You are on page 1of 156

Foreword

Preparing for a skills revolution


This publication provides comprehensive coverage of a vibrant and growing public Further Education and Training (FET) college sector. It showcases the wealth of ingenuity, expertise and creativity found in the FET colleges. The FET colleges have achieved a great deal within a short time and with limited resources. This publication reveals the following striking features of the 50 public FET colleges in South Africa: Each college has a range of strengths and specialisations. An enormous variety of private, public sector and community partnerships have developed with FET colleges. Colleges should study the partnerships and linkages developed by their colleagues, and use them to help identify new potential linkages. In this publication you will nd: An overview of the entire public FET sector and the 11 new programmes that make up the National Certicate (Vocational) qualications. A two-page showcase of each FET college, including the background, student support services, and critical skills needs they are addressing, as well as the strategic partnerships forged with government, local and international business and community organisations. A summary of case study research into best practice within our colleges, identifying lessons learned and success achieved across such key practices as quality management, simulators, sta development, student support services, and business incubation and support. I urge you to make good use of this publication, to appreciate the wealth of commitment and learning that has gone into the reality behind the pictures and text you see. What happens in this sector in the years ahead is now up to us. FET colleges are institutions for all South Africans. Find out all about their programmes in this publication. Lastly, on behalf of my Department, I want to thank the Danish Embassy and Ambassador Torben Brylle not only for providing the funding to make this publication possible, but for their consistent support for education in this country in past years. Thank you also to the editor, Ms Cornia Pretorius and to the teams of people from DANIDA and RainbowSA, who all helped to make this book a reality. Naledi Pandor Minister of Education Naledi Pandor, Minister of Education

We have to make sure that further education courses are attractive to ambitious students . . . our vision is of a college sector that will be a sector of rst choice

Naledi Pandor, Minister of Education, November 2004

FET colleges are institutions for all South Africans

Contents
Overview...................................... 4 A New College Curriculum .................................................................................8 Case Studies .............
Student Support Services ..........................................16 Inclusive Education ....................................................19 Academic Support: PLATO .........................................24 Simulators ..................................................................27 Sta Development.....................................................32 Diversity Management ..............................................35 Linkages and Programme Units ................................38 Incubation ..................................................................43 Quality Management ................................................46

15

South Africas FET Colleges................................................................. 150 College Contact Details................................................................................. 152

Overview

South Africas 50 public FET colleges oer a rich diversity of education and training programmes to a growing number of students

Introduction South Africas 50 public Further Education and Training (FET) colleges are young institutions. They were created as recently as 2002 in terms of the FET Act, No 98 of 1998 with the declaration of former technical colleges, colleges of education and training centres into 50 merged FET colleges. The reason for the reform was captured in the 2001 Report of the Department of Educations National Landscape Task Team: combining smaller and weaker colleges with stronger institutions would develop economies of scale and create capacity within colleges to reach more students, and oer a wider range of programmes, ultimately positioning them better to meet social and economic demands. The mergers commanded substantial institutional energy, at a time when concerns over unemployment, training and economic growth were growing by leaps and bounds. But when the call nally came from the highest level for colleges to step up their game coupled

with the nancial commitment to do so the merger growing pains dimmed. In 2004, President Thabo Mbeki said: We will, during the course of this nancial year, recapitalise all the technical colleges and intermediate training institutions, ensuring that they have the necessary infrastructure, capacity and programmes relevant to the needs of our economy. Subsequently, the FET colleges sector has become a central feature of the governments strategy to tackle skills shortages, job creation and economic growth. For instance, the National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS) 2005-2010 provides for close co-operation between Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) and FET colleges. Later sections of this book provide details on this. In addition, the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA), a government intervention set on removing blockages to development, has identied the need for focused interventions in education.

One of these is: A huge upgrading of FET colleges. To act upon these priorities, the Joint Initiative on Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA) was created. JIPSA has identied growth sectors that lack adequately skilled persons, including Engineering, Construction, Financial Management, Management, IT, Tourism and Business Process Outsourcing. For instance, in the IT networking eld alone, there will be an estimated 113 000 vacancies in the next three years. In the areas of internet protocol telephony, security and wireless technology, around 60 000 posts will be vacant. South Africa is also short of artisans, thanks to robust economic growth, but also because of the ageing of current artisans who are, on average, 54 years of age. FET colleges are now gearing up to make a contribution to these skills areas.

The recapitalisation process The ability of colleges to make the contribution expected of them has been given huge momentum by the governments R1,9-billion allocation for the FET sectors recapitalisation. Education Minister Naledi Pandor said during 2006 that the recapitalisation process would fast-track the Department of Educations ongoing eorts since 1995 to transform the FET sector. Some of the negative features of the then technical colleges that the department has been trying to overhaul are:

Preparation for recap Following the commitment of government, the Department of Education and colleges prepared for the recapitalisation process during 2005, while 2006 was used for monitoring and implementation of plans. In the preparatory phase, the department commissioned a comprehensive report on skills needs, compiled a database of FET college programmes, concluded an audit of the infrastructure and IT facilities of 236 college sites, developed 50 college recapitalisation plans, drafted a sector recapitalisation plan and produced the rst draft of a reformed FET college curriculum. The drafting of the new college curriculum and design of the National Certicate (Vocational) in 11 elds of study aligned with AsgiSA priority skills areas and many additional specialisations or electives has been a central part of the recapitalisation process. The aims, structure and programme of the National Certicate (Vocational) are outlined in the next section of this book. During 2006, the funds were transferred, the new curriculum was gazetted, lecturers were trained, textbooks were written, tenders and the specications for infrastructure and equipment were awarded, examiners were appointed and students were recruited. In addition, the Department of Education developed a state of readiness instrument to determine whether colleges were prepared to introduce the new curriculum in 2007. Coupled with the multimillion-rand recapitalisation programme, Finance Minister Trevor Manuel announced in his mini Budget his MediumTerm Budget Policy Statement late in 2006 that R600 million would be forthcoming for student nancial aid. In his 2007 Budget Speech, Manuel announced that another R600 million would be made available to deserving students in the FET college sector.

FET colleges rst The FET Colleges Act, which was passed in Parliament in 2006, consolidates and supports initiatives such as: NSDS, AsgiSA, JIPSA, recap and the delivery of a new curriculum. Education Minister Naledi Pandor has called it one of the most signicant pieces of legislation in the area of skills development and vocational education. The aim of the Act is to strengthen colleges responsiveness, co-ordination and quality. It will position colleges to teach the skills that are recognised and identied by AsgiSA and JIPSA. This legal muscle, which is now framing the emergence of this young sector, also gives substance to the Ministers call for FET Colleges First. From as early as 2004, the Minister has been calling for colleges to be rst choice institutions and not last resort places of learning. At present, there are about 400 000 students enrolled at FET colleges, but the Department of Education wants to increase the number of students enrolled in priority programmes to one million in 2014. The recapitalisation process, the new National Certicate (Vocational) and the drive of FET colleges to make a contribution have got the sector o to a favourable start. The FET sectors response This book conrms the promise of the FET sector young and enthusiastic to step into the huge role with which it has been entrusted. For instance, it shows that colleges have not been idling aimlessly as they waited for their grand moment to arrive. Many of them have started to pursue best practices and processes. These range from Quality Management Systems to Student Support Services units; from the professionalisation of lecturers to opening doors to students with disabilities.

Programmes that were outdated and unresponsive to the emerging economy; Low throughput rates and negligible industry take-up of students; Those working in colleges had lost contact with industry and had little knowledge of new trends, new technology and the new shape of business in South Africa and beyond; Education policies for the sector bore little relationship to new demands, funding was inadequate and colleges were somewhat like schools with training workshops.

The recapitalisation project has already gone a long way to address these concerns. With budget items for infrastructure, equipment and ICT, and the development of professional sta in relation to new programmes, administrative systems and curriculum reform, it represents a comprehensive renewal of FET colleges. Thanks to recap as it has become commonly known in FET circles colleges are poised to increase the number of students who are training in priority skills areas and ensure their employability and/or entry into higher education.

Overview

Overview
FET colleges have heeded the call to be responsive, with exciting and wide-ranging linkages with the private sector, government departments, municipalities, SETAs and educational institutions abroad. With these initiatives, FET colleges enhance the opportunities for students to gain practical experience and job placements. But colleges are also expressing responsiveness through a keen sense of their role as community resources. Colleges have been reaching out to the communities they serve, be they settlements of the big cities or the far-ung villages of vast rural areas. This enables them to deliver education and training on the broadest geographical scale, to communities that would otherwise not be reached. Geographical reach is a strength that colleges are acutely aware of. There is evidence in this book of how colleges are using their geographical location to make a contribution to the communities that surround them; to be an accessible education and training resource to all. Perhaps the most striking feature of the FET sector that emerges from this book is how diverse the colleges are. Institutions range in size and number of sites; in the programmes and courses they oer; in their strategic partnerships and in how they are managed. The character of colleges does not only dier from one college to another. Each college has dierent sites some as many as nine and each of these campuses diers from the next. This rich texture in the FET landscape gives colleges a collective exibility to live up to their mandate in the skills revolution. In this, they have the support of the national government and provincial and national departments of education. The colleges are seeking greater support from employers to participate in the renewal of the sector by providing opportunities for students to do their practical training. Setting the tone in this respect is the construction sector (Murray & Roberts, Aveng/Grinaker-LTA, Wilson Bayley Holmes-Ovcons/WBHO, Group Five and Basil Read) which will, in the next ve years, help with the training of artisans at two agship sites which will have 1 000 students each by 2009. This partnership is expected to be the rst of many and one of the many signs that the tide for FET colleges has turned. Education Minister Naledi Pandor captured the mood best when she said at the introduction of the FET Bill in the National Assembly at the end of 2006: The time for the college sector has come. Sources: Human Sciences Research Councils HRD Review 2003, Chapter 14, Public Further Education and Training Colleges and www.gov.za.

Since 2005, the Umsobomvu Youth Fund has supported young people to access skills training programmes at selected FET colleges. These colleges were supported from the 2005/2006 Budget allocation. The fund has committed to approve funding in the 2006/2007 nancial year to an additional 10 FET colleges. In addition to supporting skills training, the Umsobomvu Youth Fund has supported the establishment of Youth Advisory Centres (YAC) at selected colleges. By December 2006, there were 17 YAC points located at FET Colleges. In each case, the fund supports a YAC to the amount of R190 000 per college. These funds are used to employ youth at FET colleges to provide advisory services on opportunities available to youth. Naledi Pandor, Minister of Education, Parliamentary brieng, February 2006

Students at ORBIT FET College assemble an innovative new solar cooking utensil designed for use in rural communities

The 2006 FET Colleges Act In the past six years, the colleges have been restructured, but this process needed to be consolidated through a specic college-focused law. It is the aim of the FET Colleges Act to achieve this consolidation. Through the FET Colleges Act, the Department hopes to develop a skills prole that signals a greater correspondence between economic development and human capital. A number of developments, including government plans to boost petrochemical industries and power generation, mean new skills requirements. This requires institutions to train individuals with the appropriate skills and in the numbers required by industry and other sectors. The Act has to be understood against this backdrop. There is a plethora of institutions, organisations, businesses and individuals all involved in training. Despite this, skills gaps remain and trainees fail to secure jobs in sectors that critically need skilled practitioners. The FET Colleges Act provides the legislative framework to strengthen the responsiveness, co-ordination and quality of training in FET colleges. All indicators of economic growth and development point to the fact that we must have more artisans in all the economic sectors in our country. The Department believes colleges are best placed to teach these skills alongside industry and other partners. Now is the time for employers to look to the college sector for those critical skills they need. The Act also removes ambiguities that have been associated with the 1998 FET Act. The FET Act of 1998 did not dierentiate colleges from high schools oering FET-level programmes. The 1998 Act limits the colleges in a range of ways. First, currently college sta are employed under the Employment of Educators Act the same Act that determines the employment of school-based educators. One of the negative eects of this is that a college has to draw from school vacancy lists as a rst source of sta. Thus, even if a college is in need of a skilled technical person, it may be required to employ a language educator who is on the vacancy list. The Act addresses the situation and places the employment of college lecturers, who can deliver high quality programmes, on a sound and secure footing. Secondly, colleges are currently obliged to employ educators with educational qualications, even where the specic need is for an expert in the eld of banking, or toolmaking. The Act addresses the situation and makes it possible for colleges to engage the best teachers for the task. Thirdly, colleges need to be able to oer classes in the evening or on weekends and in facilities that are adult-friendly. The Act improves the situation so that colleges do not keep school time or terms and are available to both teenagers and adults. The Act also establishes the possibility of greater articulation and mobility between colleges and universities. The Act creates a platform for colleges to respond more adequately to the skills needs of South Africa. It introduces exibility and focus into the sector. The FET Colleges Act is designed to enable college councils and management to make colleges a sought-after and attractive choice for school-leavers, and for adult learners to enrol.

... the FET Colleges Act, hopes to develop a skills prole that signals a greater correspondence between economic development and human capital.

Overview

A New College Curriculum

Colleges market the new National Certicate (Vocational) qualications

Creating New Opportunities The governments Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA) has identied skilled artisans and vocational skills as critical for sustained economic growth.The new National Certicate (Vocational) is a comprehensive and co-ordinated response to this skills agenda. The National Certicate (Vocational) is offered across the various FET colleges in 11 economic sectors. Government funding of these programmes aims to ensure that these 11 programmes provide the skills to reduce unemployment and grow the economy. The programmes that each college has chosen to phase in from 2007 were selected to support the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy. The infrastructural face-lift of colleges under the recapitalisation initiative is not only about creating more favourable learning and teaching conditions. Recap is about providing the learning environment for the delivery of the National Certicate (Vocational). The new National Certicate (Vocational) is the mechanism to do so, enabling an enthusiastic

FET college sector to make its contribution to the critical need for intermediate to advanced skills. While the National Certicate (Vocational) aims to grow skills for a more productive economy, it also aims to give students access to skills, knowledge, values and attitudes for lifelong learning and a solid vocational foundation. A New College Curriculum The process of drafting the curriculum started in mid-2005. The Department of Education invited potential writers from industry, Sector Education & Training Authorities (SETAs) and FET colleges to participate in an inclusive process to draft a new curriculum. The department wanted a responsive curriculum of high quality, intended to yield the skills that employers wanted, and appropriately structured, allowing exibility for the employed, unemployed, school-leavers, out-of-school youth and adults enrolled at public FET institutions. The brief from the department to the curriculum developers was to consult as widely as possible. However, the consultation process was uneven.

Some of the writers groups consulted successfully, but others struggled to network adequately. These diculties slowed down the process. When, in April 2006, close to nalisation, some stakeholders wanted to povide additional comments, an extension was allowed. Comments at this late stage delayed the conclusion of the exercise, but strengthened the curriculum that nally emerged. In this pressure cooker as Penny Vinjevold, Deputy Director-General of FET, has described the process a new FET college curriculum was created.

While the [NC (V)] aims to grow skills for a more productive economy, it also aims to give students access to skills, knowledge, values and attitudes for lifelong learning and a solid vocational foundation

National Certicate (Vocational) Modern, relevant and responsive, the National Certicate (Vocational) or NC(V) will replace all Department of Education programmes in the FET (college) sector incrementally from 2007 onwards. The previous programmes have some value, but are generally outdated, including the National Technical Education, better known as NATED programmes (N1 to N6), some of which have not been revised since the 1980s. Other programmes to be replaced are the National Certicate Orientation (NCOR) or N1, which was an orientation programme used to bridge the maths and science gap some students might have; the National Intermediate Certicate (NIC), which is parallel to Grade 11 and the National Senior Certicate (NSC), parallel to the Senior Certicate, commonly known as matric. In replacing these programmes, the NC(V) is responding to scarce and high-demand skills, but is also heeding calls from employers that they want thinking employees. In the 21st-century workplace, high levels of written and spoken communication skills, work ethics and personal management are highly valued. Mastery of these so-called soft skills is based on a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of reading, writing, calculating and basic IT abilities. This is why the NC(V) comprises three compulsory subjects: Language (rst additional), Mathematics or Mathematical Literacy and Life Skills (which includes IT) alongside the four vocational or specialisation subjects. Both the compulsory and vocational subjects are spread across 11 programmes or vocational elds of study, including Management, Electrical Infrastructure Construction, Primary Agriculture and Tourism (see table on page 14 for a full listing). The 11 programmes correspond with, amongst others, the priority areas identied by AsgiSA. The NC(V) has been phased in at FET colleges from January 2007. The qualication, oered at NQF Levels 2, 3 and 4, allows for its staggered

implementation. This means the National Certicate (Vocational) at NQF Level 2 is introduced in 2007, followed by NQF Level 3 in 2008 and NQF Level 4 in 2009. Unlike the trimester N-courses, the NC(V) courses are year-long courses. This means a certicate will be awarded after successful completion of each NQF level, following a national external examination. This structure allows students the exibility to complete a certicate on one NQF level, work for a year and pick up their studies again. Implementation The Department of Education has put extensive measures in place to ascertain whether the sector and individual colleges are ready in 2007 to proceed with the implementation of the NC(V). In a move to ensure quality in the delivery of the new qualication, colleges had to prove their state of readiness to oer specic programmes. During 2006, a Ministerial Readiness Task Team visited 38 colleges.

Departmental representatives followed up later in the year measuring colleges preparedness against a list of resources for each of the 11 programmes. The checklist gauged whether individual colleges could proceed with oering particular programmes or not. In the meantime, publishers were commissioned to produce materials and approved materials were made available. A total of 1 861 college lecturers were trained to oer the new programmes and examiners were appointed to start preparing for the rst national NC(V) NQF Level 2 examination at the end of 2007. These steps have helped to prepare colleges for a new era during which they can make a historic contribution to the growth and development of South Africa.

In the 21st-century workplace, high levels of written and spoken communication skills, work ethics and personal management are highly valued. Mastery of these so-called soft skills is based on a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of reading, writing, calculating and basic IT abilities.

Curriculum

A New College Curriculum


Construction Sector Frequently Asked Questions Q: How is the National Certicate (NC) for colleges dierent from the school-based National Curriculum Statement (NCS)? A: The faces in the table below illustrate the key elements common to the two qualications.
Subjects Mathematics / Mathematical Literacy Home Language First Additional Language Life Orientation Additional subjects National Senior Certicate National Certicate (Vocational)


Three subjects


Four subjects (Three compulsory + one optional)

We were approached by the National Department of Education to comment on the curriculum. Despite the limited time available, I made numerous suggestions about what I felt should be included and what should be left out. Many of these changes were accepted by the department and their response to our comments must be commended. However, the success of the National Certicate (Civil Engineering and Building Construction) will depend on the course material and how the curriculum will be taught. I would like to think that the curriculum is not cast in stone as I believe that the second and third year of the curriculum still needs a bit more work and that we might also nd that the rst year may need some changes depending on feed-back from the students, industry and the colleges. Personally, I would like to see more emphasis on the practical side of some of the courses possibly a 50:50 split between theory and practical, rather than the current 60:40 split, as I believe this will make the students more employable. Paul Netscher, WBHO (Wilson Bayly Holmes-Ovcons)

Q: Why was the curriculum changed? How are these programmes dierent from the old ones? A: The NATED programmes, while having some merit, do not really provide for the development of cognitive skills or for an integrated approach to learning. There was a separation of practical and theory and the literacy, numeracy and life skills required for employment were not taken care of. This in large part contributed to their unrealistically short duration, resulting in speedy certication at the expense of grounded education. Research has demonstrated that the mere acquisition of practical skills is insucient to meet the broad economic and specic workplace challenges of the 21st century. Cognitive demands are increasingly being placed even on workers previously regarded as semi-skilled. The new programmes are therefore, of year-long duration, provide for integrated practical and theoretical learning and, in addition, compel students to become competent in analysis and synthesis, reading, writing, and logical thinking. This is catered for through the fundamental component, which comprises Language, Mathematics or Mathematical Literacy and Life Orientation. Q: How are the fundamental subjects in the National Certicate (Vocational) dierent from the National Curriculum Statement for schools? A: The overlap in the content for First Additional Language and Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy is about 80%. This indicates a signicant overlap and was intentionally designed in this way to ensure equivalence in cognitive demand and to promote mobility between the school National Senior Certicate and the NC (Vocational) college curriculum. Q: Can the language in the National Certicate (Vocational) be any of the ocial languages? A: Yes. All languages are included in the NC(V) policy document. The language chosen for the fundamental component must also be the language of learning and teaching. English has been developed, followed by Afrikaans and Xhosa. The other languages will be developed in the sequence of the needs conveyed to the National Department of Education. Any of the ocial 11 languages may also be oered as the fourth (optional) vocational subject.

