Augustine in the English Convent, Bruges, Belgium, on 28 October, 1927. She received the religious habit, together with a new name, Sister Mary Pia, on 24 October, 1928. On completion of her novitiate, she made her religious profession on 25 January, 1930. She qualified as a teacher and taught in the convent school in Bruges. When the German army invaded Belgium in 1940, she was evacuated to England and settled in the Augustinian Priory of her Order at Hayward=s Heath, West Sussex, where she continued teaching. At the end of World War II, she returned to her former convent in Bruges for a further three years, returning to Hayward=s Heath in September, 1948, where she again resumed her teaching career. She spent the rest of her life in the convent in Hayward=s Heath and died there on 13 September, 1982. She was buried in the Augustinian community cemetery in Sayer=s

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Common, West Sussex, England. She was a granddaughter of Dr Thomas Hayes (qv) and a niece of Thomas (qv), Stephen (qv) , John (qv), Charles (qv) and Henry Bourchier-Hayes (qv). (Carnduff, 2011, BH FT)

Carroll, Sr Bridget (1869-1904), Religious Sister

subsequently, she was appointed Superior of the Windsor convent. At one of the Presentation General Chapters, she was elected Mother General of the Presentation Sisters in Victoria. She died on 7 April, 1945, and is buried in the cemetery attached to Presentation Convent, Windsor, Melbourne. (PBVM Archives, Windsor, Melbourne).

ridget Carroll, daughter of Joseph Carroll and his wife, Johanna Moloney, was born in Cappagh, Co. Limerick, and baptised in her local parish church on 24 September, 1869. She attended Cappagh National School, before entering the Sisters of the Holy Cross, Notre Dame, IN, on 7 October, 1891. She received the religious habit, together with a new name, Sister Hieronyme, on 9 July, 1892, and made her religious profession on 13 July, 1894. She spent most of her life teaching in different schools of her congregation, including: Academy of the Holy Cross, Washington DC; Holy Cross Convent, Notre Dame IN; Mount Carmel Hospital, Columbus, OH and St Patrick=s Convent, Danville, IL When her health began to decline, she returned to St Mary=s Convent, Notre Dame IN, in 1902, where she had medical care and oversight. She died at Notre Dame IN on 6 August, 1904, aged 34 years, and was interred in Our Lady of Peace cemetery, St Mary=s, Notre Dame, IN. She was a sister of Rev Patrick Carroll CSC (qv). (CHC Srs Archives, 2011)

Guinane, Sr Helena (1887-1976), Religious Sister

elena Josephine Guinane, daughter of Daniel Guinane and his wife, Margaret Kiely, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 27 October, 1887. She attended the Mercy Convent school in Rathkeale, after which she entered the Convent of Mercy, Tipperary, on 2 February, 1907. On receiving the religious habit, she was given a new name, Sister Attracta. She completed her novitiate two years later and made her religious profession on 3 August, 1909. She qualified as a nurse and worked for some years in St Patrick=s Hospital, Cashel. Subsequently, she acted as infirmarian in her own convent in Tipperary. She died on 5 February, 1976, and was buried in the Mercy Convent cemetery, Tipperary. She was a sister of Rev Thomas Guinane (qv) and of Sister Anna (Kevin) Guinane OSU (qv). (RSM MidWest archives, 2011; Madden RSM, Thurles, 2011)

Feheney, Sr Mary (1871-1945), Religious Sister

Guinane, Sr Anna (1891-1977), Religious Sister

ary Feheney, third daughter of John Feheney (1830-1878) and Mary Cahill (1840-1881) was born in Aghalacka, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised on 7 March, 1871. After completing her primary schooling in Askeaton National School, she attended Presentation Convent Boarding school in Crosshaven, Co. Cork. She entered the Presentation Sisters in Crosshaven, Co. Cork, taking the name, Sister Columba. In 1890, she joined a group of volunteer Sisters opening a new convent in Windsor, a suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Initially, she was involved in the formation of aspirants, but,

nna Maria Guinane, daughter of Daniel Guinane and his wife, Margaret Kiely, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 8 December, 1891. She attended Mercy Convent School, Rathkeale, followed by Ursuline Boarding School, Thurles. On completion of her secondary schooling, she entered the Ursuline Sisters, receiving the habit, and a new name, Sister Kevin, on 18 April, 1915. On completion of her novitiate, she made her religious profession on 17 April, 1917. She entered UCC and obtained a BA degree, together with a Higher Diploma in Education. She then began teaching at the Ursuline Convent Boarding school, Thurles.

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Subsequently, she became Principal of that school and was a life-long promoter of the Irish language. She died on 30 March, 1977, and was buried in the convent cemetery, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. She was a sister of Rev Thomas Guinane (qv) and of Sr Helena Guinane RSM (qv). (Lillis, M OSU, 2011)

She was known as a prayerful and obliging person. She was a sister of Sister Kathleen Hough (qv). She died peacefully on 10 February, 1962. She is buried in the convent cemetery, Tipperary. (RSM Archives Ireland).

Guiry, Rev Joseph (1926-1983), Clergyman RC

Hough, Sr Kathleen (1878-1947), Religious Sister

oseph Guiry was born in Kilfinny, Co. Limerick, on 19 November, 1926. He was educated at St Munchin=s College, Limerick, and St Patrick=s College, Maynooth, where he was ordained on 22 June, 1952. After ordination, he served with St Patrick=s Missionary Society (Kiltegan) in Nigeria for three years. In 1955, he was recalled to the diocese of Limerick and sent as curate to Abbeyfeale. Subsequently, he served in the same capacity in St John=s Limerick City, Ballyhahill (1958), Coolcappagh (1963) and Shanagolden (1965). In March, 1968, he was appointed curate in Askeaton, where he served until his retirement, owing to illness, in August, 1974. He continued, however, to live in Askeaton until his death on 23 September, 1983. He is buried in the grounds of St Mary=s Catholic Church, Askeaton. (LDA)

athleen Hough, daughter of Edward Hough and Catherine Guinane, was born in Askeaton on 10 July, 1878. She attended Askeaton National School before entering the Convent of Mercy, Abbeyfeale on 27 August, 1903. She received the habit on 17 March, 1904, taking the name of Sister Patrick. She was professed on 29 March, 1906. She was elected to the position of bursar of the convent on two occasions: 1920-1932 and 1941-1947. She celebrated her Silver Jubilee of Religious Profession in 1931. She was a sister of Sister Margaret Hough (qv). In later years, her health was less than perfect and she died on 26 August, 1947, and is buried in the convent cemetery, Abbeyfeale. (RSM Archives Ireland).

Keating, Sr Bridget (1895-1922), Religious Sister

Hough, Sr Margaret (1875-1962), Religious Sister

argaret Hough, daughter of Edward Hough and Catherine Guinane, was born in Askeaton on 1 September, 1875. She attended Askeaton National School before entering the Convent of Mercy, Tipperary Town, where she received the habit on 27 September, 1897. Taking the name, Sister Mary Ita, she was professed on 14 October, 1899. Her early years were spent teaching small children, something for which she had many talents. Subsequently, she spent time in St Patrick=s Hospital, Cashel, Ballycarron, and St Vincent=s Hospital, Dublin. In her later years she returned to the Mercy Convent, Tipperary, where she spent the remainder of her life. In 1949, she celebrated the Golden Jubilee of her profession and, in 1959, her Diamond Jubilee.

ridget Keating, daughter of Michael and Mary Keating, was born in Amigan, Croagh, Co. Limerick, on 20 December, 1895. She entered St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick, receiving the religious habit, together with a new religious name, Sister Josephine, on 5 June, 1915. On completion of her novitiate, she made profession of religious vows on 30 June, 1917. She continued her studies towards qualification as a teacher and taught in St Mary=s Girls= School, Limerick. She died on 27 December, 1922, at the early age of 27 years, and was interred in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM Archives Lk, 2012)

Keating, Sr Helena (1854-1889), Religious Sister


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elena Keating, daughter of Michael Keating and his wife, Johanna Reardon, was born in Amigan, Croagh, Co. Limerick, in 1854. She was educated at the FCJ Convent, Bruff, Co. Limerick, and, subsequently, entered the Sisters of Mercy at Queenstown, now Cobh, Co. Cork. She received the religious habit and a new religious name, Sister Evangelist, on 20 November, 1875, and made her religious profession on the completion of her novitiate on 6 June, 1878. She was employed in various ministries and was resident in Cobh for the remainder of her life. She died in the Mercy convent, Cobh, on 15 January, 1989, and was interred in the cemetery attached to the convent. She was a sister of Sr Mary Keating (qv) and a cousin of Sr Bridget Keating (qv). (Lynch, RSM archives, Cloyne, 2012)

Melbourne. She received the habit on 25 December, 1925, and took the name, Sister Brigid. She was professed on 8 September, 1928. She taught in several Presentation Sisters schools in the Melbourne area and died on 11 April, 1991. She was buried in Melbourne General Cemetery, Australia. She was a sister of Sister Hanora V Kelly (qv) and of Rev Vincent Kelly (qv). (Presentation Archives, Victoria).

Kelly, Sr Hanora V (1899-1988), Religious Sister

Keating, Sr Mary (1844-1874), Religious Sister

ary Keating, daughter of Michael Keating and his wife, Johanna Reardon, was born in Amigan, Croagh, Co. Limerick, on 29 June, 1844. She was educated at the local National school, before attending the FCJ Convent Boarding School, Bruff, Co. Limerick. At the end of her secondary education, she entered the FCJ Sisters, receiving the habit on 20 May, 1862, together with a new religious name, Sister Stanislaus. At the end of her novitiate, she made her religious profession on 22 March, 1865. She spent the remainder of her life teaching and caring for girls in the Boarding school, Bruff. She died in the FCJ convent, Bruff, on 6 December, 1874, and was interred in the cemetery attached to the convent. She was a sister of Sr Helena Keating (qv) and a cousin of Sr Bridget Keating (qv). (FCJ archives, 2012).

anora Martha Kelly, daughter of Patrick Kelly and Catherine Nolan, was born in Main Street, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 18 February, 1899. She attended Askeaton National School and, subsequently, joined the Presentation Sisters, Victoria Province, Australia. She received the habit on 6 October, 1922, taking the name, Sister Virgilius. She was professed on 26 January, 1924, after which she taught in Presentation schools in the Victoria Province. She died 21 September, 1988, and was buried in Melbourne General Cemetery, Australia. She was a sister of Sister Elizabeth B Kelly (q.v) and of Rev Vincent Kelly (qv). (Presentation Archives, Victoria).

McNamara, Sr Brigid (1882-1963), Religious Sister

Kelly, Sr Elizabeth (1907-1991), Religious Sister

lizabeth Kelly, daughter of Patrick Kelly and Catherine Nolan, was born in Main Street, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 23 April, 1907. After completing her primary schooling at Askeaton National school, she joined the Presentation Sisters, Victoria Province,

rigid McNamara, daughter of James McNamara and his wife, Jane Fitzgerald, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 3 June, 1882. On 28 November, 1902, she entered the Sisters of Mercy, Bunbury, Western Australia. She received the habit, together with a new name, Sister Mary Alocoque, on 15 August, 1903. Her new patron saint, Margaret Mary Alocoque (1647-1690), was a Visitation nun at Paray-le-Monial, France, who popularised devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. On completion of her novitiate, Brigid made her religious profession on 8 December, 1906. She became a teacher and taught at Bunbury, Bridgetown and Dardanup, Western Australia. She died on 19 July, 1963, aged 81 years, and was buried in Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth. She was a sister of Ellen (qv), Elizabeth

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(qv), Jane (qv), Margaret (qv) and Mary McNamara (qv), all of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; RSM Archives, Perth & Bunbury)

all sisters, in the Bunbury convent. Ellen was a sister of Brigid (qv), Elizabeth (qv), Jane (qv), Margaret (qv) and Mary McNamara (qv), all of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; RSM Archives, Perth & Bunbury)

McNamara, Sr Elizabeth (1889-1975), Religious Sister

McNamara, Sr Jane (1881-1947), Religious Sister

lizabeth McNamara, daughter of James McNamara and his wife, Jane Fitzgerald, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 7 June, 1889. She entered the Sisters of Mercy, Clonakilty, Co. Cork, taking the new name of Sister Berchmans. Her new patron saint was St John Berchmans, a Belgian Jesuit, who died young. On completion of her novitiate, Elizabeth made her religious profession. She spent her entire life in the convent in Clonakilty and died there on 30 August, 1975. She was buried in the cemetery attached to the convent. She was a sister of Brigid (qv), Ellen (qv), Jane (qv), Mary (qv) and Margaret McNamara (qv), all of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; RSM Archives, Cork)

McNamara, Sr Ellen (1877-1944), Religious Sister

ane McNamara, daughter of James McNamara and his wife, Jane Fitzgerald, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 9 January, 1881. She entered the Sisters of Mercy, Bunbury, Western Australia, on 7 October, 1898, and received the habit, together with a new name, Sister Patrick, on 30 August, 1899. On completion of her novitiate, she made her religious profession on 21 December, 1901. She was one of the pioneer Sisters from Perth to open the Convent of Mercy in Bunbury, Western Australia. She died in Bunbury on 1 January, 1947, aged 65 years. She was buried in Bunbury Catholic Cemetery. She was a sister of Brigid (qv), Ellen (qv), Elizabeth (qv), Margaret (qv) and Mary McNamara (qv), all of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; RSM Archives, Perth & Bunbury)

llen McNamara, daughter of James McNamara and his wife, Jane Fitzgerald, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 10 October, 1877. She entered the Sisters of Mercy, Perth, Western Australia, taking the veil and a new name, Sister Cecilia, on 12 December, 1896. Her new patron saint, Cecilia, a saint of the early Church, is the patron of musicians. Ellen made her religious profession on 6 May, 1899. In 1887, she was chosen as a member of the pioneering group of Sisters, who set up a new independent convent at Bunbury, Western Australia. A teacher, she was also greatly valued by her community for her gifts as an administrator and was appointed superior of the convent, Bunbury, and principal of Sacred Heart School. Subsequently she was Mistress of Novices for several years. She died in Bunbury on 29 April, 1944, aged 65 years, and was buried in the Catholic cemetery in the city, now the third largest in Western Australia. At one time, there were five McNamara nuns,

McNamara, Sr Margaret (1883-1956), Religious Sister

argaret McNamara, daughter of James McNamara and his wife, Jane Fitzgerald, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 29 September, 1883. She entered the Sisters of Mercy, Bunbury, Western Australia, on 28 November, 1902, and received the habit, together with a new name, Sister Augustine, on 15 August, 1903. Her new patron saint was the great Bishop of Hippo, North Africa, who died in 430 AD, and who was one of the great scholars of the early Church. Margaret made her religious profession on 8 December, 1906. She spent most of her life teaching and, in Bunbury, but she also taught at Greenbushes. She spent her later years at St Joseph=s Orphanage, Subiaco. She died on 11 October, 1956, aged 73 years, and was buried in the burial plot of the Sisters of Mercy, Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia. She was a sister of Brigid (qv), Ellen (qv), Elizabeth (qv),

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Jane (qv), Mary McNamara (qv), all of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; RSM Archives, Perth & Bunbury)

McNamara, Sr Mary (1879-1961), Religious Sister

ary McNamara, daughter of James McNamara and his wife, Jane Fitzgerald, was born in Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 16 May, 1879. She entered the Sisters of Mercy, Bunbury, Western Australia, on 7 October, 1898, and received the habit, together with a new name, Sister Joseph, on 30 August, 1899. Her new patron saint was Joseph, husband of Mary of Nazareth. On completion of her novitiate, Mary made her religious profession on 21 December, 1901. She spent most of her life teaching and, in addition to teaching in Bunbury, she also taught in other Mercy schools in Western Australia. A talented administrator, she was also appointed superior in several Mercy convents in the province. She died on 24 January, 1961, aged 82 years. She was buried in the Sisters of Mercy burial plot, Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth, Western Australia. She was a sister of Brigid (qv), Ellen (qv), Elizabeth (qv), Jane (qv) and Margaret McNamara (qv), all of whom joined the Sisters of Mercy. (McNamara, M, 2011; RSM Archives, Perth & Bunbury)

1930. She spent much of her life as a member of staff in the Mercy Hospital, Cork, where she was head of catering, as well as being responsible for specialist diet programmes. In her later years, she assisted in the infirmary at St Maries of the Isle, Cork. She died there on 3 June, 2000, aged 93 years, and was buried in the Sisters of Mercy burial plot, St Finbarr=s cemetery, Glasheen, Cork. She was a half-sister of Rev Michael Madigan CSSp (qv). (RSM archives, Cork).

Mulcaire, Sr Bridget (1899-1967), Religious Sister

Madigan, Sr Anne (1906-2000), Religious Sister

nne Madigan, daughter of James and Catherine Madigan, was born in Deragh, Cappagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 18 November, 1906. She attended Cappagh National School, after which she spent some time at the Mercy Convent school, Rathkeale. On 25 March, 1925, she entered the Convent of Mercy, St Maries of the Isle, Cork, and, on completion of her postulancy, she received the veil on 19 December, 1925, together with a new name, Sister Bernadette. Her new patron saint was St Bernadette Soubirous, who had visions of Our Lady in Lourdes, France. On completion of her novitiate, Bernadette Madigan took vows on 20 December, 1927. She made her final profession on 20 December,

ridget Mulcaire, daughter of James Mulcaire and his wife, Hannah Neville, was born in Killea, Croagh, Co. Limerick, on 14 April, 1899. She attended the National School in Croagh and entered the congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross at St Mary=s Convent, Notre Dame IN, USA, on 31 October, 1923. She received the religious habit, together with new name, Sister Miriam Gertrude, on 15 August, 1924. On completion of her novitiate, she made her religious profession on 15 August, 1926. She qualified as a teacher and taught in several schools of her congregation in the USA, including, St Alphonsus School, Fresno, CA; St Joseph=s School, Washington, DC; St Theodore=s School, Chicago IL; Holy Cross School, South Bend, IN; St Mary=s School, Woodstock, IL; Immaculate Conception School, Morris, IL; St Mary=s School, Anderson, IN. She died on 2 September, 1967, at St Joseph=s Hospital, South Bend, IN, and was buried in Our Lady of Peace Cemetery, St Mary=s Convent, Notre Dame, South Bend, IN. At least four of her relatives, including her two sisters, Sr Ellen (qv) and Sr Margaret entered the same congregation. (CHC archives, 2011)

Mulcaire, Sr Ellen (1896-1982), Religious Sister

E
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llen Mulcaire, daughter of James Mulcaire and his wife, Hannah Neville, was born in Killea, Croagh, Co. Limerick, on 19 August, 1896. She attended Cappagh National School and, at the age of eighteen, entered the

congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross in Notre Dame, IN. She received the habit, together with a new name, Sister Maria Gemma, on 6 January, 1915, and made her religious profession two years later. She qualified as a teacher and taught in several schools of her congregation in the USA, including, Holy Cross School, South Bend IN; St Mary=s School, Austin, TX; Sacred Heart Academy, Fort Waine IN; St Patrick=s School, Washington DC; St Mary=s School, Davenport IA; St Vincent=s School, Elkhart, IN; St Patrick=s School, East Chicago, IN; Holly Redeemer School, Evergreen Park, IL; St Mary of the Lake School, Gary, IN; Queen of All Saints School, Michigan City, IN. She died at St Joseph=s Medical Centre, South Bend, IN, on 22 March, 1982, and was interred in Our Lady of Peace Cemetery, St Mary=s, Notre Dame, South Bend, IN. She was a sister of Sr Bridget Mulcaire (qv) and Sr Margaret Mulcaire, who joined the same religious congregation. (CHC archives, 2011)

and baptised in St Mary=s Church, Askeaton, in 1911. She attended Askeaton National School and then joined the Sisters of Sacre Coeur at Hoegaarden, Belgium. She took the name, Sister Ita, when she received the habit. She spent all of her religious life in Belgium and died at the Sacre Coeur Hospice, Nivelles, Belgium, on 22 November, 1988. She is buried in Nivelles. (Neville, P., 2007).

Sheehy, Sr Anne (1858-), Religious Sister

Naish, Sr Mary Carolin (c.1826-1858), Religious Sister

ary Naish, born about 1826, was the daughter of Carroll Naish and Mary Sampson of Ballycullen House, Askeaton. She entered the Convent of Mercy, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, and made her profession on 18 February, 1857, her religious name being Sister Joseph. Most Rev Bishop Browne of Elphin presided at the ceremony and the sermon was preached by Rev Dr O=Brien of All Hallows College, Dublin. (Irish-American, NY, 14.3.1857). She had a short life, however, and died on 12 November, 1858, of tuberculosis, then a rampant disease in Ireland. She was buried in the cemetery at St Peter=s Convent, Athlone, Co. Westmeath (Mercy Archives, Ireland).

nne Sheehy, daughter of Edmund Sheehy and his wife, Mary Hayes, was born in Toomdeely, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptized on 11 November, 1858. She was educated at Askeaton National School, after which she attended FCJ Boarding School, Bruff. At the end of her second level education, she entered the congregation of the Faithful Companions of Jesus (FCJ). Following her reception of the religious habit on 26 July, 1880, she completed her novitiate and made profession of her religious vows on 2 February, 1881. On 17 February, 1889, she was then sent to France, the home of the FCJ congregation, and remained there for the rest of her life. She was a sister of Sr Helene Sheehy (qv). (FCJ archives, 2012)

Sheehy, Sr Helene (1862-1900), Religious Sister

O=Donoghue, Sr Josephine (1911-1988), Religious Sister

osephine O=Donoghue, daughter of Patrick O=Donoghue and Elizabeth Collins, was born in Clonreask, Askeaton, Co. Limerick,

elene Sheehy, daughter of Edmund Sheehy and his wife, Mary Hayes, was born in Toomdeely, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised in the Catholic church, Askeaton, on 5 April, 1862. She was educated at Askeaton National School, after which she attended the FCJ Boarding School, Bruff, where she completed her second level education. She then decided to enter the FCJ Sisters and, after receiving the religious habit on 26 July, 1880, she completed her novitiate. She made

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profession of vows on 2 February, 1881. She spent the remainder of her life in the convent in Bruff, teaching and caring for the girls who boarded there. She died on 31 August, 1900, and was buried in the cemetery attached to the FCJ Convent, Bruff. She was a sister of Sr Anne Sheehy (qv). (FCJ Archives, 2012).

White, Sr Aileen (1866-1937), Religious Sister

ileen Mary White, daughter of Colonel John P White (qv) and his wife, Emily McMahon, was born in Nantenan House, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 8 May, 1866, and baptised six days later on 14 May, 1866. She was educated by the Sisters of the Holy Child in England and, on completion of her secondary schooling, entered this congregation at St Leonards-on-Sea, on 23 January, 1894, taking the new name, Sister Salome. She qualified as a teacher and taught in the Holy Child Schools at Harrowgate and Oxford, where she was superior. In 1936, she was chosen as one of the Sisters to open the first Holy Child convent at Stamullen, Co. Meath. Soon afterwards, however, when her health deteriorated, she returned to Mayfield, Surrey, where she died on 5 June, 1937. She was buried with her sister, Emily, and brother, Fr Tom White, at St Leonards. (CHCJ archives, 2011)

profession at St Leonard=s on 8 December, 1899. She qualified as a teacher and taught at St Leonard=s and Mayfield. She was then selected as one of the first Holy Child Sisters to study at Oxford University, where she obtained a degree in modern history. She was subsequently superior at Harrowgate and St Leonard=s. She died on 5 January, 1951, and, together with her sister, Eileen, and brother, Fr Tom White SJ, was buried in the convent cemetery, St Leonards. The oratory at Nantenan House was built to enable Sisters Eileen and Emily to visit their old home for a family reunion. Ecclesiastical rules at the time required religious to reside in the nearest convent (Rathkeale), permission being granted only for short day-time visits to their home. With the completion of the oratory, Colonel White got approval to make his home an >occasional= convent of the Holy Child Sisters, thereby enabling his two daughters to live in the house for the entire duration of their visit. Since his son, Fr Tom White, a Jesuit priest, was also visiting, the two nuns were able to attend Mass every morning in their own home. The oratory is still intact at Nantenan House. (CHCJ Archives, 2011; White, S, 2010)

White, Sr Emily (1874-1951), Religious Sister

CONTENTS

mily Mary White, daughter of Colonel John P White and his wife, Emily McMahon, was born in Nantenan House, Cappagh, Askeaton, on 24 May, 1874. She was educated as a boarder at the Holy Child Convent, St Leonard=s, and, on completion of her secondary education, entered that congregation. She received the religious habit, together with the new name, Sister Theodore, on 9 December, 1897. She made her religious

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May, 1818. (UHF).