Q: How does the National Certicate (Vocational) link to SETA programmes? A: The NC(V) is not a unit standard-based qualication but the content for subjects has been mapped against and assembled using unit standards. For this reason, much of the content in the vocational subjects overlaps with outcomes in unit standards. Q: Will the SETAs recognise subjects/levels passed in the National Certicate (Vocational)? A: The SETAs will take a decision whether they will recognise subjects passed based on the learning outcomes contained in the corresponding Department of Education subject guidelines. Q: Will learners who complete a level at school be able to proceed directly into the next level of a college programme? A: The learner will get credit for those subjects that overlap with the college programme, for example, the fundamentals and, perhaps, one specialist subject from the NCS (such as Tourism or Hospitality Studies): competence in the other subjects in the vocational specialisation of the college programme will have to be achieved before going to the next level. Q: Does the NC(V) lead to higher education? A: Yes. The National Department of Education is presently in discussions with Higher Education South Africa (HESA) and the South African Qualications Authority (SAQA) to formalise this study pathway. Q: What will the student be qualied to do after three years? A: Students will essentially have the following options: Access work opportunities in a work environment or a sector relevant to his/her vocational specialisation (such as a bank/insurance company after doing the Financial, Economics and Accounting programme). Access the workplace with the occupational specialisation he/she might have opted for through the fourth subject option (such as Motor Mechanics after opting for Automotive Repair and Maintenance). Decide to progress into higher education. Pursue further training at the same/horizontal level. Go into self-employment. Q: Who will quality assure the practical component of the assessment? A: The responsibility will be with Umalusi, the Council for Quality Assurance in General and Further Education and Training, which may choose to delegate aspects of this function to a relevant Education & Training Quality Assurance (ETQA) body. Q: Who will develop the materials? A: Publishers will do so as per the agreement between the National Department of Education and the Publishers Association of South Africa (PASA) and publishing houses. Q: Will all levels (NQF Levels 2,3 and 4) of exams be external? A: Yes.

Financial Services Sector

The National Department of Education approached the Institute for Public Finance and Auditing (IPFA) in March 2006 to comment on the new curriculum for the National Certicate (Finance, Economics and Accounting). IPFA, a professional body for public nance staff, was thrilled to be involved in this project. We believe that the philosophy behind the new curriculum is an admirable one; that of providing learners with vocationally specic skills that will assist them in following a career in a particular sector and providing employers with employees who have skills that are relevant, usable and productive. In IPFAs view, whether this philosophy translates into delivering what employers and students so desperately need will depend largely on the extent to which colleges and lecturers embrace their role in this initiative. PFiQs dealings with the lecturers have proven to both IPFA and PFiQ (IPFAs commercial arm, Public Finance IQ) that the colleges and lecturers certainly have the talent required to implement this new intervention. Karen Prinsloo, Professional Development Manager, IPFA

Curriculum

11

A New College Curriculum


IT Sector Q: Will the NQF Levels 2 and 3 papers be marked and moderated internally or externally? A: The Department of Education: Educational Measurement, Assessment and Public Examinations, will manage the marking and moderation process for all three NQF levels. Q: Does the 200 hours allocated per subject refer to contact time? A: This is a good indication of what the contact time should be. This allocation is based on the premise that there are 40 weeks in the academic year. This full-time academic year of study is inclusive of tuition and assessment. Q: Who will provide the certicates at each NQF level? A: Umalusi. The National Department of Education will issue statements of results.
In general, the [review] team felt that the NC(V) curriculum was highly relevant as a qualication for the IT industry. The challenge is to translate this curriculum into a vibrant course that is able to provide learners with the necessary skills, attitudes and values needed in order to become productive members of society. The curriculum is contextualised within the framework of the workplace and the curriculum support material must highlight this together with relevant examples. CSIR, through the Meraka Institute, which has a mandate for people development and research and innovation in IT.

Q: Will students who fail have to repeat the full year? A: Students will not have to repeat all subjects but it will cost them a year. The student may repeat only the failed subjects but will not be allowed to proceed to the next level for any of the other subjects that were passed. Each level must be completed before proceeding to the next level. Q: How will the programmes be funded? A: They will be funded through a new programme-based funding model that has been developed. This means that a sum, expressed in rands, will be allocated to a student in a specic vocational programme. One portion of this sum (80%) will be subsidised by government, and the other portion (balance) will be regarded as a fee to be paid by the student. In many instances this amount will be covered by bursaries awarded to students. Q: Who will teach Life Orientation? A: Colleges have identied and trained personnel to teach this subject. Orientation training has been provided by the Department of Education. In addition to this, funds allocated to colleges under the recapitalisation plan must be used for this purpose. Q: Will there be any training for lecturers? A: There was national orientation training provided by the department in the 11 programmes. However, provinces and colleges will complement this with their own training. Q: Can colleges continue to oer short courses? A: Yes. This is encouraged for colleges to be regarded as responsive. However, these courses will not be funded by the Department of Education and will, therefore, have to be funded from other sources. Q: What happens to the N1 to N3 courses not covered by the new programmes (for instance, Clothing Production; Art and Design)? A: These should be oered via the SETAs until such time that they come under the pool of priority programmes oered and funded by the Department of Education. Q: What happens to the N4 to N6 programmes for 2007? A: The status quo remains until an equivalent qualication is developed and is ready to be oered.

Q: How will the phasing out of the old programmes occur? A: The phasing out will happen as follows: 2007 -N1, National Certicate in Orientation (NCOR) and equivalent. 2008 - N2, National Intermediate Certicate (NIC) and equivalent. 2009 - N3, National Senior Certicate and equivalent. Q: Will the National Certicate Orientation (NCOR) still be oered? A: No. This programme was designed to orientate students for the Engineering programmes that were oered in trimester format. There was no time for the orientation of students in the 10 to 12 weeks of teaching of the N1 programmes. The new programmes eliminate the need for the NCOR because they are year-long programmes. Q: How will artisans be catered for? A: The Department of Education and the Department of Labour have agreed that there will be three routes to artisanship. These are: learnerships, the National Certicate (Vocational) and Workplace Artisan Training. All of these routes will be completed with the requisite trade test to obtain artisanship. Q: What will happen to students who cannot aord full-year courses? A: Bursaries are available through applications made directly to the colleges. Q: Will there be additional exams for students who fail programmes that are being phased out? A: Yes. There will be additional exams for learners to work themselves out of the system. These opportunities will be provided in the year following the phasing out of the specic level of programme. Q: How did the National Department of Education arrive at the 11 priority programmes? A: The skills reports completed by the SETAs as well as by dierent research institutions were reviewed. The high demand skills that were identied were then clustered into the dierent sectors of economic activity identied by AsgiSA. The NC(V) programmes are matched against these sectors, viz, Tourism, Finance, Electrical Infrastructure Construction, and so on. Q: Do these programmes respond to the needs of industry? A: Yes. The various stakeholders were engaged at dierent stages of the curriculum writing process. These include: the SETAs, business, industry, professional bodies and related interest organisations. In addition, reference persons were used to review the relevance of the curriculum content. Q: What can colleges do if they want to oer programmes that have not as yet been developed? A: Colleges can apply to the Department of Education via the Provincial Departments of Education for programmes to be approved for development.

Structure of the NC(V)

Three compulsory subjects

Communication (language, which must be one of the ofcial languages in South Africa and should be offered as a language of teaching and learning); Mathematics or Mathematical Literacy; and Life Orientation.

Four vocational subjects.

Generally three of the vocational subjects for each programme are compulsory and allow for high levels of specialisation. However, the fourth subject may be chosen from any vocational programme.

Curriculum

13

A New College Curriculum


The New National Certicate (Vocational) Programmes
NATIONAL CERTIFICATE VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS Quantities, Setting Out and Costing of Designs; Construction Contracting; Construction Equipment and Machinery; Construction Masonry; Wood Working Process; Road Construction; and Physical Science. Electrical Principles and Practice; Electronic Control and Digital Electronics; Electrical Workmanship; Electrical Systems; and Construction. CAREER OPTIONS

Civil Engineering and Building Construction

Architectural technology; drainage inspection; quantity surveying; town regional planning; sanitation engineering; road construction engineering; civil construction engineering; and building construction. Electrical engineering; industrial engineering; sound technology; theatre technology; process level control; digital electronics; and instrumentation. Car manufacturing; architectural technology; welding; tool making; automotive repair; motor mechanics; panel beating; manufacturing and industrial engineering; metallurgical and materials engineering; geological engineering; aerospace engineering; tting and machining; chemical engineering; civil engineering; mining engineering; mining metallurgy; petroleum engineering; and mechanical engineering. Private and public accounting; banking; nancial services; insurance services; investment broking; and bookkeeping. Housekeeping; food and beverage management; hotel management; accommodation services; and events management. Computer programming; information technology management; computer systems engineering; and data processing and information management Human resources; marketing; nancial management; public relations; production; and ofce administration. Marketing; business management; promotions and advertising; marketing research; product development; public relations; merchandising; brand management and customer relations. Accounting and bookkeeping; ofce management; ofce administration; freight forwarder; human resources management; personnel management; private secretary; front line reception; recruitment or employment agent; self employment; legal secretarial services; and personal and general secretarial services. Agricultural economics; agricultural science; farm management; forestry; botany; horticulture; food technology; food science; and viticulture. Accommodation management; conference and events planning; restaurant and food services; tourism development; transportation management; travel counselling; and game ranging and safari work.

Electrical Infrastructure Construction

Engineering and Related Design

Engineering Fundamentals; Engineering Technology; Engineering Systems; Automotive Repair and Maintenance; Fitting and Turning; and Engineering Fabrication.

Finance, Economics and Accounting

Applied Accounting; Economic Environment; Financial Management; and New Venture Creation. Food Preparation; Hospitality Generics; Client Services and Human Relations; and Hospitality Services. Introduction to Information Systems; Electronics; Introduction to Systems Development; and Contact Centre Operations. Management Practice; Operations Management; Financial Management; Entrepreneurship and Project Management. Advertising and Promotions; Marketing; Marketing Communication; and Consumer Behaviour.

Hospitality

Information Technology and Computer Science

Management

Marketing

Ofce Administration

Business Practice; Ofce Practice; Ofce Data Processing; and Applied Accounting or Second Language or Personal Assistance.

Primary Agriculture

Soil Science; Plant Production; Animal Production; and Agribusiness. Science of Tourism; Client Service and Human Relations; Sustainable Tourism in South Africa; and Tourism Operations.

Tourism

Case Studies

Colleges are a critical part of the nations response to the challenges of addressing unemployment and poverty

Case Studies

15

Student Support Services


CASE STUDIES

Student support systems are aimed at improving students lives, in particular their learning abilities and their ultimate chances in the labour market

About student support services Student support systems are aimed at improving students lives, in particular their learning abilities and their ultimate chances in the labour market. This can range from academic support and nancial aid to health care and encouraging extramural cultural and sporting activities. Since learning and teaching are core activities of FET colleges, academic support is a critical component because it has a pervasive inuence on the quality of all programmes. However, it must be noted that this activity is undertaken by all sta and not necessarily only by academic support specialists. Student support services and strategies aimed at promoting academic success should, therefore, be institutionalised to form part of the overall development of an institution, and not only of students.

For instance, a well-stocked library, study centres, modern equipment and enough textbooks not only optimise students abilities to learn, but also benet lecturers by improving the conditions under which they teach. Other ways in which academic support can be institutionalised is by ensuring sta development to enhance teaching practices and, ultimately, the success of students. Good course design could provide for language and literacy development in mainstream teaching of vocational education content knowledge. Linkages and Programme Units can assist by setting up links with business and industry to help in the placing of students for practical training and permanent employment. Marketing divisions can ensure that students receive correct information before and after admission. Overall, student support in the academic domain involves academic sta who can also help the support unit with the ongoing tracking of students results. The unit itself could provide thorough pre-course brieng to help students to make informed decisions about what they study; provide general academic support, including study skills to help them succeed, and simulation facilities for practical training to help them nd jobs. One college that has started putting its Student Support Services to work for the institution as a whole is Lephalale FET College in Limpopo.
Source: 2006 HSRC Report, Towards a Framework for Organising Academic Support to Improve Student Support in FET Colleges & National Department of Education

Lephalale FET College On any given day of the academic year, there are small groups of students occupying the wooden tables and chairs just outside Lephalale FET Colleges Student Support Centre. Some are having meetings; others are simply relaxing. Centrally situated on the colleges campus in the bushveld town of Ellisras in Limpopo, the centre is a drawcard for all of its students. It is a hub of social activity, not only for those faced with academic, personal, health or nancial diculties. Being welcoming and accessible is a special strength of the centre that has been making an impact on student wellbeing on campus. The centre was built in 2001 after the colleges council approved the project. A growth in student numbers at the college made it increasingly dicult for sta members to cope with student

support that was spread out across many units and departments and that was conducted in a haphazard fashion. The thinking was that, if the college had one centre, it could pull together and co-ordinate all the services together under one roof. More importantly, the restructuring would make support services more accessible to students. Rina van Jaarsveld, the project manager who has been responsible for the centre from the beginning, believes easy access to student support is critical. A student with a problem does not want to wait for two hours or 10 hours. By that time, he or she would have found their own solution to the problem and it will not necessarily be the best solution, she said. While planning the centre, Van Jaarsveld probed lecturers on the kind of support they were

oering and asked students what they wanted from such a centre. The college also looked at student support units at other colleges in South Africa and abroad but, in the end, came up with a centre and services it believed spoke essentially to the specic needs of the students of Lephalale FET College. We did what we felt our students needed. Other colleges may do things dierently because their students have dierent needs, said Van Jaarsveld. The colleges investment in the building and in people to provide the services is paying o with testimonies from students calling the Student Support Centre the best place in the college and a place that can make your life simple and easy.

Case Studies

17

Student Support Services


The colleges initiative has also earned it recognition from the outside. In 2003, it won the Ministerial Award for Student Support Services from the National Department of Education. Inside the centre, which has three sta members, is a study area, a small library, a computer room, facilities for photocopying, a room for counselling and a lecture hall for workshops or discussions. This is being used for academic purposes because of a growth in student numbers but, once recapitalisation funds provide for additional classrooms, it will revert to the support centre. There is also a common room in which to play games and read newspapers, which are bought on the days when they are packed with job advertisements. With these facilities and the activities and programmes generated there, the college oers academic, nancial, personal, leadership, discipline and workplace-related services (students pay a nominal fee for professional services). Through these services, the college aims to enable students to discover and develop their potential, to function optimally in every aspect of student life, to enjoy a safe, orderly educational environment and to obtain a personal vision of the future. Rosina Mokgotu, manager of the centre, is responsible for a variety of services. These range from overseeing the tracking of students, which means checking after three months why they might have dropped out, to overseeing the experiential training of N6 Business Studies students, who do their practical work such as phoning, faxing and e-mailing at the centre. Mokgotu will also ensure that students who fall ill or need urgent counselling are taken to the nearby hospital. But students can also make appointments to see a clinic sister during her weekly visits. Other services include leadership and communication training for Student Representative Council members, counselling and training sessions in areas such as HIV/Aids (through a partnership with Gateway International) and nancial aid. The college oers bursaries (the college pays for up to four subjects if students achieve 80% and higher) and bursaries are available from companies such as Eskom. In terms of academic and workplace support, the centre arranges for extra classes in subjects in which students struggle. Workplace support includes mock interviews, while the college can respond quickly when local companies are looking for employees. Mokgotu said she uses the opportunity to observe students who work at the centre to identify suitable candidates for possible placement. Pinpointing the centres exact contribution to the academic development of students and their success in nding jobs is tricky, as other factors such as a students hard work could also have played its part. I keep statistics of trends such as the throughput rate, but they dont tell us what the role of the centre was. We just know the centre means a lot to students because they tell us so, said Van Jaarsveld. With student support services well-established at the main campus, the next step is to focus on its two satellite campuses, Modimolle and Amandelbult. At present, lecturers are providing support as there are not yet many students on these campuses. However, as the campuses grow, the services will be formalised like those in Ellisras.

A student with a problem does not want to wait for two hours or ten hours. By that time he or she would have found an own solution to their problem and it will not necessarily be the best solution.

Inclusive Education
CASE STUDIES

Sydney Motene, a student, and Eunice Masemola from the student support oce of Tshwane North FET College. Despite Motenes mild intellectual disability - he sustained a head injury as a child - he successfully completed an art course at the college, and is shown here with one of his works. (Picture: Beeld)

About inclusive education Inclusive education is about ensuring that all learners, with or without disabilities, pursue their learning potential to the fullest. It is based on the principles of the Constitution of South Africa, which states that everyone has the basic right to an education. This has been developed into Education White Paper 6 which, instead of segregating learners with disabilities, categorises them according to the intense level of support they need, and looks for ways to include them at every level of educational practice backed up by district-support systems. Support is seen as a dynamic process. It is dened as all activities that increase the capacity of an institution to respond to diversity.

Case Studies

19

Inclusive Education
There are guidelines on how teaching methodologies and lesson plans can be adapted to allow for learners or students with different needs in one class; and how identication and assessment will focus not only on learners or students intrinsic barriers but become a holistic process involving learners, parents and teachers, and relying less on professionals. Several FET colleges have started to include students with disabilities and oer varying degrees of support to students. These colleges are guided by the principles of the Constitution and the direction of the Education White Paper 6 and the Employment Equity Act. More importantly, the colleges that have been responsive to these policies display a keen sense of responsibility towards access by providing opportunities to everyone, including people with disabilities. Some of the colleges that are attracting students with disabilities include: Elangeni, Tshwane North, Maluti, College of Cape Town, Vuselela, Thekwini and False Bay FET colleges.

Vuselela FET College Fenced in with a concrete hedge between Phakamile and Thabong Streets on the fringe of the semi-urban Jouberton Township are a couple of neat face-brick buildings adorned by white rose bushes and green acacia trees. This is the Jouberton campus of Vuselela FET College in North West, a stones throw from the hurly-burly of Klerksdorps industrial area with its wholesalers, retailers and manufacturers of electrical and mechanical components. The campus is in the heart of the Matlosana Municipality and its towns of Hartbeesfontein, Stilfontein, Orkney, Jouberton and Klerksdorp. On the Jouberton campus, there are signs everywhere that this is a place where people with disabilities are welcome: from the wheelchair ramps to the wider-than-usual doors; from the Toilets for Disabled sign to the wheelchairbound and crutch-assisted students in a lecture room marked as North Hall. Dorcas Gobiyeza, 28, is one of these students. We do not have training opportunities like normal people. We are not taken seriously. This is why I was so happy and so excited when I heard that we could come here to do computers, she says. Her excitement is shared by every single student in the class and they seem to speak with one voice: how desperate they were for training until

this opportunity came along; how they suddenly have hope for the future because they might nd jobs and how they look forward to learning each day, despite battling to nd public transport. One could argue that Gobiyeza and the other students are simply another small group of beneciaries of the National Department of Educations policy on inclusive education. Indeed, the North West Department of Education, in the implementation of this policy, was looking towards FET colleges to start acting upon the clear message from White Paper 6 on Inclusive Education. But, when Vuselelas head oce, through the Project Manager, Ann Naik, approached its

Jouberton campus to take the policy further, the campus was a deliberate choice. Naik knew that the township was home to two centres where people with disabilities already went for skills training: the Tecford Centre for People with Disabilities and the Ikaheng Centre for the Disabled in Kanana, about 15km from Jouberton. These centres could both feed and support the college as it opened its doors to students. In addition, Campus Manager Annamarie Pitts was ready to take on the challenge, in particular after she and Grieta Pienaar, the Skills Project Manager, went on a drive through the township. When we saw all the disabled people, we simply had to help, Pitts says.

Facilities on the Jouberton Campus of Vuselela FET College welcome students with disabilities

These decisions and directives coincided with the availability of money from the Danish International Development Agencys (DANIDAs), Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) project in South Africa. Dr Piet Manota, the provincial technical adviser for SESD, released funds to prepare the campus as it embarked on the journey of becoming an inclusive educational institution. Wheelchair ramps had to be built, toilets had to be adapted, bigger doors for lecture halls and workshops needed to be tted and special desks for people with wheelchairs had to be acquired. In addition, the North West Department of Education made 15 bursaries available. Vuselela College decided to focus on computer studies as this type of training is not readily available to students with disabilities. Students include those in wheelchairs as well as those with hearing impairments, thanks to Gobiyeza, who is a sign-language interpreter. Since many of the students had not completed their school education some studied only up to Grade 7 the formal training over a period of six months was preceded by six weeks of basic orientation to the computer. Pitts also wanted to nd the right lecturers, who were more than facilitators in class, but people who could support students holistically. Molly Khudunyane and Pearl Maseko, both former students of Vuselela College, tted the description. For Khudunyane, who works on the Jouberton campus, the opportunity to work with people with disabilities was a dream come true. I did not know how to further my goal. When the college phoned me, I thought: This is what I waited for, she says. I have learnt to understand their needs better. For instance some of them tire easily. I also realised how people treat them outside the college. Transport is a huge problem, in particular for those in wheelchairs. They have to wait for taxis, but the taxis just speed past. It worries them and it worries me, she adds. Up till now, the students with disabilities have been on their own, in a separate class, but Pitts is planning to climb another rung of the inclusive

ladder by opening up classes with able-bodied students, too. So, from 2007 they may also participate in the new National Certicate (Vocational) programmes. The work that the Jouberton campus of Vuselela College is doing, is an educational community project. In fact, its community engagement is a distinguishing characteristic of the Jouberton campus. It is a college in and for the community a fact borne out by its student numbers and activities. Of the just over 2 000 students it educates and trains per year, about 870 are in the community beneting from Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET), studying FabricPainting skills, Welding skills, Woodwork skills and Computer skills in particular. This includes about 320 Grade 8 and Grade 9 learners who have access to computer programmes and even some pre-schoolers and primary school pupils who are already getting their rst taste of the technologically driven world. The institutions that the Jouberton campus works with include the Leretletse-Lesedi Secondary School in Ottosdal, the Anglican Church and Ikaheng Centre for the Disabled and Lemohang Day Care Centre in Kanana, the New Vision Secondary School in Klerksdorp and the Tecford Centre for the Disabled in Jouberton. The formal Computer Studies training provided on the Jouberton campus was extended to the Ikaheng Selfhelp Centre for People with Disabilities in Kanana, about 15km from the campus. The Ikaheng centre is a meeting place for the community. Here, toddlers attending the Lemohang Day Care Centre shriek as they glide down a recently donated slide, men and women sit chatting against a shady wall. Inside the building, the smell of mieliepap (maize porridge) travels far into the computer room, where, glued to their screens, students are practising their skills in a small classroom. Down the corridor is a class of six Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) learners, completing an exercise under the supervision of their teacher, Adam Mahapela. Elizabeth Mokoena, the principal of the centre, says the college has brought computer skills and the

The college is really developing us, - Elizabeth Mokoena, Principal of Ikaheng Selfhelp Centre for People with Disabilities

When we saw all the disabled people, we simply had to help, - Campus Manager Annamarie Pitts (left) and Grieta Pienaar, Skills Project Manager, Vuselela FET College, Jouberton

Jo, I like it. What I like is the fact that I can learn something and maybe I can be someone. -- Dorcas Gobiyeza, 28, on what she enjoys about the Computer Studies course she is attending at Vuselela FET Colleges Jouberton campus.

Case Studies

21

Inclusive Education
Vuselela FET College (Jouberton campus) provides computer training to students with disabilities

The work done by the campus for students with disabilities has enriched its sta and students. The combination of formal training and community engagement also underscores the colleges commitment to lifelong learning. However, the fact that the inclusive education projects are categorised as community work does cast a shadow over their longevity. This is because of the reliance on donor funds and goodwill. Pitts summarises the reality in a report about the campuss community projects: These outreach projects are dependent on goodwill, enthusiastic sta and donor funding. They are not sustainable in themselves. The aim is not gain, or nancial sustainability, but to reach out to the less privileged and to be a socially responsible institution.

opportunity for illiterate adults to learn to read and write to the community. The college is really developing us, she says. A small group of eight students is enrolled for the formal Computer

Studies training at the centre. The students study free of charge; Vuselela FET College pays the lecturer and donated the computers. DANIDA paid for the installation of the computers.

Stepping up to an immense need


Adapt to accommodate is how Thekwini FET College in KwaZulu-Natal describes its approach to creating a welcoming space for students with disabilities. Adapt is exactly what lecturer Krige Steyn did when the Asherville campus developed the Special Needs Inclusive Programme. In 2003, two years after he had joined the college, and having had rst-hand experience of learners faced with learning barriers, he realised that the students who came from special schools battled to cope at college. He was teaching Mathematics, Science, Technology and Communication (NCOR) then and decided to take a closer look at the required unit standards for the motor skills NQF Level 2 qualications that included tyre-changing, wheelbalancing and wheel-alignment. Steyn made the changes he deemed necessary. The outcome was a longer training period stretching over two years and covering not only occupational skills, but also life skills. The more accessible curriculum coupled with lecturers who actively tried to build the condence of learners, established a rm foundation for the start of the pilot. Steyn spread the word to a few special schools and, in 2004, eight students with hearing impairments and 30 with mild intellectual disabilities enrolled for a two-year programme offered by Steyn and two other lecturers. A sign language interpreter was employed while Steyn was learning the language. The students are paying their way like all the other students. But Steyn did not want to provide only basic training. I wanted these students to have the same opportunities as the other students. They also had to do practical in-service training, he says. He managed to persuade 24 businesses to allow students to do their practical training. They include rms such as Quick Fit and vehicle agents for the likes of TATA and Volkswagen. After they accepted the rst round of students, the companies have continued to take in students for workplace training. But when the students did their short stints in the workplace, Steyn made sure to visit the employers for the upkeep of this crucial link between the college and employers. At the end of 2006, 15 students completed their studies, seven leaving to take up jobs. One of the students is part of the back-up team for South Africas off-road motorbike king, Ale Cox, who has twice ended among the top ve in the gruelling Paris-Dakar Rally. Despite the achievements, Steyn is keen to continue growing the pool of students with disabilities who can become economically active. The need is immense. I would really like to offer more programmes and accommodate more students, he says, pointing out that he is already attracting students from as far away as Port Elizabeth and East London in the Eastern Cape. Students with special education needs have also been enrolled in areas such as Art, Hair Care and Business Studies, located at the Springeld campus of Thekwini FET College. These students have hearing impairments and have intellectual disabilities. The college has taken several steps to accommodate learners, including the employment of sign language interpreters and also a exible curriculum to allow students more time to complete their qualications.

Taking one step at a time


In 2002, False Bay College, a public FET College in the Western Cape, took a strategic management decision to get serious about offering access to students with disabilities. However, as early as 2000, one of its ve campuses, Muizenberg, had already started to offer Computer Studies to students with disabilities, many of whom were in wheelchairs. Accordingly, the campus was modied to make it more accessible to these students by putting in ramps, a lift and accessible toilets. So, in 2003, when the National Department of Education was looking for an FET college at which to pilot inclusion, False Bay College decided it was ready to take the pioneering work it had started one step further. This demanded a sharper focus on an array of factors: the physical accessibility of all of its campuses, addressing issues around the curriculum, establishing support structures and the recruitment of students. An audit of the facilities was done at each campus of the college and deciencies noted -- for instance, the Good Hope campus in Khayelitsha has three levels, but no lifts. In addition, where programmes were considered too fast-paced for students with learning barriers, such as a National Senior Certicate which comprises six courses, students were encouraged to consider the N3 programmes, with fewer courses. To bridge academic gaps, the college provides tutorial assistance and counselling; it allows for extra time during examinations and it also provides scribes for class tests and major examinations. The college has purchased a number of helping devices to support learning. A full-time occupational therapist, who manages the disability ofce, was appointed to support students with learning and other barriers, together with student support ofcers on each campus. A full-time sign language interpreter joined the college to support deaf students and the college had to source suitable transport for students in wheelchairs. The college also spent time preparing staff members, who were faced with learning to deal with a diverse new range of learning needs. This was extremely challenging for lecturers who were encouraged to consider the needs of students with learning barriers in their teaching methodologies and in their classroom environments. In order to grow their understanding, the college invited specialists in various areas to conduct presentations or workshops with staff, for instance on cerebral palsy. At the start of 2004, the college enrolled 52 disabled students. The group comprised deaf students, some with cerebral palsy and quadriplegics. Many of these students reported learning challenges. In 2005, the college accepted 60 students and, in 2006, 45. While the majority come from special schools, with which the college has developed links, many students are from mainstream schools in the community. But how does False Bay College actually manage inclusion? Karin Hendricks, the colleges Manager for student support services, says it starts with a personal interview. The college encourages a standard interview as part of the general course placement assessment for all students. Following this, the college will conduct a careers assessment to ascertain the students career interest. A more in-depth interview with the student and his or her parents will follow. This takes a closer look at the students medical and schooling history and an assessment of the disability so as to identify properly the support required by the student. We try to get the best possible picture of each student so as to draw up a support plan for that student, explains Hendricks. We also provide a very good orientation. Some of the things the college focuses on during orientation includes: The process of transition/change; The process of overcoming or dealing with change; Outside speakers, including ex-students; Life skills exercises; Practical tips to assist students in dealing with a new environment; and Campus tours.

These students will then join others in all general campus orientation activities. Despite the colleges best efforts, the transition from school to college remains a challenge for many students. Those with disabilities often come from environments in which they have had extensive support. At the college, there is a shift. Suddenly, they have to take a far greater responsibility for their own academic wellbeing. Initially, says Hendricks, students with disabilities were quite a phenomenon on campus. They were stared at. But, today, there has been a huge positive shift in the culture on the colleges campuses. Students with disabilities are no longer viewed as different. The able-bodied are being educated through the mere presence of those who are different, both in class and on campus. Some students have even become advocates for the rights of disabled people. Similarly, the mindsets of lecturers have changed. They have had to rethink their teaching strategies, which now benet all the students -- and this is really what inclusion is all about. But, for Hendricks, the journey has just begun and a long road still lies ahead. There are many challenges, as the creation of an inclusive educational environment requires additional resources, in particular nancial and human resources. Presently, there are only about six qualied and accredited sign language interpreters in Cape Town. This poses huge challenges when training deaf students. The college has, to date, not received funding from the education authorities for its efforts to develop a workable inclusive model for FET colleges. Hendricks emphasises: False Bay College has not produced a awless blueprint. We have merely taken one step. We are still learning. We are still nding our way.

Case Studies

23

Academic Support: PLATO


CASE STUDIES

The PLATO programme has been a successful academic student support tool on many campuses

About PLATO PLATO (People Learning and Training Online) is a computer-assisted education software programme. The overall package comprises 6 000 hours of educational support covering subjects such as English, Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology and Life and Career Skills. It has been under development for 40 years and has been used in South Africa for more than 20 years. PLATO is a resource to a spectrum of educational institutions, including FET colleges. In fact, one-third of all FET colleges in South Africa are using PLATO as part of their student support initiatives, in particular to strengthen the basic mathematical and language skills of students.

A 2006 Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) report titled Towards a framework for organising academic support to improve students support in FET colleges, underscored the role that an intervention such as PLATO can play. It found the main concerns of academic student support included the development of academic literacy, particularly reading and writing and having the language to talk about the way things work in a eld of study. In these instances, PLATO can identify knowledge gaps and suggest or recommend a curriculum to close the gaps. PLATO does not lead to a qualication. However, it can help students to achieve a qualication. It can also be aligned with a curriculum, whereby the learning elements have been linked to a group of PLATO tutorials with the same content. Source: www.PLATO.co.za
A tried and tested tool As FET colleges continue to expand and rene their student support services, some have acquired specialised tools to boost students abilities in key subject areas. Many college students come from disadvantaged educational backgrounds and have gaps in their basic knowledge -- in particular, in the areas of Mathematics and language. The challenge colleges face is to ensure these students succeed. This requires that they ll any knowledge gaps while at the same time teach the FET curriculum. One of the strategies that about a dozen colleges have adopted is a computer - assisted education software programme called PLATO (People Learning and Training Online). PLATO works well as a fast-track programme. That is, the student starts with a PLATO diagnostic test that assesses his/her ability, identifying the gaps in knowledge and understanding in a particular eld. PLATO then plots an individual learning path that consists of various modules, with self-assessment exercises, to help the student get up to speed. It also works as a supplementary tool to teaching, whereby students work through modules aligned to the curriculum, that is, with the same outcomes as the courses in the curriculum. Ideally, they do this before the subject is tackled in class. PLATO allows them to do so at their own pace. The lecturer can then use the PLATO tracking system to check on the students progress. But using PLATO requires some investment. An institution needs hardware, that is the computers, and the PLATO software. But there is another essential requirement for it to work. PLATO needs a facilitator who can help the students. In its guide for implementing technology, PLATO Learning states that research shows computer learning approximately doubles when an instructor or facilitator is eectively involved. Simply having learners working on the computer will not lead to meaningful gains, states the guide. So far, 13 FET colleges in South Africa have made the initial investment in the PLATO package. In the Western Cape they are the College of Cape Town, Northlink, Boland, South Cape, West Coast and False Bay colleges. In KwaZulu-Natal Elangeni and Mthashana colleges use PLATO. In Gauteng, Tshwane North and in Mpumalanga Nkangala, while Taletso, Vuselela and Orbit colleges in North West have also acquired the programme. A college that has been using PLATO extensively is the College of Cape Town. It started using PLATO in 2004 as a pilot project on one campus, Pinelands, and now co-ordinates capacitybuilding for PLATO at all the FET colleges in the Western Cape. The colleges pilot project was funded by the Danish International Development Agencys (DANIDAs) Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) project. The pilot yielded good results. After only one trimester of PLATO maths, between 56% and 71% of students did better in their nal tests, while individuals improved their marks between 7% and 37%. Subsequently, various of the colleges campuses and departments have started using PLATO. In 2005, the college made support for Mathematics (Fundamentals) compulsory for rst-time Engineering students, using the PLATO fast-track programme in the rst week. This allowed the college to screen students soon after registration and to place weaker learners in the specialised support programme. The colleges fundamentals unit started using communications and language halfway through 2005, and PLATO became the primary means of teaching NQF Level 4 Communications, which was aligned with the curriculum. By November 2005, nine divisions at six of the colleges nine campuses -- Crawford, Pinelands, Guguletu, Thornton, Athlone and the City -- were using PLATO.

Case Studies

25

Academic Support: PLATO


In 2006, the college reduced the scope of PLATO in Engineering Studies because of sta costs but introduced the Optional Integrated approach (this approach encourages sta to use PLATO in their lessons) at more levels. SESD funded the use of PLATO at two engineering campuses. PLATO was also continued in the teaching of the Fundamentals, Business Studies and General Studies. Deon Halls, IT Programme Manager at the Crawford campus of the College of Cape Town, who has spearheaded the use of PLATO at the college, said the programme needs a holistic approach Other colleges have also reported success with PLATO. In November 2006, Northlink Colleges Wingeld campus, for example, said its pass rate for Maths was 100% and for Communication 98%, the best it had ever had. Some valuable lessons have been learnt from the use of PLATO at some of the other institutions. Dudu Dlamini, provincial technical adviser for the SESD programme in KwaZulu-Natal, said senior management should ideally support remedial work with students in terms of personal attention as well as nancial budgets. Each college needs an overall PLATO manager who is able to make sure that PLATO gives maximum benet to college and community, Dlamini said. She also suggested that facilitators should be given suitable incentives. A stable pool of facilitators can help build capacity among themselves and others, she explained. Alice Barlow-Zambodla, who assisted sta with the continued implementation of PLATO at Elangeni and Mthashana colleges in 2006, has also identied some challenges.. Barlow-Zambodla used PLATO extensively at the then University of Transkei in the late 1980s to supplement the learning of her Botany students. She says the diculties at the FET colleges for the successful use of PLATO include sta capacity, people not understanding computer-aided instruction or being unwilling to change the way they did things. However, she is still a rm believer in PLATOs abilities. If space is created for it to be used, and the people who use it understand how its working, its a great tool and a tried and tested tool. PLATO is pedagogically sound.

Its a great tool and a tried and tested tool. PLATO is pedagogically sound

by which it is integrated into the timetable and supported by management.

PLATO should not be considered as a sideline subject to ll in the gaps on the timetable, said Halls. PLATOs integration must be meaningful and eective. The colleges long-term aims for 2006-2008 include mainstreaming PLATO as widely as possible across all academic campuses using the integrated approach. While a lot of development still needs to take place in building sta capacity, we do envisage expanding delivery in the long run, said Halls. He added that the college could not directly attribute success in nal exams purely to the use of PLATO. PLATO support most denitely contributes. However, quantifying its value, particularly on a broad scale, may be a subjective exercise in many respects, said Halls. He said this was because the college found the picture changed from one class to another and from one trimester to another.

Simulators
CASE STUDIES

Lecturer Tjaart Lombard shows some of the parts manufactured by Tshwane South students using the colleges Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machine simulator

About simulators A simulated enterprise is a mock company that mirrors the structure, function and operation of a real company, but without real money exchanging hands. This results in a non-threatening learning environment to acquire practical skills. The marriage between knowledge and applied competence or skills through simulation is one of the purest forms of learning where the employability of learners with hard and soft skills is increased. This is how Northlink FET College describes a Simulated Enterprise (SE). With the distinction of having one of the longest-running SEs in South Africa, and with plans to set up its third SE in 2007, the college has rich experience to contribute to a learning methodology that is fast gaining ground within the FET college sector.

Case Studies

27

Simulators
Another college that has created a simulated training environment is Mthashana FET College in KwaZulu-Natal. There are no employers from whom students can gain workplace experience in the rural environment where the college operates. In an eort to overcome the problem, the college has set up a pilot Business Unit at its Vryheid Campus which will generate business for the college and create opportunities for students to do practical work. A simulation centre within the Business Unit is used to do the practical assessment of the Business Studies students in aspects such as ling, faxing, invoicing and developing business plans. Simulated training is not only applicable to the world of business and enterprise. The Centurion campus of Tshwane South College in Gauteng, for instance, uses simulated training to mimic the inner workings of vehicles and manufacturing processes to allow students the opportunity to practise their skills without the risk of damaging expensive or high-technology equipment. The college has training simulators in the areas of Autotronics, Engineering (Computer Numerical Control machining) and Process Instrumentation (Programmable Logic Controller) which is used in the automation of manufacturing processes, for instance the monitoring of ow, level, pressure, temperature and viscosity in environments such as bottling plants. In turn, South West Gauteng Colleges Roodepoort campus has created a simulated industry environment in the elds of Hair Care and Cosmetology and oers services to the public in these elds. Students not only develop their technical skills, but also gain exposure and training in handling real clients. Other colleges that use simulators include: Northern Cape Urban, Majuba, and Thekwini.

Lecture Alwyn de Villiers at work with students at the Tshwane South Colleges Automotive Electronic Training Centre

Northlink FET College At a time when the concept and methodology of Simulated Enterprises (SEs) was seeking a foothold in South Africa in the late 1990s, Tygerberg Technical College (now part of Northlink FET College) was ready to be adventurous and take on new challenges. This mood coincided with a partnership between the National Access Consortium, an NGO focusing

on providing educational access, the Western Cape Department of Education and the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), which was in search of organisations that wanted to become involved in SEs. DANIDA sent trainers to South Africa to share information on how to design training material and set up a SE. The college was the only FET college among the few hand-picked NGOs and educational institutions that participated in the training.

By 1999, it was all systems go at the Tygerberg Technical College, now the Parow campus of Northlink FET College. The college secured donations of oce furniture and telephones from insurance company Sanlam, while Skynet Worldwide Express, at that point the second-biggest courier service in the world, was willing to become its mentor company. This meant that Skynet allowed the college to access its business operating systems, including documentation on

Autotronic simulators equip tomorrows technicians


The sophisticated world of autotronics the meeting place of electrical, electronic and computing systems in the insides of a car -- requires a new kind of motor mechanic with a set of special skills. At the Centurion campus of the Tshwane South FET College, these sought-after skills are being honed for South Africas growing automotive industry, thanks to sophisticated autotronic simulators. Both provide advanced training to students who have already started to cut their teeth as motor mechanics, auto electricians, diagnosticians, production engineers and those who are directly involved in automotive manufacturing. At the Automotive Electronic Training Centre, lecturer Alwyn de Villiers offers four modules of autotronics training spread out over six weeks using circuit boards which simulate all the input and output components of vehicles such as water temperature censors, air-mass metres and fuel pumps. Thanks to the simulator, students can do fault diagnosis off vehicle components without the actual vehicles. The benets of this simulated training environment, the only one of its kind in South Africa, is obvious, explains De Villiers. You dont want students to work on vehicles immediately. The circuit boards allow them to practise rst, he says. Next door is the Phambili Autotronics Centre, which is a partnership between Tshwane South College and the Tshwane University of Technology (TUT). The work done here complements that done in De Villiers training centre. Lecturer Pierre van Rhyn says students start with a theoretical grounding before they start applying their knowledge on circuitboard simulators. The circuit boards can mimic every system in the vehicle, from brakes to fuel pump. When a fault is programmed, the circuit board reacts accordingly, giving the student the opportunity to nd the fault and x it. The next step is to move on, still in a simulated working environment, to a simulator with real vehicle components, before nally working on the actual vehicle. Once students are ready to work on the vehicle, the lecturers use a fault injector to create a problem in the vehicle (instead of having to take parts out or repeatedly cut wires). They also learn to use another high-technology tool, the Digital System Evaluator, to locate the injected fault electronically. TUT provided the equipment for the training to Tshwane South College, with the idea that students who complete their NQF Level 2 to 4 training at the college could have a seamless transition to higher education to carry on with mechatronics training at NQF Level 5. Thanks to these simulators, some motor manufacturers provide the autotronics sections of Tshwane South College with new models of their vehicles to enable mechanics and auto electricians to practise on them before they enter the labour market.

Lecturer Pierre van Rhyn working at Tshwane Souths Phambili Autotronics Centre

Case Studies

29

Simulators
Students y high on CNC simulators
The four machines in the Saab CNC Machine Training Centre of the Tshwane South College are imposing they are bulky, hi-tech and pricey. They are used for the simulated training of artisans and technicians in Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machining. In the industry, this means the high-volume production of parts for aircraft and vehicles. During the six weeks of basic training students learn how to use CNC software to write programmes for the lathe and milling CNC machines, telling them to generate specic parts. In the weeks thereafter, they have to master the setting of both types of machines and how to operate them. Then follows another six weeks of training, including ComputerAided Drafting (CAD) and Computer-Aided Manufacturing, which renes students programming skills before the production of the parts. Lecturer Tjaart Lombard says that 99% of the students are snatched up by the industry after six weeks. There is a huge demand for these students, he says. The establishment of the CNC machine Training Centre at Tshwane South College in Centurion, Gauteng, followed the South African governments purchase of 28 Swedish-made Gripen ghter aircraft. As the manufacturer of the jets, Saab, a high-technology company with its main operations in defence, aviation, space and civil security, wanted to set up a local training facility to train the artisans and technicians for industry. Tshwane South College approached Saab, inviting the company to use its facilities for training. The colleges close historic links with the South African Air Force was undoubtedly an advantage. The project was launched in 2001, with the donation of two secondhand machines from Saab, subsequently followed by two new CNC machines in 2004. So far, 112 technicians have been trained. Many of them have also received bursaries from Saab. Lombard and another lecturer, Pieter de Villiers, went to Sweden in 2001 for their training and De Villiers is now training lecturers from other colleges. Northlink FET College in the Western Cape; Lephalale College in Limpopo and Buffalo City College in the Eastern Cape have been identied as partners in the project. The three colleges will receive nancial assistance for bursaries and equipment from Saab (Denel Saab, following the setting up of a joint venture between the South African and Swedish companies in 2006). In addition, two lecturers from each college will rst be trained at Tshwane South College before travelling to Sweden for advanced training and accreditation.