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Alexander, Henry (1763-1818), Member of Parliament

Blennerhassett, Arthur (1687-1758), Member of Parliament

enry Alexander, son of Robert Alexander and Anne McCullagh, was born at Boom Hall, Co. Londonderry, in 1763. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1783), Emmanuel College, Cambridge (1779) and Lincoln=s Inn (1779). He was called to the Irish Bar in 1785. He was Recorder of Londonderry (1791-1792) and an active barrister, as well as a banker. In 1806, he accepted a post as Secretary to his cousin, Hon. Du Pre Alexander, who was appointed Governor of the Cape of Good Hope. Though entering Parliament for Newtownards (1788-1790), he exchanged this for an Askeaton seat (1790-1997) when his uncle, James Alexander, who made a fortune in India before becoming 1st Earl of Caledon, purchased the Askeaton seat from the Earl of Carrick. Henry then switched to a seat in his native Londonderry (1797-1800) and the Earl of Carrick sold the Askeaton seat to Sir Vere Hunt. Henry was a strong supporter of the British Government, and a zealous supporter of, and contact man during discussions preceding, the Act of Union. He was said to be so pro-Union that he enrolled his two infant nephews, and the embryo his sister was then carrying, as unionists. In recognition of his political support, it was arranged that he continue his membership of parliament in Westminster from 1801 to 1806, when he sat for Old Sarum (Salisbury). He distinguished himself as an advocate of coercion during the 1798 rebellion and the subsequent political unrest in Ireland. He praised the ruthless suppression of Robert Emmet=s rebellion of 1803, opposed Catholic Relief and voted against exemption of the Irish Linen Industry from duties (1804). On 8 February, 1815, he is on record as advocating the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act in Ireland. Henry Alexander died at the Cape of Good Hope on 6

rthur Blennerhassett, only son of Gerald Blennerhassett and his wife, Christiana Bayly, was born around 1687. He was educated in Dublin at Dr Jones= private school, before entering Trinity College, Dublin, on 15 May, 1704, aged 16 years. He graduated with a BA degree (1708) and qualified as a lawyer. He was awarded the degree, LLD, honoris causa, by Trinity College in 1734. He was Recorder for Limerick in 1734 and became a Justice of the King=s Bench. He was MP for Tralee from 1727 to 1743. He built Riddlestown Park House about 1730. He married Margaret Hayes of Cahirguillamore, Co. Limerick, and they had a son, Hayes, who died young and without issue, and a daughter, Ellen. Arthur, like most members of the landed gentry, was a magistrate. He was a member of the Askeaton Hell Fire Club and his wife, Margaret, popularly known as >Celinda= (qv), is reputed to have been the only lady member of this club. Judge Arthur was succeeded by his uncle, Gerald or >Garrett= Blennerhassett. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Bourke, John (c.1625-1702), Member of Parliament


John Bourke was born in Limerick to a wealthy Catholic family around 1625. Though members of his family were involved in the Rebellion of 1641, they managed to preserve their wealth and John became a wealthy merchant. Following the Cromwellian settlement, he rented Cahirmoyle estate, Ardagh, Co. Limerick, which belonged to Catherine, daughter of Earl Gerald Fitzgerald, and wife of Sir Daniel O=Brien of Carrigaholt, Co. Clare. Though this estate was part of the Geraldine possessions, it escaped forfeiture to the Crown, unlike all other possessions of Gerald, 15th Earl of Desmond. John Bourke was elected to represent the Borough of Askeaton at the parliament of King James II in 1689. Though the parliament passed legislation on a) full freedom of worship for all Catholics b)

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complete legislative independence for Ireland and c) full cancellation of the Cromwellian land settlement, these laws were all declared null and void six years later, when James and his army had departed Ireland. John Bourke married Ann Hurley of Knocklong, Co. Limerick, and had at least three children (Nicholas, his heir; Grace and Eleanor). He died in Cahirmoyle in 1702 and is buried in the Bourke vault in Ardagh, Co. Limerick. (Aherne, PT, 1988, 38)

Bury, John (c.1650-1722), Member of Parliament

ohn Bury, second son of Phineas Bury, High Sheriff of Cork in 1673, was born about 1650, at Summerville House, Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick. He inherited the Pallaskenry part of the Bury estate. His father, Phineas, received a grant of lands in County Limerick on 14 November, 1666, and another grant in the barony of Barrymore, County Cork. John=s Will is dated 6 March, 1720, and was proved 13 October, 1722. John married Jane Palliser, only daughter (b.1684) of the Archbishop of Cashel, and remarried in 1704, following the death of his first wife. This John was Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1715 until his death in 1722. Though John began building the well-known Queen Anne house in Shannongrove, Pallaskenry, it was his son, William, who completed it. John had four sons and two daughters. Though the Bury estate was quite large, John=s grandson became a very wealthy man when he inherited, through marriage, the estate (20,000 acres) of Charles Moore, 1st Earl of Charleville, who died without an heir. This man=s son, Charles William Bury (1764-1835), also inherited the Earldom of Charleville and, henceforth, the Burys lived at Charleville Castle, Tullamore. John Bury died 14 September, 1722. (Howard Bury Papers; BIFR, 1976, 190; UHF).

marriage (on 15 April, 1774) of Sarah Taylor, Ballynort, to Henry Thomas Butler, born on 19 May, 1746. Henry succeeded to two titles on the death of his father, Somerset Hamilton Butler, on 15 April, 1774. Through the first title, he became Viscount Ikerrin and through the second, Earl of Carrick. Henry=s mother was Lady Juliana Boyle (c.1728-1804), daughter of Henry Boyle, Earl of Shannon, and Henrietta Boyle. Henry was a grandson of Roger Boyle, 1621-79, better known as Lord Broghill and 1st Earl of Orrery. It was Broghill who sent men to garrison Askeaton Castle during the Geraldine wars and who was rewarded with several townlands around Askeaton. Henry Butler inherited half of the seignory of Askeaton on his marriage to Sarah Taylor. The other half went to her sister, Catherine, who married Hugh Massy (1733-90). This marriage (Henry to Sarah Taylor) was the mechanism through which several townlands in Askeaton came to be listed as the property of the Earl of Carrick in Griffith=s Valuation of 1850. Henry Butler died on 20 July, 1813, and was succeeded by his son, Somerset Richard Butler. (UHF)

Cotter, Sir James (1714-1770), Member of Parliament

Butler, Henry, Earl (1746-1813), Member of Parliament

ames Cotter, son of Sir James Cotter (d.1720), commander of the Jacobite forces of James II in Counties Cork, Kerry and Limerick, was born in Anngrove, Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork, in 1714. Following the defeat of James= army in 1691, Sir James Cotter Snr was executed for treason by order of King William on 7 May, 1720. His son, James, changed his religion to Church of Ireland and became a staunch Williamite. He was rewarded with a baronetcy in 1763 and was a Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1761 to 1768. In 1746, he married Rt Hon. Arabella Rogerson, daughter of a Lord Chief Justice, and had four sons. He died 9 June, 1770, at his residence, Rockforrest, Mallow, Co. Cork. His wife, Lady Cotter, also died there on 22 March, 1793 (Anthologica Hibernica, 1793-1794; UHF)

he close connection of Askeaton with this distinguished family began with the

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Crofton, George (c.1596-1643), Member of Parliament

eorge Crofton, third son of Edward Crofton (d.19 January, 1627) and Elizabeth Mostyn, and grandson of John Crofton, Escheator General of Ireland for Elizabeth I (1576-1597), was born in 1596 in Ballymurray, Co. Roscommon. He married (1625) Elizabeth Berkeley, daughter of Sir Francis Berkeley (of Askeaton) and Jane Loftus. They had three sons, the eldest of whom, Sir Edward Crofton (d.1675), became 1st Baronet of Mote; the second son, John settled in lands in Kilbryan, North Roscommon; the third, Thomas, had property in Incherourke, Askeaton, and in Clondtaha, Co. Clare. This latter Thomas was left gifts of a scarf and a ring by his cousin, Robert Taylor (qv), Ballynort, Askeaton, in his will of 1693, provided that Thomas attended his funeral! Following his marriage to Elizabeth Berkeley, George Crofton (Snr) was nominated as a Member of Parliament for Askeaton in 1639. He is listed as being the builder of Mote Castle, Co. Westmeath, between 1627 and 1632. He died in 1643. Westropp notes that the Crofton name survived in Askeaton for more than a hundred years. Daniel Axtell (qv), reporting on Askeaton in 1652, noted that Mrs Crofton owned a mill there. This is confirmed in the Civil Survey of 1655, while a marriage settlement, dated 21 January, 1783, involving Richard Taylor, Ballynort, Askeaton, specifically mentions >Crofton=s Brook= as a boundary to property in Askeaton (Crofton 1911, 78; Westropp, 1901, >Notes=, 171-3.).

County Kerry, was Provost of Tralee, and became High Sheriff of Co. Kerry in 1723. He was a Member of Parliament for County Kerry from 1702 to 1713 and for Askeaton from 1715 until his death in 1727. He married Lettice Coningsby, daughter of Rt Hon Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl of Coningbsy, in 1699, and had seven sons (three of whom died young) and three daughters (two of whom died young). He purchased a commission as Colonel on 18 October, 1715. He had estates in County Kerry, with an annual estimated income in 1713 of ,1,600. His father and son were also Members of Parliament (UHF).

Evans, Rt. Hon. George (1655-1720), Member of Parliament

Denny, Edward (1676-1727), Member of Parliament

olonel Edward Denny, only son of Edward Denny and Mary Boyle Maynard, was born in Tralee in 1676, and came from a very prominent family in that town. The first Denny, Sir Edward (1547-99), was sent to Ireland with Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen Elizabeth to put down the rebellion of the Earl of Desmond. The Dennys subsequently got possession of Tralee Castle and a large tract of the Geraldine estate. Edward became a resident Magistrate in

eorge Evans, eldest son of Colonel George Evans and Anne Bowerman, was born in 1655 in Co. Cork. According to family sources (Feheney, 1998. 12-15), George=s father, who came to Ireland as a sergeant with Cromwell=s army, made a fortune after the Cromwellian land confiscations, by purchasing debentures for small amounts of cash. Young George entered Trinity College, Oxford University, on 31 July, 1671, after which he qualified as a lawyer at Gray=s Inn and was called to the English Bar on 25 October, 1678. Like his father, he was a shrewd man and, in return for supporting King William, he was made a member of the Irish Privy Council. He obtained a commission as Colonel in the Volunteers, and was appointed Deputy Governor of Limerick in 1699 and Custos Rotulorm (keeper of Court Records) for Limerick in 1703. He married Mary Eyre in 1679 and his children, in turn, married into the Irish gentry and aristocracy. Three of his sons were members of Parliament and one, George, became 1st Baron Carbery, with his family seat in Castlefreake, Co. Cork. Through judicious land purchases, especially from the Commissioners for Sale of Forfeited Estates, George built up a large estate and established his family seat in Bulgaden Hall, Co. Limerick. He also had land (3,127 acres) in the barony of Connello. George=s nephew, John Evans, built Ballinacourty House, Ballysteen, around 1750, and became a >middle man= for part of the Bury estate, later in the possession of

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the Earl of Charleville. In addition to being Member of Parliament for Askeaton (1695-1699), Rt Hon. George Evans was also MP for Co. Limerick (1692-1693) and for Charleville (1703-1713, 1715-1720). He died in May, 1720. (UHF, Feheney, 1998, 12-18).

Griffith, Richard (1752-1820), Member of Parliament

ichard Griffith, son of Richard and Elizabeth Griffith, was born in Dublin on 10 June, 1752. He joined the East India Company and made a fortune, after which he retired to Ireland. He was a Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1783 to 1790. In 1786, he acquired Millicent House, Clane, Co. Kildare, which became the family seat. He married Charity Yorke Bramston, and one of their sons was the well-known Sir Richard Griffith, who compiled the famous Griffith=s Valuation (1850). In his earlier parliamentary career, Richard Griffith was a liberal and wrote several pamphlets, advocating the protection and expansion of Irish industry. However, by the time of the 1798 rebellion, he was a staunch supporter of the British Government and captain of a Yeoman unit used to suppress the insurrection in Clane. He was also involved in the opening of the Grand Canal. On the death of his first wife, he married Mary Hussey Burgh and, with her, had eleven children. He died on 27 June, 1820, at Holyhead and is buried there. His mother, Elizabeth Griffith, had earlier made a name for herself in Dublin as an actress and writer. (UHF)

>Governor and Guardian of the Lying-in Hospital (1786). He was listed among Irish Judges and Barristers in 1789. He married (1744) Catherine Summerville, daughter of Sir James Summerville, 1st Baronet, and had one son, Joseph, and one daughter, Catherine, who married William Hume. Sir Joseph >purchased= his Askeaton seat >for life= from Edward Taylor (Ballynort) in 1766 and sat for 39 years for Askeaton, until the Act of Union. Sir Joseph was also related to the Taylors, Edward Taylor=s mother being Sarah Hoare. The Hoare family was politically allied to the Ponsonbys and was regarded as being consistently opposed to Catholic Relief. Sir Joseph voted against the Union in 1799 and 1800. On 10 December, 1784, he was made 1 st Baronet of Annabella in County Cork. He is listed as receiving reimbursement of ,200 for the loss of his seat in Askeaton in 1800 (Lewis, 1837). Sir Joseph was succeeded as 2nd Baronet by his son, Sir Edward Hoare (1745-1814), who represented Carlow (1768-1776) and Banagher (1790-1797; 1798-1800) in the Irish Parliament. Sir Joseph continued to attend parliamentary sessions even when blind and hard of hearing. He died 24 December, 1801. (UHF)

Hunt, Sir Vere (1761-1818), Member of Parliament

Hoare, Sir Joseph (1713-1801), Member of Parliament

ir Joseph Hoare, son of Edward Hoare of Dunkettle, Co. Cork, and Grace Burton, was born in Dunkettle on 25 December, 1713. He was educated at Trinity College (1732) and the Middle Temple and was called to the Irish Bar in 1745. He was appointed weighmaster of Cork for life in April, 1766 (but dismissed, apparently for political reasons, in 1789). He also held an appointment as >Commissioner for Paving the Streets of Dublin= (1778-1780), and

ere Hunt=s ancestors came from Gosforth, Essex, and the first of the family to come to Ireland seems to have been John Hunt, one of the >49 Officers= in the English forces. Vere was born in Curraghchase in 1761, son of Vere Hunt and Anne Browne, of Newgrove, Co. Clare. In his youth he showed an interest in literature and the theatre (which was to re-emerge more forcibly in his grandson, Aubrey de Vere). In 1783, he was appointed Major in the Fencible Regiment, raised at the close of the American Wars. In 1784, he married Elinor Perry, daughter of Lord Glentworth, Protestant Bishop of Limerick. In 1784, he was made a baronet, Sir Vere Hunt. Subsequently, he became High Sheriff of Limerick and was commissioned at the outbreak of the French wars to raise two levies. While attached to the 135th regiment in

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Southampton, he was made a colonel. On his return to Ireland, he purchased one of the Askeaton Parliamentary seats in 1797. His time in parliament was short-lived, however, since Askeaton was disenfranchised with the passing of the Act of Union in 1800. Though Sir Vere was listed for compensation of ,1,100 (in lieu of his seat in Parliament), he experienced difficulty in obtaining this money, as well as payment for his army services. It is said that his disappointment with the Dublin administration in this matter turned him into an Anglo-Irish nationalist. Concerning the Act of Union, he is on record as saying that it was >a measure which my honour was bound to but my soul revolted at= (Nolan, >Glengoole- New Birmingham and the Parishes 1600-1900'). The great work of Sir Vere Hunt=s life, however, was his scheme to build the model town of New Birmingham in Glengoole, County Tipperary, and to turn it into a prosperous industrial centre. Sir Vere had inherited land in Tipperary from his father, and, in collaboration with the Parish Priest, Father Meigan, he attempted to extract coal from the ground in commercial quantities. He was bitterly disappointed at the failure of the British Government to support his far-sighted enterprise. Though several buildings were erected, and a new town was on the verge of being established, the coal extraction failed to became a profitable business and, after Sir Vere=s death on 11 August, 1818, his successors allowed the project to founder and eventually fail. Sir Vere had only one son, Sir Aubrey Hunt. It was he who changed the name from >Hunt= to >De Vere=, which was the family name of his aristocratic great grandmother, five generations removed. The adoption of the De Vere surname finally separated the Hunts (as in Incherourke) from the De Veres of Curraghchase. (BIFR, 1976); Nolan, W., 2007).

1771. He became Member of Parliament for county Limerick in 1826, continuing until his death on 29 December, 1829. He married Catherine Evans, daughter of Eyre Evans of Milltown Castle, Bulgadan, Co. Limerick, and they had two sons, Thomas and Eyre, and two daughters, Catherine and Eliza. He supported Catholic interests and his candidacy for a seat in parliament was supported by Daniel OConnell. (BLGI, 1899, 164-165)

Malone, Edmond (1702-1774), Member of Parliament

Lloyd, Thomas (1771-1829), Member of Parliament

dmond Malone, second son of Richard Malone of Baronstown, Co. Westmeath, and Marcella, daughter of Redmond Mulleady, was born on 16 April, 1702. He was educated in London at the Middle Temple and called to the English Bar on 16 May, 1729. In 1734, he entered the Inner Temple and was called to the Irish Bar in 1740. In 1756 he was awarded an LLD degree (honoris causa) by Trinity College, Dublin. He married (26 May, 1736) Catherine, daughter of Benjamin Collier of Essex. They had two boys, Richard, who became 1st Baron Sunderlin, and who also sat in the Irish Parliament, and Edmund, who became a celebrated Shakespearean critic. They also had two girls, Henrietta and Catherine. Edmund Malone had a very successful legal career. His appointments included King=s Counsel (1746), Justice of the Common Pleas (1767), Bencher of the Honorable Society of King=s Inns (1767), Commissioner for Causes in Chancery (1768) and Commissioner for Bankruptcy (1772). He took one of the Askeaton Parliamentary seats on the death of John Minchin-Walcott in 1753 and sat until 1760. During the period, 1761-1767, he represented Granard in Parliament. Among the honours heaped upon him were the Freedom of the Guild of Merchants (29 April, 1754) and the Freedom of Cork (14 July, 1760). He died on 22 April, 1774. (UHF).

homas Lloyd, second son of Colonel Thomas Lloyd and Ellen Lloyd, was born in Beechmount Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, about

Massy, Sir Hugh (1733-1790), Member of Parliament


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ugh Massey, eldest son of Sir Hugh Massey, 1st Baron of Duntrileague, Co. Limerick, and his wife, Mary Dawson, was born on 14 April, 1733. He was appointed Sheriff of County Limerick in 1763 and was Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1776 to 1783. On 25 September, 1760, he married Catherine Taylor of Ballynort, Askeaton, and had four sons, Hugh, Edward, George-Eyre and John, together with four daughters, Mary-Anne, Catherine, Jane and Sarah. His wife, Catherine Taylor, was the elder daughter (and co-heiress with her half sister, Sarah, Countess of Carrick), of Col. Edward Taylor of Ballynort, Askeaton. Catherine brought a marriage dowry of ,5,000 in cash plus >half the barony (sic) of Askeaton=. Her fortune was later used by her husband to settle the Massey family debts outstanding since the time of his grandfather. Hugh Massey succeeded to the Duntrileague title in January, 1788. He died on 10 May, 1790. (UHF; Tracey, F., 2005, 23)

and one member of the family, Thomas, married heiress Sara Westropp of Ballysteen and, for two generations, the Ballysteen family were known as Odell-Westropp (Feheney, 1998, 12; UHF)

Odel, William (1752-1831), Member of Parliament

Odell, John (c.1641-1700), Member of Parliament

ohn Odell was born in England around 1641, son of John Odell and Jane Mervin. He joined the British army, rising to the rank of major. He came to Ireland and, in recognition of his services to the royalists, was granted estates in County Limerick on the restoration of King Charles II in 1667. He was commissioner for Poll Tax in Limerick in 1660-1661 and High Sheriff of County Limerick in 1678-1679. He married Elizabeth Crane and had two sons (John and William) and two daughters (Judith and Mary). He was Member of Parliament for Askeaton during the period 1692-93. Sadly, John Odell got into debt and was sued by his daughter-in-law, Constance, daughter of William Fitzmaurice, Baron of Kerry, for non-completion of her marriage settlement. Odell was imprisoned for debt and died in the debtor=s prison in April, 1700, as a result, his own daughter alleged, of >severe treatment= from his daughter-in-law. The Odell family was prominently associated with Ballingarry

illiam Odell, son of Captain John Odell and his wife, Jane Baylee, was born in Bealduvroga, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1752. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, which he entered in 1768, at the age of 16. He married, first, Aphra Crone of Doneraile in 1773, and by her had seven sons and five daughters. After Aphra=s death in 1814, he married, secondly, in 1818, Anna Maria Finucane, a Catholic from Ennis. He was appointed Sheriff of Limerick in 1789 and became an officer of the Limerick militia, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, in 1793. He lived at Fort William, Rathkeale. He became a Member of Parliament for county Limerick in 1797, and, in 1810, was appointed Commissioner for the Treasury. He voted consistently for Catholic relief, sometimes against the wishes of the Government. Owing to serious disagreements with Pitt=s Government, he lost his seat in Parliament, following which he also lost his appointment at the Treasury in 1819. He then became embroiled in litigation with his family. When he refused to pay his debts, he was lodged in Marshalsea Debtors Prison, London, where he died after a confinement of twelve years on 8 June, 1831. He was a grandson of John Odell MP (qv). (Thorne, R, 1986)

Perceval, Philip (1686-1748), Member of Parliament


hilip Perceval, son of Sir John Perceval, 3rd Baronet of Burton, Co. Cork, and Catherine, daughter of Sir Edward Dering, 2 nd

P
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Baronet of Surrenden, Kent, was born in King=s Weston, England, on 13 November, 1686. He was educated at Westminster School, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and Lincoln=s Inn. Despite his legal training, his passion was for music and he was appointed Director and Supervisor of State Music to King George I and King George II. He married (12 June, 1712) Martha, daughter of Christopher Ussher of Dublin and widow of Nehemiah Donnellan, Member of Parliament for Galway. After his marriage, he obtained a post as >Customer and Collector of Dublin, Skerries, Malahide and Wicklow=. He was well connected politically as well as socially, his brother being Lord Egmont, a Member of Parliament for County Cork. His occupancy of one of the Askeaton seats came through the >grace and favour= of the Taylor family, who >owned= both Askeaton seats. Perceval=s tenure was short, however. He entered Parliament on 25 November, 1713, and it was prorogued on 24 December, 1713. He and his family were zealous supporters of the Hanoverian succession. He died on 26 April, 1748. (UHF).

polemical works and died 1 April, 1699. (Petts Family; UHF).

Philips, Chichester (c.1664-1728), Member of Parliament

Pett, Sir Peter (1630-1699), Member of Parliament

eter Pett, son of Peter Pett (1593-1652), a shipwright of Deptford, was baptised in St Nicholas= Church, Deptford, on 31 October, 1630. He was educated at St Paul=s School and at Sidney-Sussex College, Cambridge (BA, 1648). He then moved to Pembroke College, Oxford, where he graduated with a BCL in 1650. After that, he enrolled as a law student at Grey=s Inn and was called to the English Bar in 1664. He was one of the original Fellows of the Royal Society (with Sir Robert Boyle), when it was formed in 1663. He was appointed Advocate General for Ireland and knighted by the Duke of Ormond. He was a Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1661 to 1666. He wrote anti-Papist

hichester Philips, born before 1664, was the son of Chichester Philips of Middlesex and his wife, Susanna, daughter of Thomas Warner, Rector of Balshaw, Cambridgeshire. He married Sarah Handcock, daughter of William Handcock and Sarah Stanley, and three of his four sons became clergymen. Starting as an ensign to Sir Thomas Fortescue (1663-5), he progressed to Captain in Viscount Mountjoy=s Regiment of Foot (1685). He was removed from command by the Earl of Tyrconnell on the accession of James II and he responded by seeking employment in the army of William of Orange. His home was at Drumcondra Castle, Dublin, though he purchased an estate (including 580 acres in Westmeath) from the Commissioners for Sale of Forfeited Estates in 1703. He also sought (28 September, 1703) to inherit land from Sir Simon Eaton Bart., deceased, by seeking the disqualification of the beneficiary of the Eaton will, on the grounds of Catholic connections. His Askeaton seat in Parliament (1696-99; 1703-17) was probably purchased from the Taylors of Ballynort, who were the effective owners of the two Askeaton seats. Chichester Philips died in 1728. (UHF)

O=Shaughnessy, Patrick (1872-1920), Member of Parliament

atrick Joseph O=Shaughnessy, son of David O=Shaughnessy and his wife, Johanna Power, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1872. He was educated at Rathkeale National School and Blackrock College, Dublin (then popularly known as the >French= College). Though intended by the family for the legal profession, he was personally interested in

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politics and joined the Irish National Party. After the Parnell >split=, he sided with section led by John Redmond and was elected unopposed as a member of parliament for West Limerick in October, 1900. At the age of 28, he was the youngest >Home Ruler= in the party. He was returned unopposed at the General Election on 16 January, 1906, and, though opposed by Mr DD Sheehan, an anti-Parnellite, comfortably retained his seat in the General Election on 18 January, 1910. However, with the rise in support for political independence, following the Easter Rising in 1916, the new Sinn Fein organisation decimated the National Party of John Redmond in the General Election of 1918, taking 70% of all parliamentary seats in the 32 countries, thereby leaving the Irish National Party with a mere 6% of the seats. Patrick O=Shaughnessy was one of the casualties in this election disaster. He continued, however, to work in Government committees until he fell victim to the Great >Spanish= >flu, 1918-1920, which killed more than 20 million people in Europe. He caught the infection and became ill on the passenger boat, while returning from England. He died from virulent pneumonia, gasping for breath, in Dublin on 29 December, 1920, aged 48 years. After a funeral service in St Andrew=s church, Westland Row, Dublin 2, his remains were brought by train to Rathkeale, where he was interred in the family burial plot on 30 December, 1920. (Feheney, 1996, 88-90)

July, 1789. Robert senior became a member of parliament for Downpatrick, Co. Down, in 1776, and held the seat until 1783. He died on 29 August, 1817, aged 71 years. (http://www.thepeerage.com/p14819)

Southwell, William (1669-1719), Member of Parliament

illiam Southwell, son of Richard Southwell and Lady Elizabeth O=Brien, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1669. He joined the British army under William III, obtaining a commission in Colonoel Hamilton=s regiment in 1693. He spent much of his life fighting with the British forces in Europe, especially under the command of the Duke of Marlborough. He distinguished himself during the peninsular war against Napoleon=s forces, especially while leading his troops in the capture of Barcelona in 1705. Sword in hand, he was the first through the breached walls of that great city. He was appointed Governor of Monjuich, the citadel guarding Barcelona, and was promoted to the rank of Colonel. He retired from soldiering in 1714. In 1715, he entered the Irish parliament as an MP for Baltimore, Co. Cork. He married Lucy, younger daughter of William Bowen of Ballydans, Co. Offaly, and they had several children. He died in 1719. (Kilburn, M, ODNB)

Southwell, Robert (1745-1817), Member of Parliament

Taylor, Berkeley (ante 1683-1736), Member of Parliament

on. Robert Henry Southwell, son of Thomas, 1st Viscount Southwell, and his wife, Margaret Hamilton, was born in October, 1745. He was commissioned as an officer in the 8th Dragoons (British army) and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He married Frideswide Moore, daughter of John Moore, in 1786. They had one son, Robert Henry Southwell, born 9

erkeley Taylor, eldest son of Robert Taylor, was born in Ballynort House, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, before 1683. He married Sarah Hoare, daughter of Edward Hoare, Dunkettle, Co. Cork, and had four sons (William, Edward, Richard and Robert) and two daughters, Sarah, who married Thomas Westropp, and Lucy, who married Arthur Ussher of Cappagh, Co. Waterford. His first two sons were also Members of Parliament for

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Askeaton. In addition to the Ballynort estate, he possessed a much larger estate in Mallow, County Cork, together with considerable property in Cork City. He was a foundation member of the Dublin Society in 1731 and was Sheriff of County Limerick in 1724. His son, William Taylor, inherited his estate. Berkeley died 25 June, 1736. He was Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1723 to 1736. (UHF)

Parliament for Askeaton for 33 years, 1727-60. (UHF)

Taylor, Robert (ante 1660-1696), Member of Parliament

Taylor, Edward (post 1694-1760), Member of Parliament

dward Taylor, second son of Berkeley Taylor and Sarah Hoare, was born after 1694. He obtained a commission as Colonel (10 November, 1737) and was High Sheriff for County Limerick in 1727. He was a foundation member of the Dublin Society in 1731. He married (10 October, 1747) Anne, daughter of Richard Maunsell (from a prominent Limerick family) and had one son, Edward, and two daughters, Catherine and Sarah. Sadly, the son, Edward, was drowned in the river Isis in 1769, while studying at Oxford University. The two daughters became Edward Taylor=s heirs, Catherine marrying Hon. Hugh Massey, 2 nd Baron Massey (also an MP for Askeaton), while Sarah married Hon. Henry T Butler, 2 nd Earl of Carrick (also an MP for Askeaton). It is said that each daughter received a dowry of ,5,000, together with >half the barony (sic) of Askeaton=. It will be remembered that this was part of the 12,000 acre seignory given originally to Sir Francis Berkeley and inherited by the Taylors. With the passing of the Act of Union in 1800, the Earl of Carrick and the trustees of the will of Hon. Hugh Massey each received compensation of ,6,850 from the British Government, since the Taylors >owned= the two Parliamentary seats in Askeaton. Edward Taylor died in December, 1760, and seems to have been the last of the Taylors to live in Ballynort House. He was a Member of

obert Taylor, son of John Taylor and Gertrude Berkeley, was born in Ballynort House, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, before 1660. He was High Sheriff of County Limerick in 1670. He had two sons, Berkeley and Robert, both Members of Parliament for Askeaton after the death of their father. The Taylors, from a political point of view, were the most important family in Askeaton for more than 150 years. Through his marriage to Gertrude Berkeley, Robert=s father, John, obtained control of the two Parliamentary seats in Askeaton. Thenceforth, until the Act of Union, the Taylors determined who, other than themselves, sat in these two seats. These seats were really >pocket boroughs=, and, was the custom at the time, the Taylors sold them to other people, when it suited them, as mentioned elsewhere in these pages. It was Robert Taylor Senior who built up the Ballynort estate. He died some time before March 28, 1696, and was a Member of Parliament for Askeaton from 1692 until his death in 1696. Around this time, the Taylors were also prominent in the political and social history of Swords, Co. Dublin. (Dalton, J., 1938; Crofton 1911, 93; UHF).