One of the CNC simulators

job descriptions of sta, business procedures and nancial management. The information allowed the college to design a simulated environment where students from Secretarial, Public Management, Marketing and Business Studies could be accommodated as part of their college training. These were the areas in which the SE would help with the provision of training. As part of the SE students will, for two to three hours a week, report to the business to work shifts. They will rotate through all the available mock jobs, ranging from secretary to marketer, staying in one position until the student is competent. The tasks that these employees have to complete range from writing memos

to arranging meetings; from the payment of accounts, to the ordering of goods. Activities are generated either by lecturers or through the job descriptions, which means that each employee has a set of routine tasks to complete, or through transactions from the outside. This could come from other external SEs based at other colleges, schools and training institutions. Northlink is also a member of Simulated Enterprises SA (Simsa), which creates opportunities to trade with other members of Simsa. Over time, the colleges SE has evolved. It did not, for instance, remain a courier business. In 2000, the Western Cape Department of Education contributed R60 000 to the colleges SE, which

it used to upgrade its oce with computers and other equipment. When the Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority (W&RSETA) started to look for a service provider for a retail learnership in 2001, the colleges SE was geared to become Quench Emporium, a soft drink retailer, which was established thanks to some corporate contributions by Appletiser South Africa. This initiative with the W&RSETA enabled the college to become the only SE to oer unit standard-based training, to accommodate a learnership and to be recognised for its methodology. As from 2006, the SE programme has also been formally assessed.

While working at Quench Emporium, students are confronted with a range of workplace realities, ranging from telephone etiquette and the management of the switchboard to receiving stock and the protocol of customer care. They also have to be aware of safety and security measures, job descriptions and marketing.

a ringing phone, can understand job descriptions to know who is responsible for what and understand how employees and departments are interrelated and interdependent. One student came back after her stint of practical work and told Schoonwinkel she had a denite advantage over her peers, some of whom came from higher education institutions. She was the only one who knew how to operate the fax machine, thanks to her shifts at the SE.

A further spin-o of the colleges relationship with the W&RSETA has been the RAVE Business Start-Up Course, a 12-week skills programme for students who are interested in the business But, more importantly, says Schoonwinkel, the world. Each student (they attend in groups of about 40) sets up a business and they then trade SE creates an environment for many students who have no frame of reference for working with each other. environments such as oces because they come This allows students, who have not been from disadvantaged backgrounds in which their economically active to grasp the implications of parents were not economically active. Working business decisions and to get some hands-on in an oce or a store allows them to make the experience without nancial risk. transition from theory to practice. In 2006, the college could expand its pioneerAccording to her, the speed at which students ing work in the eld of SE following a nancial learn at the SE is phenomenal. In the lecture hall, injection from the Ikapa Elihlumayo Programme some students would take weeks to come to Development Fund, a part of the Western Capes grips with a topic such as petty cash but, while provincial growth and development strategy. The at the SE, they would be able to manage the college has already received R2,3-million. process within two hours. Thanks to this support an entirely new building But, warns Schoonwinkel, setting up an SE takes could be erected and a second SE established. time and eort. Assessing a number of students, This was chosen because of the challenges it each in a dierent position, at the same time would pose to work with perishable products and is quite daunting. Sometimes the company the health and safety implications thereof. will face diculties and you wont have all the answers, but you will learn and grow with your In 2007, the college plans to also set up a simuenterprise. lated call centre. With the introduction of the new National Certicate (Vocational) programmes from 2007, the college will be taking another look at its existing SEs to align them with the outcomes of the new programmes. The big question is, are students beneting? Liesl Schoonwinkel, who manages the SE at Northlink FET College, is unequivocal in her answer. SEs, she says, undoubtedly nurture the soughtafter soft skills employers want but often nd lacking in new recruits. This gap in workplace preparedness is being dealt with by time spent in the SE so that students are not terried to answer Having dedicated sta who believe in what they are doing, helps too. Schoonwinkel says that two of the colleges SE facilitators, Elb Henn and Christelle Marais, have been instrumental in keeping the momentum going and in keeping continuity within the business they are shadowing with an SE. This is crucial as groups come and go and the new group coming in needs to know where the previous group has left o.

Northlink Colleges Simulated Enterprise

the [simulator] creates an environment for many students who have no frame of reference for working environments such as oces because they come from disadvantaged backgrounds

A simulated reception area

Despite the pitfalls and diculties, Schoonwinkels belief in SEs as a learning tool is unwavering. Once you see one of your students grasp a task, everything becomes worthwhile, she says.

Case Studies

31

Sta Development
CASE STUDIES

Qualied and experienced lecturers enhance the overall quality of an institution

About sta development Lecturers are key resources within the FET sector. But many FET colleges face a peculiar challenge when it comes to its academic sta. Ideally, appointees should have ample theoretical content knowledge, practical know-how moulded in the workplace and the ability to engage students as they convey their expertise. However, according to a Human Sciences Research Council report titled Towards a framework for organising academic support to improve student success in FET colleges, some appointees with trade and industry backgrounds and experience do not have formal teaching qualications, and some sta teach technical areas without workplace experience. Though some of these lecturers may be ne teachers, the advantages of their having practical and theoretical knowledge as well as a pedagogical foundation are clear.

On a personal level, qualied sta can be employed permanently, benet from promotional opportunities, have easier access to continued educational opportunities and reap the benets of professional condence and fullment. Qualied lecturers could also enhance the academic support of students and lift the overall quality of an institution. The professionalisation of sta and the sharpening of management and research skills of sta members would also enable individual colleges and the FET sector as a whole to position itself more strategically within South Africas education and training environment. These imperatives have driven a visionary sta empowerment initiative in KwaZulu-Natal.
KwaZulu-Natal takes the lead Teaching at a FET college demands lecturers who can bring theory alive in the classroom because they have already applied their know-how on the shop oor, at the construction site or in the oce. But the unique blend of academic and vocational learning at FET colleges does not mean that such lecturers are always easy to come by. The dilemma is this: lecturers with trade and industry backgrounds and experience often dont have formal teaching qualications. Similarly, sta teaching technical subjects may lack the necessary workplace experience. Though these lecturers may be ne teachers, the ultimate benets of entering the classroom knowing how learning happens and how a complicated piece of machinery works and being able to operate it are obvious. Research in KwaZulu-Natal showed that 60% of sta at FET colleges in the province were underqualied or unqualied. These disconcerting research ndings, coupled with talks between the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education, Ivor Baatjes, Director of the Centre for Adult Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and Professor John Aitchison, the Head of the School of Adult and Higher Education at UKZN, yielded a solution. A two-year, part-time qualication which has the distinct purpose of upgrading currently underqualied educators was designed. The National Professional Diploma in Education Vocational Training (NPDE-VT) is specically designed for college lecturers with a curriculum content which deals with FET and broader educational issues, says Baatjes. Funding from the Danish government, through the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) managed to kick-start the training process under the Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) Programme. Both Mthashana and Elangeni FET colleges enrolled 14 sta members each in 2005. Other colleges such as Umgungundlovu FET college decided to join with 22 sta members. In February 2006, 45 lecturers enrolled from ve dierent colleges and, in June 2006, another 40 from Majuba College. From 2007 onwards, numbers are set to increase with a further intake from Esayidi FET College and another group funded by the Provincial Department of Education. Frank Ingram, Director of FET colleges in KwaZulu-Natal, who has been instrumental, together with Dudu Dlamini, SESD provincial technical adviser, in arguing for the programme, believes the professionalisation of sta in the province will have a far-reaching impact on the capacity of sta and the FET sector as a whole. This is why a college such as Umgungundlovu FET College got involved. Cynthia Stephens, Manager of the Msunduzi campus at Umgungundlovu College explains: Firstly, legislation informs us that educators need to be properly qualied. Secondly, through the professional development of sta, we can facilitate their permanent employment, which is not possible if they are not properly qualied. Thirdly, as an institution we can only benet. We believe that the spin-os of the personal and professional development of sta will be reaped in the classroom. The sta members who enrolled are from various departments, including Engineering, Business Studies and even the administration section, as some of the sta members in this division also teach part-time. We believe that, if we can impact on our sta all of them they can impact on their communities, Stephens says. Oscar Grerath, SESD-co-ordinator at Elangeni college, says the college will benet as these sta members will have a better all-round performance as professionally qualied educators. Indeed, according to Baatjes, the feedback from participants has been overwhelmingly positive and very encouraging. A common saying among the students from Mthashana is that they talk NPDE which means that they have discussions about ... curriculum models, assessment and theories of learning, he says. Baatjes said that, though the institution found the lecturers teaching practice satisfactory -- in fact, many of them are excellent teachers -- they

Case Studies

33

Sta Development
are willing to explore new teaching methods and strategies. However, he says, it is too early to measure the impact in FET colleges, which is something the university is keen to explore through research in the future. What is clear is the growth in their understanding of the politics, policies, theory and practice of education. Another outcome is that most of them also cannot wait to proceed with the next level of studies. Access to the university for most of these lecturers has been a signicant achievement because they would generally not meet the entry requirements. This has been a great inspiration and self-condence booster for all of them. They have been highly committed to their studies and most of them would like to pursue further studies at UKZN, says Baatjes. Despite the impact that these interventions are having at the level of individual sta members and colleges, this is only a rst step for the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education. An Advanced Certicate in Education-Vocational Training oered at UKZN from 2007 is the next step, which could lead more students to postgraduate studies. This is what Ingram is hoping for. The departments big vision is to establish a strong FET research capacity in the province. As a result, one candidate from each of the nine FET colleges in the province and a departmental ocial are already enrolled for a fully paid MEd (Masters in Education). In addition, a research unit has been established at each college. This process will be ongoing. Every second year, we will have a batch of nine participants, one from each college, on a fully-paid postgraduate programme, Ingram says. The training of underqualied lecturers coupled with the bolstering of the research capacity at FET colleges and at the level of the Provincial Department of Education is adding considerable strength to a sector that is gearing up to deliver on great skills expectations.

What is clear is the growth in their understanding of the politics, policies, theory and practice of education. Another outcome is that most of them also cannot wait to proceed with the next level of studies.

Diversity Management
CASE STUDIES

Colleges are focusing on the diversity management of sta to connect better with diverse student populations

About diversity Diversity is a keystone of South Africas democratic Constitution, the preamble to which begins: We, the people of South Africa ... believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity. The Employment Equity Act, passed by Parliament on August 21 1998, was an expression of the Constitutions principles in the workplace. Its aim is to ensure that unfair discrimination is removed, equity is promoted in the workplace and armative action measures include steps that promote diversity. But the framework in which diversity operates in South Africa, in education in particular, is complex. A Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) review of September 2005 points out that, while schools in the country have become more diverse, de-racialised enrolments are not matched by a more diverse teaching body.

Case Studies

35

Diversity Management
In 2006, the HSRC published a report on teacher education and the challenge of diversity in South Africa. It examined three higher education institutions teaching the Postgraduate Certicate of Education and found that the sta of all three reected, to a large extent, the original racial composition of the institution. If educational institutions had academic sta from a range of backgrounds, suggested the report, it would enable access to different life experiences, and it would require that students engage with intellectual leadership from people of dierent identities. A Department of Labour analysis of Employment Equity reports submitted in 2005 summarises the challenge: The SA demographics are not reected in the composition of the current SA workplace. A good, well-designated employment equity programme can work eectively in creating an even playing eld.

South Cape College When South Cape College set out to change the racial, religious and language prole of its sta members, the path ahead was uncharted. Guiding the process was more than putting employment equity legislation into action at a college that was still too white. It was also the realisation that, for the college to serve its diverse community of students more eectively, the representivity of its sta had to reect its determination to connect better with the 500 000 people in its catchment area. Spread across the towns of George, Mossel Bay, Oudtshoorn, Plettenberg Bay and Beaufort West, this populations demographics are 28% African, 52% coloured and 18% white. In its approach to diversity management, South Cape College did not merely want to produce cold, rigid equity targets in a paper-based exercise, discounting the human element. It wanted a much broader strategy which, at its core, acknowledged that change involved people and an array of powerful emotions. One way to tackle this challenge was to pull sta members themselves in to participate, even allowing them to direct the steps. This was not the rst time the college had done things in this way. Following the amalgama-

tion of four colleges (George Technical College, Oudtshoorn Technical College, South Cape Technical Institute and Mossel Bay Technical College) in 1998, a new college was created, but it consisted of dierent parts with dierent institutional cultures. In 2004, the college went on a drive to determine what the common values were that joined all its parts into one. During visits to all the campuses and a sta imbizo, the college community decided what their common values were, despite dierent institutional cultures on its seven campuses. These values included: to strive to exceed expectations, to put people rst, to maintain high moral values and to embrace change. These values were subsequently promoted internally through a poster campaign. With this foundation, the college at least had some road map as it embarked on its equity and diversity drive in 2005. At this critical juncture, the college was fortunate to receive nancial support from the Danish Agency for International Development (DANIDA) under the rst phase of its Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) programme. This has enabled the college to move forward with its diversity drive. It contracted a company to design a diversity intervention that would have an impact at all levels of the college. The idea was to have an intervention that would highlight the specic issues that

needed attention through an audit; sensitise all sta; train management to manage diversity and develop a diversity plan and a performance management tool that would ensure that diversity continued to be a mainstreamed issue at the centre of activities -- in the organisation and not an add on. So, the rst step for the college was to conduct an audit to gauge everyones perceptions on equity and diversity. The audit included interviews with the colleges senior management and the Student Representative Council (SRC). What were the problem areas? What was the way forward? How should the college go about reaching its goals? The audit results were divided into two categories: the general issues aecting the college as a whole and the specic issues aecting individual campuses. Transformation in all its dierent guises emerged as the biggest issue. Black sta members felt all new appointees were still white; white sta members felt they were not important any more. These ndings were handed over to an equity Steering Committee, responsible for co-ordinating and sustaining the intervention and to provide input into the nal Equity Plan, which included sta members from all campuses, all divisions and levels of work. Members were

selected during information sessions about the colleges diversity and equity strategy. During these sessions, hosted on each of the colleges seven campuses, brochures were handed out, outlining the process, its goals and ultimate aims. Based on these processes, a training programme was designed for the college. In the meantime, the college had developed an equity plan that was, once again, presented on each campus, allowing for input from those on the ground. The rst phase of the training focusing on Diversity Awareness, included senior management, members of the college council and the SRC. The next round was on Diversity Management and focused more on the role of management in managing diversity eectively at all levels in the organisation. The college then realised that all sta had to be trained in diversity awareness. As a result, campus-based workshops were organised with the whole sta (educator and support sta ) of each campus. Eectively, this meant that the whole institution became more aware of and sensitive about issues related to diversity. At the end of each session, problem areas emerged. These included the lack of knowledge of other cultures, which lead to misunderstandings and how to address such issues not only among sta members, but also how to handle diversity in the classroom. The training was interactive. In one of the most powerful sessions during the training, sta were called upon to tell their stories about how diversity or the lack of it had aected them individually. This was tough for sta. Initially, some people did not want to participate. In the end, however, everyone shared their stories a very personal engagement with colleagues, their working environments and history. Hermien du Plessis, acting head of the human resources department, witnessed some of the sessions: It was very emotional. Some of the guys got angry. Others just opened their hearts. There were always two facilitators so that if someone had to go outside, the facilitator could accompany him/her, while the session continued. All of these activities the steering committee, the training, the information sessions, enabled

the college to come up with the necessary paper goods: a diversity strategy and equity targets. But this does not mean a line has been drawn under the work in this eld. The college has already taken diversity management one step forward with a pilot project to add diversity competencies to the performance assessment of managers. It uses an instrument that has two sections. Based on a self-assessment of diversity competencies, a manager has the opportunity to create a personal development plan to tackle shortcomings. The second section of the instrument actually measures diversity sensitivity and management. With a clear mandate from its council, the college is forging ahead on this path. Its approach to include as many people as possible has helped to keep the momentum. However, this still does not mean the process is easy. Everyone knows transformation must happen but, in the end, it remains an extremely dicult and painful process. Many sta members support it, but if it starts to aect their promotion and salary, they may start to look at it dierently, says Du Plessis. Already, there has been an extensive shift to have a sta component that mirrors the provincial equity targets of 28% Africans, 52% coloureds, 18% whites and 2% (rounded o) Indians. However, despite its eorts, the college is hamstrung by the same broader issues that bedevil employment equity in other sectors of South African society. Highly skilled people, with opportunities in the private sector, are hard to attract to colleges, in particular as salary structures are xed according to scales of the Department of Education. Though the college does employ sta from its own funds, it cannot always compete with better-paying employers. The very essence of change suggests that South Cape College will still face diculties as it soldiers on towards becoming a fully transformed institution. But, by now, it has an institutional memory of diversity management that it can draw upon and, above all, has displayed the courage that will help it to keep moving forward.

It was very emotional. Some of the guys got angry. Others just opened their hearts.

Diversity Management Competencies


SHOW RESPECT

Do you: Treat all people with dignity and respect?


Treat people as unique individuals? Find out and use the correct pronunciation of peoples names? Demonstrate respect for a diverse range of people by adapting body language, gestures, formality, and your manner of speaking? Find out what words people prefer to be used in describing diverse groups and the signicance of offensive and valued words?

Extract from a diversity assessment instrument developed by Faranani Facilitation Services cc and used by South Cape College.

Case Studies

37

Linkages and Programme Units


CASE STUDIES

Linkages with industry are essential to give students real-life experience

About linkages and programme units Linkages and Programme Units (LPUs) came about as a result of increasing pressure on FET colleges to become more responsive to the needs of the job market. FET colleges have been expected to oer the relevant training to counter poverty and unemployment and to provide the higher skills levels demanded by employers. Broadly speaking, the responsibilities of LPUs at FET colleges are twofold. Firstly, they are tasked with establishing links with partners such as government departments, SETAs, industry, business and other educational institutions. Linkages are established when a partner, which has specic training requirements, enters into an agreement with a college to deliver on these needs. For instance, a municipality that wants sta to be trained in water sanitation

or basic computer skills could enter into an agreement with the local FET college to provide the necessary training. Naturally, location and socioeconomic conditions will inuence the type of partnerships initiated. Secondly, LPUs are responsible for putting the necessary programmes and sta into place to deliver and roll out the training once the partnership agreement has been signed and sealed. A 2006 HSRC report titled Building FET College Responsiveness: The Role of Linkages and Programme Units, highlights that colleges are becoming more responsive by targeting training in areas such as bio-fuels, tourism, agri-processing, chemicals, metals beneciation, small and medium enterprises, entrepreneurial and self-employment; training for the unemployed for the Expanded Public Works Programme; for infrastructural development, in the construction sector in particular; training of local government employees; of community-based organisations; short courses customised to industry needs; business incubators and training programmes linked to regional and local economic initiatives. LPUs can, therefore, be a huge asset in bolstering local and national skills development. They also have the ability to attract substantial funding to the college as one of the case studies will conrm. In addition, LPUs also have a role to play in student support services. Links with potential employers, for instance, are critical for the placement of students to obtain practical workplace experience. A number of colleges have established LPUs since 2002. They include Mthashana, Coastal KZN, Majuba, Thekwini, Esayidi, Umgungundlovu, Elangeni and Umfolozi FET colleges in KwaZulu-Natal; ORBIT, Taletso and Vuselela colleges in North West; South Cape College, Boland and College of Cape Town in the Western Cape; and Capricorn and Vhembe in Limpopo.
South Cape College South Cape Colleges LPU does not readily say no when opportunities for links with SETAs, industries or community-based organisations arise. Though the unit can barely cope with the demand to provide training in the vast area it covers it has the largest catchment area of all the FET colleges in the Western Cape -- it risks losing hard-earned business to other providers if it turns down requests from potential partners. The LPU was set up in 2004 to pull together all the activities related to partnerships which, at that time, were spread across the colleges ve campuses. The unit evolved from the colleges Oudtshoorn campus where sta started pursuing NQFaligned programmes (50% theory and 50% practice) and learnerships (30% theory and 70% practice or workplace training) on behalf of the college. This campus also established an advisory committee that included external partners to help the campus with formulating and quality assuring the new programmes it was developing. Thanks to seed money from the Support to Education and Development (SESD) programme, the work was expanded and a formal LPU was set up, which is a separate business unit, removed from mainstream academic activity. The unit reports to the Vice-Rector: Academic and works closely with programme managers on each campus. The LPU has a long list of responsibilities. It has to develop and implement new programmes and contributes to college growth by increasing student numbers. At the same time, it increases, improves and maintains the colleges links with external partners and generates new businesses in the areas of learnerships and skills programmes. It has been successful when measured against its responsibilities. The LPU generates 43% of the income for the college and caters for 1 500 students (at the time of publication) who are participating in

Case Studies

39

Linkages and Programme Units


learnerships and skills programmes. The college has 2 600 students enrolled for departmental programmes. The number of students and variety of links have forced the college to develop practices that make its job easier. One strength the South Cape Colleges LPU has developed is its capability to manage learnerships from A to Z: wrestling through the tedious paper work, managing allowances and reporting to SETAs. One of the colleges innovations has been to develop one standard document, which accommodates dierent SETAs requirements for learnerships. Previously, the college had to complete dierent documents on aspects such as quality assurance and facilities for each of the SETAs it was doing business with. According to the college, If this document is in place, it covers the requirements of 16 SETAs. The LPU also has to ensure that all the programmes, in particular short courses and skills programmes, which ow from agreements with SETAs are approved and ready for delivery. It also has links with Petro SA, which is the largest employer in the area, district and local municipalities and institutions such as schools where it provides training and Adult Basic Education & Training. The work of the LPU with SETAs has broadened the activities of the college. For instance, it is a service provider for the Agricultural SETA in beekeeping, covering everything from catching the bees to making honey, as well as the business of bee- farming. Other SETAs the college is working with include Forestry for furniture production and the Education Training and Development Practices for the training of Early Childhood Development practitioners. Skills training for the Department of Labour includes building and plumbing to ll a need in the construction industry and rst aid, business skills and customer care for industries.

Duties and responsibilities of an LPU specialist, ORBIT FET College


Undertakes research to determine the relevance of existing programmes, determines the training needs of the community, business and industry and establishes and maintains a database of the training needs; Liaises with potential partners and writes proposals for the delivery of training programmes; Co-ordinates, facilitates and monitors curriculum development for new programmes; Ensures, in collaboration with the Assistant Communications Manager, that newly approved programmes are efciently and effectively marketed and promoted; Liases with delivery sites to discuss delivery of identied programmes; Oversees the establishment of project plans for newly approved programmes and ensures the availability of resources at identied learning sites; Co-ordinates and monitors Recognition of Prior Learning processes and procedures for new programmes; Identies and claries roles and responsibilities of facilitators, assessors and moderators; Develops relevant templates to ensure uniformity across sites and programmes and compliance with industry and SETA requirements; Co-ordinates, manages and evaluates the implementation of learnerships and skills programmes; Ensures that the Quality Management System is updated in respect of newly implemented learnerships and that quality management processes and procedures are established; and

Colleges are active in school communities

Many colleges have links with provincial departments of education to train Early Childhood Development practitioners

College of Cape Town As happens with all new things, some initial scepticism surrounded the idea of oering programmes outside the NATED orbit at the College of Cape Town. But, as the college started to explore the potential of learnerships, skills programmes and partnerships, a new world opened up. We realised that there is business out there and that we could generate income, says Rhazia Hamza, LPU Manager at the College of Cape Town. Since then, the college has never looked back. Situated in a robust urban economy and having resources and infrastructure, the unit nds itself in an enviable position. Its a question of business nding the unit instead of the unit having to nd business. Skills development is at the forefront of everyones agenda, says Hamza. So, we cant keep up with the needs. The LPU at the college was established in 2003 and, thereafter, the college obtained funding through the Danish International Development Agencys (DANIDAs) Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) programme, allowing for building the capacity of the units sta. We were on the brink of a new era and the SESD funding allowed for it to happen, says Hamza.

The College of Cape Town denes its LPU as an academic-orientated service unit supporting academic growth -- academic growth being the responsibility of the programme managers and the LPU supporting the growth. In the formation of the LPU, the college, therefore, built on its academic strengths, notably in the eld of engineering, and, because of its sound academic sta and management structures, it has been able to develop a decentralised approach to building linkages. The unit services the College of Cape Towns nine campuses by asking dierent departments to submit proposals and, if a linkage is established, by preparing programmes, forging partnerships, conducting research, initiating learnerships and skills programmes and conducting Recognition of Prior Learning appraisals. Some of the links it has established include those with higher education institutions, in particular universities of technology and international institutions as well as with SETAs, NGOs, government bodies, business and the community. All these links, which are aligned with provincial priorities, are set up in close contact with the academic and programme managers on each campus.

My internal clients are the academic programme managers, who have to implement what I bring in, says Hamza. In fact, our LPUs special strength is the great level of integration with the other units of the college such as the academic and other support services. Some of the diculties the unit is facing includes a shortage of sta, day-to-day operational funding and ongoing pressure to generate income to ensure the units self-sustainability. This means the unit cannot always control the implementation of the partnership. Yet it impacts on me. I cant go back to the client if anything goes wrong, says Hamza. In an eort to counter this, she believes in working with project teams representing all parties involved in a partnership. They meet once a month and this allows for troubleshooting. Hamza believes this is necessary to keep clients happy. You need to know exactly what is happening. As an LPU manager, your footprint has to be everywhere, she says.

Case Studies

41

Linkages and Programme Units


Mthashana FET College Mthashana College for FETs approach to responsiveness is captured in its vision for its LPU: To be a unit ... that develops and steers a high-quality, co-ordinated academic system of primarily FET programmes, which are responsive, exible and lead to community socioeconomic support. The LPU was established in October 2003 through the intervention of the Support to Education and Skills (SESD) programme funded by the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA). It has an extensive list of responsibilities, including the creation, writing and production of material, programme accreditation, identication of new learnerships, maintenance of partnerships and linkages, creation of links with SETAs and industries and the identication of new opportunities at the colleges skills centres. Though these responsibilities are fairly standard tasks of any LPU, a number of factors distinguish the colleges approach to links and partnerships. They include Mthashanas location in rural Northern KwaZulu-Natal, where industries and formal employment opportunities have been in decline, in particular following the closure of coal mines in the area since 2000. Furthermore, the surrounding community has low educational levels, coupled with a huge population of 10- to 14-year-olds. Phakama Langa, CEO, who plays a central role in the work of the LPU, describes the response of the college to these challenges: In recent years, the college has dramatically refocused and repositioned its programme provisions to respond to the particular deep rural characteristics and realities of the region. The driving principle that now binds college programme delivery is poverty alleviation, aligned in particular to the niche areas of tourism, agriculture and forestry. The college now focuses mainly on empowering communities through sustainable skills and personal entrepreneurial development initiatives. The interview with Langa was part of a study by the Human Sciences Research Council, which assessed the work of LPUs at three colleges, and produced the report titled: Building FET College Responsiveness: The Role of Linkages and Programme Units. The new approach to some of the colleges activities is captured in the strategic goals of the LPU, which include: to serve the industry and economy through its oerings; the adaptation of programmes to be in line with the provinces strategic goals, and the establishment of niche programmes according to sector needs. This has resulted in the development of more short NQF-aligned programmes which focus on skills areas such as Sewing, Beadwork, Poultry, Organic Vegetables, Welding, Motor Mechanics, Motor Body Repairs and Electrical Work. In oering these, the college has links with community-based organisations, NGOs, government departments and municipalities. For example, the college approached all hospitals in the region asking what kind of programmes they would support. In addition, it has teamed up with the Jozini municipality in one of the most far-ung corners of the colleges catchment area, to form a partnership with BioSwiss Industries. The company specialises in the processing of organically produced green beans for the export market, and has already set up a factory outside the town of Vryheid. The idea is that, after students have been trained in organic farming and entrepreneurship, they will be able to set up their own farms. Its work in communities is also Mthashana College LPUs special strength. According to Theresa Venter, Manager of the LPU, the college has a sound knowledge of local conditions and understands the challenges facing the communities that surround its 11 sites. However, the LPU also faces some challenges in its work. These include expectations that are proportionally out of kilter with the units capacity; a public perception of colleges which is not conducive to establishing links and which is also reected by apathy from industry and lukewarm employers; and the need for greater sta capacity and buy-in from its campuses. Despite these constraints, Mthashana is set on making the most of the opportunities in the region it serves.

Incubation
CASE STUDIES

Carpenter Sydney Ngubeni runs his woodwork business from the Tshwane North business incubator in Mamelodi, Tshwane

About Incubation Incubation helps fast-track early-stage business growth and improves the survival rate of start-up businesses by helping them to become nancially viable, usually within two to three years. It also creates a synergistic environment where entrepreneurs share learning experiences, create working partnerships and do business together. This is according to South Africas New Regional Industrial Development Strategy, published by the Department of Trade and Industry (dti) in June 2006. Tshwane North FET College and Tshwane South FET College in Gauteng are two of South Africas FET colleges that have set up business incubators. Umgungundlovu FET College in KwaZulu-Natal signed a contract in 2006 with its Provincial Department of Economic Aairs, which formalised the awarding of European Union funds to the college to develop, among others, an SMME incubator at its Edendale campus. A number of other colleges are in the process of setting up or considering the establishment of business incubators. They include: Ingwe, King Hintsa, Ekurhuleni East, and South Cape FET colleges.

Case Studies

43

Incubation
Tshwane North College The Mamelodi campus of Tshwane North College is home to one of its Business Incubation Centres. It also has incubators at its Rosslyn campus and its Soshanguve North campus. In Mamelodi, the incubator was set up in 1998, but at that stage it did not consist of much more than an oce. Thanks to a partnership with the Ntsika Enterprise Promotion Agency (which has now been incorporated into the Small Enterprise Development Agency, known as Seda) a building, which could be populated by entrepreneurs, was erected on the Mamelodi campus. The centre provides training as well as acting as a referral service for entrepreneurs who need specic support, for instance start-up funding. James Philane, Manager of the centre, attracts a steady ow of people from the community who have backyard businesses and need some professional help. Entrepreneurs who could occupy space at the incubator are invited to the centres training sessions. Those who are interested can attend a screening that will determine whether they are accepted or rejected. If accepted, they can stay for 12 months. In this period, their business practices will be closely scrutinised, including their books and their record-keeping. They will also be able to access services such as help with writing proposals, pitching for tenders and registering their businesses. These services are free. The only expense to the entrepreneurs is rent of R200 a month. At present, the centre has businesses that include welding, clothing production, brickmaking, carpentry and T-shirt printing. Philane says the advantages for the entrepreneurs include the ongoing, free training; the fact that they are in a protected environment, and their businesses receive support in areas in which they are weak. Incubation is a good hands-on concept. What I like most is that we are in a position to keep checking the progress of an individual business. If the business needs funding we can make a recommendation. If you have a good concept and people with the right knowledge and skills to run it that is really empowerment. If we could get more support, infrastructure, workshops and people, it could be a great thing, he says.

James Philane

Incubation is a good hands-on concept. What I like most is that we are in a position to keep checking the progress of an individual business.

Martin Kgobe and some of the employees of Letimbe Clothing at BUSICOL, the business incubator of Tshwane South FET College

Tshwane South College Called BUSICOL, the Tshwane South Colleges business incubator was established in Atteridgeville in the west of Tshwane in 1994. BUSICOL provides 40 hours of courses three times a year, funded by the Small Enterprise Development Agency, to aspiring entrepreneurs. At the end of the training, entrepreneurs can submit business plans to BUSICOL. Those who have drafted plans that are deemed workable are oered space at the incubation centre for a period of 12 months. If they are not ready to go on their own after a year, they can stay for another 12 months. In this period, they pay rent for their space only R7 a square metre and attend more training sessions on topics such as submitting tenders and nancial management. Businesses there are about 25 -- located at the incubator include a brickmaking company, an artists studio, an Internet caf, a day care centre,

an architect and builder, a clothing production company, an atjar factory, fast foods, an estate agent and a knitting business that produces school jerseys. The brickmaking company recently provided all the bricks for extensions of the colleges nearby buildings. Anthonie Thiart, Project Manager of BUSICOL, says that, over the years, several entrepreneurs who started at the incubator ventured out and have been doing well on their own. While they are still at the incubator, the benets are clear, says Thiart. They have the benet of a secure space, which means they dont have to insure expensive machinery, easy access to business advice and up-to-date information about available tenders that they could apply for. BUSICOL have beneted from support of such helpers as nancial services company Sanlam, the Japanese Embassy, Iscor (now Mittal Steel

South Africa) and the National Department of Education. Based on both Tshwane North and Tshwane Souths experiences both have had incubators for some years -- one of the biggest challenges faced by incubation centres is to limit the time that entrepreneurs keep their businesses at the incubator. The low rent, security, access to college equipment and a supportive environment create a comfort zone, which makes it hard for the entrepreneurs to leave. In some instances, entrepreneurs have had their business for longer than three years at the incubator and do not have concrete plans to leave. Another challenge for colleges and their business incubators is to establish a stronger link between the incubator and the colleges core academic activities, which could allow more students with a knack for business to access the advantages of the incubators. At present, the incubators have an almost exclusive focus on entrepreneurs from the communities surrounding the incubators.

Elsewhere its noisy. I work very well here.

I chose this place because

(William Langa, Artist, BUSICOL)

I used to work from my house, I needed peace of mind.

but I wanted an oce to work from (Moses Sindane, Architect, BUSICOL)

It is helping me because of the [colleges] campus, which makes my business accessible.

I want to be here.

(Velby Vunywa, W.V. Exclusive Knitted Garments, BUSICOL)

Case Studies

45

Quality Management
CASE STUDIES

ORBIT FET College secured a multimillion-rand training project for the training of petrol attendants, thanks to its Quality Management System

About quality management A number of South Africas FET colleges have obtained their ISO (International Organisation for Standardisation) accreditation. This is a widely accepted approach to quality assurance. Despite adhering to the same ISO requirements, it is up to each college to write its own manual capturing its documentation, tools, methods and processes for quality assurance. The ability of any institution to prove that it has rm quality assurance with regard to service delivery and supporting areas such as nances, management and governance and every single aspect of its operations -- has obvious benets. This includes being able to send a clear message of accountability and transparency to potential business and social partners. The ISO standardisation system is, thus, in its own words (see www.iso.org), a global network that identies what international standards are required by business, government and society, develops them in partnership with sectors that will put them to use, adopts them by transparent procedures based on national input and delivers them to be implemented worldwide. The ISO a non-governmental organisation is a federation of the national standard bodies of 157 countries, one per country, from all regions in the world, including developed, developing and transitional economies. Each ISO member is the principal standards organisation in its country.

ORBIT FET College An inconspicuous icon on CEO Maryna Marais computer screen constantly reminds her how ORBIT FET College has overhauled the manner in which it conducts its day-to-day business. In fact, each ORBIT employee and each student is confronted by an identical icon when they switch on their PCs on any of the colleges campuses. This icon represents the colleges ISO 9001:2000 (International Organisation for Standardisation) accreditation -- a commitment to quality in everything it does. Click on the grey, squarish icon and you will go on a virtual tour of diagrams, documents, policies and guidelines that will outline, in detail, how every aspect of the college from petty cash to the election of council members is supposed to work. The colleges Quality Management System (QMS) emanated from its Linkages and Programmes Unit. When an institution has a QMS in place, it enhances its appeal as a training service provider to corporates, industries and SETAs. When some partners want you to oer a programme or a course, you have to guarantee to them that you have the resources and you have the QMS that ensures you put policies into

practice. Just having policies is not enough, says Marais. When funding became available under the Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) programme, the college moved rapidly to deal with this hurdle in its growth. Each unit of the college had to review its policies. This proved to be surprisingly dicult. Beautiful words that could not be put into practice were no good. The college needed living policies. It had to turn the process around by looking at what it was doing already and translating existing practices into policies. But, by November 2005, the college was nally ready to be externally audited and received its SABS accreditation in February 2006. This is now our bible, says Marais. Everyone has access to our policies, which is why no one can say: I did not know how this or that worked. Everyone at the college knows exactly what is expected of him or her, she says. Indeed, the QMS has real practical benets. For instance, if an employee wants to take leave, her or she can follow the virtual pathways and eventually download the necessary leave forms. The colleges quality system is also more than a tool to formalise and standardise the manage-

ment processes of the institution. It is about transparency and accountability in all its dealings with sta, students and the outside world. In turn, this has enhanced ORBIT FET Colleges competitiveness as a service provider in education and training, something it had hoped for. One of the direct oshoots has been a multimillionrand contract to be the lead provider in a Skills Transfer and Empowerment Programme (S.T.E.P), a human resource development project initiated by the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA) for the fuel industry. But it is not only lucrative contracts that spurred ORBIT college on to pursue a quality management process. The merger of four institutions (Rustenburg and Brits technical colleges and the Odi and Temba manpower centres) in 2002 brought together institutions with very dierent ways of doing things. These diverse systems had to be integrated into one new system. Elsje Landsberg, Quality Manager at ORBIT college, says the campuses were functioning in isolation from each other and were doing things very dierently. There was no uniform standard and this had to be addressed. It was done through the QMS, and having the system was seen to be a huge benet when ORBIT recently opened its new Mankwe

A Quality Management System enhances a colleges appeal as a training service provider to industry

Case Studies

47

Quality Management

Boilermaker students and their lecturer at ORBIT FET College

campus in Mogwase near the Pilanesberg Game Reserve. There were no systems. Now, when the sta wants to know something, they can quickly look it up, says Landsberg. Landsberg has the arduous task of managing the QMS. She is constantly busy adapting the system as policies and procedures are elaborated on, streamlined or changed under newly appointed managers. She must keep tabs on the system to curb uncontrolled growth into a nightmare of red tape and oversee the replacement of unworkable policies. Landsberg has been involved in strengthening the colleges internal quality auditing capacity. Each campus has a quality representative whom she trained to interpret ISO. They do internal audits. A month prior to an external audit, the Deputy CEO for academic aairs will also do an audit on non-academic matters on all the campuses. Problem areas have to be dealt with. Every six months, external auditors, in this instance the SABS, visit the college. The institution does not know which of its policies they will scrutinise. It may be whether the number of re extinguishers match the health and safety guidelines; it may be whether there are minutes for the monthly meetings the corporate centres operational team are supposed to have. When the

This one of thingsiswe havethe bestat done this college

SABS can nd proof that the college is already dealing with shortcomings, it will have evidence that the college is continuously trying to improve its QMS. There are also four management review meetings during the year when the managers of the dierent units come together to discuss improvements in policies and systems. While there is general acceptance of the system by now, Landsberg had to do some internal marketing of the system, conducting workshops, telling people how it worked, what the purpose was and how they would benet. Once people were positive, it was easier to take things forward, she says. The fact that sta and students have easy access to college policies through the colleges computer network, and may contribute to it, have also enhanced ownership of the system. However, Landsberg is fully aware that her work is ongoing; that there are still gaps and that there are always better ways to do things. Even so, she believes that the QMS has made a huge dierence in improving the overall standard of operations at the college. Her CEO supports this view. This is one of the best things we have done at this college, says Marais.

CEO Maryna Marais

A Quality Management System reaps rewards


When ORBIT FET College secured a multimillion-rand training project, its Quality Management System (QMS) was key to winning the contract. The project, the Skills Transfer and Empowerment Programme (S.T.E.P), involves the training of about 5 000 people over a fouryear period for the fuel retail industry. ORBIT College will be the Lead Training Provider of the NQF Level 2, STEP training, based on a learnership for Service Station Operations, but with add-ons such as Tourism programmes to help South Africa prepare for the FIFA World Cup in 2010. The target for the project is to have 1 700 current employees on learnerships between 2006 and 2010 and 3 300 unemployed people on learnerships, of whom at least 80% are placed in permanent jobs. Two thousand service stations will be involved in the programme. As the Lead Training Provider, ORBIT college will have to assure the quality of the training of private training providers such as Ensemble, Finmill and Mosakong as well as the offering of fundamental unit standards by Tshwane South FET College and Ekurhuleni West FET College. Some big colleges were competing for the S.T.E.P project, but we were the only one that was ISO-accredited. Based on our QMS, we could prove that we have adequate controls in place, said Maryna Marais, CEO of ORBIT FET College. The S.T.E.P programme, which was initiated by MERSETA and which is project-managed by SIGIMA Consulting, was developed in response to factors such as the skills and training needs within the fuel retail industry and South African society in general. However, it does aim to benet trainees in very tangible ways, from job enrichment (with the subsequent career advancement opportunities), to elevating the skills levels of school-leavers and the unemployed, to enhancing the marketability of trainees, which could lead to better job opportunities. For Pontsho Mokoka, a lively 19-year-old, who is one of the S.T.E.P projects 5 000 beneciaries, the learnership was the rst training opportunity that presented itself since he completed school in 2004. He had no money to further his studies he would have liked to have been an accountant. He hopes that this will allow him to nd employment. I read about learnerships in Bona magazine in February. I went to the Department of Labour to inquire, and they said they would send me information. Two weeks later, they told me to come to ORBIT. They explained what it was about, I came for an interview and a test and then they told me to return on 1 June to start with the learnership, Mokoka said. In the few months since the project started in June 2006 and alternating ve days in the classroom with ve days at the fuel station (in this time, two of the employed petrol attendants also receive their theoretical training), Mokoka has learnt much about the work of a petrol attendant. There is the handling of cash, re-ghting, customer care and communication. Unlike some of the other students who have no intention of ever working at a fuel station, but are using the learnership to get workplace experience, Mokoka would not mind working as a petrol attendant. I have beneted from my dealings with the customers. I want to run a business like this and am trying to collect information about running a fuel station. I dream about owning my own fuel station, he said.

Students during training for the Skills Transfer and Empowerment Programme (S.T.E.P.)