Taylor, Robert (c.1682-1723), Member of Parliament

obert Taylor, younger brother of Berkeley Taylor, was the second son of Robert Taylor (c.1660-96) and was born in Ballynort House, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, around 1682. He was Sheriff for County Limerick in 1706 and was commissioned as an officer in the Earl of Argyle=s Regiment of Foot. He was a Member of Parliament for Askeaton during the years 1703-1714. He then obtained a seat in

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Tralee and represented that constituency from 1715 until his death in 1723. Politically, he was regarded as a Whig and he is on record as voting for a National Bank in Ireland in 1721. (UHF, 2043).

Taylor, William (1693-1746), Member of Parliament

illiam Taylor, eldest son of Berkeley Taylor and Sarah Hoare, was born in CONTENTSBallynort House, Askeaton, in February 1693. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he obtained a Doctorate (LLD) on 2 March, 1742. He was a foundation member of the Dublin Society in 1731. He held the posts of Collector of Taxes for Limerick (1736-1742) and for the town of Mallow (1742) and was both Sheriff of Cork (1741) and Mayor of Cork (1746). He married (3 April, 1738) Dorothy, daughter of Sir Nicholas Osborne, Bart., and had one daughter, Mary. He was returned for Askeaton on the death of his father, Berkeley Taylor, in 1736, and continued as a member until his own death on 15 May, 1746. He had a large estate in Cork City and county, including some 1,813 acres, which was purchased from the Commissioners for Sale of Forfeited Estates in 1702-1703. (UHF, 2047)

Society of King=s Inns (1760) and Commissioner of Appeals (1776-1783). He was a member of the Royal Dublin Society from 1762. He obtained his Askeaton seat (1768-1776) because he married Anne Maunsell, widow of Col. Edward Taylor of Ballynort, Askeaton (who >owned= the two Askeaton seats). He was subsequently a Member of Parliament for Longford (1776-1783). Ambitious to become a judge, he was dismissed from all offices by Lord Temple when it was discovered that he had embezzled a large sum of money entrusted to him by a client. As a consequence, he died a bankrupt and was buried on 15 May, 1787. (UHF, 2116; Farrar, Limerick Directory, 1769)

CONTENTS

LANDED GENTRY
Bateman, John (d.1792), Landed Gentry

Tunnadine, John (1726-1787), Member of Parliament

ohn Tunnadine, son of Rev John and Rebecca Tunnadine, was born in Limerick and baptised on 19 December, 1726. He entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 24 May, 1744, and, on completion of his degree, registered at Lincoln=s Inn on 29 November, 1748. He was called to the Irish Bar in 1756. His appointments included Master in Chancery (1773-1783), Magistrate in Limerick, 1764; burgess of the City of Limerick; Sheriff (1764), Governor of the Hibernian Fire Insurance Company (1775); Bencher of Honourable

ohn Bateman, son of John Bateman of Killeen (now Oakpark), Tralee, Co. Kerry, and his second wife, Anne Evans, sister of Lord Carbery, was born in Tralee about 1725. He married, firstly, in 1745, Elizabeth Sadleir, with whom he had one daughter, Catherine. He married, secondly, in 1756, Grace Brooke, daughter of Henry Brooke of Colebrooke, Co. Fermanagh, with whom he had three sons, John, who inherited the family estate, Henry, who was ordained a Church of Ireland clergyman (qv), and George Brooke, who died unmarried in 1809, together with two daughters. One daughter, Laetitia, married Gerald Blennerhassett (qv) of Riddlestown, Rathkeale. The other, Frances, married Rev Thomas Lloyd (qv), of Beechmount,

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Rathkeale. John built Altavilla House, Cappagh, about 1746. It had a six-bay central block of three stories, over a basement, with flanking wings of two storeys. The house was burned at one stage but was partially restored by a later owner, Lord Daresbury. John Bateman died in 1792 and was interred in Rathkeale Church of Ireland cemetery. (Irish Bomfords)

Blakiston, Sir Matthew (1783-1862), Landed Gentry

hough the Blakistons came from Blakiston village, Durham, the social and economic rise of the family began with George Blakiston (b.1675), who came south to London. His son, Matthew (1702-74), a prominent London grocer, became Lord Mayor of London (1760-61), was knighted and raised to the baronetcy (1763). Sir Matthew Blakiston=s son (1761-1806), of the same name, together with Robert and Thomas Maunsell, was one of the founders of Maunsell=s Bank, Limerick, in 1789. Sir Matthew was owner of the seignory of Askeaton. His family seat was established at Sandy Brook Hall, near Ashbourn, Derbyshire. The seignory of Askeaton continued in the possession of the third Baronet, Sir Matthew Blakiston (1783-1862) and the fourth, another Sir Matthew Blakiston (1811-83). Apart from the town of Askeaton, Blakiston property, totalling some several thousand acres, included the townlands of Aghalacka, Ballyengland (Upper and Lower), Cloonreask, Coolrahnee, Cragmore, Askeaton Glebe No.1, etc. etc. (O=Donovan, 1840, OSL; White=s Almanak, 1857; www.thepeerage.com; Griffith=s Valuation, 1850).

Castle and the surrounding lands, formerly part of the estate of the dispossessed Earl of Desmond. The Blennerhassetts came into possession of Riddlestown Park through marriage to Elizabeth Windall, whose mother inherited the Rice estate in Riddlestown. Gerald is regarded as the founder of the Riddlestown branch of the family and Riddlestown continued to be the principal seat of the Blennerhassett family in county Limerick, until it was inherited by the 27th Knight of Glin, who sold it about 1904. Gerald married Christiana Bayly of Loughgur, Co. Limerick, and they had an only son, Arthur, and six daughters. He died about 1758. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Blennerhassett, Gerald (c1734-1774), Landed Gentry


erald (known locally as >Garrett=) Blennerhassett, who succeeded his nephew, Arthur Blennerhassett, as owner of Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, was born about 1734. He married Margaret Wilson, his cousin, from Bilbao Court, Murroe, Co. Limerick, and had two sons, Arthur and Gerald. He died in 1774. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Blennerhassett, Gerald (d.1806), Landed Gentry


erald, generally known as >Colonel= Gerald, Blennerhassett, son of Gerald Blennerhassett and his wife, Margaret Wilson, was born in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. He was colonel of the Riddlestown Huzzars and a magistrate for the Rathkeale area. He married, firstly, Mary Wilkinson, daughter of Joseph Wilkinson, of county Cork, and, after her death, he married, secondly, Laetitia Batemen, daughter of John Bateman of Altavilla, Cappagh, Co. Limerick. They had a family of two sons, Gerald and John, and one daughter, Laetitia. He died in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, on 19 September, 1806, and was succeeded by his elder son, Gerald, while his younger son, John, succeeded to the property in Whiskey Hall, Kilmoylan, Co. Limerick. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Blennerhassett, Gerald (d.c.1758), Landed Gentry

erald Blennerhassett, youngest son of Edward Blennerhassett (d.c.1728) and Mary Windall (sometimes spelled Windale), was born in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. His family came to Tralee from Cumberland in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, and, initially, was aligned with, if not in the service of, the Dennys, who controlled Tralee

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Blennerhassett, Gerald (c1780-1845), Landed Gentry

erald Blennerhassett, eldest son of Gerald Blennerhassett and Laetitia Bateman, was born in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, around 1780. He was High Sheriff for county Limerick (1812-1813) and a member of the county Limerick Grand Jury (1831). On 23 April, 1805, he married Elizabeth Massy, daughter of William Massy, of Glenville, Ardagh, Co. Limerick, and they had two sons, Gerald Fitzgerald and William, and a daughter, Clara, who married the 25 th Knight (the >Cracked Knight) of Glin. Gerald was Colonel of the Riddlestown Huzzars, a company of Yeomanry, and he was also first Master of the Limerick Foxhounds. Both he and his son signed a letter in the Ennis Chronicle in October, 1799, supporting the Act of Union. He also signed a petition opposing the repeal of the Act of Union in 1830. In 1821, together with other landlords, he offered a reward for information leading to the conviction of the men responsible for the attempted murder of Alexander Hoskins, in Newcastle West. His wife, Elizabeth, who lived to be 96 years old, is notable for the fact that she had 21 brothers and, on one occasion, 17 of them were mounted at a hunt led by her husband. Gerald died at Riddlestown Park, on 22 January, 1845. He had a reputation for generosity and hospitality. (Bowen, 1954, 48; Jehan, B, 2011)

portrait in oils by Joseph Haverty hangs in Glin Castle. On the death of her brother, Gerald, in 1886, Clara became the last of the Blennerhassetts to live at Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale. When she died in 1904, the property was inherited by the 27th Knight of Glin, who removed some its historic paintings to Glin Castle and then sold the Riddlestown Park property. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Blennerhassett, Gerald Fitzgerald (1845-1886), Landed Gentry


Gerald Urmston Fitzgerald Blennerhassett, son of Gerald Blennerhassett and his wife, Geraldine FitzGerald, was born in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 15 September, 1845. He was baptised in Rathkeale on 16 October, 1845. A local magistrate, he was also deputy lieutenant for county Limerick. In 1876, he was listed as owning 1,142 acres of land. He died 15 August, 1886. He was an enthusiastic follower of the Limerick County Hounds and was described as >one of the best men with the hounds=. He was the last of the male line of the Blennerhassetts at Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Blennerhassett, Rice (d. 1734), Landed Gentry

Blennerhassett, Gerald (1809-1876), Landed Gentry

erald Fitzgerald Blennerhassett, son of Gerald Blennerhassett and his wife, Elizabeth Massy, was born in Rutland Street, Dublin, his father=s >town= house, on 8 February, 1809. He was a deputy lieutenant for county Limerick in 1834, in addition to being a local magistrate. On 13 June, 1840, he married Geraldine FitzGerald, eldest daughter of the 24th Knight of Glin. They had one son, Gerald, and two daughters, only one of whom, Clara, married. She married George Fosbery (1854-1939) of Clorhane, Adare. Gerald was said to have been a very handsome man. His

ice Blennerhassett, son of Edward Blennerhassett and Elizabeth Windall, was born in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. He was High Sheriff of Limerick in 1723 and went on to become deputy Mayor of Limerick City. He married Mary Beckworth of Cashel, Co. Tipperary, who left no issue. The name >Rice= was taken in memory of his grandmother, who was heiress to the Rice estate in Riddlestown Park, Rathkeale. Rice died in 1734. (Jehan, B, 2011)

Brown, John (1724-1810), Landed Gentry

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ohn Brown, son of Archdeacon John Brown (qv) and his wife, Ann Vincent, was born in

Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1724. He was the fourth of twelve children. He married Meliora Southwell of Rathkeale, in 1751, and they had six surviving children. Meliora died on 3 November, 1767, aged 35 years. John married, secondly, Catherine, daughter of William Massey, but there was no issue from the second marriage. Catherine died in 1796, aged 65 years, and John was a widower from then until his death on 30 December, 1810. Initially, he lived at Danesfort, Rathkeale, before taking up his residence at Mount Brown (now Dromard House), Croagh, Rathkeale about 1770. He was succeeded by his son, from his first marriage, Lt. John Southwell Brown (qv). The Brown Papers, including a considerable amount of correspondence to and from John Brown, much of it relating to the Southwell estate, are now housed in the Palatine Heritage Centre, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. (Brown Papers, IPA, Rathkeale)

on the death of his father in 1810. On the night of 28 February, 1822, he accompanied a unit of the Third Dragoons, to search the house of Edward Markham, Mount Brown, Croagh, and discovered two pistols, at the bottom of a cupboard in the house. Under the terms of the Irish Insurrection Act, passed the same day, it was a serious crime to be in possession of a firearm without a licence. The punishment on conviction was transportation for seven years. At a subsequent trail, Markham was convicted and transferred to Cork, where he was put on board the ship Mangles, and transported to New South Wales. John and his wife, Margaret Anne, evidently believed in educating their children since their three boys (John, Thomas and Vesey) attended Trinity College, Dublin. Their father, John Southwell Brown died towards the end of May, 1872, aged 78 years. (www.thepeerage.com/, 25368.htm; Murray, F, 2010; Burtchaell and Sadleir, 101; LC 30.5.1872; Brown Papers, IPA, Rathkeale)

Brown, John S (c.1765- ), Landed Gentry

Brown, John Edward (1818-1894), Landed Gentry

t John Southwell Brown, younger son of John Brown and his first wife, Meliora Southwell, was born in Mount Brown, Croagh, Rathkeale, about 1765. He joined the army and was commissioned as an officer in the 19 th Regiment of Foot. He married Mary Gordon from Glasgow in 1793 and lived at Mount Browne, now Dromard House, Croagh. Their issue included John Southwell Brown, born about 1794, who died in his home in November, 1872, at the age of 78 years. (Brown Papers, IPA, Rathkeale; LC: 30.5.1872)

ohn Edward Brown, son of John Southwell Brown and his wife, Margaret Vesey, was born in Mount Brown, Croagh, Co. Limerick, in 1818. He acquired the title of Colonel and is listed in 1874 as living in Dromard House (formerly Mount Brown) with 1,272 acres of land. He died in 1894. (thepeerage.com/p25368.htm: #253672)

Cooke, Alice (1862-1938), Landed Gentry

Brown, John S (c.1794-1872), Landed Gentry

ohn Southwell Brown, son of Lt John Southwell Brown and his wife, Mary Gordon, was born at Mount Brown, Croagh, Co. Limerick, about 1794. He married Margaret Anne Vesey (1802-1855), daughter of General John and Mrs Vesey, and their issue included: John Southwell Brown (b. 1823), Thomas Southwell Brown (b.1826) and Vessey Brown (b.1824). John inherited Mount Brown

lice Cooke, daughter of Rev John Cooke and his wife, Frances Elizabeth Dowdall Peppard, was born in The Glebe, Glenealy, Co. Wicklow, in 1862. She was the last of the Peppard clan to live in Cappagh House, where that family had been resident for two centuries. Her mother, a descendant of the Dowdall family, one of most prominent in county Limerick, died in June, 1911, her husband having predeceased her. Though Alice had a brother, she inherited Cappagh House and the accompanying estate. She supplemented her modest earnings from the estate with a limited

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income from writing, but, in her later years, was in financially straitened circumstances. She died on 25 November, 1938, and was buried in Cappagh cemetery, Co. Limerick. After her death, the estate was declared bankrupt and the Irish Land Commission acquired both house and land. While the house, together with a small part of the estate was sold, the remainder of the estate was distributed among local farmers in order to augment their holdings. Since then, the house has changed ownership several times, and, though damaged by fire in 1983, it has been gradually renovated and restored. The current owner is Michael Morrissey. (Whelan, n.d., 91-93; Cleshan, 1999)

Delmege, John C (d.1893), Landed Gentry

Copley, John (c.1780-), Landed Gentry


ohn Copley, Ballyclough House, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, was a witness at the trial of three men, Patrick and James Minnane and John Green, for the murder of Major Richard Hare during the >Tithe War= on 1 February, 1822. It will be recalled that, at this time, much of West Limerick was in a state of ferment owing to the activity of the >Rockites=. These men were raiding the houses of the gentry in an attempt to build up a supply of firearms. At the trial, Mr John Copley testified that five or six persons came to his house and purloined certain firearms, including >a blunderbuss, a short gun and two muskets=. On 18 February, 1822, a large group of about 200 men assembled in Mr Copley=s demesne to cut wood. When Mr Hunt (magistrate), accompanied by police and soldiers, tried to disperse them, an affray occurred, during which one man was killed and two others severely wounded. In 1809, John Copley is listed as being granted a gun license. In 1876 the Copley estate in Ballyclough was listed as consisting of 390 acres. John Copley married Dorothea Stack, Ballyconry, Lisselton, Co. Kerry, on 15 April, 1805. This John Copley was a relative of Sir John Singleton Copley, Lord Lyndhurst (1772-1863), distinguished jurist and British Lord Chancellor. (LC, 1809; HCPP 1822 (423), 14; Con. Jrnl., 9 Aug, 1824; ODNB)

ohn Christopher Delmege, son of Christopher Delmege and his wife, Martha Yielding, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. His father had been born a member of the Rathkeale Palatine community. The family name in the Rhine Palatinate had been Dolmetsch, but, in Ireland, had gone through various adaptations, including Dolmage, until it finally became Delmege. John inherited the Yielding Glensharrold estate, purchased from the Encumbered Estates Court for ,8,000 by his father, Christopher, in 1853. The Yieldings were prominent in West Limerick, being substantial, but benevolent, landlords in the area. With a view to getting a better return from the estate, which had a good deal of bogland, John began to raise the rents of his tenants, in some cases to twice what Yielding charged. The formation of the Land League in 1879, and the subsequent Plan of Campaign to lower rents to the figures used in Griffith=s Valuation, encouraged the tenant farmers to resist higher rents. Moreover, even for bogland, which was free under Yielding=s ownership, Delmege insisted on payment of rent. To carry out his plan, Delmege brought in his own police and appointed bog rangers to ensure that no tenant=s animals would get a free meal. In the final showdown, Delmege began to evict tenants, but the Plan of Campaign organisers invited the press and Members of Parliament to witness the evictions and the name of Delmege got very unfavourable publicity, becoming synonymous with oppressive and ruthless landlordism. In 1888, the London Times gave prominence to the evictions. Eventually, after the intervention of the British Government, the tenants were reinstated at reduced rents, though several of them had already immigrated to the USA. Fr Bob Ambrose played an important part in supporting the tenants. Delmege married Katherine O=Grady, from Raheen, Limerick, niece of Viscount Guillamore, and had issue, including at least two sons (John and James) and two daughters (Kathleen and Maria Julia). His son, John Christopher, immigrated to New Zealand, where he died in May, 1886. His son, James O=Grady, who succeeded him, became High Sheriff for Limerick and died on 17 April,

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1923. His daughter, Maria Julia, died on 6 December, 1881, while his daughter, Kathleen, died in September, 1927. In 1876, he was listed as owner of 1,641 acres of land (Cd.1492; www.thepeerage.com, 380988)

Griffin, Peter (d.1896), Landed Gentry

eter Gerald Griffin, born in Corgriff, Foynes, Co. Limerick, settled in Altavilla, Askeaton (the Bateman mansion), around the middle of the nineteenth century. He was a relation of the writer, Gerald Griffin (1803-1840). He married Maria Sarah Hunt (d.1912), daughter of Robert Hunt of Cloughodromin, Ballyneety, Co. Limerick, and they had two sons, Peter Gerald and Robert George and three daughters. Peter died of suicide on 31 October, 1896. The funeral took place on Sunday, 1 November, 1896, at the family burial place in Nantenan cemetery, Rathkeale. Among the chief mourners were his two sons, together with his brothers-in-law, Captain George W Hunt RN, Mr Hunt and Captain Alex Caulfield, Milltown, Pallaskenry. Peter=s eldest son, Major Peter Gerald Griffin DSO succeeded his father in Altavilla. (LC, 3.11.1896; M Griffin, 2012)

aurice Gilbert Hewson, son of John Gilbert B Hewson and Kathleen Violet Hewson, was born in Castlehewson on 25 September, 1912, and was educated at Repton Public School (England), St Columba=s (Dublin) and Trinity College, Dublin. He then went on to St Catherine=s College, Cambridge, where he obtained the degrees BA (1936), LLB (1947) and MA (1952). In Trinity College, he took an active part in sports and was captain of the Athletic and Tennis Clubs. He subsequently entered the British Colonial Service and rose to the rank of District Commissioner in the Gold Coast (present Ghana), West Africa. He served with the West African Frontier Force during World War II. In addition to the Castlehewson property, he also inherited ground rents of property in the town of Askeaton west of the bridge over the river Deel. Maurice and his wife, the former Pamela Mary Kettle, from Ballycarney, Co. Wexford, perished in an accidental fire at their home, Lough House, Ballyengland, Askeaton, on 23 February, 1998. They were buried at the family cemetery at Castlehewson, Askeaton. (BIFR, 1976, 585).

Hewson, Robert (c.1876), Landed Gentry

Hewson, John Brownrigg (1826-1908), Landed Gentry

ohn Brownrigg Hewson, only son of William Hewson and Eizabeth Anne Brownrigg, was born in Castlehewson on 11 July, 1826. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and was appointed a Justice of the Peace. He married (8 July, 1873) Harriet Mary Gardiner of Rochford, Essex. They had three sons. He died 3 December, 1908, and was buried in the family cemetery, Castlehewson, Askeaton. In the list of landowners published in 1876, he was listed as being in possession of 1,435 acres of land (BIFR, 586; Cd.1492; LC 5.12.1908).

obert Hewson, son of George Hewson and his wife, Barbara Purcell, was born in Enniscouch, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. He married Mary Massy (d.1876), daughter of George Massy of Ballinakill, and had issue, including a son, George, who married, firstly, Susanna Massy Bevan and, secondly, Harriett O=Donnell of Truogh, Co. Clare. In 1876, Robert was listed as owning 398 acres of land at Enniscouch, Rathkeale. (BIFR, 1976, 585; Cd. 1492)

Hewson, George (1753-), Landed Gentry

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Hewson, Maurice (1912-1998), Landed Gentry

eorge Hewson, son of Robert Hewson, of Castlehewson, and his wife, Lillian Lees, was born in Castlehewson, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 31 October, 1753. He acquired the Enniscouch estate in Rathkeale and married Barbara, daughter of John Purcell, of Templemary, Doneraile, Co. Cork. Their issue

included three sons, Robert, John and James. (BIFR, 1976, 585)

Hewson, James (1783-1864), Landed Gentry

ames Hewson, son of George Hewson and his wife, Barbara Purcell, was born in Enniscouch, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1783. He married his cousin, Mary Hewson, daughter of John Hewson, Castlehewson, Askeaton, in 1824, and had issue, including a son, George James Hewson (1826-1904). He purchased Hollywood House and estate in Adare. He died early in March, 1864, aged 80 years. (BIFR, 586; LC, 5.3.64)

Incherourke, born in 1842, was the grandson of Robert Hunt and his wife, Catherine Hewson (1701-1805). He married (1876) Louisa Margaret Coplen-Langford, 3rd daughter of Edward Langford of Merino, Co. Kerry, and Stonehall, Co. Limerick. There were several branches of the Langford family in west Limerick and they intermarried with most of the Co. Limerick gentry. Robert Hunt of Inchirourke (b.1878), son of Robert Mun Hunt, was the father of the late Patricia Denise Hunt (d. 19.3.94), who married Colonel Philip O=Grady. (BIFR 1976, 335)

Lloyd, Thomas (c1805), Landed Gentry

Hewson, John (1749-1829), Landed Gentry

ohn Hewson, eldest son of George Hewson and Lilian Lees (d.1780), was born in Castlehewson, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 15 March, 1749. He married (1 January, 1782) Mary, daughter of William Lysaght, and niece of 1st Baron Lisle. They had five sons and two daughters. John was Deputy Lieutenant of County Limerick and was responsible for building the Hewson mill in Askeaton in 1825. He was a middleman for Sir Matthew Blakiston, owner of the seigneury of Askeaton. He died in October, 1829. (BIFR, 1976, 586; O=Donovan)

homas Lloyd, fourth son of Rev Thomas Lloyd and his second wife, Frances Bateman of Altavilla, Askeaton, was born in Kilbragh, Co. Tipperary. The family, of Welsh origin, was descended from Thomas Lloyd of Tower Hill, Co. Limerick. He was called to the Irish Bar in 1762 and became Recorder for Limerick City in 1782. He also held the rank of Colonel in the British army. In 1805, he purchased Beechmount House and estate, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. He married his cousin, Ellen Lloyd of Dromsalla, Co. Limerick, and, by her, had seven sons and two daughters. (BLGI, 1899, 164-165)

Lloyd, Thomas (1798-1873), Landed Gentry

Hunt, Robert Mun (1842-), Landed Gentry

he Hunts of Incherourke trace their ancestry back to William Hunt of Gosfield, Essex, who died about 1552. His grandson, John (b.1582), came to Ireland during the Confederate war and was one of the =49 Officers= in the English army. From him descended two main branches of the family, the more prominent being the descendants of Sir Vere Hunt of Curraghchase (qv), whose son, Sir Aubrey, changed the family surname to the more aristocratic De Vere. The other branch included those at Incherourke, and their cousins in Friarstown, Bruff. Robert Mun Hunt, of

homas Lloyd, eldest son of Thomas Lloyd MP and his wife, Catherine Evans, was born in Beechmount, Rathkeale, in 1798. He was appointed Deputy Lieutenant for county Limerick and became a magistrate for counties Limerick, Clare and Tipperary. He married, firstly, Anne Burke, in 1825, and by her had one son, who died without issue, and two daughters, Jane and Catherine. He married, secondly, in 1838, Julia Palmer, and by her had three sons, Thomas, Arthur and Henry, and two daughters, Julia and Anna Maria. He died in 1873. (BLGI, 1899, 164-165)

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Massy, Hugh (1721-1790), Landed Gentry

ugh Massy, son of William Massy and his wife, Anne Bentley, was born in Cloghanarold, Rathkeale, in 1721. He inherited the Stoneville estate from his father, William, and married Eleanor, daughter of Col. James Fitzgerald. He was succeeded by his son, James Fitzgerald Massy. Hugh died on 8 May, 1790. (Massy, H, 2012)

Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 22 January, 1853. He inherited the Stoneville estate from his father. He married Lucy Annesley, and they had a family of one girl (May Eva) and five boys (William, Hugh, Lionel, Derek and Ingoldsby). Hugh Ingoldsby died on 29 March, 1900. (Massy, H, 2012)

Massy, James Fitzgerald (1747-1821), Landed Gentry

Massy, Hugh (1923-2012), Landed Gentry

ugh Le Souef Massy, son of William Ingoldsby Massy (1883-1965) and his wife Freda Simpson, was born in Stoneville, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 14 August, 1923. He was educated at Arnold House Preparatory School, North Wales, and Stowe Public school, Buckinghamshire. Arnold House School is famous as the school where Evelyn Waugh taught for some years before becoming a full-time writer. After school, Hugh entered the Royal Air Force and saw combat during World War II. He attended Christ Church College, Oxford, and graduated with an MA (1947). Hugh inherited the Stoneville estate on the death of his father. He married Prudence Williams in 1961 and they had a family of one boy (James, b.1962) and three girls (Anna Patricia, b.1963; Lucy Caroline, b.1968; Mary Le Souef, b.1968). A man of keen intellect and wide scholarship, he was the author of a valuable unpublished family history, entitled, Biographical Notes on the Massy Family History, Relating in Particular to those Living at Stoneville (1994). He died on 2 October, 2012, at Thorpes Nursing Home, Clarina, Co. Limerick, aged 89 years. His remains were cremated. (Massy, H, 2012; thepeerage.com #253584)

ames Fitzgerald Massy, son of Hugh Massey and his wife, Eleanor Fitzgerald, was born in Stoneville, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1747. He married Henrietta Hickman and had issue, including two boys (James Fitzgerald and John) and four girls (Ellen, Hariot, Anna and Ellen). He died in 1821and was succeeded by his son, James Fitzgerald (qv). (Massy, H, 2012)

Massy, James Fitzgerald (1780-1858), Landed Gentry

ames Fitzgerald Massy, son of James Fitzgerald Massy and Henrietta Hickman, was born in Stoneville, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1780. In1811, he married Mary Dunscombe of Mount Desert, Lee Road, Cork, and had issue 5 daughters (Harriet, Jane, Mary, Helena and Sarah) and two sons (James Fitzgerald and Richard). James Fitzgerald died in 1858. (Massy, H, 2012)

Massy, James Fitzgerald (1811-1861), Landed Gentry

Massy, Hugh Ingoldsby (1853-1900), Landed Gentry

ames Fitzgerald Massy, son of James Fitzgerald Massy and his wife, Mary Dunscombe, was born in Stoneville, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 18 November, 1811. He inherited the Stoneville estate from his father. On 3 October, 1844, he married Elizabeth Preston and they had issue of five girls (Mary, Diana, Isabella, Anna and Elizabeth) and four boys (Hugh, Arthur, Gerald and William). James died on 13 June, 1861. (Massy, H, 2012)

ajor Hugh Ingoldsby Massy, son of James Fitzgerald Massy and his wife, Elizabeth Preston, was born in Stoneville,

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Massy, William (c.1690-1768), Landed Gentry

illiam Massy was a son of Hugh Massy and his wife, Amy Benson. William married Anne Bentley and had three sons (Hugh, William and John) and five daughters (Amy, Elizabeth, Margaret, Catherine and Anne). Initially he lived at Cloghanarold, Rathkeale, but in 1751, he purchased 160 acres, together with a >hunting lodge= at Cloghatrida, Rathkeale, from the Hon. Henry Southwell, son of 1st Baron Southwell. This house gradually evolved into Stoneville House and estate, which has been in the Massy family for more than 250 years. The Massys of Stoneville, Rathkeale, descend from William=s son, Hugh, while the Massys of Glenville, Ardagh, descend from William=s son, John. William died in March, 1768. (landedsetates.nuigalway.ie; Massy, H, 2012)

married Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Delmege, Attorney, Rathkeale, on 21 June, 1858, and had issue. He died on 16 December, 1898. Like most members of the Irish landed gentry of the time, he was a Justice of the Peace. The Maunsell estate in Ballywilliam was listed as comprising 4,231 acres in 1876. (Burtchaell & Sadleir, 564, BLGI, 303-304; Cd.1492)

Maunsell, George Mears (1785-1871), Landed Gentry

Massy, William I (1883-1965), Landed Gentry

ajor William Ingoldsby Massy, son of Hugh Massy and his wife, Lucy Justice, was born on 16 February, 1883. He was educated at the Royal College, Tipperary, and the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. He entered the Indian army, 12th Pioneer Regiment, and attained the rank of Major in the Burma Military Police. He inherited the Stoneville estate from his father and married Freda Simpson in September, 1918. They had a family of two boys, Michael and Hugh, and one girl, Philippa. Hugh inherited the family estate in Stoneville from his father. William died on 7 June, 1965. (Massy, H, 2012)

eorge Mears Maunsell, son of Robert Maunsell and his third wife, Louisa Douglas of county Antrim, was born in Ballywilliam, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1785. He was educated at Oriel College, Oxford (BA 1807) He married, firstly, Catherine, daughter of Thomas Lloyd MP of Beechmount, Rathkeale, on 19 December, 1817, and had issue of two daughters and six sons, including Daniel Mears Maunsell (qv). On the death of his first wife, George married, secondly, on 15 October, 1833, Mary Stopford, whose father was Church of Ireland rector in Blarney, Co. Cork. He had three boys and one girl from his second marriage. George was High Sheriff of county Limerick in 1835. He is listed as living at Ballywilliam, Rathkeale, in both Pigot=s Directory (1824) and Slater=s Directory (1846) (BLGI, 304)

Maunsell, Richard (1721-1790), Landed Gentry

Maunsell, Daniel Mears (1819-1898), Landed Gentry

ichard Maunsell, eldest son of Richard Maunsell MP for Limerick and his second wife, Jane Waller, of Newport, Co. Tipperary, was born in 1821. He settled in Ballywilliam, Rathkeale, and married Helena Toler and they had issue, including a son, George.

aniel Mears Maunsell, son of George Mears Maunsell and his wife, Catherine, daughter of Thomas Lloyd of Beechmount, Rathkeale, was born in Ballywilliam, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 26 October, 1819. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he obtained his BA degree in 1843. He

Minchin-Walcott, John (1701-1753), Landed Gentry

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ohn Minchin, son of Edward Minchin, Glanahulty, Co. Tipperary, born in Glanahulty in 1701, changed his surname to Minchin-Walcott, as a condition for inheriting

part of the estate of his cousin, John Walcott, of Croagh, Co. Limerick. Minchin-Walcott, a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, who was called to the Bar in 1726, became an MP for Askeaton (1747-1753). He married and had a daughter, Jane, who was the first wife of Rt Rev William Cecil Perry, 1st Baron Glentworth of Mallow. John Minchin-Walcott died in 1753. (www.thepeerage.com, #35908)

Manister, Co. Limerick, in 1787, and they had issue, including Thomas Henry FRB Royce; Abraham F Royce (c1794-1822); Nicholas F Royce (d.1821); Mary Royce; William F Royce (1803-1890). Nicholas died on 25 March, 1809, at the early age of 45 years.