Case Studies

49

The time for the college sector has come


- Education Minister Naledi Pandor

South Africas FET Colleges


Provincial List
EASTERN CAPE Buffalo City FET .............................................052 Eastcape Midlands College for FET ...............054 Ikhala FET ......................................................056 Ingwe FET ......................................................058 King Hintsa FET College ................................060 King Sabata FET ............................................062 Lovedale FET .................................................064 Port Elizabeth College for FET .......................066 FREE STATE Flavius Mareka College for FET .....................068 Goldelds College for FET .............................070 Maluti College for FET ....................................072 Motheo College for FET .................................074 GAUTENG Central Johannesburg College for FET .........076 Ekurhuleni East College for FET ...................078 Ekurhuleni West College for FET ..................080 Sedibeng College for FET .............................082 South West Gauteng College for FET ............084 Tshwane North College for FET .....................086 Tshwane South College for FET .....................088 Westcol FET ...................................................090 KWAZULU-NATAL Coastal KZN FET ...........................................092 Elangeni FET ..................................................094 Esayidi FET Institution ....................................096 Majuba FET Institution....................................098 Mnambithi FET Institution ...............................100 Mthashana FET Institution..............................102 Thekwini College for FET ...............................104 Umfolozi FET Institution .................................106 Umgungundlovu FET Institution .....................108 LIMPOPO Capricorn FET ................................................110 Lephalale FET ...............................................112 Letaba FET .....................................................114 Mopani South East ........................................116 Sekhukhune FET College...............................118 Vhembe FET College .....................................120 Waterberg FET College ..................................122 MPUMALANGA Ehlanzeni FET College ..................................124 Gert Sibande FET College .............................126 Nkangala FET College ..................................128 NORTH-WEST Orbit College for FET......................................130 Taletso College for FET ..................................132 Vuselela FET College ....................................134 NORTHERN CAPE Northern Cape Rural College for FET ............136 Northern Cape Urban College for FET ...........138 WESTERN CAPE Boland College for FET .................................140 College of Cape Town FET.............................142 False Bay College for FET .............................144 Northlink FET College ....................................146 South Cape College for FET ..........................148 West Coast FET College ...............................150

Alphabetical List
Boland College for FET .................................140 Buffalo City FET .............................................052 Capricorn FET ................................................110 Central Johannesburg College for FET .........076 Coastal KZN FET ...........................................092 College of Cape Town FET.............................142 Eastcape Midlands College for FET ...............054 Ehlanzeni FET College ..................................124 Ekurhuleni East College for FET ...................078 Ekurhuleni West College for FET ..................080 Elangeni FET ..................................................094 Esayidi FET Institution ....................................096 False Bay College for FET .............................144 Flavius Mareka College for FET .....................068 Gert Sibande FET College .............................126 Goldelds College for FET .............................070 Ikhala FET ......................................................056 Ingwe FET ......................................................058 King Hintsa FET College ................................060 King Sabata FET ............................................062 Lephalale FET ...............................................112 Letaba FET .....................................................114 Lovedale FET .................................................064 Majuba FET Institution....................................098 Maluti College for FET ....................................072 Mnambithi FET Institution ...............................100 Mopani South East ........................................116 Motheo College for FET .................................074 Mthashana FET Institution..............................102 Nkangala FET College ..................................128 Northern Cape Rural College for FET ............136 Northern Cape Urban College for FET ...........138 Northlink FET College ....................................146 Orbit College for FET......................................130 Port Elizabeth College for FET .......................066 Sedibeng College for FET .............................082 Sekhukhune FET College...............................118 South Cape College for FET ..........................148 South West Gauteng College for FET ............084 Taletso College for FET ..................................132 Thekwini College for FET ...............................104 Tshwane North College for FET .....................086 Tshwane South College for FET .....................088 Umfolozi FET Institution .................................106 Umgungundlovu FET Institution .....................108 Vhembe FET College .....................................120 Vuselela FET College ....................................134 Waterberg FET College ..................................122 West Coast FET College ...............................150 Westcol FET ...................................................090

See page 152 for a list of contact details of each college

50 colleges, 1 goal

51

Bualo City
FET College

Life starts here

ualo City College (BCC) is a vibrant multi-sited institution that was established in 2002 as a result of the merger between East London Technical College, John Knox Bokwe Technical College and Border Technical College. Through its four campuses the East London, St Marks, John Knox Bokwe and King Street campuses, the college oers a wide variety of programmes, ranging from certicates to national diplomas, equipping students to meet the demands of the workplace and the needs of a changing society. The East London campus oers a wide range of full-time and part-time programmes in the Business, Art and Design as well as Utilities sectors. It is also home to the Business Skills Centre, which oers part-time courses geared towards skills training, re-training and enrichment. John Knox Bokwe campus in Mdantsane, which boasts modern facilities, is situated near major arterial routes and, therefore, is easily accessible. Programmes oered include Business and Engineering Studies.

Our Story
St Marks campus for Engineering Studies was opened in Southernwood in 1996 to oer Engineering learning programmes. The King Street campus, also in Southernwood, houses the colleges learnership unit. For the past ve years this separate unit has been actively involved in engineering and commercial learnerships involving a number of major companies in East London, including DaimlerChrysler REHAU Polymer, as well as various small and medium enterprises.

The college oers a wide variety of programmes, ranging from certicates to national diplomas, equipping students to meet the demands of the workplace and the needs of a changing society

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 9 000 (2005) Full-time equivalents: 2 769 (2005) Location: Eastern Cape Campuses: East London (three), Mdantsane (one). Critical Skills: KUKA Robotics, through which learners are taught the fundamentals of construction and operation and to programme the KUKA industrial robot via a hand-programming device to create a new or modify an existing programme. Computer-Aided Draughting (CAD) is another critical skill oered. It enables students to produce mechanical, civil and electrical engineering diagrams for later use in Computer-Aided Manufacturing applications and/or producing models of the new product. In addition, the colleges Information Technology training is helping to ll critical skills needs in the community. Some of the other programmes the college oers include Business, Financial and Marketing management, Sport Management and Coaching, IT, Clothing Production, Haircare, Educare and Electrical, Mechanical and Civil Engineering. Key Strengths: International partnerships, resources, well-equipped facilities, skilled and dedicated sta and well-established relationships with industries as well as the variety of programmes on oer.

Student Support Services


Study Resources: The college has the BP Resource Centre, which was established through a generous donation from BP SA Limited. It houses a well-equipped library, and the Sanlam Computer Centre, which gives students access to the internet and e-mail. General Services: Other student services include: a cafeteria, counselling, guidance and additional assistance such as Supplemental Instruction and the Reading Excellence Programme, as well as sporting and cultural activities. Accommodation: The college has three residences in East London to accommodate students from outlying areas. Health: Bualo City College established a health centre to meet the needs of the sta and students of the institution. The centre oers the following services: primary health care for basic day-today minor ailments; general HIV/Aids counselling; health promotion, particularly focused on youth and high-risk behaviour, and referral to one of the provincial facilities for ongoing care and treatment.

Together with a dedicated council, the sta will continue their eorts to ensure BCC remains an institution that provides quality education and training, oering programmes that are responsive to the needs of local industry and the community

(CEO Philip Loots)

Strategic Partnerships

ualo City College benets from a range of partnerships. The college has links with the following international and national partners: International: Government of Lower Saxony, Germany. As a result of the co-operation agreement signed between Lower Saxony and the Eastern Cape government, the college has beneted in terms of the: provision of a specialised Internet Webserver, focusing on education, as well as capacity training for the sta required to operate the server; provision of equipment for the Motor Vehicle Repair workshop; capacity-building of lecturers and assistance with workshop practice. Agreements of Co-operation with Berufsbildende Schulen Neustadt i.Rbg and Berufsbildende Schulen Cloppenberg in respect of sta developmental exchanges and student visits; liaison and sharing of policy developments; and communication and assistance in respect of curriculum development, sta development, institutional development and student support services. ROC Leiden, Netherlands: As a result of the Buffalo City Municipalitys partnership with Leiden, an Agreement of Co-operation with ROC Leiden was signed providing for: Sta developmental exchanges; liaison and sharing of policy developments and communication and assistance in respect of curriculum development, sta development, institutional development and student support services. DCSA Stuttgart, Germany: This entails provision of

equipment for workshops and capacity building of sta. GTZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit) / CIM (Centrum fr Internationale Migration und Entwicklung), Germany: The partnership means the college receives assistance with the establishment of a quality management system and the concomitant capacity-building of sta; establishment and equipping of health centres on the colleges East London and John Knox Bokwe campuses; promotion of learnerships and a CIM-integrated expert to support the college with institutional development. SAAB Sweden: Establishment of a CNC (computer numerical control) Technology Training Centre at the college and capacity-building of the sta members identied to lecture these programmes. National: Automotive Industry Development Centre: The partnership involves assistance in developing and nurturing the skilled sta needed to expand the automotive industry in the region. College of Cape Town: The college works with the College of Cape Town in two key areas, the capacity building of sta and the sharing of best practices. Learnerships: The college works with companies such as DaimlerChrysler South Africa, Summerpride Foods as well as a number of local retail organisations to oer learnerships.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting Tourism IT and Computer Science Engineering and Related Design Civil Engineering Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Campus East London and John Knox Bokwe (Mdantsane) East London and John Knox Bokwe East London East London John Knox Bokwe and St Marks John Knox Bokwe John Knox Bokwe and St Marks

Contact Details
Telephone: (043) 722-5453 Fax: (043) 743-0116 Postal Address: Private Bag X9016, East London 5200 E-mail: ceo@bccollege.co.za

www.bccollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

53

Eastcape Midlands
Creating new futures

FET College

astcape Midlands College, known as EMC, came into being on 31 March 2002 with the merger of Uitenhage Technical College, KwaNobuhle Technical College, Grahamstown Technical College and the satellite campus of Bethelsdorp Technical College in Graa-Reinet. Today, EMC has ve campuses: three in Uitenhage, where its administrative head oce is located, one in Graa-Reinet and another in Grahamstown. In Uitenhage, the High Street campus oers Business Studies; the Park Avenue campus oers Engineering Studies and the Charles Goodyear campus skills training. The Grahamstown campus specialises in Business Studies and will introduce Tourism as a focus area in 2008, while the GraaReinet campus focuses on Business Studies and Agriculture. The college serves a highly industrialised urban area, part of the Nelson Mandela Metropole, as well as the rural western part of the province. As

Our Story
such, it faces enormous challenges in being a provider for the needs of a highly advanced industrial component on the one hand and, on the other, a widespread rural area with high unemployment and poverty rates. Since the merger, EMC has expanded its modes of delivery to include distance education. In addition, it oers skills training in the areas of Agriculture, Mechatronics (the combination of mechanical, electronic, electrical and computer skills), Autotronics and Automotive Component Manufacturing. The needs of commerce and industry are being met through the establishment of a corporate training centre that oers short courses in areas such as Computer Studies and Project Mttanagement and courses on request such as Customer Care, Public Speaking and Communication. The head oce and campuses are in the process of being upgraded to the value of R37-million under the governments recapitalisation plan.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 261 (June 2006) Full-time equivalents: 1 320 Location: Eastern Cape Campuses: Uitenhage (three), GraaReinet and Grahamstown. Critical Skills: Motor-related courses to feed the automotive industry in the Eastern Cape; Agriculture; Financial Management; Marketing Management; Machining, Welding and Electrical Training. Key Strengths: The college has a Centre for Welding Excellence that trains learners to international welding standards and supplies the manufacturing industry with skilled welders. The college is close to two higher education institutions (Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University and Rhodes University). The college caters for rural areas while it is close to motor-related industries such as : Volkswagen, GoodYear, Hella and Johnsons Control. It is also well situated to serve the Coega Industrial Development Zone with: learnership training in Fitting and Turning; Welding and Electrical Engineering. The college is proud of its Performance and Risk Management System (PDLAM) for accountable governance.

Student Support Services


Student support services, with a dedicated learner support ocer on each campus, include: Counselling and Guidance: Pre-admission and registration information, orientation services and boarding placement. Individual and group counselling is provided for personal and social development as well as crisis intervention. Career Guidance: Guidance and occupational development include assistance with occupational and subject choices, career information, job-hunting skills and strategies and in-job placement. Financial aid is also available. Health and Wellness Education: This entails life skills training, cultural and social activities, sexual education, HIV/Aids education and substance and drug abuse education. Academic Development Support: The academic development and learning support includes remedial support, study skills, computer assistance, identifying high-risk students and drop-out prevention. The academic progression of students is tracked and attempts are made to remedy problem areas by liaising with parents or guardians. Youth Advisory Centre: The centres services include walk-in information and counselling services, information on the Umsobomvu Youth Fund and its activities, internet services and access to various publications and job placements.

We are a trend-setting, benchmarking institution and the fastest-growing college in the Eastern Cape
(CEO JJ Mbana)

Strategic Partnerships

earnerships: The college oers any learnership for which there is a demand. At present, learnerships are being oered in Automotive Component Manufacturing and Assembly (NQF Levels 2 and 3) and through the following qualications: the National Certicate Mechatronics (NQF Levels 2 and 3), the National Certicate Autotronics (NQF Levels 2 to 4), the National Certicate Fitting (NQF Levels 2 and 3), National Certicate Welding (NQF Level 2), National Certicate Animal Production (NQF Level 2), Wholesale & Retail SETA Skills Programmes (NQF Levels 2 to 4) and the National Certicate Mechanical Engineering: Machining (NQF Level 2). SETAs: The college also has a partnership with the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA) and Continental Tyres to alleviate the shortage in machining artisans. Twenty-four learners have started the National Certicate Mechanical Engineering: Machining. Research done for the Coega project indicated a serious shortage of skills in engineering qualications, which prompted MERSETA to identify 300 learners to be trained. The college, in partnership with Coega, East Cape Training Centre, a private provider, Volkswagen SA and Port Elizabeth College, is visiting companies in the metropole to negotiate placement of learners to gain the necessary experiential training. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: There is a partnership with the Umsobomvu Youth Fund (school-to-work programme). Forty-two learners were trained in

the Automotive Component Manufacturing and Assembly qualication of which 40 qualied. As a result, 34 were permanently employed by Dana Spicer Axle. The Umsobomvu Youth Fund expressed its satisfaction and indicated willingness to sponsor further projects. EMC trains students to be employed by Coega in areas such as Fitting and Turning, Welding and Electrical Engineering. Welding Centre of Excellence: To alleviate the current shortage of coded welders and training to meet high welding standards, especially in the Eastern Cape, an agreement was signed between EMC and the MERSETA for the establishment of a Welding Centre of Excellence. SA Institute of Welding-Accredited Training to a 6G Level (pipe-welding at 45 deg Celsius) will be provided in the nationally- and internationally-accredited centre. Automotive industry: Due to the automation in factories, Mechatronics (a combination of mechanical, electrical, electronic and computer skills) was developed as a new qualication. EMC signed an agreement with the Automotive Industry Development Centre (which assists companies in the automative industry to become globally competitive) to train learners in Mechatronics. The success led to a further contract to train the learners on NQF Level 3. This partnership is set to continue, subject to funding. Graduate Development Project: Currently busy training 50 graduates in preparation for the job market.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Management Marketing Finance, Economics and Accounting IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Campus High Street campus (Uitenhage), Graa-Reinet and Grahamstown Grahamstown High Street and Graa-Reinet Grahamstown Grahamstown Park Avenue and Charles Goodyear (Uitenhage) Park Avenue and Charles Goodyear (Uitenhage)

Contact Details
Telephone: (041) 995-2000 Fax: (041) 995-2028 Postal address: Private Bag X35, Uitenhage 6230 E-mail: emc@emcol.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

55

Ikhala

FET College

A better future with Ikhala

Our Story
and unemployed youth through programme selection and strategic partnerships. With campuses strategically positioned all over the region, the college is also well-positioned to take formal vocational education closer to the communities. It is focusing on: Business and Commerce, Tourism, Information Technology and Civil and Mechanical (Automotive) Engineering.

khala Public FET College (Ikhala College) was formed on 1April 2002 through the merging of a number of previous technical colleges, namely: Ezibeleni Technical College; Queenstown Technical College; Sterkspruit Technical College; East London Technical College (Aliwal North campus); Iqhayiya Technical College (Cradock campus) and Dordrecht International Peoples College. Currently, the college serves the communities of the northern region of the Eastern Cape; with its administrative head oce in Queeenstown and campuses in Aliwal North, Cradock, Dordrecht, Ezibeleni, Queen Nonesi (formerly known as Lady Frere), Queenstown and Sterkspruit. The name and logo of Ikhala is derived from the isiXhosa word for the aloe plant that is indigenous to the Eastern Cape and more specically to the northern region and which is well-known for its healing qualities in particular. The sun in the logo symbolises the intention of the college to provide a ray of sunshine in education in the region and the six rays of the sun symbolise the strategically placed campuses. The thick border around the logo symbolises the unity and interaction between the college and the communities it serves. In a rural region marked by high unemployment and a limited number of industries, the college sets itself the target of acting as a catalyst for community upliftment. It has positioned itself to support regional growth and development projects, SMMEs, co-operatives

The name and logo of Ikhala is derived from the isiXhosa word for the aloe plant that is indigenous to the Eastern Cape ... [and] is well-known for its healing qualities

Student Support Services


Youth Advisory Centre: Supported by the Umsobomvu Youth Fund, it assists students with information and guidance on employment opportunities. Sta also deal with life skills and counselling. Student Representative Council: The SRC is responsible for eective communication between students and management and student activities on all campuses. Sport and culture: A sport and culture committee is responsible for the organising and development of sport and culture on all campuses. Activities include soccer, netball, volleyball, softball, choir, drama and dancing. Student Resource Centres: From January 2007, all campuses will have limited computer facilities with internet access. On the Aliwal North, Queenstown and Ezibeleni campuses, the format will be that of an internet cafe with extra services like photocopying and scanning. Financial aid: Annually, nancial assistance is available according to a basic means test. Students who do well could qualify for academic bursaries. Supplemental Instruction (SI): From 2007, the college will introduce SI, whereby selected senior students mentor academically weak students in identied areas in a structured academic remedial programme.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 166 Full-time equivalents: 1 303 Location: Northern region of the Eastern Cape Campuses: Aliwal North, Cradock, Dordrecht, Ezibeleni, Queen Nonesi, Queenstown and Sterkspruit. Critical Skills: Business skills (entrepreneurial), Engineering skills (Civil and Mechanical) and computer-related skills. Key Strengths: Widespread geographical representation with campuses in the seven most important towns of the region, a very close working relationship with the district as well as local municipalities of the region and a strong focus on service delivery to rural communities.

Like the healing qualities of the Aloe, Ikhala College is committed to be an agent of transformation in serving the communities of the northern region of the Eastern Cape (CEO Cwayita Zituta)

Strategic Partnerships

istricts and Municipalities: Ikhala College has close working relations with two District Municipalities, namely Ukhahlamba and Chris Hani District Municipalities, and is in the process of formalising a Memorandum of Understanding with both. The relationship is extended to local municipalities within the districts and involves local government sta training and future support to local economic development projects with the emphasis on the training component. Automotive Industry: The partnership agreement with the Automotive Industry Development Centre focuses on the establishment of human resource capacity as well as equipment for the servicing side of the automotive industry. Through this partnership, the college successfully established a Basic Handskills Workshop (Metalwork) as well as an industry standard Automotive Workshop. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: Through the Umsobomvu Youth Fund, the college rolled out a learnership programme for 40 unemployed youth in Vehicle Servicing NQF Level 2 integrated with additional computer skills and entrepreneurship training (New Venture Creation). The fund also supported and funded the establishment of a Youth Advisory Centre at the college. SETAs: The college has partnerships with the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA), the Wholesale and Retail SETA and the Local Government SETA.

During the past two years, the college successfully oered a variety of learnerships and skills programmes funded and supported by these three SETAs. The college has a strong relationship with the MERSETA, which is supporting the college to deliver skills training to the more rural communities. Education Institutions: Ikhala College has formal and informal relationships with a variety of higher institutions like Unisa, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University and the Central University of Technology, Free State International: Through the German Development Service, the college has placed two German Experts in Engineering (Electronics and Automotive) at the Engineering campus in Ezibeleni for a period of two years (Automotive only for six months). The main objective of the co-operation agreement is to transfer high-level technical skills to college sta and to assist in the upgrading and development of workshops to industry standards. Pastel Accounting: The campuses at Aliwal North and Queenstown are both registered and accredited Pastel training centres. International Computer Drivers Licence (ICDL): The campuses at Queenstown, Aliwal North and Cradock are registered ICDL Centres. In addition, the Queenstown campus is accredited as an ICDL Testing Centre.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Management Finance, Economics and Accounting Tourism Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design 2008 Hospitality IT and Computer Science Aliwal North Queenstown Campus Aliwal North, Cradock, Queenstown & Queen Nonesi Aliwal North, Queenstown and Dordrecht Queenstown Aliwal North Ezibeleni and Sterkspruit Ezibeleni Ezibeleni

Contact Details
Telephone (045) 838-2593/ 838-2594 Fax: (045) 839-5997 Postal Address: Private Bag X7110, Queenstown 5320 E-mail: zituta@ikhalacollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

57

Ingwe
Ingwe Idla Ngamabala

FET College

Our Story
In fact, the three district municipalities the college serves OR Tambo, Alfred Nzo and Ukhahlamba are characterised by a lack of industries. The local communities depend on agriculture and subsistence farming. This contributes to an unemployment rate of 70%. In addition, the area is severely aected by HIV/Aids, with Maluti and Lusikisiki having being declared as districts that have among the highest infection rates. Despite these challenges, the colleges vision captures its determination to play an active role in the area. Its vision states that Ingwe aspires to be A catalyst in poverty alleviation and local economic development through provisioning of high-quality and aordable training programmes that are relevant to local and regional socioeconomic development. For the college to make this vision a reality, it has set goals that include: delivering services of high quality, eective and ecient management and administration, sound nancial accountability and responsiveness to community needs. These goals are part of its strategic plan, which has been formulated to measure the progress that the college is making in becoming a centre of excellence in developing the skills of young and old.

ngwe Public FET College is in the eastern part of the Eastern Cape in an area that shares borders with KwaZulu-Natal and Lesotho. Like the other seven FET colleges in the province, Ingwe Public FET College was created during the national restructuring process that started in 2002. Five former technical colleges merged after which Ingwe also acquired the former Maluti College of Education. Ingwes campuses now include Siteto in Bizana, Maluti in Matatiele, Mount Fletcher in Mount Fletcher, Mount Frere in Mount Frere and Ngqungqushe in Lusikisiki. The coming together of these diverse former institutions is captured in the colleges slogan, Ingwe Idla Ngamabala, which means, in short, that although the communities served by Ingwe dier from one another, if combined, they can benet irrespective of their ethnic groups. Indeed, Ingwe is situated in a natural environment of the rich cultural diversity of Bacas, Pondos, Sothos, Xhosas and Hlubis. Though the merger created a much bigger institution, Ingwe remains a fairly small college compared with others in the province. The various campuses also come from the same political background: they are all previously state colleges, lack resources, have poor infrastructure and serve impoverished communities.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 788 Full-time equivalents: 1 169 Location: Eastern Cape Campuses: Mount Frere, Lusikisiki, Mount Fletcher, Bizana and Matatiele. Critical Skills: Basic computer skills and bead artwork. Key Strengths: The ability to reach rural communities with education and training opportunities where few other institutions can. This puts the college in an ideal position to provide training to help individuals nd employment or to become self-employed.

Student Support Services


Ingwe College engages in several activities to enhance students experiences during and after their studies. The aim is to provide learners with support of high quality and which is responsive to the needs of the learners. The colleges strategic objectives in this respect include: Learner Support Material: This includes the development of learner support material. Facilitating the Provisioning of Workplace Experience: The college helps to make arrangements to help students with workplace experience. One of the steps the college took was to purchase microbuses to transport students to workplaces where they are obtaining practical experience. Counselling and Guidance: The college has entered into a contract with a counselling services company to guide students. In addition, it has a partnership with the Eastern Cape Department of Labour in Mthatha to provide guidance services.

Wild Coast Sun A partnership in the eld of Tourism and Hospitality will create internship opportunities for students.

It is our intention to oer dynamic learning programmes to meet market needs and to increase the number of students. But we have to change the hearts and minds of our communities towards FET colleges versus institutions of higher learning

(CEO Sam Sipamla)

Strategic Partnerships
ithin the next 12 months to two years, the college will be entering into strategic partnerships and agreements with a number of key stake-

holders. This has been identied as of utmost necessity as it will assist the college in achieving the following: Infrastructure development for some programme oerings; Sharing of resources and providing access to certain resources; Implementation of skills and learnership programmes; Incubation services (provision of infrastructure and facilities); and Workplace experience and internship for college learners. The following key stakeholders have been identied for the purpose of establishing strategic partnerships and entering into agreements: Alfred Nzo District Municipality and Furntech: Focused on the areas of forestry, sawmilling and furniture manufacturing, the partnership will aim to provide workplace experience for learners and incubation opportunities at the companys factory/training centre at Umzimkhulu. Hans Merensky (Singisi Forest Services): Students will have the opportunity for workplace experience and internships in forest management and sawmilling. Qaukeni Local Municipality: The focus area of the partnership is the local economic development in

the area of agriculture with the purpose of poverty alleviation. Through this partnership, the college aims to implement skills and learnership programmes on development facilitation and internships in Agriculture, Engineering and Civil Engineering. Incubation services for Mechanical Engineering will be another outcome. OR Tambo District Municipality: Co-operation in the areas of primary health care and agriculture will allow students to gain practical experience in Agriculture at Mfundisweni and in Engineering at Qaukeni. Mbizana Local Municipality: There will be opportunities for students to do in-service training, while incubation services would be created for Engineering students at Mbizana. Elundini Local Municipality: The partnership will entail co-operation in the elds of Primary Health Care and Agriculture, creating incubation opportunities for emerging farmers as well as the possibility of implementing skills and learnership programmes. Magwa Tea Estate: College students in the eld of agriculture will be able to gain workplace experience at the estate. Wild Coast Sun: A partnership in the eld of Tourism and Hospitality will create internship opportunities for students.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Marketing Finance, Economics and Accounting IT and Computer Science Management Electrical Infrastructure Civil Engineering & Building Construction Manufacturing and Assembly Campus Mount Frere Ngqungqushe Maluti Mount Fletcher Siteto Ngqungqushe Siteto Mount Frere

Contact Details
Telephone: (039) 255-0346 Fax: (039) 255-0347 Postal address: PO Box 92491, Mount Frere 5090 E-mail: sipamla@ingwecollege.org.za

www.ingwecollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

59

King Hintsa
FET College

Reigning through technology

Our Story
The college serves an overwhelmingly rural population. A total of 98% of households live in rural areas, 67% live below the poverty line, about 20% have no formal education and 33% have completed only Grade 6. King Hintsa College views itself as responsible for changing the lives of the communities it serves. This is a challenge, since there are expectations of uplifting the economy, which is dicult because of fewer job opportunities. The situation has meant the college has refocused the structure of its business which is based on the municipalities Integrated Development Plan as well as the Provincial Growth Development Plan. The college is in the process of setting up an incubation centre with assistance from the Eastern Cape Department of Public Works, whereby students can get experiential training with support from the college.

ing Hintsa Public FET College was established in 2002 through a merger of Teko, HB Tsengwa and Centane technical colleges. Teko Campus, the colleges main campus, is located in Butterworth under the jurisdiction of the Mnquma Municipality. It evolved from a multi-purpose skills development centre into an agricultural college and later in 1970 into a technical college. HB Tsengwa Campus, in Willowvale town centre under the Mbhashe Municipality, was established in 1987 and has a satellite campus in Idutywa. Centane campus, in Centane, also in the Mnquma Municipality, was established in 1995. Teko specialises in Agriculture and Engineering Studies; HB Tsengwa in Business Studies and Centane in Clothing Production and Hospitality Studies. The college is named after the Xhosa King Hintsa, who ruled over the area in the early 19th century before he was murdered by British military commander Harry Smith in 1835.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 1 240 Full-time equivalents: Not available Location: Eastern Cape Campuses: Butterworth, Willowvale and Centane. Critical Skills: Building Construction, Primary Agriculture and Welding. Key Strengths: Community involvement: Civil Engineering students doing Building Construction are involved in the construction of low-cost houses in Willowvale. Those participating in informal programmes will be assisted in forming co-operatives. Agriculture: The college has just introduced Primary Agriculture at Teko campus. The surrounding communities are supportive of this initiative and activities such as agricultural shows take place on the campus. Mechanical Engineering: Welding has proved highly successful within a short time. The college has participated in the manufacturing of gas stoves for the Eastern Cape Department of Educations School Nutrition Programme. The hardware stores in the area rely on East London suppliers for security doors, window frames and door frames, so the college intends empowering trainees to manufacture them for these stores.

Student Support Services


The Student Support Services section is managed in the administration centre by the students liaison ocer who reports to the senior manager. Each campus has a student liaison ocer. Services include: Financial Aid: There is a budget for needy full-time students. An African Scholar Fund focuses on full-time students under 25. Students Representative Council: Each campus is represented on the SRC, which arranges social and fund-raising activities. HIV/Aids: An awareness programme is driven by the student liaison ocer and the HIV/AIDS Committee comprising sta and students. Religious Activities: The college has a Students Christian Organisation for all denominations. Academic Activities: The section organises the New Students Orientation programme whereby new students are welcomed and informed about courses, activities and resources. Counselling and Career Guidance: Individual attention is given to students who have problems in choosing a career or who want to gain more insight into their chosen elds. Sport: The college believes that a sound mind is found in a sound body and allows time for sporting activities.

King Hintsa Public FET College is vibrant, involved and committed


(CEO Sibusiso Lukhozi)

Strategic Partnerships

ast and present partnerships include: Educational Institutions: The college has joined forces with the Butterworth Private Technical College to allow sta and students to exchange information and best practices. Macibe Senior Secondary School and Nzanzana Junior Secondary School as well as Patricia Noah Junior Secondary Schools are feeder schools and utilise the colleges computer labs, workshops and sta. Langalethu Junior Secondary School is also a feeder school with which the college shares facilities. The college also exchanges resources and best practices with Coastal KZN College for FET and Bualo City College. In addition, Unisa provides for college sta to register upgrading courses at special rates. Municipalities: Current partnerships are with Mnquma and Mbhashe local municipalities. Both the college and the municipalities benet from the training of college sta and students. For example, the building of the low-cost houses beneted sta and students by exposing them to working on a real building site. The municipality had houses built and some community members capacitated. Government Departments: The college has been working with the Eastern Cape Departement of Education on its School Nutrition Programme by manufacturing gas stoves and supplying gas cylin-

ders. Students and community members got training and the project raised our funds. Future partnerships are planned with: The Provincial Department of Public Works: Students will receive experiential training, sta will get exposure to the business world. An incubation centre, DPW, will solve the problem of obtaining young artisans. Coega Development Corporation: The college will oer training for their sta on their projects, while students will get experiential training. Global Tools & Industrial Supplies: The college and the company will jointly access tenders. Similarly, the college and Phakisa Operations (Pty) Ltd will access tenders jointly and our students and sta will receive training. The Eastern Cape Centre of Excellence for Agriculture: The centre will be training college sta and students.

Both the college and the municipalities benet from the training of college sta and students. For example, the building of the low-cost houses beneted sta and students by exposing them to working on a real building site. The municipality had houses built and some community members capacitated.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Campus Hospitality Centane Tourism Centane Civil Engineering & Building Construction Teko Primary Agriculture Teko Electrical Infrastructure Construction Teko Oce Administration HB Tsengwa Finance Economics & Accounting HB Tsengwa IT & Computer Science HB Tsengwa

Contact Details
Telephone (047) 491-3722 /491-3731 Fax: (047) 491-3730 /491-3744 Postal address: Private Bag X3018, Butterworth 4960 E-mail: sblukhozi@yahoo.com

50 colleges, 1 goal

61

King Sabata
FET College

Conquer through technology

Our Story
Mapuzi in Coee Bay; Ngcobo in Ngcobo; Mngazi in Port St Johns; Libode in Nyandeni Local Municipality and Ntabozuko in Elliotdale (Xhorha). The colleges main service area is the OR Tambo District Municipality and part of the Chris Hani District. This area suers unemployment levels ranging between 65% and 87% and poverty levels of 65% to 90%. Main economic drivers are the public sector and community services. The area is characterised by huge infrastructure backlogs, mainly water and sanitation, housing, roads, telecommunication and electricity. It is also prone to water-borne diseases such as cholera, diarrhoea and HIV/Aids. Literacy levels are extremely low. The service-delivery capacity of the municipalities within the OR Tambo region has been identied as poor, specically with regards to social and economic development, although there are pockets of success in some areas. The college oers vocational education and training programmes that focus on addressing the skills shortage and promoting the development of SMMEs. Through its Business, Engineering and community programmes and learnerships, the college seeks to ll the needs of local communities.

ing Sabata Dalindyebo Public FET College is situated at the centre of the former Transkei in the Eastern Cape province. It is named after King Sabata Dalindyebo, former King of the Tembus in Transkei. Born in 1928, he was deeply involved in the liberation struggle of South Africa. He died in exile in 1986 and was refused burial in his home by the former SA government. He was later reburied in Bumbane near Mthatha. The college was founded in April 2002 as a merger of three former technical colleges: Mthatha, Mapuzi and Engcobo. Satellite campuses were Ntabozuko in Elliotdale (Xhora), which has been declared the poorest area in the country; Libode in Nyandeni Local Municipality and Mngazi at Port St Johns. The new college has six campuses: Mthatha;

This area suers unemployment levels ranging between 65% and 87% and poverty levels of 65% to 90%

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 826 Full-time equivalents: 1 353 Location: Eastern part of the Eastern Cape Campuses: Mthatha, Coee Bay, Port St Johns, Libode, Elliotdale (Xhorha) and Ngcobo. Critical Skills: The Libode campus supports community co-operatives engaged in: traditional arts and craft; leatherwork; tannery and agriculture. Funding for the arts and craft production comes from the Transnet Foundation. There is also an HIV/Aids programme at this campus. Mapuzi and Ntabozuko campuses run community programmes such as: Cabinetmaking, Bricklaying and Plastering. Key Strengths: Strong strategic partnerships and linkages with the community, which benet both the college and the people of the Eastern Cape.

Student Support Services


The oce of the senior manager for Education and Training Services executes all student support service activities. Sports and Culture: The college oers rugby, soccer, softball and volleyball. Most of the campuses oer arts and cultural activities such as choral music and traditional dances. Orientation: The college started a welcoming activity in February 2006 for new students. Library: Mthatha, Mngazi, Mapuzi and Libode campuses have libraries. However, they lack study material, computer/internet services and librarians/sta. Student Representative Council: Each campus has 10 SRC members. Leadership training helps members to balance their studies, deal with student needs and succeed academically. HIV/Aids: This service assists students and sta in dealing with issues like faithfulness, condomising and sexually transmitted diseases. A lecturer who was a professional nurse collects HIV/Aids material and condoms on a voluntary basis. The college does not have a structured HIV/Aids awareness programme yet.

The college recapitalisation programme and introduction of the new National Certicate (Vocational) ushers in the beginning of the new era which will make the college a catalyst in alleviating poverty through skills development and the promotion of the entrepreneurial spirit

(CEO Nelson Mziwamandla Gibeni)

Strategic Partnerships

he main objectives of these partnerships will be to leverage additional technical and nancial resources and facilitate sharing of resources; ensure easy access to infrastructure; provide workplace experience and internship opportunities to learners; implement skills and learnership programmes for various target groups and generate additional income for the college. SETAs: The college has partnerships with the Media, Advertising, Publishing, Printing, and Packaging SETA (MAPPP-SETA); and the Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA). The partnership with the MAPPSETA commenced in March 2005 and was as the result of a partnership with the Nelson Mandela Museum. Twenty students have beneted from this learnership, which deals with craft production. The Nelson Mandela Museum became an employer and KSD college a service provider. The products made by the learners were sold at the museum. This year, with the help of German donor funding, the Nelson Mandela Museum opened a craft production workshop and some of the colleges learners were absorbed there. The Health and Welfare (HWSETA) learnership, which began in March 2006, was as a result of the partnership between HWSETA, Walter Sisulu University and the college. The college is the site of delivery but the learners still have to attend some modules at the Regional Training Centre at WSU.

The 50 students participating in this learnership are divided into two groups of 25 each. One group attends classes while another does practicals in surrounding clinics. On completion of this learnership, it is envisaged that these learners will be employed as community-based health care workers. Government Departments and Educational Institutions: The Eastern Cape Department of Education and three FET colleges, King Sabata Dalindyebo, King Hintsa and Lovedale, signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the provincial Department of Public Works in East London. The college and the Provincial Department of Public Works have enabled 11 additional Civil Engineering - Bricklaying and Plastering - students from Mapuzi campus to sign an employment contract for the purpose of participating in an internship and experiential training. Five students started a similar programme in October 2005 and have participated in the construction of Nkanga JSS in Libode and the tribal authority oces in Ntabankulu. The college is looking forward to developing this partnership further. The colleges long-standing working relationship with the Department of Public Works has beneted the Civil Construction, Electrical, Carpentry and Plumbing learners who do their practical training with the department.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Marketing IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure Construction Finance, Economics and Accounting Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering and Related Design Oce Administration Campus Mthata and Ngcobo Mthata and Ngcobo Mthatha Mthatha Mthatha and Mapuzi Mthatha Mthatha Mthatha, Ngcobo and Mapuzi campuses.

Contact Details
Telephone (047) 536-0923/ 536-0924 Fax: (047) 536-0932 Postal address: Private Bag X5011, Mthatha 5099 E-mail: jola@ksdfetcollege.org.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

63

Lovedale
Connect with the future
ovedale Public FET College occupies the historic Border-Kei area of the Eastern Cape, 59km north of East London and 90km south of Grahamstown. The college is the product of a merger between Lovedale Community College, East London Technical College (King Williams Town Campus) and Zwelethemba Technical College in Zwelitsha township, about 2km outside King Williams Town. Many of South Africas great leaders studied at Lovedale alumni include President Thabo Mbeki; Nosimo Balindlela, Premier of the Eastern Cape, and slain SACP leader Chris Hani. The college was named in the early 1800s after Scotsman Sir John Love who inuenced the establishment of the original Lovedale Teacher Training College, now the Alice campus. From a school to an industrial training institution; from being closed and reopened by the Ciskeian homeland government under apartheid, Lovedale has survived.

FET College

Our Story
Each of its campuses has a unique history. King campus is located on the south side of the Bualo River in King Williams Town. The college was originally erected in the 1800s as a missionary station. In 1989 it amalgamated with East London Technical College and moved to its current premises. In 1855 the governor of the Cape, Sir George Grey, proposed the establishment of full-time industrial courses at Lovedale to train apprentices in areas such as wagon-making and blacksmithing. This was the start of Zwelethemba Technical College. Under apartheid, the college became part of the Ciskeian homeland. The college serves peri-urban and urban areas, many of which have large numbers of unemployed youth and suer extreme poverty. It, therefore, focuses on potentially income-generating skills such as Agriculture, Engineering, Crafts and Business Studies with an entrepreneurial focus.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 233 (2006) Full-time equivalents: Not available Location: Eastern Cape Campuses: Alice, King Williams Town and Zwelitsha Critical Skills: Potentially income-generating skills such as: Agriculture, Engineering, Crafts and Business Studies, Computer Literacy and various entrepreneurial learnerships. Key Strengths: Responsiveness to the community, public and private-sector needs; capital resources such as practical workshops and a newly established Skills Training Centre. The college also oers skills training in Computer Literacy, Agriculture and various entrepreneurial learnerships to address skills shortages. In addition, the college has student accommodation, qualied assessors, moderators, learning material developers and a skills development facilitator. The college has special expertise in these areas. This division has two sections, one focusing on internal processes and the other on external issues, such as areas in which there are training needs.

Student Support Services


The main unit is based at the Lovedale headquarters in King Williams Town, but each of the three campuses has an oce rendering student support. The unit oers a range of services, including: Orientation: At the start of each year/semester/trimester students are orientated to familiarise them with college life by means of life skills programmes including HIV/Aids, counselling, life and career skills. Bursaries: Are allocated to nancially needy students who show responsibility and capability in maintaining average to good marks. The college provides bursaries from its own funds. Student Representative Council: Members attend capacity-building workshops to familiarise them with the colleges structure, protocol and expectations of students in leadership roles. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: A Youth Advisory Centre is located on the King campus where students can get information on careers. Sport: Each campus has rugby, soccer, netball and volleyball teams. The college team is selected from all three campuses. Culture: The college has choirs on each campus and participates in national and provincial competitions.