Royce, Vere (1700-1768), Landed Gentry

Morgell, Thomas (1708-), Landed Gentry

homas Morgell, son of Thomas Morgell and his wife, Bridget Crosby, was born in Mount Morgell (later known as Beechmount), Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1708. In 1733, he married Melian O=Callaghan and they had three daughters (Mary, Hannah and Melian) and a son, Crosbie Morgell. Crosbie (b.1735), who became a lawyer, married Mary Hickson in 1775. Crosbie and Mary had several children, including a daughter, Anne, who married Sir Barry Denny in 1794. Anne=s second husband was General Sir John Floyd, Bart., by whom she had three daughters, one of whom married Sir Robert Peel, British Prime Minister. Melian, daughter of Thomas and Melian, married William Blennerhassett in 1776, and Mary married William Sullivan about 1762. In addition to an estate in Rathkeale, members of the extended Morgell family also held property in counties Cork and Tipperary up to the end of the nineteenth century. (Landedestates.nuigalway.ie, Morgell, retrieved 23.4.12)

ere Royce, son of Rev Henry Royce and his wife, Susan Hunt, was born in Nantenan House, Co. Limerick, about 1700. He inherited Ballinvirick House and estate from his father. He Married Anne Hunt, daughter of Henry Hunt of Ligadoon, Co. Limerick, in 1726. He had issue, including Thomas Royce and Vere Royce (d.1757), who immigrated to North Carolina, USA. Vere died in 1768.

White, John (c.1805- ), Landed Gentry

Royce, Nicholas Foorde (c1765-1809), Landed Gentry

icholas Foorde Royce, son of Thomas Henry Royce and his wife, Martha Foorde, was born in Nantenan, Co. Limerick, about 1765. He was educated at Mr Ford=s Preparatory school and entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 15 November, 1781, aged 16 years. He graduated with a BA degree in 1785. He married Mary Catherine Croker, daughter of Captain Edward Croker of Grange Hill,

ohn White, son of Jasper White of Fairyhill, Parteen, Co. Limerick, and his wife, Helen Creagh, was born about 1805. He is reputed to have made a fortune in Jamaica in sugar plantations. On his return to Ireland, he married Eleanor Irwin in 1835 and they had a family of three boys (William, Jasper and John) and one girl (Helen). He purchased Nantenan House, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, together with about 145 acres of land, under the terms of the Encumbered Estates Act, in 1858. He knocked the old house, previously the home of several generations of the Royce family, and built the present house. He then began a process, continued by his son, of purchasing neighbouring lands to increase the size of the family estate, which, by 1876, reached 2,447 acres. John was survived by his widow. (Cd 1492; LC, 24.04.1906)

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White, John J (1860-1940), Landed Gentry

ohn Joseph White, son of John P White (qv) and his wife, Emily McMahon, was born in Nantenan, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, in 1860. He entered the British army and served overseas, attaining the rank of Captain. He married the >war widow=, Dorothea Conyers, nee Blood-Smyth (qv) in 1917. There was no issue from this marriage. He succeeded to the family estate on the death of his father in 1892. He died on 18 April, 1940, and was buried in Cappagh churchyard. (landedestates.nuigalway.ie)

MILITARY COMMANDERS
Axtell, Daniel (1622-1660), Military Commander

White, John P (1840-1892), Landed Gentry

ohn Patrick White, son of John White and his wife, Eleanor Irwin, was born Nantenan House, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, in 1840. He joined the British army and served overseas, reaching the rank of Lt Colonel. He married Emily McMahon in 1861 and they had a family of four boys (John (qv), Jasper, Thomas (qv) and William) and three girls Mary (died unmarried in London on 27 September, 1910), Aileen (qv) and Emily (qv)). Over the following decades, John continued a policy, initiated by his father, of increasing, through purchase, the size of the estate, to the extent that it occupied 2,447 acres in 1876. He retained his Catholic religion and was a generous patron of the Cappagh parish. His son, Thomas, became a Jesuit priest, while his daughters, Eileen and Emily, joined the Sisters of the Holy Child in England. (landedestates.nuigalway.ie)

aniel Axtell was born in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, in 1622. A convinced Methodist, he was apprenticed to a grocer, but turned his back on this trade and joined Cromwell=s New Model Army, where he quickly rose from the ranks to become an officer. He was captain of the Parliamentary Guard at the trial of King Charles I at Westminster Hall in 1649. He came to Ireland with Cromwell and, after distinguishing himself as a commander, was made Governor of Kilkenny. In 1652, he dismantled the Desmond Castle in Askeaton. In August 1655, he compiled a report which includes a description of Askeaton. On the Restoration of King Charles II, Axtell was tried for regicide and was condemned to death. He was hanged, drawn and quartered on 19 October, 1660. (Thompson, A., ODNB; Westropp, >Notes=, 171)

Berkeley, Sir Edward (c.1540-1589), Military Commander

CONTENTS

dward Berkeley, the eldest of three sons of Maurice Berkeley and Katherine Blount, was born in Bruton, Somerset. He took over command of Askeaton Castle after it was abandoned by Geraldine forces on 3 April, 1580. He was duly knighted and remained in command of the Castle until he surrendered command to his brother, Francis, before his death in 1589. By edict of Queen Elizabeth, the castle and seignory of Askeaton was bestowed on Sir Edward and his brother, Francis, after him. Seignories normally consisted of 12,000 acres, not including bog, mountain or heath. (Westropp, 1902, 125; Crofton 1911, 92-3)

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Berkeley, Sir Francis (1543-1615), Military Commander

influence on Askeaton continued for some 200 years after his death. (Westropp, 1902, 118-32; Crofton, 1911, 92-93).

rancis Berkeley, second son of Sir Maurice Berkeley and Katherine Blount, daughter of Lord Mountjoy, was born around 1543 in Bruton, Somerset. He was a brother of Sir Edward Berkeley, who died in 1589 (q.v). Francis took over command of Askeaton Castle and seignory after his brother=s death and defended it valiantly, especially against the attacks of the Sugn Earl, when the latter unsuccessfully besieged the Castle in 1599 for 246 days. Francis was knighted for his bravery by Lord Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex, on 2 June, 1599. Though the Castle and some forty acres were assigned to Sir Anthony St Leger on 17 October, 1599, this edict was revoked by King James I in 1610 and the Castle reverted to Sir Francis. The seignory or manor of Askeaton originally consisted of 7,000 acres, but this was increased to 12,000 acres by Queen Elizabeth, who is said to have been impressed by Francis= >comely face and florid oratory= (Crofton, 92). In 1580, Francis was Provost Marshall and Sheriff of Connaught and, in August, 1600, he checked O=Donnell temporarily, when the latter was on his way to Kinsale. Sir Francis followed O=Neill and O=Donnell to Kinsale and took part in the famous battle. In January, 1610, Sir Francis offered to build a wall around Askeaton. On 20 October, 1612, he also managed to have Askeaton incorporated as a Borough, with a right to send two members to Parliament. In addition to the Provost (Head of Borough), the town had twelve burgesses, including Sir Francis, himself. Sir Francis married Katherine Jane Loftus (daughter of Dr Adam Loftus Archbishop of Armagh and, later, Dublin, and Chancellor of Ireland). Sir Francis left two sons, Maurice and Henry, and four daughters. As we shall see, both sons died young and the extensive estate was divided between Elizabeth and Gertrude, two of the four sisters. Elizabeth married George Crofton of Ballymurray, Co. Sligo; Katherine married George Courtenay; Gertrude married John Taylor of Ballynort. Frances married, firstly, Thomas Blayney of Tregonan (Denbigh, Wales), and, secondly, James Purcell of Croagh. Sir Francis died at Askeaton Castle on 20 December, 1615. His

Berkeley, Maurice (1598-1622), Military Commander

aurice Berkeley, son of Sir Francis Berkeley, was born in Askeaton Castle about 1598. By Royal Letter of 25 April, 1611, he was granted the Constableship of Limerick for the duration of his life. This, however, proved shorter than anticipated, Maurice dying on 8 September, 1622, at the early age of 24. His younger brother, Henry, also died young at the age of 20, and, eventually, Sir Francis= two daughters, Gertrude (Taylor) and Elizabeth (Crofton), became his heirs (Westropp, 1902, 130-31).

Carew, Sir George (1555-1629), Military Commander

eorge Carew, son of Sir George Carew and Anne Harvey, was born on 29 May, 1555, and was educated at Broadgates Hall (later Pembroke College), Oxford. He began his military career in Ireland in 1574, serving under, among others, the great Sir Philip Sidney. He had a command as Master of Ordnance in Ireland during the years 1588-1592. After further service in Europe (Cadiz, 1596, Azores, 1597), he was appointed Lord President of Munster in 1600. He helped his deputy, Lord Mountjoy, defeat Hugh O=Neill, Earl of Tyrone, and was rewarded with honours and riches, including the titles, Baron of Clopton (1605) and Earl of Totnes (1626). He was also a scholar and collected material, later used by his secretary, Thomas Stafford, in compiling the important book, Paccata Hibernia or A Historie of the Late Warres in Ireland (1633). This volume contains one the earliest drawings/ maps of Askeaton. He married Joyce Clopton in 1580 and had one son, Peter, who died young. In the summer of 1600, Carew passed through Askeaton and brought much-needed men and supplies to Sir Francis Berkeley. Carew died in London on 27 March, 1629, and is buried in Stratford-on-Avon. (Connolly 1998, 70)

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Courtenay, George (d.1642), Military Commander

aptain George Oughtred Courtenay, fifth son of Sir William Countenay (1553-1630), of Powderham Castle, Devon, and his wife, Elizabeth Manners, married Katherine Berkeley, daughter of Sr Francis Berkeley, Askeaton. They had three sons, Sir William Oughtred Courtenay, who died about 1651; Sir Francis Courtenay (1617-59); Morrisse Courtenay (b.1618), who died young. Captain George Courtenay succeeded to the appointment of Constable of Limerick on the death of his brother-in-law, Maurice Berkeley, but this proved no sinecure. After their defeat at the battle of Liscarroll in 1641, a large body of Irish troops, under the command of Pierce Butler, Lord Muskerry and General Barry, attacked St John=s Castle, Limerick. Courtenay, though left with inadequate troops and armaments, resolved to defend the castle. During a prolonged siege, the Irish excavated a tunnel under the wall of the Castle and, on exploding a charge on 21 June, 1642, a large hole was made in the outer wall. Though Courtenay was forced to surrender, he managed to arrange the escape by boat of some four hundred English, mostly women and children. The defeat, however, hastened his death, for he was already suffering from a >lingering illness= and he died later in 1642. His Askeaton estate included the townlands, Aughinish and Fawnamore. George Countenay=s father, Sir William, was an >undertaker=, who received a seignory of 12,000 acres in Newcastle West. Descendants of his cousin, Sir William Courtenay, subsequently became Earls of Devon and increased their Newcastle West estate to 33,000 acres. (Crofton, 1911, 78, 93; Courtenay, 1993)

island of St Helena, during the period that the Emperor Napoleon was a prisoner there. Julius married Suzanne de Gorrequer, from a prominent French family in Morlay, Brittany, France, and had two sons, Julius, who became a solicitor in Rathkeale, and Gideon, who joined the British army and reached high rank. Julius also had three daughters, Margaret, Julia and Rebecca. Julius died on 7 August, 1849, aged 77 years and was interred in the Church of Ireland cemetery, Rathkeale. His wife, Suzanna died on 8 February, 1848 and was buried beside her husband. (BILG, 1899, 112; CoI Rathkeale, Inscriptions)

Fitzgerald, James (>Sugan Earl=), (d.1607), Military Commander

Delmege, Julius (1772-1849), Military Commander

ulius Delmege, eldest son of Johann Adam Dolmage and his wife, Elizabeth Powell, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1772. He joined the British army and saw service overseas for several years. He became Adjutant General to Sir Hudson Lowe, Governor of the

ames Fitzthomas Fitzgerald, son of Sir Thomas Ruadh Fitzgerald of Conna, and his wife, Ailish de Poer, was a nephew of the ill-fated 15th Earl. In 1598, he proclaimed himself Earl of Desmond. Since he was not recognised by the Irish Government as such, the Earldom having been declared extinct by the Irish Parliament in 1586, he was derisively termed the >Sugan Earl=. When Hugh O=Neill and his army invaded Munster, he >confirmed= James= position as rightful Earl of Desmond at a gathering at Inniscarra, Co. Cork, in February, 1600. James married (1585) Margaret Power, daughter of Baron John B. Power of Curraghmore and Eleanor Fitzgerald. He married, secondly, Ellen Butler, daughter of Pierce Butler and widow of Maurice Fitzgibbon, brother of Edmund, the White Knight, who later betrayed him. In June, 1600, he was captured by Dermot O=Connor, who had agreed a fee of ,1,000 with Lord Carew for delivering him. James was imprisoned at Castlelishen, Kanturk, Co. Cork, but was rescued by a rebel force on the night of 25/26 June, 1600, before Carew could reach the castle. James then went into hiding and escaped at least twice more from pursuers before being finally captured by a kinsman, Lord Edmund Fitzgibbon, the White Knight, who discovered him in a cave near Mitchelstown, Co. Cork. Fitzgibbon handed him over to Carew, who lodged him in Shandon castle, Cork, before

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sending him to London as a prisoner, in August, 1601. James was placed in the Tower of London and he survived for six years, dying there in 1607. He was buried in St Peter=s Chapel in the Tower on 28 April, 1607. It was the army of this >Sugan Earl= which besieged Askeaton castle for 246 days during the Desmond Rebellion. The defending force was commanded by Francis Berkeley (qv), who was knighted on the spot for his bravery by Lord Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex (qv), when he eventually arrived in Askeaton to raise the siege on 2 June, 1599. (McCormack, ODNB)

formed in 1824, spent much of its time abroad and was engaged in the China Opium War and the Second Anglo-Sikh War. In 1873, it moved to the British West Indies and Lloyd became commander. Afterwards, the regiment moved to Malta. Lloyd had a distinguished military career, ending with the rank of Major-General. He married 26 May, 1870, Mary Allheusen of Stoke Court, Buckinghamshire, UK, and they had one child, Thomas Eyre Lloyd, born 2 May, 1871, who also entered the British army and was killed in action 1901, during the Boer War. The General died on 10 November, 1921, aged 84 years. (BLGI, 1899, 164-165)

Kiggell, Sir Launcelot (1862-1954), Military Commander

McSheehy, Rory (c1600), Military Commander

auncelot Edward Kiggell, son of Launcelot John Kiggell and his wife, Meliora Brown, was born in Wilton House, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 2 October, 1862. He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and commissioned in the Royal Warwickshire regiment in May, 1882. He did advanced military studies at the Staff College, Camberley, and, in 1895, returned to Sandhurst as an instructor. He served in the South African Wars under Sir Redvers Buller. When Sir Douglas Haig became commander of British forces in World War I, he appointed Kiggell as his deputy. Military historians, however, have felt that some of Kiggell=s strategies were ill-advised and he was relieved of his command before the end of the war in 1918. After the war, he began work on the official history of the war, but had to abandon his work in 1923 because of ill-health. In 1888, he married Eleanor Spencer Field and they had three sons. He died at his home in Felixstowe on 23 February, 1954. (Cave, NTA, ODNB)>

Lloyd, Thomas (1839-1921), Military Commander

ory McSheehy was a member of the Scottish MacSheehy clan, which was introduced into the Rathkeale area by James, 7th Earl of Desmond, around 1420. Members of the clan were Gallowglasses (mercenary soldiers) by profession and their principal duty was to protect the Earl of Desmond and safeguard his territory. They built a castle at Liosnacoille, about two miles from Rathkeale. Later, they assumed control of Ballyalinan Castle, Rathkeale, originally built by the O=Hallinan family. When Hugh O=Neill invaded Munster in February, 1600, he >confirmed= James, >Sugan Earl= as rightful Earl of Desmond. In June, 1600, however, Dermot O=Connor, acting for the British, captured the >Sugan Earl=, together with two sons of Rory MacSheehy, and took possession of Ballyalinan Castle. MacSheehy=s allies, however, recaptured the castle and the >Sugan Earl= went into hiding. He was subsequently betrayed and sent to England, where he was imprisoned in the Tower of London, dying there in 1607. The MacSheehys were intensely loyal to the House of Desmond and paid a high price for this loyalty, losing most of their lands and castles. (MacLysaght, 1991, 148-149)

homas Francis Lloyd, son of Thomas Lloyd and his wife, Catherine Palmer, was born in Beechmount House, Rathkeale, on 21 April, 1839. He entered the British army, obtaining a commission with the 98th (Prince of Wales) Regiment of Foot. This regiment,

Malby, Sir Nicholas (1530-1584), Military Commander

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icholas Malby, soldier and administrator, was born in the North Riding of Yorkshire

around 1530. His father died when he was about four years old and he was reared by his uncle, John Malby, a merchant and lawyer in London. Nicholas married Thomasine Lamb from Leeds and they had one son, Henry, who attended Oxford University, and one daughter, Ursula, who subsequently married Anthony Brabazon, Lieutenant-governor of Connaught. Nicholas learned his soldiering by serving with Lord Ambrose Dudley, Earl of Warwick, in Spain. In 1567, he came to Ireland as officer in the English army and he was stationed in Ulster for some years, where he proved to be a capable commander. In 1576, he was appointed chief commissioner and army commander of Connaught. Again, he proved to be a very capable administrator and he obtained grants of large tracts of land in that province, including monastic lands and castles in Roscommon and Athlone. On 7 October, 1576, he was knighted by the Lord Deputy, Sir Henry Sidney, and, in May, 1579, he was made President of Connaught. The same year, he had Connaught so well under control that he offered to come to Munster with 600 soldiers to help Sir William Drury fight the Earl of Desmond=s forces during the Desmond Rebellion. This was the time he captured Rathkeale and killed three of the Franciscan Friars in Askeaton and desecrated the tombs of the forbears of the Earl of Desmond. Sir Nicholas died suddenly in Athlone on 4 March, 1584. His wife, Thomasine, survived him and remarried. His son, Henry, died in 1602 and this was the end of the direct involvement of the Malby family in Ireland. The English settlers, however, which Sir Nicholas so strategically and adroitly introduced into Connaught, prospered, and some of their descendants are still there today. (Cunningham, ODNB)

voracious reader and, in his later years, displayed vast erudition in his copious writings. Before coming to Ireland, he saw military action on the continent, but it was in suppressing the Desmond Rebellion that he made his name as a military commander. He was present at the siege at Smerwick harbour and captured Rathkeale and Askeaton. He received the freedom of Rathkeale in 1580 and, the same year, held a meeting with the poet, Edmund Spencer, at Castle Matrix, Rathkeale. He repaired both Rathkeale Castle and Castle Matrix and is said to have given a present of some potato tubers to Edmund Southwell, who subsequently distributed them around Munster. Raleigh became the biggest landowner in Munster when he received 42,000 acres of land in East Cork and Waterford. Subsequently, he sold this estate to Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, for ,1,500. He received other estates in England, but, after the death of Queen Elizabeth, he lost favour and was imprisoned in the Tower of London for 13 years, during which time he wrote some poems and several treatises, including The History of the World (London: 1614). He was executed for treason (against King James I) in the palace of Westminster on 29 October, 1618. He is credited with introducing tobacco to England and Ireland. (Mark Nicholls and Penry William in ODNB)

St Leger, Sir Anthony (d.1613), Military Commander

Raleigh, Sir Walter (1552-1618), Military Commander

alter Raleigh, youngest son of Walter Raleigh and Catherine Champernowne, was born in Hayes, Devon, about 1552. He was registered as a student at Oriel College, Oxford, and at Middle Temple. Though his education seems to have been intermittent, he was a

nthony St Leger, son of Sir Anthony St Leger and Anne Warham, was a younger brother of Sir Warham St Leger (1525-1597). His father, Sir Anthony, had been Lord Deputy of Ireland five times. The latter=s son, the present Sir Anthony, was one of the less prominent members of this distinguished family. His significance in the history of Askeaton is that he received a grant of Askeaton Castle and 40 acres of land from

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Queen Elizabeth II on 17 October, 1599. This grant was embarrassing for Sir Edward Berkeley, who had received the seignory of Askeaton (with 7,000 acres of land) on 18 Dec 1589. Fortunately for Sir Edward=s heir, his brother, Sir Francis Berkeley, the St Leger grant was revoked in 1610 and the castle reverted to the Berkeleys. Sir Anthony St Leger died in 1613. (Bryson, ODNB).

Waller, Sir Hardress (c.1604-66), Military Commander

ardress Waller, son of George Waller of Groombridge, Kent, and Mary, daughter of Richard Hardress, was born in Kent about 1604. Descended from a 15th century soldier and administrator, he was also a first cousin of the Parliamentary General, Sir William Waller. Hardress was knighted in 1629 and the same year married Elizabeth Dowdall, daughter of Sir John Dowdall, Kilfinny, Co. Limerick, who had acquired a large estate along the river Shannon, centred in Castletown. They had two sons, John and James, and four daughters, Elizabeth (married, firstly, Sir Maurice Fenton and, secondly, Sir William Petty, and became mother of the 1st Earl of Shelburne); Bridget (married Henry Cadogan, whose son was 1 st Earl of Cadogan); Mary (married Sir John Brookes, Bart.); Anne (married Sir Henry Ingoldsby, Bart.). Sir Hardress was a close friend of Sir William St Leger, Lord Deputy, and he sat in the Irish Parliament representing Askeaton in the parliaments of 1634 and 1640. With the outbreak of the rebellion of 1641, St Leger (qv) appointed Waller Governor of Askeaton and, in 1642, he became Lieutenant Colonel of St Leger=s regiment of Foot. During this period, Sir Hardress was back and forth to England and he was one of the judges that condemned King Charles I to death in 1649. He was appointed a Colonel in Cromwell=s New Model Army and he played an active part in Cromwell=s

campaign in the Limerick area. On the Restoration of King Charles II, Sir Hardress initially fled to France, then returned to England and was one of only two to plead guilty to the charge of regicide. Condemned to death, the sentence was commuted to exile and he spent the remainder of his life imprisoned in Mount Orgueil Castle, Jersey, where he died in 1666. Though his family and friends deserted him after his conviction for regicide, he had already arranged marriages with influential people for his children. These liaisons ensured not only that the Wallers retained their property up to the twentieth century (they still had 6,636 acres in 1876), but that Sir Hardress= descendants are to be found among the English, as well as the Irish artistocracy. (BIFR 1976, 1176-77; Little, ODNB; Cd. 1492)

CONTENTS

CENTENARIANS
Bowen, Margaret (1833-1938), Centenarian

argaret Bowen was the mother-in-law of Gerald Moran, long-time Principal in Askeaton National School. Gerald was married to Julia Bowen, daughter of Margaret. In her later years, Margaret came to live with her daughter and son-in-law. Margaret=s husband, James Bowen, was a shopkeeper in High Street, Askeaton. Margaret died in Askeaton on 10 May, 1938. Her death certificate lists her as being 105 years at the time of death. She is buried in the Moran burial plot, in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton, where her

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year of death seems to be incorrectly listed as 1937, rather than 1938. (Sheehy, K, 2007)

Murphy, Elizabeth (1871-1971), Centenarian

Boyle, Mary (d.c.1901), Centenarian

ary Boyle was the mother of Bridget Moran, wife of Terence Moran, Aghalacka, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. In her later years, Mary lived with her daughter, Bridget, in Askeaton. She was in the Moran household, Aghalacka, Askeaton, on the night of 31 March, 1901, when she listed her age as 100 in the 1901 Irish Census. (NAI, Census 1901)

Hunt, Catherine (1701-1805), Centenarian

lizabeth Murphy, daughter of Joseph Murphy and Helen Clancy, was born in Main Street Askeaton, and baptised in St Mary=s Catholic Church on 4 June, 1871. She attended Askeaton National School and operated a drapery shop on the site of the present Post Office. She was a sister of William Murphy, Principal of Cappagh National School, and a relative of Dr William Murphy, Askeaton, who practised medicine and died in Kenfig Hill, Glamorgan, South Wales. Elizabeth lived to be 100 years and seven months, dying on 26 December, 1971. She is buried in the family grave in the Abbey, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. (Sheehy, C., 2007).

atherine Hewson, daughter of George Hewson (1662-1735) of Castlehewson and his wife, Katherine Peacocke, was born in Castlehewson around 1704. She married Robert Hunt of Incherourke, who predeceased her. She had a remarkably long life and died in the home of her grandson, Edmund Hunt, Incherourke, in February, 1805. A newspaper report of her death records that she lived to see her great great grandchildren and, almost to the end, was in full possession of her senses. (Hewetson, 1911, 4; LGA, 21, Feb., 1805)

O=Loughlin, Barbara (1797-1901), Centenarian

Kenneally, Nora (1911-2012), Centenarian

arbara O=Loughlin, who came from a prominent family, resident in both Askeaton and Rathkeale, lived with her grand niece, Mrs John Fitzgibbon, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. Several of her relatives (qv) were surgeons and apothecaries. Barbara lived to be over 103 years, being born in 1797 and dying in 1901. She is listed in the Irish 1901 census. On the night of 31 March, 1901, she was a guest at the home of John Fitzgibbon, East Square, Askeaton. She is listed as a spinster. (NAI, 1901 Census).

ora Carmody, daughter of Michael and Helen Carmody, was born on 7 January, 1911. She was brought up at Direen, Kilcornan, Co. Limerick. She married Jackie Kenneally (qv) and they had a family of four boys (Michael, Con, John and Pat) and one girl, Eileen. All her married life was lived in Askeaton. She was the recipient of a congratulatory letter and cheque from President Mary McAleese on the occasion of her 100 th birthday. She died on 4 May, 2012, and was buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. Nora=s sister was also a centenarian. (Lk Leader)

CONTENTS

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PHYSICIANS
Bourchier-Hayes, Charles (1871-1897), Physician

Anna, Geraldine and Ethel). John died on 28 September, 1940, and was buried in the cemetery, attached to the Catholic church, Rathkeale. He wife, Alice, died on 30 March, 1930, and was buried beside her husband. (Carnduff, 2011; BH FT)

harles Bourchier-Hayes, son of Dr Thomas Hayes and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Bourchier, was born in Rathkeale in 1871. He was educated at Blackrock College, before entering the Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, where he qualified as a medical practitioner. Soon after qualification, he fell into bad health and died in 1897, aged only 26 years. (Carnduff, BH FT)

Bourchier-Hayes, Stephen (1865-1907), Physician

Bourchier-Hayes, Henry (1866-1950), Physician

tephen Edward Bourchier-Hayes, son of Dr Thomas Hayes and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Bourchier, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 14 June, 1865. He qualified as a physician and established a medical practice at Scart House, Mullinavat, Co. Kilkenny. On 27 April, 1897, he married Mary Cahill. He died on 7 April, 1907. (Carnduff, 2011, BH FT)

enry Bourchier-Hayes, son of Dr Thomas Hayes of Rathkeale, and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Bourchier, was born in Shanagolden, Co. Limerick, on 11 August, 1866. Henry, and the rest of the family, transferred to Rathkeale, when their father was appointed Medical Officer of the Workhouse there. Henry was educated at Rockwell College and Blackrock College, before entering the Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, where he qualified as a medical practitioner (LRCSI; LM; LRCPI). On 27 April, 1897, he married Mary Cahill, daughter of Michael Cahill of Charleville, Co. Cork, and they had a family of two boys and six girls. Henry was medical officer to the Post Office. He died on 17 September, 1950. (Carnduff, BH FT)

Delmege, Alfred (1846-1923), Physician

Bourchier-Hayes, John (1864-1940), Physician

ohn Thomas Bourchier-Hayes, son of Thomas Hayes, physician, and his wife, Elizabeth Bourchier, was born in Rathkeale on 10 May, 1864. He qualified as a physician and joined his father=s medical practice in Rathkeale, eventually establishing his surgery at Bridge House, Rathkeale. He married Alice Bouchier (1867-1930) in 1891 and they had a family of one boy, Aubrey, and four girls (Eva,

lfred Gideon Delmege, son of Julius and Belinda Leake, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1846. A member of the Rathkeale Palatine community, the family name in the Rhine Palatinate had been Dolmetsch, but, in Ireland, had gone through various adaptations, such as Dolmage, until it finally became Delmege. Alfred was educated at Queen=s College, Cork, where he studied medicine, graduating with an MD degree in 1868. The same year he obtained the licentiate (LRCSI) from the Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland. He then entered the Royal Navy, where he had a distinguished career, ending with the post of fleet surgeon. He served in the Ashanti War in Africa (1873-1874) and was medical officer on board the HMS Bacchante during its voyage around the world, with the Princes, Albert Victor and George, aboard. Following his retirement from the navy in 1899, he became physician to the Prince of Wales, for which he received the MVO award (Member of the Royal Victorian Order). He was also physician to His Majesty, King Edward VII. Alfred married Mary Elizabeth Lawson, and they had two sons. He died at his home in Blackheath, London, on 2 February, 1923, aged

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76 years. He was buried in London. (The British Medical Journal, 17.3.1923, p.488)

Delmege, Christopher John (d.1861), Physician

hristopher John Delmege, son of Tobias Dolmege and his wife, Arabella Collis, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. He studied medicine and joined the British army, where he rose to high rank in the 27th Regiment. He was involved in the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny and the Kaffir War. He retired with the rank of Surgeon Major. In 1817, he changed his surname from Dolmage to Delmege. He married Susan Maria Chiapinni and they had a family of two boys (Edward and Anthony) and four girls (Antoinette, Clarissa, Frances and Caroline). Christopher died in 1861. (BLGI, 18999, 112; Www.thepeerage.com, 380957)

some of his pupils, including Michael Ftizgibbon, travelling to school every morning by train to Ballingrane. Michael also spent some time at the Normile Academy, Newcastle West, from where he matriculated to the Royal College of Surgeons, where he studied medicine. When he qualified as a medical doctor, he sailed with the White Star Line as a ship=s doctor, before taking up the post of dispensary doctor in Askeaton in 1918. The previous dispensary doctor, Patrick O=Brien (qv), had died unexpectedly in 1916. Michael practised in Askeaton until his retirement in 1956, when he was succeeded by his son, Dr Noel Fitzgibbon. Michael married Mary Lavelle (qv) on 3 October, 1929, and they had a family of three sons and five daughters. He died 13 June, 1969, and is buried in Kilcornan cemetery. (Fitzgibbon, N., 2007)

Griffin, Robert G (c.1880-), Physician

Ferguson, James (1803-1834), Physician

ames Ferguson, son of David Ferguson and his wife, Mary O=Connor, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1803. He studied medicine and then joined the British army, obtaining a commission as assistant surgeon with the 5th Regiment of Foot. He married Marian Johnston in the West Indies in 1828 and they had three sons (James, Johnston and Hector). James died at the early age of 31 years, on 21 October, 1834. He was a brother of David (qv), John (qv), Charles (qv) and Robert (qv) Ferguson. (Leahy, D et al., 2012)

obert George Griffin, son of Peter G Griffin (qv) and his wife, Maria Hunt, was born in Altavilla, Askeaton, about 1880. He studied medicine and qualified as a doctor at the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin (LRCSI and LRCPI). He took a medical appointment with the British Government in India and became medical officer at Dooma, Assam, India. He married Annie Ruth Browning, daughter of Jeffrey Browning and his wife, Elizabeth MI Power, on 29 November, 1911, and they had one daughter. He was a brother of Peter G Griffin, who died in 1921 (qv). (M Griffin, 2011)

Fitzgibbon, Michael (1891-1969), Physician

Hayes, Thomas (1832-1913), Physician

ichael Fitzgibbon, second son of John Fitzgibbon and Elizabeth O=Loughlin-Casey, was born in Askeaton and baptised at St Mary=s Church on 8 February, 1891. He attended Askeaton National School initially, and, subsequently, Cappagh National School, where Mr William Murphy was Principal. Murphy, from Askeaton, had a great reputation as a teacher,

homas Hayes was born in Fairy House, Athea, Co. Limerick, on 6 August, 1832. One of eight children, he was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied medicine. He then went to the United Kingdom, where, in 1856, he obtained the advanced degree of Doctor of Medicine (MD) from the University of Edinburgh and was awarded membership of the Royal College of Surgeons, England (MRCSE). He worked

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initially in Shanagolden, before his appointment as medical officer to the Workhouse, Rathkeale, and dispensary doctor in the town of Rathkeale. He married Elizabeth Bourchier, daughter of Mr Henry Bourchier of Fort Henry, Rathkeale, and they had issue, including six sons, Henry (qv), Michael, John (qv), Stephen (qv), Thomas (qv) and Charles Bouchier-Hayes (qv), and two daughters, Alice (qv) and Mary. Dr Hayes was a man of wide cultural interests and was a fluent Irish speaker. He was President of the Munster branch of the British Medical Association. He was also a Justice of the Peace. He died on 3 April, 1913, aged 80 years. He was interred in the new cemetery, Church Street, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick. (BMJ, 26.4.1913, 916)

Murphy, William (c.1896-1942), Physician

medical officer in Askeaton. He was married three times. With his first wife, Mary Margaret Magner, from Tally-ho, Rathkeale, he had three sons, two of whom died young, one from German measles. His son, John, then aged three, is listed in the Infant class, Askeaton National School, in 1896. John later lived in Croom. His second wife was Catherine Curtin, with whom there was no isssue. With his third wife, Elizabeth Magner, from Grange, Newcastle West, he had one daughter, Olive M O=Brien, who later married Thomas Fitzgibbon. His three wives were cousins. Dr O=Brien died unexpectedly on 29 March, 1916, from pneumonia, brought on by a severe wetting, received while answering a sick call. He is buried in Kilbradran cemetery. He was a brother of Dr Cornelius O=Brien LRCSI LKQCPI, dispensary doctor in Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick, in the second half of the nineteenth century. (Meade, M., 2007).

illiam Murphy, born about 1896, was reared with his grandparents, Joseph and Helen Murphy, at Main Street, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. He attended Cappagh National school, where his uncle, William, was, initially, teacher, and, subsequently, principal. Young William was a bright and diligent student and matriculated to University College, Dublin, where he studied medicine, graduating in 1920 with the degrees MB, BCh, BAO. He obtained an appointment as assistant medical officer at Kenfig Hill, Bridgend, Glamorgan, South Wales, where he worked with great success for several years. His health, however, declined and he died on 8 April, 1942, at the early age of 46 years He was interred in the family grave in the Franciscan Abbey, Askeaton, Co. Limerick (NAI, Census, 1901, 1911; Fitzpatrick, 1942, 535-538)

O=Hanlon, Philip (c1800- ), Physician

hilip O=Hanlon is listed in Piggott=s Directory (1824) as a surgeon and apothecary, with a surgery in Thomas Street, Rathkeale. He married Mary Ferguson, daughter of David Ferguson and his wife, Mary O=Connor, in November, 1824. (Piggott, 1824)

O=Loughlin, Terence (1807-1877), Physician

O=Brien, Patrick (1860-1916), Physician

atrick C. O=Brien was born in Knockpatrick, Foynes, Co. Limerick, about 1860. He received his early education locally, after which he matriculated at Queen=s University, Dublin (now UCD), where he studied medicine. On completion of his course as a >surgeon= (M.D., MCh), he was appointed

erence O=Loughlin, son of Patrick O=Loughlin, apothecary, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1807. He qualified as a surgeon and practiced in Rathkeale in the middle and later part of the nineteenth century. He is listed in Slater=s Directory (1846). He died in 1877 and was buried in the cemetery attached to the Church of Ireland, Rathkeale. (Slaters Directory, 1846)

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Patterson, Charles (1795-1869), Physician

MAGISTRATES
Davenport, Thomas E (c.1801-1856), Magistrate

harles Patterson MD, son of Thomas Patterson, was born about 1795 and became a practicing physician in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, during the middle of the nineteenth century. In addition to a private practice, he also held a post as medical officer to the Rathkeale Workhouse hospital. He was a dedicated researcher and published numerous medical papers in medical journals, most of them based on his own clinical experience. His papers included, >On the Effects of Mamary Irritation in Amenorrhoea= (Baltimore Medical and Surgical Journal and Review, Vol. 2, pp. 250 et seq.); >Asphixia of New-born Children= (The Dublin Journal of Medical and Chemical Science, Vol. 3, pp. 188 et seq.). Earlier, in 1848, he published a book, entitled, Practical Observations on a Successful Method of Treating Cholera (Dublin: The Medical Press, 1848). Dr Patterson was approved as a dispensary medical practitioner by the Medical Council for Ireland on 31 January, 1859, in accordance with new revised legislation for the registration of medical practitioners. He married Dorothea Copley on 14 March, 1850. He died in 1869, aged 74 years. (Slater=s Directory 1846; British Medical Journal, 26/43/1859, p.252)

CONTENTS

olonel Thomas Evans Davenport was born in Ballinacourty House, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, around 1801. He was the son of Thomas Davenport (will 1784) and Martha Evans, daughter of Tyrell Evans, a middle man for part of the Bury estate in County Limerick. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA, 1825). Thomas Evans Davenport inherited part of the Evans estate and is listed as tithe proctor in Iverus in 1828 and 1829. He is also listed as owner of several properties in Askeaton and Ballysteen, in addition to his estate in Ballinacourty, in Griffith=s Valuation of 1850. It would appear that he became a middleman for properties, owned by the Earl of Charleville, in the Askeaton area. He was also land agent for the Earl of Clare and other landowners. He is also mentioned by Dr John O=Donovan in his Ordinance Survey Letters of 1840. Davenport was a founder member of the Limerick Athanaeum in 1850 and he subscribed to the fund to publish Lewis= Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1835). In addition to being a Magistrate and Justice of the Peace, Thomas Evans Davenport also had the military rank of Colonel and it was he who gave the order to the military to open fire at the fair of Askeaton in 1833, when other attempts to stop the combatants at a faction fight failed. There is a letter in the National Archives from Henry Watson, High Sheriff, Limerick City, written at the start of the Great Potato Famine, dated 6 December, 1845, stating that Mr Davenport of Ballinacourty had travelled County Limerick and had confirmed that there would be sufficient potatoes for both food and seed for the year 1846. How wrong he was! Thomas Davenport married Jane Nihill in 1920 and had issue, including a son, Dickson, who succeeded him, and a daughter, Prudence, who married Dudley OGrady. (Burtchaell and Sadlier, 1924, 212; NAI: RLFC2/Z17220; LC, 18.x.1856).

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Going, Major Richard (c.1769-1821), Police Magistrate

ichard Going, second son of Richard Going, Bird Hill, Co. Tipperary, J.P., and Anne, daughter of Henry White, New Ross, was born in Bird Hill around 1769. He entered Trinity College, Dublin, on 13 July, 1784, and graduated with a BA in 1789 and an MA in 1792. He was obviously a bright and diligent student because he was also called to the Irish Bar the same year. Taking up a career as a Police Magistrate, he worked first in Tipperary, before taking up duties in County Limerick. He married and had children. He was the officer in charge of the police during the tithe >affray= at Incherourke, Askeaton, on 15 August, 1821. Acting on >information received= he sent a detachment of seventeen specially-picked armed constables, led by Captain Thomas Doolan, to intercept a >Rockite= raid on the house of the Tithe Proctor, John Ivess (qv), in Incherourke. According to reports, there were up to 200 men, some on horseback, many dressed in white, and all armed with either make-shift weapons or firearms. When the police arrived at the scene, the leaders, who had the tithe proctor on his knees on the road, gave the order to attack. The police responded with a volley that had fatal consequences. Three rebels were mortally wounded, two of these being later picked up by police. Three others were captured. Some fifteen wounded horses were brought to the Rathkeale barracks next day and the two >dead= (some say still alive) men were buried in >Croppy= graves near the bridge in Rathkeale. The captured prisoners were made to dig the graves of the two to be buried and to throw quicklime on their bodies. People were outraged at the story (officially declared to be untrue) that Going caused wounded men to be buried alive and a conspiracy was hatched to murder him. This came to pass on 14 October, 1821, when a group of assassins opened fire on him as he rode along the Curraheen Road from Cappagh village. Two men (one was James Bridgeman) were later arrested, convicted at the March Assizes in Limerick, 1822, and hanged for the murder. It may be of interest to note that Major Going=s brother, Rev John Going, Church of

Ireland Rector at Mealiffe, Co. Tipperary, was also murdered eight years later, in 1829. [BLGI, 1899, 172; Connaught Jrnl, 19.1.1824; LC, 18.8.1821; HCPP 1825 (20)].

Hare, Thomas (d.1822), Magistrate

ajor Thomas Hare, Mount Henry, Rathkeale, son of Mathew Hare and his wife, Sarah McDonough, was shot by members of the Rockite Agrarian movement, during an attack on his residence at Mount Henry, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, at about midnight on 31 January, 1822. The raiders were seeking arms and escaped with three guns. Subsequently, three men, Patrick Minnane, James Minnane and John Greene, were tried for this murder, convicted and executed in Limerick jail in 1824. Mr John Copley, from Askeaton, whose house was raided the same night, was a witness at the trial. This raid and related events were subsequently investigated by a Government commission of inquiry. Major Hare was married twice, first to Sarah Louisa Byles, with whom he had three surviving children (Thomas, Louisa and Robert). His second wife, another Sarah, whom he married in Rathkeale, died in Limerick in 1882. He was interred in the Church of Ireland cemetery, Rathkeale, on 5 February, 1822. He had been in the Government service for 25 years. (HCPP 1822 (423), 14; Rathkeale CoI Inscriptions)

Hewson, William (1781-1858), Magistrate

illiam Hewson, second son of John Hewson and Mary Lysaght, was born in Castlehewson, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, in 1781. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1804) and qualified as a Barrister in 1805. He married Elizabeth Anne, eldest daughter of John Brownrigg, Justice of the Peace, of Edenderry, Co. Offaly. They had one son, William H Hewson (d.1881) and two daughters. William was middleman for Sir Matthew Blakiston, owner of the seigneury of Askeaton and is listed as >lessor= for part of the town of Askeaton and several townlands in the

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parish in Griffith=s Valuation of 1850. William died in March, 1858, aged 77 years. (BIFR, 586; LC, 20.3.1858).

Leake, George (c1822), Magistrate

ellow George Leake was of Palatine stock. A son of George Leake (d.1804) and his wife (d.1820), he was born in Rathkeale Abbey, Co. Limerick, in the late eighteenth century. In his youth, he was a member of the Rathkeale Volunteers, a Yeoman regiment, of which one of his relatives was commander, with the rank of colonel. George, though regarded by some contemporaries as >a grand fellow, very clever and witty, who wrote a lot of hunting songs and sang them well=, became notorious for the burial of Rockites or >Whiteboys=, involved in the Tithe >Affray= in Askeaton on 15 August, 1821. It was alleged, though officially denied, that some of his victims were still alive when buried in quicklime. This story caused public outrage and anger was directed at Major George Going, police magistrate in the area, who was Leake=s superior officer. In retaliation, Going was murdered soon afterwards at Cappagh, on 14 October, 1821. Leake was also known as George >Salt= Leake, because he is alleged to have ordered that the prisoners be well salted with quicklime, before being cast into their burial hole. George=s wife is said to have been a Catholic and there is no evidence that he objected to her practising her religion. (Castellan, OLJ, 2009, 50-53; Feheney, 2007, 66, refers to this gentleman as George Lake, an error, attributable to the fact that the surname >Leake= was not only locally pronounced >Lake= but also sometimes written in this way.)

Ireland (1842-90). The family was in this area for hundreds of years, David Fitz James Ruadh Nash, then owner of Ballycullen Castle, being killed in 1581 during the Desmond Rebellion. A descendant turned sides, however, and, while remaining a Catholic, fought with Lord Broghill during the Cromwellian campaign. One of James= sons, Patrick Sarsfield Naish, immigrated to the USA, married Catherine Moran from Ardineer, Foynes, and was the father of the film star, James Carroll Naish (1897-1973). Carroll Naish=s sister, Carolin Mary (qv), became a Sister of Mercy in Athlone. In 1690, a Patrick Naish from Ballycullen settled in Co. Cork and gave rise to the Finnstown and Rockfield branches of the family. James died in 1874 and was buried in the family vault, in the Abbey, Askeaton. He was a half-brother of Rt Hon John Nasih (qv). (BIFR 1976; Connact Jrnl, 19.1.1824)

Vokes, Thomas (c.1780-1852), Police Magistrate

Naish, James Carroll (1825-1874), Magistrate

ames Carroll Naish, son of Carroll Patrick Naish and Mary Sampson (eldest daughter of Denis Sampson, Dublin), was born in Ballycullen House, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 15 June, 1825. He is listed as owning 573 acres of land in 1870. He was an older brother of the Rt Hon. John Naish (qv), Lord Chancellor of

homas Phillips Vokes, nephew of Sir Richard Vokes, was born about 1780. Following the Rockite agrarian violence in the early 1820s, he was apppointed Chief Constable and Chief Police Magistrate in Munster. He had a position roughly equivalent to that of a stipendiary magistrate. According to his son-in-law, Henry Addison, he enjoyed great success in this post and was rewarded with an unusually large salary (,1,200 p.a.) and a large pension (,950 p.a). His arrest of Captain Rocke (Sean Fitzmaurice) in 1822 and the killers of the Coleen Bawn (Scanlan and Sullivan) in 1820 was >the stuff of legends=. He seems to have been married three times: a) to Susan Brew in 1806 b) to Mrs Burton, a widow and c) to Anne Walsh of Co. Kilkenny. His son-in-law, Addison, wrote a book based on Vokes= life, thereby greatly adding to his reputation as a guardian of the safety of honest people in West Limerick. It was Vokes, who gave the order to the dragoons to fire on combatants at a faction fight in Askeaton on 27 September, 1833. (Feheney, 2010, 186).

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Willcocks, Richard (c.1824), Police Magistrate

ajor Richard Willcocks was appointed Inspector of Constabulary and Chief Magistrate for county Limerick following the assassination of Major Richard Going in October, 1821. He gave evidence to the Lord=s Commission into the State of Ireland in 1824 and dealt with events connected with and consequent to the Tithe >Affray= in Askeaton on 15 August, 1821. Previous to his appointment as Chief Magistrate in county Limerick, Willcocks had served in Waterford and Tipperary. His appointment to Limerick was under the terms of the Constabulary Act, which came into force in 1821. In his evidence in 1824, Willcocks stated that one of two medical officers in Rathkeale, who examined the bodies of the two men, subsequently buried in the >Croppy= hole in Rathkeale on 22 August, 1821, confirmed that both men were dead before being interred. He failed, however, to state the opinion of the other doctor, Patrick O=Loughlin, from Askeaton (qv), who is believed to have confirmed that at least one of the prisoners was alive. [HCPP 1825 (20)].

LIMERICK COUNTY COUNCILLORS


Bridgeman, Joseph (1889-), Limerick County Council

oseph Bridgeman, son of Edward Bridgeman and Elizabeth Hewson, was born in Toomdeely, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised in St Mary=s church, Askeaton, on 15 February, 1889. He attended Askeaton National School, after which he worked on the family farm. He had several brothers and sisters, though there are now no direct descendants of theirs in the area. He was a member of the Limerick County Council for the Rathkeale constituency during the period 1934-1942. He died in the late 1950s and is buried in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton. (Ferriter, 1998, 220)

Feheney, Michael (1860-1939), Limerick County Council

CONTENTS

ichael Feheney, eldest son of John Feheney (1830-1878) and Mary Cahill (1840-1881), was born in Aghalacka, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised on 7 November, 1860. He stood as a candidate for Askeaton in the first Limerick County Council elections in 1899, but, because of a split in the Nationalist vote, was defeated by Lord Mounteagle, Unionist candidate. In the 1902 election, however, he won the Askeaton seat and held it until his retirement from the Council in 1911. He was a member of the anti-Parnellite faction of the Irish Party, led, at the time, by Justin McCarthy, and assisted by John Dillon and William O=Brien. He married Catherine O=Sullivan and had two sons, John and William, and one daughter, Mary. He died 13 October, 1939, and is buried in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton (Ferriter, 1998, 206-211).

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Fitzgibbon, John (c.1920), Limerick County Council

Sheehy, Patrick (1912-1999), Limerick County Council

ohn Fitzgibbon was chairman of the Rathkeale Board of Guardians in 1910. In June 1906, he became chairman of the Rathkeale Council and, as such, automatically a member of the Limerick County Council. He continued as chairman of the Rathkeale Council until 1920. (Feritear, 1995, LCC)

Fitzsimons, Patrick (1854-1938), Limerick County Council

atrick Fitzsimons, son of Patrick Fitzsimons and Ellen Stack, was born in Morgans, Askeaton, in 1854. He represented Askeaton as a member of the Limerick County Council (LCC) from 1911 to 1920 and from 1925 to 1928. He married Bridget Mangan, from Ardineer, Foynes. They had three sons (Patrick, Daniel and Thomas) and two daughters (Celia and Violet). His son, Patrick (qv), was also a member of the Limerick County Council (1942-50). Patrick Senior died on 2 July, 1938, and is buried in Mount Pleasant cemetery, Askeaton. (Ferriter, 1998, 213-15)

addy Sheehy, eldest son of Edmund Sheehy and his wife, Mary Kenrick, was born in Ballinvoher, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 26 June, 1912, and baptised at St Patrick=s Church, Ballysteen. As a young man, he purchased his own truck and laid the foundations of a haulage business. He married Nellie Staffe from Pallaskenry and they had a family of five boys and six girls. He lived for some years in Ballinacourty, before moving to a historic Georgian house in Clonlara (Doonass House, built by Sir Hugh D Massey in 1780). Later he moved to a similar estate nearby (Belle Isle House), before settling in a farm in Clouncagh, where he turned his hand to dairy farming. As usual, he made a success of this project. Then he turned to local politics, winning a seat, as a Fianna Fail candidate, on the Limerick County Council in 1967 and retaining it until he retired in 1991. He died on 29 November, 1999, and is buried in Clouncagh cemetery, Co. Limerick. (Sheehy, C., 2007).

Naughton, Michael (1842-1910), Limerick County Council

ichael Naughton, fourth son of Thomas Naughton and Bridget Murphy, was born in Ballycanana and baptised in St Patrick=s church, Ballysteen, Co. Limerick, on 19 September, 1842. He was a member of the Rathkeale Board of Guardians before being elected to the first Limerick County Council for the Rathkeale constituency in 1899. He retained his seat until his sudden death on 19 March, 1910. He is buried in the family grave in Kildimo, Co. Limerick. He was an uncle of Thomas B Naughton (qv). (Feheney, 2006, 23-25)

CONTENTS

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VETERINARIANS
Bourchier-Hayes, Thomas (1870-1947), Veterinary Surgeon

homas Bourchier-Hayes, son of Thomas Hayes, physician, and his wife, Elizabeth Bourchier, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 7 March, 1870. He qualified as a veterinary surgeon (MRCV) and established a practice in Rathkeale. He married Margaret Lyons and they had a family of three sons (Cyril, Thomas and Aubrey) and one girl, Irene. Thomas died on 8 September, 1947, aged 77 years, while his wife, Margaret, died on 21 November, 1946, aged 70 years. (Carnduff, 2011, BH FT)

medicine at the University of St Andrew=s, Edinburgh, and, after qualification, established a veterinary practice in Newcastle West. He married a widow, Ellen Aherne nee Keogh (from Knockea, Ballyneety), and they had a family of two boys (Edmund and James) and one girl, Florence. James died of throat cancer in 1901 and his wife, Ellen, died in 1903. Florence attended boarding school at Notre Dame Convent, Plymouth, England, where her maternal aunt was a nun. (Keating, E, 2012)

CONTENTS

O=Mahony, Conor (1920-1992), Veterinary Surgeon

ARCHITECTS
Deane, Thomas (1792-1871), Architect

onor O=Mahony, son of Maurice O=Mahony and his wife, Mary O=Connell, was born in Ashford, Co. Limerick, on 14 April, 1920. He was educated at Rockwell College, after which he entered University College, Dublin, where he studied veterinary medicine, qualifying as a veterinary surgeon just after World War II. He established a veterinary practice in Askeaton, where he became a popular and highly-esteemed veterinary. He married Mary (Polly) Jones and they had four children (John, Maurice, Anne and Marian). He died on 26 July, 1992, and was buried beside his wife, Polly, in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (A Sheehy, 2012)

Sheehy, James (1865-1901), Veterinary Surgeon

ames Sheehy, son of Edmund Sheehy and his wife, Mary Hayes, was born in Toomdeely, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised in the parish church, Askeaton, on 19 November, 1865. He studied veterinary

homas Deane, son of Alexander Deane, a builder, and his wife, Elizabeth Sharpe, was born in Cork in 1792. He studied architecture and came to prominence when he won a competition for the design of the Cork Commercial Buildings in South Mall, Cork, in 1811. He went on to become a prominent and successful architect. Among his buildings is the original central block of the National University of Ireland, Cork (UCC). He served in the Cork Corporation and was Mayor of Cork in 1815, 1830 and 1851. He continued his father=s building firm and won a contract for the building of Rathkeale Workhouse, which he completed in December, 1840. The building cost ,6,686 and could accommodate 660 inmates. Deane moved to Dublin in 1860 and was elected President of the Royal Hibernian Academy. He was married twice and had issue by both wives. He died in Dublin in 1871. (Dic Ir Arch, 1720-1940)

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McCarthy, James J (1817-1882), Architect

retired to England in 1888 and died in Twickenham, Middlesex, England, on 4 October, 1890. (Dict of Ir. Arch)

ames Joseph McCarthy, son of Charles McCarthy, was born in Dublin on 8 January, 1817. He attended the Christian Brothers= school, North Richmond Street, before entering the Royal Dublin School of Architecture, where he graduated as a prize winner. He worked initially for the architect William Farrell and subsequently for Charles Hansom in England. He specialised in church architecture and became Professor of architecture at the Catholic University, Dublin. Known as the >Irish Pugin=, he was architect for many churches in Ireland, including St Mary=s Catholic Church, Rathkeale, St Peter & Paul=s, Kilmallock; St Patrick=s Cathedral, Armagh; St Saviour=s, Dublin; parish churches at Maynooth, Derry, Tramore, Enniscorthy, Wexford, Sandymount, Dundalk and Thurles. He was accorded many honours including membership of the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland; Royal Institute of British Architects; Royal Hibernian Academy and Royal Society of Architects of Ireland. He died on 6 February, 1882, and was buried in Glasnevin cemetery. He was survived by his wife, his son, Charles, and three daughters. (DIA)

CONTENTS

ENTREPRENEURS
Erson, Paul (c.1801-), Entrepreneur

Wilkinson, George (1814-1890), Architect

eorge Wilkinson was born in Witney, Oxfordshire, England, in 1814. He studied architecture and came to prominence in 1835 when he won a competition for the design of a Workhouse for the Poor Law Union of Thame, Oxfordshire. He then went on to specialise in the design of Workhouses in England. In 1839, he was invited to come to Ireland by the Poor Law Commissioners and he went on to design several Workhouses in Ireland, including those in Limerick, Rathkeale and Newcastle West. In Ireland, he also designed railway stations at Multyfarnham, Co. Westmeath, and Harcourt Street, Dublin. He was the author of Practical Geology and Ancient Architecture in Ireland (1845). He

aul Erson was a flour mill owner in Askeaton, Co. Limerick, in the first half of the nineteenth century. His mill was part of the old creamery complex in Askeaton and consisted of two mills, one built by Mr Studdert around 1795, and the other built by Mr Erson in 1832. Both mills were operated by water wheels, each around 14 feet in diameter. Mr Erson lived in a building near the site of the present >Tall Trees=, Askeaton, but then called >Rockview House=. This mill was taken over by the Limerick Corn Merchants and Millers, Messrs John Norris Russell, in the mid-1840s. They are listed as the >immediate lessors= in Griffith=s Valuation of 1850 and were also listed as the owners, when the fire, which burned down the old Catholic Church, broke out at these mills in 1847. (O=Donovan, 1840, OSL).

O=Riordan, Diarmuid (1908-1981), Entrepreneur

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iarmuid O=Riordan was born in Sunday=s Well, Cork, in 1908. He attended University College, Dublin, where he specialised in science, obtaining a BSc degree, followed by an MSc in 1932. After graduation, he worked with the Drumm Battery Company,

transferring to Southern Chemicals, Askeaton, in 1935. He was largely responsible for the development and expansion of Southern Chemicals, of which he was managing director for many years. One of his most successful innovations was the production in 1957 of a form of polystyrene, known as >aeroboard=, which is now a feature of insulation in all new houses and is much used in the packaging industry. Diarmuid was very involved in local community development. He was one of the promoters of the Community Hall, Askeaton, built in 1956. He was director of Gaeltarra Eireann from 1964-1979. He was also chairman of the Board of Gaeltarra Mara for ten years, prior to its reorganistion as Udurs na Gaeltachta. He was also a founder member of Cois Sionna Credit Union and its first chairman. Diarmuid married Maureen Sweeney, a school teacher from Donegal, in 1940, and they had five children. Both Diarmuid and Maureen were enthusiasts of the Irish language. Diarmuid died in May, 1981, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (O=Riordan, D., 2007).

>Rathkeale, Nov. 28, 1823."Rose you are directed by the Manegrs and Supplymentary Corps of this Towne to continue your honest Miller, Mr. O'Dwyer, as he has been always pleasing to all the Neighbours, if not you will make the consequence.N.B.:We want no vagabond strangers among us, &c. &c. Yours &c. &c. &c.A.S.D.C.E.M.L.T.R.R. Rose, Esq. Castle Matrix Mills, Rathkeale.= (Connaught Journal, 8 December, 1823)

Russell, John Norris (c.1771-1853), Entrepreneur

Rose, Richard (c.1823), Entrepreneur

ichard Rose, son of George Rose and his second wife, Susanna Stephens, of Newcastle West, was the recipient of a Rockite warning in November, 1823. Richard, whose uncle, Henry Rose MP, rose to the position of Chief Justice, owned a mill at Castle Matrix, Rathkeale. He had earlier prosecuted some intruders for burglary and robbery at his house during the Rockite disturbances of 1821-1822. One of the accused had been convicted and hanged. Richard then dismissed his miller, named O=Dwyer, whereupon, he received the following threatening notice through the Rathkeale Post Office:

ohn Norris Russell was born in Limerick around 1771. He was described by Maurice Lenihan, author of the History of Limerick (Dublin, 1866), as the most enterprising merchant Limerick ever saw. He began his milling empire by taking over the Plassey Mill, after which he acquired the Corbally Mills from the Bindons in 1820. Subsequently, he built the steam mills at Newtown Perry in 1827 and the Lock mills soon afterwards. Sometime after 1840, and before 1847, he acquired Paul Erson=s mills (later the site of the Creamery) in Askeaton. For over a century, his company was the largest employer in Limerick, with about 2,000 employees. He was granted the Freedom of Limerick City on 1 July, 1822. In the collection for the famine victims in Askeaton in 1847, Thompson Russell, then managing director of the firm, as well as a son of the founder, John Norris Russell Senior, contributed the sum of ,2 (in addition to ,20 from his father) to the fund. Another son of the founder, Richard Russell, built the present Plassey House (now part of the University of Limerick) in 1863. The Russells were also co-founders of some of the better-known industries in Limerick, including Matterson=s bacon factory and Cleeve=s Condensed Milk

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and confectionary business. Like other wealthy merchants of the time, the Russells also invested in land, including 700 acres adjoining Plassey House, as well as extensive holdings in Ballinacarriga, Kildimo and Askeaton. John Norris Russell died in 1853, at the age of 82, and is buried, with other members of his family, in the Russell vault in St John=s, Limerick (LC, 15.3.1847; LC, 21 Dec., 1993; Hannan and O=Donnell, 1994, 133-34)

obias Delmege, son of Tobias Dolmage and Arabella Collis, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1820. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied law and was called to the Irish Bar in 1843. He died 1847. (www.landedestates.nuigalway.ie: Delmege)

Ferguson, David (d.1819), Lawyer

D
CONTENTS

LAWYERS
Delmege, Christopher (1784-1859), Lawyer

hristopher Delmege, son of Johann Adam Dolmage, was born in Courtmatrix, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, and baptised in Rathkeale on 12 September, 1784. A member of the Rathkeale Palatine community, the family name in the Rhine Palatinate had been Dolmetsch, but, in Ireland, had gone through various adaptations until it became Dolmage, and, finally, Delmege. Christopher qualified as an attorney and had a practice in Rathkeale. He married Martha Yielding, daughter of John Yielding of Glenaster Lodge, Ardagh, Co. Limerick. They had a family of one boy (John Christopher) and four girls (Isabella, Martha, Eliza and Annabella). He lived initially at Mount Henry, Rathkeale, and, later, at Castle Park, Limerick. Christopher died in 1859. (Www.thepeerage.com, 380988)

avid Ferguson, founder of the Rathkeale branch of a distinguished family was of Scottish ancestry. One of his ancestors immigrated to Northern Ireland, where he became involved in the linen industry. David qualified as a solicitor and established himself in Rathkeale. He married Mary O=Connor and they had a family of two girls and five boys, all of whom entered the professions. His son, John, 1797-1858, (qv), became a solicitor in Rathkeale; his son Charles, 1808-1845, (qv), became a Jesuit priest; his son, Robert, 1812-1892 , (qv), became a judge; his son, James, 1803-1834 (qv), became an army surgeon. Some of his descendants intermarried with prominent members of the Palatine community in Rathkeale (e.g. Leakey and Delmege families) and several acquired large estates. (Leahy, D et al., 2012)

Ferguson, John (1797-1858), Lawyer

Delmege, Tobias (1820-1847), Lawyer


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ohn Ferguson, son of David Ferguson and his wife, Mary O=Connor, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, about 1797. He qualified as an attorney and set up a practice in Rathkeale. He married Mary Leakey, also of Rathkeale, and had a family of six boys (David, Samuel, Augustus, Richard, Frederick and Charles) and two girls (Elizabeth and Belinda). He died in 1858. His son, David, succeeded him in his legal business in Rathkeale. David acquired Smithfield House, Croagh, together with more than 600 acres of land. David married Susan Delmege and had issue. John was a brother of Charles (qv), James (qv), Robert (qv) and David Ferguson (qv). (Leahy et al., 2012)

Liston, Patrick (1859-1928), Lawyer

atrick Terence Liston, eldest son of Terence Liston and his wife, Bridget O=Shaughnessy, was born in Mahoonagh Beg, Co. Limerick, in 1859. He qualified as a solicitor and established a practice in Rathkeale, which was subsequently continued by the late Maurice Noonan, and is currently in the name of Michael Noonan and Son. Patrick married, firstly, Mary Cahill, and they had a large family of five boys (Terence, Michael, Patrick, James and John Francis) and five girls (Mary, Gabrielle, Bridget, Margaret and Diana). On the death of his first wife, Mary Cahill, in 1894, Patrick married, secondly, Agnes Lyons, with whom he had one son, Vincent, and one daughter, Anne. This branch of the Liston family became prominent in the legal profession in Dublin and included some well-known figures. Patrick died in July, 1928, and was survived by his second wife, Agnes. (Feheney, Liston family Tree)

CONTENTS

SPORTSPEOPLE
Blackwell, James (1921-1999), Sportsman

Maunsell, Daniel (1747-1824), Lawyer

aniel Maunsell, eldest son of Richard Maunsell and his wife, Helena Maria Toler, was born in the family home in Ballywilliam, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 19 September, 1747. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he obtained his BA degree in 1764. He was called to the Irish Bar in 1774. He married Sarah Mears, daughter and heir of George Mears of Lion Hill, Dublin, on 18 February, 1779, and had issue, including eleven sons, Richard, George, Daniel (died young), John, Daniel Henry, William, Edward, Francis, Robert, Thomas and Horatio. Four of the sons (Daniel Henry, Francis, Thomas and Horatio) became clergymen of the Church of Ireland, thereby forging strong connections between this family and that Church. Daniel died on 14 February, 1824 (BLGI, 1899, 303-304; histfam.familysearch.org)

ames Blackwell, son of Thomas Blackwell and Mary Canty, was born in Coolraney, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 9 November, 1921. He attended Askeaton National School, before going to college, where he trained as a radio operator. During his teen years, he began to distinguish himself at hurling and was chosen to play for Limerick in the minor hurling championship of 1940. He had the unique distinction of being the only hurler from Askeaton ever to win an All-Ireland hurling medal when he was a member of the victorious Limerick minor team to win the All-Ireland in Croke Park in 1940. James spent most of his life, including World War II years, in the British navy, working as a radio operator. During his working years, he lived in England, thereby cutting short his hurling career. On his retirement, however, he settled in Dublin, where he died on 10 August, 1999. He was interred in Dublin. (E Blackwell, 2012)

Carrig, Thomas (1942-2003), Sportsman

T
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homas Carrig, son of Maurice Carrig and his wife, Mary Lynch, was born in Creaves, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 12 March, 1941. He attended Nutgrove National School, after which he began work in Foynes. Subsequently, he took up employment at Southern Chemicals, Askeaton, where he

remained for the remainder of his working life. Tommy was unusually gifted in sports and showed early promise, when, after playing for Askeaton/ Ballysteen minors, he was selected to represent Limerick in intercounty minor football in 1958. He then graduated to senior level and, again, represented Limerick in senior intercounty football continuously until 1968. He was a member of the great Askeaton/ Ballysteen teams of the 1960s and early 1970s and won a total of five county medals. Tommy married Nora Geoghegan and they had a family of four girls (Mary, Joan, Helena and Teresa). He also had two grandsons, Tony and Edward. Tommy died on 10 June, 2003, and is buried in Relig Mhuire cemetery, Askeaton. (Carrig, J, 2007).

hurling team. He went on to develop his hurling skills and represented Limerick at minor, junior and senior level. He was also selected for the Munster Senior Hurling team, with which he won two Railway Cup medals. Paddy was an all-round player, also playing Gaelic football and club soccer. He was a member of the Ballysteen junior football team which won the county final in 1946 and he played with Limerick FC against Shamrock Rovers. In his later years, he painted scenery for the Askeaton Musical Society, of which he was a valued member. Paddy married Peg Shanahan and they had two children (Michael and Carol). He died on 24 September, 1982, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Fitzgerald, G., 2007).

Fitzgerald, James (1918-1983), Sportsman

Flaherty, Patrick (1880-1966), Sportsman

ames Fitzgerald, son of Michael Fitzgerald and Mary Kenny, was born in Church Street, Askeaton, on 22 August, 1918. He attended Askeaton National School, after which he became an apprentice painter to his father. James displayed an early talent for hurling and became a member of the Askeaton minor hurling team. Later, he graduated to the junior team and was called for a trial to play with the Limerick senior team. He played with Limerick in the National League of 1947. James= talent in hurling, however, was soon surpassed by his younger brother, Paddy, who became a regular member of the Limerick senior hurling team. James married Mona Mooney and they had four children (Liam, Anne, Margaret and Andrea). He died on 16 September, 1983, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Ryan, MJ, 2007; Fitzgerald, G., 2007)

addy Flaherty, son of Edward and Bridget Flaherty, was born in Kyletaun, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1880. A gifted athlete, he played for Abrahams hurling team, Rathkeale, before winning his place with the Limerick senior hurling team. He played for many years in the county colors and, subsequently, became involved in the local administration of the GAA. He married Hana Daly from Templeglantine and had issue. He was apprenticed to a baker in his youth and subsequently worked at the People=s Bakery, Rathkeale. Patrick died in 1966 and was survived by his son, Edward. (O=Callaigh; NAI, 1901 Census)

Foley, Stephen (1923-1984), Sportsman

Fitzgerald, Paddy (1921-82), Sportsman

addy Fitzgerald, son of Michael Fitzgerald and Mary Kenny, was born at Church Street, Askeaton, in May 1921. He attended Askeaton National School, before joining the family painting contracting firm. His sporting talents were recognised early and he was a prominent member of the Askeaton Minor

tephen Foley, eldest son of Timothy Foley and his wife, Maria Griffin, was born in Church Street, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 26 December, 1923. He attended Askeaton National School, before transferring to the Cistercian College, Roscrea, as a boarder. Here he distinguished himself in several sports, winning the Leinster Swimming Colleges championship and representing his College in the Leinster Colleges Rugby Cup. It was probably in hurling, however, that his sporting talents received most prominence. He was

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chosen to play with the Limerick minors in the 1940 championship. After playing a few games, however, he was reported to the GAA for playing rugby and, in view of the Association=s ban on >foreign games= at that time, Stephen was dropped from the team for the All-Ireland, which Limerick won that year. Stephen went into the catering business when the sea planes began coming into Foynes. From there, he went on to become catering manager at Shannon Airport, before taking up a post as manager of the Hydo Hotel, Kilkee. Subsequently, he purchased the former Villiers School in Henry Street, Limerick, and transformed it into the popular Shannon Arms Hotel. He married Rosaline Casey and they had two sons, Michael and Sean. Stephen died of a heart attack in September, 1984, and is buried in Mount St Oliver cemetery, Limerick. (Foley, M., 2007)

in September, 1905. He attended Askeaton National School and followed the example of his older brother, Jackie, by becoming involved in hurling. He graduated from minor to junior hurling and was captain of Askeaton when they won the Limerick county final in junior hurling in 1935. The following year, 1936, Michael was captain of the Limerick inter-county junior hurling team. He also played football with Ballysteen, winning several West Limerick junior football championships. Michael married Hana Flavin and they had a family of eight boys and three girls. Michael died in June 1983 and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. He was a brother of Jackie Kenneally (qv). (Kenneally, M., 2007).

McDaid, Eamonn (1921-1997), Sportsman

Kenneally, Jackie (1903-1975), Sportsman

ackie Kenneally, son of Con Kenneally and Susan Purcell, was born in Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 23 June, 1903. He attended Askeaton National School, at the same time showing evidence of great sporting talent. He represented Askeaton in minor hurling and graduated to junior level. In 1924, he played with Cappagh and helped the team win the West Limerick Junior Championship. In 1935, he was a member of the Askeaton team which won the junior hurling county championship. The following year, he was chosen to represent Limerick in inter-county junior hurling. Jackie subsequently played football with Ballysteen, also winning West Limerick championships in this code. He married Nora Carmody (qv) and they had a family of six boys and one girl. Jackie died on 20 February, 1975, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. He was a brother of Michael Kenneally (qv). (Kenneally, M., 2007).

amonn McDaid was born in Ramelton, Co. Donegal, in September, 1921. He was educated at St Mary=s National School, Ramelton, and St Joseph=s College, Dumfries, Scotland. A talented athlete, he specialised in soccer, playing for Swilly Rovers, Coolraine and Derry City. He also represented the Republic of Ireland in junior soccer. In October, 1962, he and his wife, the former Sheila Canning, settled in Askeaton, where she took up a post as a teacher, first in Askeaton, subsequently in Ballysteen, later returning to Askeaton National School. Eamonn was employed in Southern Chemicals. They had a family of eleven boys and three girls. Eamonn was very active in soccer in Askeaton, initially as a player and, subsequently, as an administrator. He was also a member of the Askeaton/ Ballysteen Community Council for many years. His later years were plagued with illness. He died on 11 January, 1997, and he is buried in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton. (McDaid, E., 2007).

Kenneally, Michael (1905-1983), Sportsman

Madigan, Michael (1892- ), Sportsman

ichael Kenneally, son of Con Kenneally and Susan Purcell, was born in Askeaton

M
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ick Madigan, son of Michael and Honoria Madigan, was born in Main Street, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1892. He attended Rathkeale National School and

showed early promise as an athlete. He was one of the early members of the Rathkeale GAA club, starting his playing career as a schoolboy and altar server. After playing football for some years, he was induced to try his hand at hurling by another Rathkeale GAA star, Bill Sheahan. Mick proved to be a talented hurler and subsequently became a regular player in the Abraham Hurling team in Rathkeale. Among the trophies he won was the national >lift and strike=, later known as the Puc Fada, competition. While still in his teens, he was elected a member of the Rathkeale Town Council. He was also Hon. Secretary of the local branch of the Irish Land League and Labor Association. As an athlete, he won prizes in the half mile and 440 track races. Among his hobbies were hunting with foot beagles and gardening, in which in he won many prizes. He was also a prominent member of the Rathkeale church choir. (O Ceallaigh, Lk L)

Wall, Maurice (1866-), Sportsman

aurice Wall, son of Mary Wall, was born in Scart, Newbridge, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1886. In the early years of the GAA, which was founded in 1884, Maurice helped organise a football team in Newbridge and subsequently became team captain. Maurice and his team featured for several years in the West Limerick GAA competitions. Among his most treasured memories were the games Newbridge played against the Limerick Commercials, the great Limerick team which won the first All-Ireland Senior Football championship in 1887. (O=Ceallaigh)

Murphy, Thomas (1927-2005), Sportsman

CONTENTS

homas Denis Murphy, son of Thomas Murphy and Elizabeth Keith, was born at Church Street, Askeaton, on 16 June, 1927. He attended Askeaton National School, where his hurling skills were first noticed. In his teen years, he played with Askeaton minor hurlers and then moved on to play with the junior team. He came to the notice of the Limerick hurling selectors and soon he was a regular member of the Limerick senior hurling team. He was on the Limerick team, with his fellow-Askeaton man, Paddy Fitzgerald, which drew with Kilkenny in Croke Park in the final of the National League on 15 November, 1947. In the replay, Limerick was successful and Tommy received his first and only National League medal. It was a great loss to Askeaton and Limerick hurling when lack of employment opportunities forced Tommy, like so many other young men and women, to immigrate to England in the early 1950s. Initially, he settled in Birmingham, where he married his wife, Terry. Tommy died on 13 February, 2005, and is buried in England (Ryan, MD, 2007).

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TEACHTA DLA
Hewson, Gilbert (1875-1951),
Teachta Dla

ohn Gilbert Brownrigg Hewson, second son of John Brownrigg Hewson and Harriet Mary Gardiner, was born in Blackrock, Dublin, on 21 May, 1875. He was educated at Malvern College, England, Trinity College, Dublin, and Kings Inn, where he qualified as a lawyer. He was elected to the Limerick County Council in 1928 for the Rathkeale electoral area. On election, he took issue with the legality of part of the current county council rate. He argued his case all through the courts and won, that part of the rate being consequently quashed. After this, he was approached to stand for Dil ireann. He stood as an Independent and won a seat in the Fifth Dail in June 1927. This, however, was the shortest Dil on record, lasting only 98 days, until it was dissolved in September, 1927. Gilbert married a distant cousin, Kathleen Violet Hewson (1876-1958), youngest daughter of George Hewson, Ennismore, Listowel, Co. Kerry, and had one son, Maurice, and one daughter, Rachel Elizabeth (>Betty=). In addition to the estate at Castlehewson, Gilbert inherited the flour mill, built by his great grandfather in Askeaton in 1825. With the decline of this industry, he started a new one in 1902 which later evolved into Southern Chemicals. After World War II, however, the market for this material collapsed. In 1935, a business consortium, led by Diarmuid O=Riordan, purchased the plant and site. Gilbert Hewson also owned the ground rents of much of the property in Askeaton west of the bridge, his father having purchased these from Sir Matthew Blackiston. Gilbert Hewson died on 30 January, 1951, and is buried in the family cemetery in Castlehewson (BIFR, 586; Feheney, 2007, 54-55).

enis Jones, son of John Jones and Mary O=Connell, was born in Broadford, Co. Limerick, on 12 October, 1906. His father was Principal teacher in Broadford and his mother an assistant teacher. Denis was educated at Broadford National School and Rockwell College. He then entered St Patrick=s Teacher Training College, Dromcondra, and qualified as a national teacher. His first teaching assignment was in Kilmallock, after which he came to Askeaton, where he became Principal in 1933. He was an enthusiastic sportsman and played with Askeaton when they won the Limerick junior county hurling championship in 1935. Subsequently, he became a member of the Limerick County Board and a team selector. During World War II, he served as an LDF officer (Commandant) in the local defence force. He was also an active member of Muintir na Tre. In 1957 he was elected as a Fine Gael deputy to Dil ireann, where from 1967, he served as Leas Ceann Comhairle, a position he retained until his retirement from the Dail in 1977. He was also a member of the Public Accounts Committee, holding the chair of this important body for eight years, a delegate to the Council of Europe and a member of the Inter-Parliamentary Union. At a cultural level, Denis Jones played a pivotal role in the national Folklore Project of 1937-38. It was he who coordinated the collection of hundreds of pages of local folklore, which are now housed in the National Folklore Collection at UCD. Copies, however, are available in the Limerick County Library. Denis Jones married Anne O=Donnell, a fellow teacher in Askeaton, and they had four daughters (Mary, Catherine, Anne and Ailesh). Denis died on 6 May, 1987, and is buried beside his wife, Anne, in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Fitzgibbon, M., 2007).

Madden, David (1880-1955),


Teachta Dla

Jones, Denis (1906-1987),


Teachta Dla

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avid John Madden was born in Rathkeale in 1880. In addition to farming, he also had a bar and an auctioneering business on Main Street, Rathkeale. He joined the Fine Gael party and, as a representative of that party,

was elected a member of the Limerick County Council, in 1925. He was re-elected in 1928, 1934, 1942, 1945, 1950 and 1955. He was elected to Seanad ireann as a Fine Gael Senator in April, 1938, and re-elected in July, 1938, 1943 and 1944. He was elected a Fine Gael TD for West Limerick in 1948 and re-elected in 1951 and 1954. He died in office on 31 July, 1955. (Feriter, 1995)

SCHOOL PRINCIPALS
Conway, Daniel (c.1844-1892), School Principal

O=Brien, Donnchadh (1897-1981),


Teachta Dla

onnchadh O=Brien, son of David O=Brien and his wife, Kathleen Casey, was born in Knockaderry, Co. Limerick, on 17 November, 1897. In his youth, he was associated with the Gaelic League and the Irish Volunteers. An enthusiast for the Irish language, he became an Irish teacher in Foynes, Co. Limerick, where he made the acquaintance of Mary Spring-Rice, an ardent Nationalist. Subsequently, he became a Timire Gaeilge teacher, travelling throughout Munster, establishing branches of Conradh na Gaeilge. In 1928, he was appointed secretary of Conradh na Gaeilge. In 1933, he was elected a TD (FF) for West Limerick. A great admirer of Eamonn D Valera, they collaborated in the founding of the Fianna Fil party. From 1951 to 1954, he was Parliamentary Secretary to Taoiseach Eamonn De Valera, and, from 1957-1961, fulfilled the same role in respect of Taoiseach Sean Lemass. He also served as Joint Parliamentary Secretary and Chief Whip of the Fianna Fil party. He lived in a farm in Ardghoul, in the parish of Cappagh, for several years. An archive of his personal papers is preserved by UCD and is a valuable research source for the history of the Fianna Fil party. He retired from the Dail in 1969 and died on 22 September, 1981, aged 83 years. (UCD archives; Whelan, n.d., 124; N Mhurch, 2, 72)

aniel Conway was born in Tournafulla, Co. Limerick, around 1844. He became Principal of Askeaton National school and married Charlotte O=Connor (d.1919), who was also a teacher in the Infant School, Askeaton. The marriage took place in St Mary=s RC Church, Askeaton, on 18 August, 1869. They had a large family of seven girls and four boys. He died on 3 August, 1892, and is buried in the Abbey, Askeaton. >A Directory of the British Isles, 1861' lists Daniel Conway as >Master= in the National School and >Eliza McLoughlin= as >Mistress=. Ms Mary Mulcahy was listed as Mistress in the Infant School. (A/B PR; Directory of the British Isles, 1861; Thoms, 1884, 133)

Conway, Patrick (1872- 1947), School Principal

CONTENTS

atrick Conway, son of Daniel Conway and Charlotte O=Connor, was born and baptised in Askeaton on 20 March, 1872. Both his parents were teachers in Askeaton National School and it was natural for Patrick to follow in their footsteps. After qualifying at St Patrick=s Training College, Drumcondra, he began teaching in Askeaton National School as an assistant teacher where his father, Daniel, had earlier been Principal. In due course, he, himself, became Principal. On his retirement in 1933, he had 43 years service in Askeaton. He married Mary Moynihan (d. 8 December, 1923), who taught in the Askeaton Girls= school. They had a family of two boys, Donal and Paidin, and two girls, Christine and Agnes. Patrick Conway died on 4 August, 1947, and is buried in the Abbey, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. (A/B Par. Reg.; O=Donnell, D., 2007)

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Fitzgibbon, Mary (1906-1980), School Principal

ary Lavelle, eldest daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Lavelle, was born in Shrove, Co. Donegal, in April, 1906. She trained as a teacher at Carysfort Teachers College, Dublin, and qualified as a teacher in 1926. Her first teaching appointment was at Mater Dei School, Basin Lane, Dublin 8. While there, she attended UCD in the evenings and obtained a BA degree. When her father became Head Keeper of Beeves Lighthouse on the Shannon estuary, she moved to Askeaton and became assistant teacher at the Junior National School. She married Dr Michael Fitzgibbon (qv) on 3 October, 1929, and they had a family of three boys and five girls. She retired as Principal of Askeaton Junior National School and died on 3 November, 1980. She was buried in Kilcornan cemetery. Her son, Noel, was medical officer in Askeaton for many years. (N Fitzgibbon, 2007; NAI, Census 1911)

r Assissium Larkin, daughter of Maurice and Ellen Larkin, was born in Lixnaw, Co. Kerry, on 21 October, 1899. She joined St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick, receiving the religious habit on 13 April, 1909, and made her religious profession two years later on 8 July, 1911. On completion of her teacher training, she was assigned to St Anne=s Convent of Mercy, Rathkeale, where she taught for several years, holding the post of principal in the 1930s. She was also superior of the convent in Rathkeale. She died on 11 August, 1957, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM, Lk, 2012)

McNamara, Elizabeth (1913-1990), School Principal

Jones, Anne (1905-1988), School Principal

nne O=Donnell was born in Newcastle West on 11 October, 1905. Her father, Michael O=Donnell, was Principal of the Courtenay primary school and it was deemed natural for her to follow in his footsteps. She attended Mercy Convent School in Newcastle West, before starting teacher training at the College of the Immaculate Conception, Limerick. Her first appointment on leaving college in 1927 was in Herbertstown. In 1935, she took an appointment at the Girl=s school, Askeaton, where she met her future husband, Denis Jones. They married in 1937 and had four daughters (Mary, Catherine, Anne and Ailesh). She retired in 1970 and died on 1 March, 1988. She is buried beside her husband, Denis, in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Fitzgibbon, M., 2007).

lizabeth O=Shaughnessy, daughter of Thomas O=Shaughnessy and his wife, Nora Magner, was born in Aughinish, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 10 October, 1913. She was educated in Leeds, Presentation Convent, Thurles, and UCD, where she obtained her BCom and HDE qualifications. She began teaching in Dublin at the Gregg Institute, after which she joined the staff of St Mary=s Secondary School, Askeaton, founded by Mrs Polly Jones in 1939. Subseqently, Elizabeth opened her own private secondary school in Shrulane, Borigone, where she was later joined by her brother, Noel, and sister, Patricia. After some years, she closed the school in Shrulane and, together with Noel and Patricia, joined the staff of Stella Maris Mercy Convent School, Mount Trenchard, Foynes. She married Patrick McNamara of Aughinish and they had two daughters (Anne and Mary). She died on 25 October, 1990, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Fitzsimons, M., 2007)

Meagher, Sr Agnes (1818-1907), School Principal

Larkin, Sr Assissium (1899-1957), School Principal

A
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gnes Meaghar, daughter of William and Mary Meagher, was born in Cloneen, Co. Tipperary, in 1818. In 1843, she joined the Sisters of Mercy, St Mary=s, Limerick, where she received the religious habit and made her

professsion on 2 October, 1845. She qualified as a National teacher and, after teaching for some time in the Mercy convent schools in Mallow and Tipperary, she was chosen to be the first superior and school principal at the new convent of Mercy in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1851. She remained in this post for some years. She died on 25 March, 1907, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM Archives, Lk, 2012)

from Askeaton National School included copious notes from Gerald. This material, hitherto preserved by the National Folklore Headquarters at University College, Dublin, may now be viewed in the Limerick County Library. Gerald married Julia Bowen and had a family of five boys and one girl. He died on 1 July, 1940, and is buried in the cemetery, Church Street, Askeaton. (A/B PR).

Moran, Margaret (1902-1986), School Principal

Moran, Sr Nora (1901-2000), School Principal

argaret Quirke, daughter of Patrick Quirke and his wife, Ellen O=Mara, was born in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, on 30 October, 1902. She attended the Presentation Convent School, primary and secondary, before qualifying as a teacher at Carysfort Teacher Training College, Dublin. After a brief period in Borrigone, she took up a post at the Infant School, Askeaton, as from 1 January, 1925. A very successful teacher, she was forced to take retirement in 1959 owing to ill-health, but she subsequently returned to teaching. She succeeded Mrs Mary Fitzgibbon as Principal of the Junior School, Askeaton, and finally retired in 1963. In 1929, she married Terence Moran and had seven children. She was a founder member of the Irish Country Women=s Association in Askeaton, as well as being a member of Muintir na Tre. She was a life-long enthusiast for the Irish language. She died on 30 November, 1986, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Moran, T., 2007)

ora Moran, daughter of John and Bridget Moran, was born Donaghpatrick, Caherlistrane, Co. Galway, on 31 March, 1901. She was educated at the local National School, before entering St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick, where she received the religious habit, together with a new religious name, Sister Columba, on 6 May, 1922. On completion of her novitiate, she made her religious profession of vows on 24 May, 1924. She completed her teacher training at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, after which she taught at St Mary=s convent school, Limerick. In the 1940s, she served as principal at Ratkeale Convent of Mercy School, after which she went to the US and was a member of the teaching staff at St Mary=s, Rockledge, Florida. On her return to Ireland, she was principal at Scoil Mhthar D, Limerick, and superior of the Mercy Convent attached to the Regional Hospital, Limerick. She died on 25 December, 2000, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM Arachives, Lk., 2012).

Moran, Gerald (1872-1940), School Principal

Murphy, William (1866-1949), School Principal

erald Moran, son of James Moran and Mary Ambrose, was born in Ballysteen, Co. Limerick, and baptised in St Patrick=s Church, Ballysteen, on 18 February, 1872. He was educated at Ballysteen National School and St Patrick=s Training College, Drumcondra, Dublin. He taught in Askeaton National School for many years, ending his career as Principal. He was an active participant in the National Folklore Project 1937-38 and the contribution

illiam Murphy, son of Joseph Murphy and his wife, Helen Clancy, was born in Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised in his local parish church on 29 April, 1866. He was educated at Askeaton National school and subsequently qualified as a primary teacher. He was an uncle of Dr William Murphy, former medical officer in Kenfig Hill, Mid Glamorgan, Wales. In 1890, he became principal of Cappagh National School, where he won a

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reputation for dedication and professional expertise. Many ambitious students from outside the parish of Cappagh, including Askeaton, travelled to his school daily. Among his successful past students was Dr Michael Fitzgibbon, dispensary doctor in Askeaton for many years. William retired as principal of Cappagh National School on 30 June, 1931. He died on 8 July, 1949, and was buried in the cemetery, attached to the Franciscan Abbey, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. He never married. (A/B, PR; Whelan, n.d., 51)

Limerick, and qualified as a National teacher. After some years teaching in Limerick, she became principal of the Convent of Mercy School, Rathkeale (1959-1967), where she remained until she reached retirement age. She died on 21 May, 1979, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM Archives, Lk., 2012)

O=Sullivan, Sr Patrick (1860-1941), School Principal

O=Brien, Gerard T (1916-1977), School Principal


Gerard Thomas O=Brien was born in Limerick city in 1916. After completing his primary schooling at the Model School, O=Connell Avenue, he transferred to CBS Secondary School, Sexton Street, for his second level education. Deciding to become a teacher, he entered De La Salle Training College, Waterford, where he qualified as a primary teacher in 1937. His first appointment was in Kilkenny, after which he taught in the National school, Shantraud, Adare. He came to Askeaton as assistant teacher in the 1940s and became Principal on the retirement of Denis Jones. He married Maureen Keogh in 1947 and they had two boys and a girl. He died suddenly on 20 March, 1977. He is buried in the family plot in Mount St Laurence cemetery, Limerick. (Feheney, 2007, 87)

ary O=Sullivan, daughter of Timothy and Mary O=Sullivan, was born in Knockaderry, Co. Limerick, in 1860. She entered St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick, receiving the religious habit, and the religious name, Sister Patrick, on 26 September, 1882. On completion of her novitiate, she made profession of religious vows on 7 October, 1884. She qualified as a teacher and became superior and principal of St Anne=s Convent School, Rathkeale, in the 1930s. She died on 28 January, 1941, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM Archives, Lk., 2012)

Potter, Sr Stanislaus (1835-1889), School Principal

O=Dwyer, Sr Peter (1902-1979), School Principal

r Peter O=Dwyer, daughter of John and Johanna O=Dwyer, was born in Kilrush, Co. Clare, on 29 March, 1902. She was educated at the local National School, before entering St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. On 7 April, 1923, she received the religious habit, together with a new religious name, Sr Peter. On completion of her novitiate, she made profession of religious vows on 18 April, 1925, after which she attended Mary Immaculate Teacher Training College,

r Stanislaus Potter, daughter of James and Margaret Potter, was born in Robertstown, Co. Limerick, on 22 January, 1835. After completing her primary education in the local school, she entered St Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick, where she received the religious habit on 16 December, 1851. She made her religious profession on 20 December, 1853. On completion of her teacher training she spent ten years at the Mercy Convent, Tipperary, before being transferred to the Convent of Mercy, Rathkeale, where she was, first, a teacher, and, subsequently, principal, in the 1880s. She died on 17 February, 1890, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St

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Mary=s Convent of Mercy, Limerick. (RSM Archives, Lk., 2011)

Sheehy, Ellen (1890-1942), School Principal

Dublin, where she resided until her death on 31 January, 1958. She was buried in Rathkeale. Teresa was a grand-aunt of Dr Pat Wallace, distinguished archeologist and emeritus Director of the National Museum of Ireland. (Wallace, PF, 2007; Buckley, M., 2007).

llen Griffin, second daughter of Michael Griffin and Mary Sheahan, was born in Church Street, Askeaton, and baptised in St Mary=s Church on 30 July, 1890. She attended Askeaton National School, where she became a pupil teacher, under the supervision of her mother, who was already teaching there. Ellen completed her teacher training in Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, and subsequently returned to teach in Askeaton, where she became Principal of the Girls= school. She married Michael Sheehy from Moig, Askeaton, and had a family of two boys (Michael and Edmund) and two girls (Christine and Vera). The family lived in Kilbeha, Askeaton. Ellen died of a brain tumour on 5 March, 1942, and is buried in Lismakeery cemetery. (Sheehy, E., 2007).

CONTENTS

MISCELLANEOUS
Blennerhassett, Margaret >Celinda= (d.1775), Hell Fire Club

Wallace, Teresa (1872- 1958), School Principal

eresa Wallace, daughter of Patrick Wallace and his wife, Catherine Ryan, was born in Ballyengland, Asskeaton, Co. Limerick, and baptised in St Mary=s Church, Askeaton, on 25 September, 1872. She attended Askeaton National School and passed through the monitorial system to become a teacher in her old school in Askeaton. She took a lively interest in nationalist politics and is alleged to have closed the school in 1922 to show her disapproval of the terms of the Anglo-Irish Treaty. She retired as Principal of Askeaton Girls School in 1937. During the Second World War, she spent time with her sister, Mrs Sheehan, in Pallaskenry, and was reputed to be sympathetic to republican fugitives. In her later years, she moved to

argaret Blennerhassett, wife of Arthur Blennerhassett of Ridlestown Park, Rathkeale, was born Margaret Hayes of Cahir Guillamore, Bruff. She bore two sons, Hayes and Gerald, and a daughter, Ellen. Margaret was familiarly known as >Celinda= and is remembered as the only woman ever to be admitted as a member of the Askeaton Hellfire Club. The story goes that curiosity moved her to try to discover what the men did during their meetings at the club. She, accordingly, hid herself in the meeting room in advance and, when discovered, was formally inducted as a member to ensure her silence. She is featured in James Worsdale=s painting (c.1736) of members of the club. There is also a painting of her by James Latham in the Drawing Room, Glin Castle. Celinda was drowned in a boating accident in Killarney, October, 1775. (Burke, 1899, 36; BIFR, 1976, 136)

Collins, Donie (1924-1987), Musician

D
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onie Collins was born in Askeaton in 1924 and attended Askeaton National School. From an early age, he displayed an unusual musical ability, moving from violin to piano

and then to a variety of instruments. He started playing for dances in his early teens. Initially, his venues were the library buildings in Askeaton and Ballysteen, and, subsequently, venues in Foynes and beyond. When the >big band= era arrived, Donie=s band was in demand all over Munster. Though he specialised in trumpet and clarinet, he was, in fact, in true musician style, proficient in about nine instruments. In later years, his favourite instrument was the alto saxophone. He died on 25 February, 1987, and is buried in Relig Mhuire cemetery, Askeaton. (ABC 1987, 57).

great care in educating their children and Adam displayed his foresight and ambition by registering the family coat of arms with the College of Heralds. (BLGI, 1899, 111-112; Bovenizer, A; Dulmage, D, 2012)

Delmege, Tobias (1773-), Palatine

Corneal, John (d.1821), Murder Victim

ohn Corneal, a member of a well-known Palatine family in Rathkeale, was murdered during the agrarian disturbances in West Limerick, probably by members of the Rockite movement, in September, 1821. Corneal was carting tithed goods for Rev William Langford, Church of Ireland Rector of Rathkeale, when he was set upon at Ringmoylan, Pallaskenry, and his head severed from his body. Corneal was listed as a >Tithe Proctor=, an appointment, which, at the time, was very much hated because of the organized opposition to the collection of tithes at the time. (Donnelly, 2009, 255)

obias Dolmage, son of Johann Adam Dolmage and his wife, Elizabeth Powell, was born in Courtmatrix, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1773. His family, which originated in the Rhine Palatinate as Dolmetsch, was part of the Palatine community, settled on his estate around Rathkeale, by Lord Southwell, in 1709. Tobias, who lived at Court Lodge, Rathkeale, married Arabella Collis and they had a family of three boys: Christopher, who became an army surgeon (qv); Robert and Tobias, who became a barrister-at-law and died in 1847. Tobias also had two girls, Margaret and Anne. He was a brother of Julius (qv), Christopher (qv) and Rev John (qv) Delmege. (www.landedestates.nuigalway.ie: Delmege)

Drew, Edmund (c.1590-), Provost

Delmege, Adam (c1758-c1840), Palatine

ohann Adam Dolmage was the founder of the Dolmage/ Delmege Palatine clan who settled in Courtmatrix, Rathkeale, in 1709. The family name in the Rhine Palatinate had been Dolmetsch, but, in Ireland, it went through various adaptations, including Dolmage, until it finally became Delmege. His grandson, also Adam Dolmage, was born in Courtmatrix, Rathkeale, around 1758. He joined the Loyal German Fusiliers, one of several corps in the Limerick Volunteers, and held the rank of captain in 1778. He married Elizabeth Powell and had a family of five sons, Julius (qv), Tobias, Christopher (qv), James and John (qv), each of whom made a name for himself in his chosen profession. Adam and Elizabeth took

dmund Drew was the first Provost of the Borough of Askeaton, Co. Limerick. He was one of the English settlers introduced by Sir Francis Berkeley and Drew is on record as leasing Lismakeery from Sir Francis in 1612. Though the Drews have been in the Askeaton/ Kilcornan area for the past four hundred years, it is not possible at this stage to trace the present Drews of Kilcornan directly back to the first Provost of Askeaton. Members of the Drew family were also very prominent in Waterford, where they had a seat at Mocollop Castle, Ballyduff. Carol Baxter (NSW, Australia) has done extensive research on the Kilcornan branch of the family, members of which are to be found in Australia and USA. (Baxter, 1996; Westropp, 1902, 600)

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Embury, Philip (1728-1773), Wesleyan Preacher

hilip Embury, a descendant of Palatine immigrants, from the German Palatinate on the Rhine, and son of Andrew Embury, was born in Ballingrane, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, on 21 September, 1728. He was educated at the local school and, in his teen years, was apprenticed to a carpenter. He married Margaret and they had issue. He was friendly with the Palatine immigrants at Courtmatrix, Rathkeale, and, through their influence, he became an itinerant preacher. In 1860, he immigrated to the USA and began to work as a carpenter and teacher in New York. In 1766, he resumed his preaching and, two years later, he built the first John Street Methodist church, which was the precursor of what is now the American Methodist Episcopal church. In 1770, he moved to Washington County, New York. He died in Camden, Washington County, New York, in August, 1773. His cousin, Barbara Heck, also from Ballingrane, Co. Limerick, helped him in his ministry. (DIB; Boylan, 1998, 122)

ichael John Finn, generally known as Sen Finn, son of John Finn and his wife, Annie, was born in No. 53 Main Street, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, in 1898. He was educated at Rathkeale National School and, as a young man, joined the IRA, quickly rising up the ranks to become leader of the West Limerick Brigade. He organized several ambushes, and, with Sen Wall, O/C of East Limerick Brigade, was regarded as one of the most effective republican leaders in county Limerick. He was killed near Foynes, Co. Limerick, on 30 March, 1921, during an engagement with British Forces. (http://www.limerickdioceseheritage.org/Rath keale/gyRathkeale.htm

Fitzgibbon, Michael (c.1823-1898), Clerk of Union

Ferguson, Robert (1812-1892), Judge

obert Ferguson, son of David Ferguson and his wife, Mary O=Connor, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 7 January, 1812. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he studied law and was called to the Irish Bar in 1839. He became a County Court Judge in 1886. He married Mary Ann Costello in Dublin on 14 March, 1857, and had a family of three boys (Robert, Nicholas and David) and five daughters (Catherine, Helena, Elizabeth, Alice and Agnes). Two of his sons, Robert and David, also became lawyers, with Robert becoming a judge for county Limerick. Robert Senior, who owned more than 1,000 acres of land, was a brother of David (qv), John (qv), Charles (qv) and James (qv) Ferguson. (Leahy, D et al., 2012)

ichael Fitzgibbon, Clerk of the Rathkeale Union Workhouse, was born around 1823. He was appointed clerk of the Union Workhouse, Rathkeale, a post equivalent to a modern chief executive officer. He died in April, 1898. He was interred in the >new= cemetery, Rathkeale, the funeral service being conducted by Rev Fr Moloney PP VG. Relatives present included his brother, R Fitzgibbon, and his son-in-law, James Benchy, a solicitor from Charleville, Co. Cork. (LC, 5 April, 1898)

Fitzgibbon, Thomas (1887-1968), Relief Officer

Finn, Sen (1898-1921), IRA Leader


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homas Fitzgibbon, eldest son of John Fitzgibbon and Elizabeth O=Loughlin-Casey, was born in Askeaton and baptised at St Mary=s Church on 12 June, 1887. He attended Askeaton National School before entering Rockwell College, from where he matriculated to University College, Dublin. His university studies were interrupted, however, when his parents required his presence at home. In addition to his substantive post as Relief Officer in Askeaton, he also had business and farming interests. He married Olive O=Brien, daughter of Dr Patrick O=Brien and Elizabeth Magner, and they had a family of one son (Fr. John) and four daughters (Mary,

Betty, Celestine and Patricia). He died on 17 September, 1968, and is buried in Kilcornan cemetery. (Meade, M., 2007).

Griffin, Peter G (1878-1921), Army Officer


eter Gerald Griffin, eldest son of Peter Gerald Griffin and his wife, Maria Sarah Hunt (d.1912), was born in Altavilla, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, in 1878. He entered the British army and was initially attached to the Limerick City Artillery. Subsequently, he was stationed in the Middle East. He married Cara Lilian Ponsonby and they had issue, including sons, John Ponsonby Griffin (b.1909) and Ronald Griffin (1911, qv) and three daughters. He died as a result of a polo accident in Egypt on 31 March, 1921. Among the military honors he received was the Distinguished Service Order (DSO). (M Griffin, 2011)

Griffin, Peter Ronald (d.1957), Army Officer

eter Ronald Ponsonby Griffin was born in Altavilla, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 26 February, 1911. He was notable for his great height, approximately 7 ft. He joined the British Army and, partly because of his skill in foreign languages, including French, German and Russian, was employed as a military attach in several countries, including Russia. During World War II, he was a recruited as a member of the Special Operations Executive (SOE) for covert operations behind enemy lines, one of which was the liberation of Greece. With his first wife, he had two daughters, Anneliese, who died as a baby, and Rosie, who, as Rosie Swale, became a well-known author, adventurer, sailor and TV personality. He married, secondly, Marianne Micolot, a Swiss lady, with whom he had one daughter, Maude, and three boys, Gerald, Nicholas and Ronald (1957-2004). (M Griffin, 2011)

artin Haverty was born in Galway on 7 November, 1809. He spent some years in Paris studying for the priesthood at the Irish College, but left before taking orders. He married Catherine Rogers from Dublin and they had three daughters, two of whom died in their early twenties. He turned to journalism in London and, eventually, became editor of the London Morning Chronicle. In 1850, he purchased 1,000 acres of the Royce estate in Kilbeha, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, and built a house, known as Kilbeha Mhuire, which is still in use. It is said that he paid only ,1 per acre for the Kilbeha land. A deeply religious man, with a great devotion of Mary, the mother of Jesus, he erected an oratory and a shrine to her in the house. John Hogan, the sculptor, was a friend of Haverty and, during a visit to Kilbeha, he cast a first version of his famous >Dead Christ= statue. There are four other versions of this famous statue: one in St Teresa=s Church, Dublin; one in St Finbarr=s South church, Cork; one in St John=s Basilica, St John=s, Newfoundland; and one in plaster at the Crawford Art Gallery, Cork. In 1860, Haverty published his book, History of Ireland (Dublin: James Duffy, 1860), which was well received and reprinted. Soon afterwards, he moved to Dublin, where he took up a post as sub-librarian of the King=s Inns Law Library, in Dublin 1. He died in Dublin on 18 January, 1887, aged 77 years. He was a half-brother of Joseph Haverty, portrait painter, some of whose paintings hang in Glin Castle. (Crone, 90-91).

Heck, Barbara (1734-1804), Methodist Missionary

Haverty, Martin (1809-1887), Writer


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arbara Ruttle, a member of the Palatine community, was born in Ballingrane, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, in 1834. She married Paul Heck and, with other Palatines, immigrated to the USA abut 1760, settling in New York. She collaborated with her cousin, Philip Embury, in establishing in New York, a Methodist community, in the tradition of John Wesley, which became known as the John Street Church. She and her companions subsequently moved to the Hudson valley. With the outbreak of the American Revolution, Barbara, a loyalist, fled to Canada and helped

establish Methodism there. She died in Augusta, Ontario, on 17 August, 1804, and, a century later, was honoured as >the mother of Methodism in the New World=. Her husband, Paul Heck, predeceased her. (Whelan, n.d., 113-115)

Ivess, John (c.1821), Tithe Proctor

ohn Ivess was the >Tithe Proctor= (i.e. Tithe Collector) in Askeaton in 1821. He became the unwitting centre of an >affray= when the Askeaton >Whiteboys=, led by Terence Moran (qv), decided to attack his house on 15 August, 1821, for the purpose of seizing and burning the tithe books. Newspaper reports stated that up to 200 people, were involved, some of them on horseback,. The locals, however, were betrayed and a detachment of armed police were waiting for them. In an exchange of fire, Moran and two others were mortally wounded, while three others (Michael Moran, Michael Halloran and Michael Fitzgerald) were captured and subsequently charged with the wilful murder of Thomas Manning, one of the policemen present. The bodies of two of the >dead= >Whiteboys= were next day buried (some say while still alive) in quicklime in a >croppy hole= near the bridge in Rathkeale. Some of the Ivess family immigrated to Australia around 1850 and members of this branch now live in Buderim, Queensland. One of them suggests that the surname, Ivess, may have come from the old name for Ballysteen, Iverus, from Ubh Rossa, but local etymologists are sceeptical. (LC, 18.8.1821; DEP, December, 1821)

October, 1901. There is a memorial to him in St Mary=s Church of Ireland Cathedral, Limerick. He had kept a diary from the time he landed in Capetown, on 12 November, 1899, to 29 October, 1901, the day before he was killed by a Boer bullet at the age of 30. The circumstance that led to his death was his decision to go to the assistance of his commanding officer, Col Benson. Lloyd left camp and walked through open ground to where his superior was pinned down. Though he displayed great courage in this action, some of his superiors felt that he had shown poor judgement in the matter and blocked Col Benson=s recommendation for a decoration for Lloyd. The commander of the British forces in South Africa, Field Marshall Lord Roberts, however, praised him. There are memorials to Captain Lloyd both in the Catholic church and Church of Ireland, Rathkeale. (Brown, T, OLJ, 52-54; BLGI, 1899, 164-165)

Lynch, Christopher (1920-1994), Singer

Lloyd, Thomas Eyre (1871-1901), War Casualty

homas Henry Eyre Lloyd, only child of Major-General Thomas Lloyd and his wife, Catherine Evans, was born in Beechmount, Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 2 May, 1871. He joined the British army, obtaining a commission with the Coldstream Guards, and, at the time of his death, held the rank of captain. His company moved to South Africa during the Boer War and he was killed in action at Brackenlaagte, in the Transvaal, on 30

hristopher Gerard Lynch, son of Patrick Lynch and his wife, Mary Collins, was born in Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, on 23 July, 1920. His clear tenor voice marked him out from his early days as a possible successor to the great Irish tenor, John McCormack, then in his later years. Christopher went to Dublin, where he received tuition from McCormack=s old mentor, Vincent O=Brien. Moreover, Time magazine carried a story in 1946 to the effect that, during the last year of his life, McCormack >taught the strapping blue-eyed tenor what he knew about singing=. McCormack, on first hearing Lynch sing in Dublin, is also alleged to have said, >He is the one most likely to succeed me=. Joseph O=Mara became Lynch=s agent and managed to get a contract for him to sing with the Firestone Tyre orchestra in the USA in 1946. His first appearance was at Carnegie Hall, New York, in October, 1946. . He continued for several years to be the >Voice of Firestone=, at the same time touring the USA, where he gave concerts in many cities. He sang with many famous orchestras and conductors, including The Philadelphia Orchestra, under Eugene

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Ormandy. He sang in the film, >The Hills of Ireland= and made several recordings with RCA and Columbia. He married Dymphna Daly and they had three sons, Brian, Terence and Christopher, and two daughters, Marse and Rosaleen. On the death of his first wife in 1981, he married, secondly, Yvonne Cox, in 1986. His paternal grandmother was a governess from Switzerland, where members of her family were piano manufacturers. Christopher Lynch died in Worcestershire, England, on 15 April, 1994, aged 73 years. In recent years the Rathkkeale District Council placed a commemorative plaque on the outside wall of the house where he was born. (New York Times, 22.4.1994; R Tobin, 2012)

becoming involved in several new projects, including an Askeaton Youth Band. Paddy died on 21 July, 2002, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Cronin, P., 1995, 102-03.)

Moran, Michael (1934-1988), Equestrian

McCarthy, Paddy >Sax= (1932- 2002), Musician

addy McCarthy was born in Askeaton on 1 August, 1932. He was educated at Askeaton National School, after which he began an apprenticeship as a tailor at Collins Tailoring Shop, Askeaton. Music, however, was Paddy=s great passion. He came from a family of musicians, his uncles, Chris and Joe McCarthy, being members of the Donie Collins Danceband. His brother, Edmund, was also a musician, specialising in drums. By the age of nine, Paddy had mastered the accordion. Donie Collins, however, persuaded Paddy to try the trumpet, but they both eventually decided that Paddy had a special gift for the alto saxaphone. Paddy continued with the Donie Collins band until 1951, when he immigrated to England. He saw service with the merchant navy and, later, with the Royal Airforce. During this time, he also had an opportunity to play with the Royal Airforce Band. Paddy married Frances Kirwan from Foynes in 1958 and they had a family of four girls and one boy. After the marriage, they returned to England and Paddy worked in an office by day and played with the big bands at night. Finally, they returned to Askeaton for good in 1968, where, again, Paddy held down a conventional job during the week, and played with his own band at weekends. In 1979, his health deteriorated, but he continued his voluntary work for the local community,

ichael Moran, eldest son of Terence Moran and his wife, Margaret Quirke (qv), was born in Church Street, Askeaton, on 20 December, 1934. He was educated at Askeaton National School, after which he entered Clonakilty Agricultural College, where he completed a course in theoretical and practical agriculture and farm management. Though he was employed for some years by the predecessor of Brd Bainne, his special interest was equestrianism. Specialising in show jumping, he spent many of his weekends riding at horse shows and gymkhanas, and winning numerous awards. Gradually, he built up is own equestrian centre at his farm in Aghalacka, Askeaton, where he laid the foundations of what later developed into Deelside Stud. He married Jill Jones and they had a family of two boys (Brian and David) and one girl (Patricia). Michael was killed in a tragic riding accident on 7 November, 1988, and is buried in Relig Mhuire, Askeaton. (Moran, T., 2007).

Moran, Terence (1790-1821), Rockite Leader

erence Moran was born in Aghalacka, Askeaton, around 1790. As a young man, he became involved in the agrarian agitation against the tithes, then payable by Catholics and Protestants alike for the upkeep of the Church of Ireland clergy. He was the leader of the >Whiteboy= or Rockite >affray= on the night of 15 August, 1821, when the house of the local tithe collector in Incherourke, Askeaton, was attacked for the purpose of seizing and burning the tithe books. Major Going, commander of the recently-formed constabulary, was, however, warned of the planned attack in advance and he dispatched a detachment of 17 specially-chosen armed men, under the command of Captain Thomas Doolan, to intercept the raiders.

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The raiders numbered about 200, some on horseback, and all armed with weapons of various kinds, including some firearms. Terence Moran, the leader of the group, according to reports, was >attired in a most conspicuous manner, with a white dress, a cocked hat and feathers= (LC, 18.8.1821). The constabulary managed to get in among the raiders before the latter realised their identity. When Captain Doolan ordered a surrender, the response was a volley of fire, which killed Thomas Manning, one of the constables. The constabulary then opened fire and several of the attackers were wounded, some mortally, including Terence Moran. His companions carried him away, but he died that night and he was buried secretly for fear of reprisals. The Limerick Chronicle (18.8.21) reported that three men were taken prisoner and two shot dead. It was also alleged that more of the attackers would have been killed had they not dismounted and hidden behind their horses, fifteen of which were brought to the barracks in Rathkeale next day. Several of the horses had gun shot wounds. The bodies of the two who were killed were brought to Rathkeale and buried, on the orders of Major Going, in quicklime in a >croppy= hole near the bridge in Rathkeale. The three captured men were forced to dig the burial hole. Some people alleged that one of the men was alive when buried and this caused outrage among the people, leading to the subsequent murder of Major Going on 14 October, 1821, on the Curraheen Road, outside Cappagh. The Askeaton >affray= was one of the largest assemblies in the entire >tithe war=, surpassing in numbers the better-known incident in January of the same year described by Mire Bhu N Laoire, in the poem, Cath Cim an Fhia (HCPP 1822 (423), 14; HCPP 1825 (20); LC, 18 August, 1821).

James Carrol Naish. He was educated at Clongowes Wood College and Trinity College, Dublin (BA, 1863, bar, 1865). After practising as a barrister for some years, he was appointed a Q.C. in 1880. Appointed legal adviser to the British establishment at Dublin Castle, he unearthed the celebrated statute of Edward III and put it into force against the Land Leaguers. He acted successively as Solicitor General and Attorney General, before being appointed Lord Chancellor (1884-85) by Gladstone, at the age of 44. This was the highest judicial office in Ireland at that period. Subsequently, he became judge of the Appeal Court. On 15 April, 1884, he married Matilda Mary Dease (1859-1920) and they had three daughters. He died in Dublin in August, 1890, and was buried in Dublin. He was a half-brother of James C Naish (qv). (London Illustrated News, 23 Aug, 1890, Naish Obituary; BIFR 1976, 108; Crone, 1928, 166).

Naughton, Thomas B (1864-1914), Clerk of Union

Naish, John Rt. Hon. (1842-1890), Lord Chancellor

homas Bennett Naughton, eldest son of Denis Naughton (1832-1993) and Margaret Bennett (1835-1924), was born in Bushy Island, Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick, in 1864. He was educated at Ballysteen School, Rockwell College and Queen=s College (now National University of Ireland) Cork, which he entered in 1880. He left Queen=s College in 1883 to take up a career as a journalist, starting with the The Leinster Leader, Naas. A gifted writer, he soon gained success as a journalist. He was subsequently editor of the Tipperary News and Waterford Herald in Clonmel. Later he was editor of The Limerick Leader before taking up a post as Clerk/ administrator of the Rathkeale Union. He was an ardent nationalist and a fluent poet. He died in the Cistercian Monastery, Roscrea, on 3 June, 1914, and was buried in the family grave in Kildimo, Co. Limerick. He was a nephew of Michael Naughton LCC (qv). (Feheney, 2006, 26-28)

ohn Naish, second son of Carroll Naish and first son of his second wife, Anna O=Carroll, was born in Ballycullen House, Askeaton, on 10 July, 1842. He was a younger brother of Carroll Naish (qv) and relative of the film actor,

Corrbu, Mairtn (1912-2002), Writer

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airtn Corrbu was born near Nenagh, Co. Tipperary, in 1912. He was educated

at Nenagh CBS School, Coliste Iosagin, Ballyvourney, and St Patrick=s College, Drumcondra, where he qualified as a national teacher. His first appointment was at his alma mater, Nenagh CBS, after which he took an appointment as assistant teacher at the Boys National School, Askeaton, in 1937. Subsequently, he became Principal in Ballinacarriga National School, Kildimo, where he remained until his transfer as Principal to Pallaskenry National School in 1964. He married Olive Carey in 1942 and they had a family of three boys and four girls. He was a great enthusiast for the Irish language and wrote several books in Irish, which were widely used in primary and secondary schools. He was also a noted scholar in the field of local history and is, arguably, better known for his local history books, including, Kenry: The Story of a Barony in County Limerick (Dundalgan Press, 1975) and County Tipperary (Irish Books & Media, 1991). He died on 8 May, 2002, and is buried in Clochprior cemetery, near Neenagh, Co. Tipperary. (N Mhurch, agus Breathnach 8, 118; Corboy, O., 2007)

1847 and awarded an honorary doctorate by Trinity College Dublin. His great work of scholarship was the first complete edition of The Annals of the Four Masters. He died in Dublin, on 9 December, 1861, and is buried in Glasnevin Cemetery. He is regarded as one of Ireland=s greatest scholars. In the course of his work for the Ordinance Survey Office, he, or his assistans, visited every townland in the barony of Lower Connello in 1834 and made copious notes of the names of the land owners and tenants, the nature of the soil and the ancient monuments, of which he also made drawings. (O=Donovan 1840, OSL, passim; Connolly, 1998, 405)

O=Driscoll, Sen (d.1991), Bibliophile

O=Donovan, John (1809-1861), Scholar

ohn O=Donovan, son of Edmund O=Donovan, was born at Atateemore, Co. Kilkenny, on 9 July, 1809. The death of John=s father in 1817 caused the dispersion of the family and he was brought to Dublin by his older brother, Michael. In 1826 he began a serious study of the language, philology and archeology of Ireland. Through the help of James Hardiman, he found work as a translator of old Gaelic manuscripts in the Public Record Office, Dublin. Subsequently (1829), he was engaged, under George Petrie, in the Ordinance Survey Office. He was given access to all ancient documents in his huge task of establishing the placenames of 62,000 townlands of Ireland. In 1836, he commenced the compilation of an index of Irish manuscripts in Trinity College. He was called to the bar in

ohn Joffre O=Driscoll was born in the USA. In later years, he preferred to use >Sen=, the Irish version of his first name. He was educated at Cooper Union College, New York, where he specialised in art and architecture. He then joined the US Air Force, retiring with the rank of Colonel. In 1961, he acquired a 15 th century Tower House, known as Castle Matrix, in Rathkeale. It had been built by the Earls of Desmond and had important historical associations, having been visited by both Edmund Spenser and Sir Walter Raleigh. Sen invested both energy and resources in restoring it. A life-long collector of antiques and objects de art, he had a fine and varied collection at Castle Matrix. During the 1960s and early 1970s, he opened the castle for mediaeval banquets. He married Elizabeth Forrest and they had a son, Kieran Forrest O=Driscoll (1984-2003), who died some days short of his 20th birthday from cancer. Sean died in 1991. (Reid, Bob, 1988)

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O=Faolin, Sen (1900-1991), Writer

en O=Faolin, born John Francis Whelan, third and youngest son of Denis Whelan, a constable with the Royal Irish Constabulary, and his wife, Bridget Murphy, was born in 3 Mardyke Street, Cork, Ireland, on 27 February, 1900. Subsequently, the family moved residence to Half-Moon Street, near the present Cork Opera House. He was educated at the Lancasterian School, Presentation College, and the National University of Ireland, Cork. In >Pres=, he was influenced by his Irish teacher, Pdraig Domhnail, and became a fluent Irish speaker and an enthusiast for the new Gaelic Ireland. At university he studied English, Irish and Italian and adopted the Irish version of his name. After obtaining his degree, he joined the IRA, becoming director of propaganda for the southern division. In 1924, however, disillusioned with the IRA, he returned to university to take an MA in Irish. He remained on to take an MA in English and a Higher Diploma in Education. In 1926, he travelled to Harvard University on a Commonwealth Fellowship. There he met Eileen Goold, a friend from his days at summer school in the West Cork Gaeltacht. They were married in Boston in 1928. They then moved to England, where Sean got a job as a lecturer at St Mary=s Teacher Training College, Strawberry Hill, Twickenham. In 1933, they returned to Ireland, where Sean determined to make his living as a professional writer. There followed many books, novels, biographies and, especially, short stories, a genre in which he became an acknowledged expert. He also received many honours, including the Star of Solidarity from the Italian Government, the Freedom of Cork City and nomination as Saoi in Aosdana. In his later years, he suffered from memory loss. He died in Dublin on 20 April, 1991. His mother, Bridget Murphy, came from a small farm in Loghill East, Rathkeale, and he spent many summer vacations there. He

became familiar with the landscape around Rathkeale and the surrounding countryside forms the background to his novel, A Nest of Simple Folk (1933). In his Autobiography, Vive Moi (1993), he recalls with affection the places he visited while travelling around on his bicycle during his vacations in Rathkeale. (Adrian Room, >Sean O=Faolain, 1900-1991=, ODNB)

O=Neill, Patrick (d.1798), United Irishman

addy O=Neill was born near the >White Corner=, Ballynort, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, in the second half of the eighteenth century. He became a member of the United Irishmen and was accused of membership of that organisation in 1798. When the insurrection in Wexford was ruthlessly suppressed, a hunt for rebels was extended to other counties. Paddy went into hiding in a clump of furze in Ballinvoher, Ballysteen, Co. Limerick, but, following information given, he was hunted with blood hounds and arrested. He was summarily tried in Askeaton and hanged, his head being exhibited on a pole near the Desmond Castle, Askeaton, as a warning to would-be rebels. Through the influence of a friendly soldier, the family obtained the head and it was buried beside his body in Beigh cemetery, Ballysteen, the burial place of the O=Neill family. In recent years, a letter has been found from General John Westropp, Ballysteen, to Sir Vere Hunt, Curraghchase, referring to the hanging of O>Neill and expressing satisfaction at a job well done. (Feheney 1998, 120)

O=Shaughnessy, Br Patrick (1908-2006), Religious Brother

P
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atrick O=Shaughnessy, son of John O=Shaughnessy and his wife, Helena Sheehy, was born in Ballyanne, Askeaton, Co.

Limerick, on 19 December, 1908. While he and his brothers and sisters were young, his father and mother died, and kind aunts and uncles volunteered to raise the children. Patrick went to his aunt, Mrs Kennedy, in Cappagh, and was reared as one of her own family. He attended Cappagh National School and became proficient at handball. Subsequently, he attended secondary school at the Presentation Brothers Preparatory School in Cork. In 1926, he entered the Presentation Brothers and made his religious profession in 1929. He became a teacher and spent most of his life teaching at Presentation College, Bray, Co. Wicklow. He always regarded Cappagh as his adopted home. He died on 24 February, 2006, and was buried at Mount St Joseph, Cork. (Feheney, 1996, 80)

house and a limited amount of land surrounding it. (De Breffny, 68-70; Whelan, n.d., 90-91)

Ryan, Michael D (1929-2011), Local Poet

Peppard, Patrick (d.1751), Churchwarden

hough the Irish branch of the Peppard family was first noted in county Louth in the 1600s, the first member of the family to settle in Cappagh, Co. Limerick, was Patrick Peppard of Kilmacow, Co. Limerick, who married Catherine Dowdall, eldest daughter of Patrick Dowdall and his wife, Alice Conway, of Cappagh, in the first quarter of the 18 th century. The issue from this marriage included a son, Patrick, and three daughters (Mary, Cecily and Constance). The son, Patrick Peppard, a churchwarden in Ballingarry in 1731, married Faith Standish and had issue, including a son, Standish Peppard (b.c.1735), who married Catherine Hewson of Castlehewson, Askeaton, and had issue. Descendants of the Peppard family continued to live in Cappagh House, built by the first Patrick, until the death of the last member, Alice Cooke, on 25 November, 1938. The house and estate was then acquired by the Irish Land Commission, which distributed portions of the estate among local farmers, but sold the

ichael Ryan, son of Thomas and Mary Ryan, was born, in Bawnreagh, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, on 6 February, 1929. He was educated at Askeaton National School and St Marys Secondary School, Askeaton. Subsequently, he attended lectures organised by the National University of Ireland, Cork, and obtained a Diploma in Sociology. A carpenter by trade, Michael was best known as a GAA supporter and a popular poet. In his youth, he was a prominent hurler and, as a minor, won three-in-a-row West Limerick junior hurling championships (1945, 1946, 1947). He was chairman of the Askeaton GAA club for three years, 1983-1986, and spent many years as the clubs PRO. Michaels humorous poems and ballads are part of the folklore of Askeaton. Some of his ballads have been set to music and one, My Auld Tambourine, was recorded in the 1970s by the Dublin City Ramblers and later by Dermot OBrien and Larry Cunningham. In 1998, Patrick Cronin published an anthology of Michaels poetry, calling him The Peoples Poet. And this he certainly was. Michael married Nellie OSullivan from Kildimo, Co. Limerick, in 1957, and they had a family of six children. Michael died on 5 September, 2011, aged 82 years. He was interred in the family burial plot, Mount Pleasant cemetery, Askeaton, Co. Limerick. (Aherne, T, 2011, 41)

Ryan, Patrick (1880-1914), Titanic Victim

P
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atrick Ryan, son of Thomas Ryan and Helen O=Donoghue, was born in Toomdeely, Askeaton, Co. Limerick, and

baptised at St Mary=s RC Church, Askeaton, on 6 March, 1880. He was educated at Askeaton National School, after which he worked on the family farm. With three friends (Seamus Moran, Bridget Moran and Margaret Madigan), he sailed from Queenstown (Cobh) on the ill-fated liner, The RMS Titanic, which was sunk by a giant iceberg on 15 April, 1912. Of the four from Askeaton, the two boys, Patrick and Seamus, were drowned, while the two girls, Bridget and Margaret, were saved. Patrick and Bridget were said to be engaged, hoping to marry in the USA. The Titanic, built in Belfast, was considered, at that time, the pinnacle of naval architecture and, with a double bottom, was said to be >practically unsinkable=. (Ryan, MD, 2007).

Sander sailed with the Spanish expedition to Ireland in 1579. He landed with Sir John of Desmond at Smerwick harbour in July, 1579. Immediately, he began sending out letters to the Irish leaders. Westropp notes that Sander met Gerald, Earl of Desmond (and 1,000 armed men), at Askeaton, on 12 November, 1579, and formally entered the war. Sometime later, however, Sander fell into bad health and became terminally ill. It is said that, once he realised this, he asked the Bishop of Killaloe to administer the last rites to him. He died at dawn the following day (sometime between March and June, 1581) and is buried in an unmarked grave. (Mayer, ODNB; Westropp, 1901, >Notes=, Part II, 153).

Sander(s), Rev Nicholas (c.1530-1581), Papal Legate

Taylor, John (c. 1750), Poet

icholas Sander (or Sanders), son of William Saunders and his wife, Elizabeth Mynes, was born in Charlwood, Surrey, around 1530. His usual signature in English was >Sander=. He enrolled in Winchester College in 1540. In 1548, he was elected a Fellow of New College, Oxford, where he also obtained a BCL degree the same year. He was professor in Canon Law in the University in 1557. Though he is said to have been offered the post of Latin Secretary to Queen Elizabeth I, Sander resigned his Fellowship in 1560, rather than take the Oath of Supremacy. In 1561, he went to Rome and was ordained a priest. In 1564, he received >archiepiscopal= powers and he travelled to Louvain, where he became a professor at the University. He wrote several learned theological tracts, most of them dealing with Henry VIII=s suppression of Catholicism in England and Ireland. In 1572, he returned to Rome, where Pope Gregory XIII made him a special legate to King Philip II of Spain, in an attempt to persuade Philip to invade England and restore Catholicism.

ohn Taylor was a poet and stays maker, who lived and worked in Rathkeale during the middle of the eighteenth century. In addition to his trade as a stays maker, he wrote dedicatory verses for members of the landed gentry. His work appeared in Miscellaneous Works of John Taylor (Limerick: 1787) One of his pieces included the following lines about Richard FitzGerald, 21st Knight of Glin: Remember me, Sir, to squire Richard of Glin, That offspring of heroes, and essence of men, Pray tell him, if Taylor be sent to the crib, He must push out his pinnace, with foresail and jib, And steer to the city, nor think of delay, My debts, jailers' fees, and my garnish to pay. And tell him, I've promised that during my days, His mountain seraglio shall never want stays.

Walcott, John (1754-1831), Naturalist

J
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ohn Walcott, son of John A Walcott and his wife, Mary Yeamans, was born on 8 August,

1754, a great grandson of Colonel Thomas Walcott, who acquired a large estate in Croagh, Co. Limerick, but who was executed for treason in 1683. John was a dedicated scholar and researcher in natural history and compiled an incomplete Flora Britannica, using the classification system devised by Linnaeus. He also did pioneering work in geology and fossils and had specimens called after him. He published several books, including Synopsis of British Birds (1792). Though benefitting from rents of Irish properties owned by his family, he did not acquire the Croagh estate, which passed to his cousin, John Minchin-Walcott, on condition that the latter add the name Walcott to his own surname. This John Minchin-Walcott was an MP for Askeaton in 1751. (Landedestates.com; John Walcott, genealogy.com 30.4.12; Torrens, HS, >John Walcott=, ODNB)

regular entries, which were largely devoted to prayers and aspects of his religious work. He died in Dublin on 8 April, 1858, of tuberculosis, and was buried in grounds of St Nicholas Without. He is regarded as one of the early propagators of Methodism in Ireland. (Malcomson, K, 2012)

Walcott, Thomas (d.1683), Judge

Walsh, Rev Thomas (1830-1858), Wesleyan Preacher

homas Walsh, son of Edmund and Helena Walsh, was born in Ballylyn, Croagh, Co. Limerick, in 1730. He was baptized in Croagh Catholic church. An intelligent and diligent student, whose mother tongue was Irish, he attended a local >hedge school=, where he mastered the basics of English and Latin. On completion of his primary education, he was sent to County Clare to be apprenticed to a carpenter. He began reading the Bible and was converted to Methodism and then took up schoolmastering. He became a friend and follower of Charles Wesley, founder of Methodism, and was brought to London to help Wesley in his preaching campaign. Walsh was a life-long student, who learned Greek and Hebrew, in addition to logic, metaphysics and natural philosophy. He was appointed co-ordinator of Methodist preaching in Ireland and traveled all over the country in the exercise of his ministry. He kept a diary and made

t Col Thomas Walcott, a judge, was granted lands in Munster counties in 1667 and acquired a large estate in counties Limerick, Cork and Tipperary. His lands in Croagh, Co. Limerick, ran to more than 1,000 acres. He was executed in 1683 for his part in the Rye House Plot, a conspiracy to assassinate King Charles II and his brother, James, Duke of York, as they travelled from Newmarket races to London past Rye House in Hertfordshire. The plot was aborted but was betrayed to the Government. However, his attainder was reversed in 1698 in favour of his eldest son, John Walcott. Thomas married Jane, daughter of Thomas Blayney and niece of Baron Blaney and they had nine children, including the eldest, John, who inherited the estate in Croagh. (www.Landedestates.com)

Walton, Ernest (1903-1995), Nobel Physicist

rnest Thomas Sinton Walton, son of Rev John Walton, Methodist Minister, and his wife, Anna Sinton, was born in Dungarvan, Co. Waterford, on 6 June, 1903. The nature of his father=s ministry necessitated moving residence at regular intervals within Ireland. One of these changes was to Rathkeale, Co. Limerick, where Ernest lived when on vacation from boarding school. His father was subsequently promoted to the post of President of the Methodist Church in Ireland, whereupon he moved to Dublin. Meantime, young Ernest attended the Methodist College, Belfast, from where he won

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a scholarship in Mathematics to Trinity College, Dublin, in 1922. After graduation and postgraduate studies, he went to the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, where he specialized in atomic physics. There John Cockroft and Walton managed to split a Helium nucleus into two alpha particles by bombarding it with protons. A report of this success was published in Nature on 30 April, 1932 and Cockroft and Walton were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for this achievement in 1951. Walton subsequently returned to Trinity College, Dublin, where he held the post of Professor of Physics. He declined an invitation to join the Manhattan Project, which led to the construction of the first atomic bomb. He died on 25 June, 1995, and was buried in Dean=s Grange cemetery, Dublin. (Brian Pippard, ODNB)

ordinary people and, to this purpose, he travelled all over the England, Wales and Ireland, often preaching outdoors. He was insistent that Methodist preachers would not be ordained and that their assembly places would not be consecrated churches. In Ireland, Methodism particularly appealed to the Palatine Community, especially those members in Courtmatrix, Killeheen, Ballingrane, Pallaskenry and Adare. Wesley visited Ireland a total of twenty one times and preached several times in Rathkeale. John Wesley died in London on 2 March, 1791, and was buried at the rear of his City Road chapel, London. (Rack, ODNB, 2010)

White, Dorothea (1871-1949), Novelist

Wesley, Rev John (1703-1791), Religious Reformer

ohn Wesley was born in Epworth, Lincolnshire, on 17 June, 1703, the son of Samuel and Susanna Wesley. He was educated at Charterhouse School and Oxford University and ordained an Anglican minister on 22 September, 1728. While still at university, he and his brother, Charles, founded a group called the >Holy Club=, members of which prayed together and followed a rule of life. Because of the regularity of their lives, these men were called >Methodists=, a name by which Wesleyans are still known. Between 1735 and 1738, Wesley spent time in Georgia, USA, as a missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. Among the practices, he adopted as a result of his American experience were extempore prayer, outdoor preaching and the composition of new hymns for congregational singing. In this latter, his brother, Charles, became an accomplished hymn writer. Rather than found a new Church, Wesley concentrated on bringing religion to

orothea Spaight Blood-Smyth, daughter of Major John Blood-Smyth and his wife, Amelia Spaight, was born in Fedamore, Co. Limerick, on 11 November, 1869. She married, firstly, Col. Charles Conyers, of Castletown Conyers, Co. Limerick. He, however, was killed in action during World War I, and she married, secondly, Captain John Joseph White, of Nantenan, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, in 1917. From her first marriage, she had a boy (Lt Col. Charles Conyers) and a girl (Elsie Conyers). She had no children from the second marriage. She was the author of about 40 novels, many of them dealing with hunting. Among her best-known works are The Thorn Bit (1900), The Conversion of Con Cregan (1909) and Sporting Reminiscences (1919). A keen horsewoman, she hunted regularly with the Stonehall Harriers. She died on 25 May, 1949, and was buried in the cemetery attached to St Mary=s Cathedral, Limerick. There is a story in local tradition that, soon after marrying John Joseph White, she considered becoming a Catholic. As a prelude to this, she began accompanying her husband to Mass in Cappagh Catholic church. One morning, during the

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>Troubles=, when she came out after Mass, she discovered that the local IRA had commandeered the family automobile, which, at that time, was probably the only car in the parish. After this incident, her attitude towards the Catholic Church is said to have changed. The White family, however, was noted for its generous patronage of the Catholic community in Cappagh over previous decades. (OCIL)

White, William (1876-1901), War Casualty

illiam Michael Joseph White, son of John P White (qv) and his wife, Emily McMahon, of Nantenan House, Cappagh, Co. Limerick, was born in September, 1876. He entered the British army and held the rank of Lieutenant in the 2nd Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). He was killed in action on 12 March, 1901, at Smithfield, South Africa, during the Boer War. He was buried in South Africa. There is a stained-glass window, behind the high altar, erected to his memory by his mother, in the Catholic parish church, Cappagh, Co. Limerick. (White, S, 2010)

Worsdale, James (1692-1767), Painter

clever conversation, conviviality and ability as an actor and singer, he was, nevertheless, commissioned to paint the portraits of several important people, including members of the Royal family. He came to Ireland in the 1730s and was befriended by Lord Blayney and Sir Laurence Parsons, 1st Earl of Rosse, with whom he founded the Dublin Hellfire club in 1735. He also helped form the Askeaton Hellfire Club around 1736. His painting of a group of five members of the Dublin Club and another of a larger group of members of the Askeaton Club are now in the National Gallery, Dublin. In Ireland, Worsdale also acted with theatre companies in Dublin, including the Smock Alley Company (1737-1740). He was reputedly the author of several songs, plays and operas, though at least some of these are likely to be the work of others, especially needy artists, who were willing to forego their claim to authorship for a fee. He returned to London in the 1750s and performed at Drury Lane Theatre in Samuel Foote=s comedy, >Taste= (1752). He was said to be a very small man, approximately five feet in height. He died in London on 10 June, 1767, and is buried in St Paul=s, Covent Garden, London (O=Donogue and Burnette, ODNB).

ames Worsdale, portrait painter and actor, was born in London in 1692, son of a colour grinder. He built up a reputation as a portrait painter and was appointed Master painter to the Board of Ordnance about 1744. Though his success is said by some to be largely due to his

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