Innovative, pioneering and responsive, Lovedale College wants to improve the quality of life of local communities, improve literacy, slow the HIV infection rate, inculcate lifelong learning, an entrepreneurial spirit and provide students with workplace experience

(CEO Nceba Stole)

Strategic Partnerships

kills Development: The college has a partnership with the Uluntu Skills Development Centre. The partnership was formed for the implementation of learnerships for the Wholesale & Retail SETA. Lovedale is a lead provider. HIV/Aids: Lovedale United Presbyterian Church in South Africa and the college have joined forces in the ght against HIV. Both parties provide the public with information about HIV and Aids in the hope of educating people about how to protect themselves. Learnership: The Eastern Cape Department of Health and the Bualo City FET College are working with Lovedale College to implement a handyman learnership. Work Placements: The college partnered with Colven Associates, a recruitment agency in East London, to arrange placements for Lovedale College graduates. A list of contacts of college graduates is sent to them regularly. Agriculture and Forestry: Lovedale has a feeder type relationship with Fort Cox College of Agriculture and Forestry. Since Lovedale provides only a bridging course in Agriculture, students who prefer to further their studies are referred to Fort Cox to obtain a higher qualication. Lovedale, in turn, oers students of Fort Cox the opportunity to do their practical work at its campus in Alice. Educational Institutions: Although Lovedale does not have signed agreements with the following higher institutions of learning, it maintains

close contact and favourable relations with them: Fort Hare University; Walter Sisulu University, and Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (which allows agricultural students to move to its Department of Agriculture). Municipalities: The college maintains close links with the following municipalities: Bualo City Municipality, Amahlathi Municipality, and Nkonkobe Municipality. Business: Our students are employed through the colleges partnership with Fabkom. The company is a few kilometres from Zwelitsha and employs students in the elds of Mechanical Engineeringfabrication and Welding. Stutt-Brick is working with bricklaying students. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: This programme oers skills to help individuals to become self-employed or more employable. Government Departments: The Department of Water Aairs will oer students the opportunity to do their practical training in water and sanitation. Eskom: Students have the opportunity for experiential training placements. International: The Deutscher Entwicklungsdienst (DeD) is in the process of working with crafts development, involving Business Management students and Financial Management students to keep businesses aoat. The DeD is also assisting the colleges Engineering campus in Zwelitsha with the upgrading and development of various engineering workshops addressing critical skills.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Primary Agriculture Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Oce Administration Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Engineering Engineering and Related Design 2008 and 2009: IT and Computer Science Marketing and Tourism Campus Alice King (King Williams Town) King King Zwelitsha Zwelitsha Zwelitsha

Contact Details

www.lovedale.org.za

Telephone (043) 642-1331/ 642-1336 Fax: (043) 642-1388 Address: PO Box 2156, King Williams Town 5600 E-mail: headquarters@lovedale.org.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

65

Port Elizabeth
Get a head, get an education

FET College

Our Story
college to train up sta. A focal area over the next three years is to cement working relationships with SMMEs, a project the college is undertaking in conjunction with the Port Elizabeth Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Through the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA), PE College oers programmes in Plastics to industry, both on- and o-site. The college is also the preferred provider of South African Airways and the South African National Defence Force, particularly for training in Upholstery, Tailoring, Welding and Electronics. The emphasis on workplace-based/practical training is facilitated by the colleges 10 workshops or skills laboratories. The college is involved in learnerships and skills programmes in partnership with the Wholesale and Retail SETA, the Local Government SETA and the Automotive Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC). It has assisted MERSETA in the design of the curricula in the area of autotronics. PE College is planning to introduce distance and open learning.

he merging of technical colleges in the Eastern Cape has created new opportunities for Port Elizabeth (PE) College to position itself as a skills provider to the Nelson Mandela Metropole, the province and South Africa as a whole. It has also allowed PE College to grow niche areas and develop new ones. Industries such as catering and hospitality, nancial management, automotive as well as art and design have been identied for student training. For instance, the college is the sole training provider of certied national courses in Catering in the Port Elizabeth area. Its Victoria site in the CBD has been donated to the college by the Anglo Gold Education Trust and a restaurant is being equipped here. This allows for in-service training for Hospitality and Catering students, as well as the introduction of learnerships and skills programmes in the catering trade. Our Utility and Hospitality Services students are often utilised by corporate and private hosts for catering functions. The college enjoys close working relationships with a number of large businesses that use the

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 12 410 Full-time equivalents: 3 400 Location: Eastern Cape Campuses: Bethelsdorp, Struandale/New Brighton, central Port Elizabeth. Critical Skills: Catering and Hospitality, Upholstery, Tailoring, Welding and Electronics, Financial Management, training for the automotive and related industries, Arts and Design introducing glass recycling and glassmaking in one of the poorest areas of the metropole; e-commerce and distance and open learning to enhance access. Training and mobilising of co-operatives as entrepreneurship ventures for self-suciency and local economic development. Key Strengths: Hospitality and Catering; about 200 partnerships in the public and private sector which provide students with placement opportunities for practical work; Upholstery; Tailoring; Welding and Electronics. Quality facilities the college has 10 workshops, skills laboratories where hands-on, applied competence is attained.

Student Support Services


PE College oers several types of support. These include: Study resources: The college has a modern, well-equipped Resource Centre at the Russell Road campus, where students can refer to reference material, utilise the computers on o periods or engage in group work in specially designated areas. Iqhayiya and Bethelsdorp campuses also have their own libraries, and plans are afoot to upgrade these within the next year. Accommodation: At the Dower campus the existing hostel facility allows students from rural areas to access FET more readily. General activities: These include sports, arts and cultural activities. Academic support: Supplemental instruction includes additional support to students who are struggling. Counselling: The college has an active HIV/Aids programme and students who have personal problems are referred to a counsellor. Student Representative Council: The SRC manages the students aairs.

Our focus remains to oer high-quality programmes and learnerships which are relevant to the sectorial skills and poverty alleviation projects of our province

(CEO Joy Grobler)

Strategic Partnerships

he college has more than 200 public and private partnerships. These include a large number of corporates, government departments (health, social welfare, correctional services and labour), local government and the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), which will ensure recognition and benchmarking of learning programmes. The partners in various elds are listed below. Engineering/learnerships: ADT Alarm Technician, I.E Electrical, Algoa Bus Company, Murray & Roberts, six FET colleges (Lovedale, East Cape Midlands, King Sabata Dalindyebo, King Hintsa, Bualo City, College of Cape Town), SETAs (Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services, Energy, Construction, Mining and Minerals), Coega IDZ, Lower Saxony College in Germany, Delta and Volkswagen. Business studies/learnerships: Wholesale and Retail SETA, Ellerines, Spar, Servistar, Big Daddys Footballer & Sport Co, Sure Parts Midas, Haslop and Mason, Woodys T Birch & Co, Contract Marketing, Aberdeen Furnishing, United Cash and Carry, Strand Hardware, Couch Creations, Uppercrust Bakery, Alpha Pharmacare, Pep Stores, the Cacadu municipality and NMMU. Utility Industries and Social Services: These include guest houses (La Provence, The Cock House, Jutland Manor, Cosmos Cuisine, Andries Stockenstrom, GBs Guesthouse, Cyler Crescent, Sand Flats B & B, Millibury, Cascades, Karoo Ouberg Lodge, Halstead, Sandals, Lodge on the Bay, Hackelwood, Supertubes, Mount Lodge, Villa dHestia, Heugh Rod, Bay Lodge, Fernandos Panorama and Weldon

House); hotels (Beach, Marine, Beacon Isle, Middleton Manor, Golden Valley Hotel, Edward, Humewood, Gateway, Swartberg, Old Village Inn, Assegaaibos, Drostdy, Hogsback Inn, Victoria Manor, The Halyards, Bayberry Fountain, Humewood, the Paxton); 15 game lodges (Amakhala Safari, Camp Fig Tree, Intaba, Redbourne, Shamwari, Lairds Shumba Safaris Maitland River, Bayethe Game Reserve, Lalibela Gamy Reserve, Tstisikama, Hunters Country House, River Bend and Breede River); restaurants (Tarantinos, Staceys Diner, Cafe Rossini, De Kelder, Stormsriver Bridge, Stormsriver Mouth, Something Fishy, Thatshwood, Protea Hotel (Mthatha), Living Waters, House of Coees, Buelsbaai Waterfront, The Islander, Mama Rosa, Bloomingdales, Fishtales, Boardwalk Bayside Pantry, Pine Lodge, Buthers Block, The Oyster Catcher, Cafe Brazilia, Cagneys Action Cafe, Ristaurante di Mauro, Guidos Apron Springs Tea Garden, Blue Waters Cafe, Cafe da Vinci) and catering companies (Bojangles, Father and Son, Fat Cats, Dyasons, Fedics Food Services, Compass Group, Royal Food, Sodexho, Freedom, Algoa, Kei, Country Kitchen, Barrys Food and Estate Deo Volante) which provide in-service training opportunities to students. Similarly, students work at hospitals, schools, educational institutions and a home for the aged. In this area, the college also works with four other FET colleges (Bualo City, King Sabata Dalindyebo, King Hintsa and Ikhala) and two SETAs (Media, Advertising, Publishing, Printing and Packaging; Forest Industry).

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Civil Engineering & Building Construction IT and Computer Science Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Hospitality Tourism Campus Russell Road Russell Road Iqhayiya Iqhayiya Russel Road Dower Russel Road Russel Road

Contact Details

www.pecollege.edu.za

Telephone (041) 585-7771 Fax: (041) 582-2281 Postal address: PO Box 6040, Port Elizabeth 6000 E-mail: pec@rrc.ac.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

67

Flavius Mareka
Embrace your future

FET College

Our Story
economic needs of the region. O-site training, part-time classes and exi-classes are oered to government departments such as health, labour (SETAs), social service, correctional services, the South African National Defence Force and local municipalities. Communities and all other stakeholders are informed to understand that the college belongs to the Fezile Dabi District and should be utilised by all the institutions, including local governments and NGOs. The college is achieving its goals as has been proven by the awards it has collected from the Provincial Department of Education. These include: the 2004 award for the Most Improved College in the Free State, the 2005 award for the Best FET College in the Free State; and the 2004/2005 awards for both Best Student Support and Best Curriculum Innovation.

n 2003, three colleges in the northern Free State merged to form the Flavius Mareka FET College: Sasolburg Technical College, Kroonstad Technical College and Mphohadi College of Education. The new college was named after Flavius Mareka, a prominent gure in education, cultural and political circles in Kroonstad, who died in 1965. Flavius Mareka FET College provides education and training from two campuses with three delivery points: Sasolburg and Moqhaka. Sasolburg is the main campus while Moqhaka campus has two delivery points Mphohadi, situated in Maokeng, near Kroonstad and the Kroonstad campus. The location of the campuses covers the vast catchment area of the Fezile Dabi District including towns such as: Kroonstad, Heilbron, Parys, Sasolburg, Deneysville, Viljoenskroon, Steynsrus, Edenville, Koppies, Bothaville, Vredefort and Frankfort. Given the colleges reach, programme oerings are broad to meet the diversity of the social and

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 527 Full-time equavalents: 1 564 Location: Northern Free State Campuses: Sasolburg and Moqhaka campuses. Sasolburg is the main campus and Moqhaka Campus has two delivery points Mphohadi, situated in Maokeng, and Kroonstad. The catchment area includes Kroonstad, Heilbron, Parys, Sasolburg, Deneysville, Viljoenskroon, Steynsrus, Edenville, Koppies and Bothaville. Critical Skills: Chemical plant operations, maths and science literacy, short computer courses, formal computer training, Business Administration, Community Development, Entrepreneurship and Agriculture. Key Strengths: Qualied sta members; service to the community by also targeting the unemployed, the unskilled, rural women and disabled students; income-generating halls, sports facilities; computer rooms; a media technology centre; workshops and laboratories; a bookshop and a printing business. The college is responsive to training needs and oers a variety of knowledge and learning packages.

Student Support Services


The student support services unit started at the main campus in 2003 and has expanded into two other delivery sites. Activities include: Financial Aid: The college provides loans and is in talks with the Provincial Department of Education to fund bursaries. Study Methods and Technique Seminars: Specialists from the Eskoms Lethabo Power Station and Sasol are invited to address students. Media Centre: The centre provides internet access, e-mail, an auditorium for training, study rooms, reading rooms, life skills counselling and recognition of prior learning assessment. Orientation on College Policies: All new students undergo induction after registration. Matlafala House: This is a centre where students can receive counselling and support, where information sessions on HIV/Aids take place and where nursing sta from the local clinic oer their services to test sta and students. Employees from Sasol also visit the house for counselling. Cultural Activities and Sport: These include a choir and drama as well as sports such as soccer, netball, volleyball, tennis, squash, korfbal, rugby and cricket.

Flavius Mareka FET College has proved that it is a strength to be reckoned with. The FET Colleges awards we have won have been made possible by dedicated sta so that our students can embrace the future

(CEO Thabo Letho)

Strategic Partnerships

he college is networking with various chambers of commerce, employers, the health and welfare sectors, unemployment forums, University of the Free State, North-West University and Unisa, local government, organisations in the Fezile Dabi District as well as all secondary schools in the catchment area. Business Skills: Organisational Development and Learning is a partnership with Sasol, involving the training of entrepreneurs for the Metsimaholo Region (Sasolburg Municipality). Some of these students run their own businesses owing to the training and continuous support given by the facilitators of the college. Once training has started at o-site centres, facilitators visit on a regular basis to capacitate facilitators on site. Flexible learning takes place as various and relevant modes of delivery and learning are implemented. OBE (Outcomes-Based Education) is applied to these students. Assessment takes place by trained assessors, moderators and veriers. In this way quality assurance is maintained. Moderation and evaluation of learners and study material take place on a continous basis. After evaluation and the successful completion of a course, certicates are awarded for these accredited courses. Sasol: Sasol SkillTech is a partnership with Sasol whereby practical training is done in the plant and theory taught at the college. Sasol also contributed to the upgrading of the Flavius Mareka sporting complex.

The college bought the sporting complex from Sasol years ago and has been using it as its Business Studies campus. When Sasol became involved in the rejuvenation of the Metsimaholo (Sasolburg) District, it contributed money to upgrade the complex. Arts and Culture: The college is involved in a beading project in Mphohadi which is funded by the National Lottery Fund. Beaded craft products are exported to Hamburg in Germany. Educational Institutions: Learners from Bothaville High School, Kholagano Secondary School, Matseripe Secondary School, Nampo Agricultural School, Thabang Secondary School, and Dr Reginald Cingo Secondary School receive computer skills. The college also has partnerships with local pre-primary schools for the training of its students, which has led to employment for the students. Computer Skills: The college provides training to employees of the Moqhaka Municipality, the Oce of the Free State Premier and to teachers through a partnership with the Free State Department of Education.

The college is involved in a beading project in Mphohadi which is funded by the National Lottery Fund.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme IT and Computer Science Marketing Hospitality Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Electrical Infrastructure Construction Campus Mphohadi Sasolburg and Kroonstad Mphohadi Kroonstad Sasolburg and Kroonstad Sasolburg and Kroonstad Sasolburg

Contact Details
Telephone: (016) 976-0829 Fax: (016) 973-1618 Postal Address: Private Bag X2009, Sasolburg 9570 E-mail: sasolburg@aviusmareka.net

www.aviusmareka.net

50 colleges, 1 goal

69

Goldelds
FET College

Breaking ground for gold

oldelds FET College was the result of the merger between the former Tosa Technical College and Welkom Technical College in 2002. The college was named after the regions gold mining industry. It operates from two campuses: Tosa, in the Thabong community on the outskirts of the Welkom/ Matjhabeng Municipality, and Welkom campus in the city of Welkom. Since both are accessible to the broader community and only 12km apart, it was feasible to consolidate programme oerings. All Engineering-related study programmes as well as learnerships and skills programmes are oered on the Tosa campus, while the Welkom campus hosts Business and Service Studies. Although the college is situated in the Welkom/ Matjhabeng Municipality, geographically it serves the Lejweleputswa District. The Matjhabeng Municipality includes the towns of Welkom, Virginia, Henneman, Odendaalsrus and Allan Ridge.

Our Story
However, the college attracts learners from all the regions in the province. The programme oerings focus on school-leavers who need to either complete secondary education and/or to upgrade and advance their existing qualications with relevant skills. A priority focus is also on those sectors of the community in which the lack of skills, qualications and practical work experience results in unemployment and poverty. Goldelds FET College has a proven track record as an institution that strives for excellence. Awards include an acknowledgement from the National Department of Labour for being one of the best Employment and Skills Development Lead Employers (ESDLE) projects in the country (2006); a provincial award for establishing linkages leading to skills programmes (2005); a national award for innovation in the curriculum for Early Childhood Development (ECD) training (2004) and a provincial award for the best performing FET college in the province (2004).

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 700 Full-time equivalents: 2 050 Location: Free State Campuses: Welkom with satellite campuses in Virginia and Theunissen. Critical Skills: Engineering with an emphasis on Electrical Engineering; Agriculture; Entrepreneurship skills New Venture Creation in particular; Financial Management. Key Strengths: Commitment to transformation and adaptability to change; exibility and innovation in programme oering; high performance and achievement orientation; ability to perform and achieve with limited resources and community-needs driven.

Student Support Services


The college established a unit for student support services in 2002 on both its campuses. Professionally qualied counsellors are active in the unit while a manager and sta volunteers co-ordinate sport and cultural activities. The unit provides opportunities for academic development, assists students with basic college requirements and serves to motivate students towards the successful completion of their education. The ultimate goal is to increase the retention and graduation rates of the college and to facilitate the transition from one level of education to another, higher level. The following services are oered: Counselling: Two qualied counsellors help students to overcome performance diculties. Career guidance: The aim is to help students to improve their knowledge about themselves, their interests and their potential, to make more informed choices about their studies. Sports: The college oers rugby, netball, volleyball, basketball and table tennis. Culture: The college choir takes part in choral music events. Life Skills: Entrepreneurship, job preparation, how to respond to job advertisements, CV-writing, interview-preparation, managing personal nances and HIV/Aids programmes are covered.

The programme oerings focus on school-leavers who need to either complete secondary education and/or to upgrade and advance their existing qualications with relevant skills.

Goldelds FET College understands the importance of continuing access to education and training, acquiring new skills and qualications. We shall continue our eorts to develop an FET system that is responsive to the community.

(CEO Dr Lynette Fourie)

Strategic Partnerships

CD: The De Hart Trust is a training provider for the Education Training and Development Practices (ETDP) SETA. The colleges partnership with the trust enabled it to train 200 ECD practitioners at 170 ECD sites. Municipalities: One of the strategic objectives of the college is to establish itself as a primary service provider to the local government. As a result, it has established a memorandum of agreement with the Lejweleputswa District Municipality. Areas of co-operation identied are the training of local government ocials in engineering and technical skills. College students will also be accommodated for practical and workplace experience in relevant local municipal departments. A learnership oered in partnership with the Matjhabeng Municipality has also led to the successful completion of a learnership in a paprika project. Government Departments: The college joined forces with the National Department of Labour in 2004 to deliver the Employment and Skills Development and Lead Employers (ESDLE) project in the province. The project aimed to fast-track the implementation of learnerships. As a result, 14 learnerships in partnerships with eight SETAs were oered and 708 learners completed their training from November 2004 to August 2006. Harmony Jewellery School: The school is based at the Harmony Mine in Virginia. It is an accredited training provider of the Mining Qualications Authority (MQA). Students who complete the learn-

ership can access higher education. To obtain a national diploma, Harmony has a partnership with the Central University of Technology, Free State, which allows college students to take advantage of further training. Private Sector: Vesco Plastics: A manufacturer of plastics and plastic products, Vesco Plastics is also an accredited training facility in the plastics industry. The college has a partnership with the company to oer the fundamental subjects that form part of the learnership oered by Vesco Plastics. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The Fund established a Youth Advisory Centre (YAC) at Goldelds FET College in May 2005. It is a walk-in centre where trained sta provide information, counselling, training and referral services to young people. The Goldelds YAC also provides outreach services to communities in Lejweleputswa that are unable to access the centre. So far, it has covered 17 towns in the district, reaching about 4 400 young people. In addition, the college has partnered with the Fund to provide a Cabinet-making learnership through its School to Work programme.

A learnership oered in partnership with the Matjhabeng Municipality has also led to the successful completion of a... paprika project.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Engineering and Related Design Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure and Construction Hospitality Primary Agriculture Campus Tosa Welkom Welkom Tosa Tosa Welkom Tosa

Contact Details
Telephone: (057) 395-1301/ 395-1302/ 395-1303 Fax: (057) 395-1304 Postal address: Private Bag X95, Welkom 9460 E-mail: admin@goldelds-college.edu.za

www.goldeldsfet.edu.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

71

Maluti

FET College

Great Place, Great Choice for Lifelong Learning

Our Story
cluding those from both vocational and teacher training backgrounds. The college now boasts a team that takes on challenges with great enthusiasm. Another challenge has been to grow the student population, which is being achieved. Between 2003 and 2006, it has more than doubled its head count and full-time equivalents to 6 012 and 3 217 respectively. Part of this growth has come from female students who are increasingly enrolling for programmes in Engineering studies. In addition, the college is beginning to attract learners with disabilities. It is attempting to support emerging entrepreneurs, in particular in the tourism and hospitality industries. Its Itemoheleng campus houses a Bed & Breakfast business and Morena wa Letlalo is a project that specialises in the manufacture of leather goods.

n 2002, four former technical and two teacher training colleges merged, resulting in a new public further education and training provider: Maluti FET College. The college has eight campuses: Bethlehem and Bonamelo in Bethlehem; Harrismith; Itemoheleng; Phuthaditjhaba; Kwetlisong in Riverside; Sekeng campus in Tsheseng Village and Lere la Tshepe campus in Tseki Village. The main economic activities in these areas are agriculture mainly maize and wheat and tourism. Ficksburg and Fouriesburg are famous for their cherry and asparagus festivals, while a tourism sector has been established, thanks to the Golden Gate National Park and its hilly terrain, lending itself to rock climbing and abseiling. Maluti FET College is increasingly serving the needs of these sectors. However, the newly created college did face challenges following its merger. One was uniting sta members from six sites, in-

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 6 012 Full-time equivalents: 3 217 Location: Free State Campuses: Bethlehem (two), Harrismith, Phuthaditjhaba (two), Riverside, Tshesheng Village and Tseki Village, in the Eastern Free State (serves municipal areas of Thabo Mofutsanyana, Maluti a Phofumg, Dihlabeng, Pumelela, Nketoana and Setsoto, with a population in 2001 of 726 000). Critical Skills: Hospitality, Agriculture, Electrical Engineering and Finance Management. Key Strengths: Maluti FET College is positioned in the most populous district municipality in the Free State. It is situated in close vicinity to the Qwa-Qwa campus of the University of the Free State and shares resources and expertise. Maluti students have access to the universitys library and its services. The area also has a highly developed tourism and agricultural infrastructure. The college attracts state-sponsored antipoverty interventions.

Student Support Services


The student support unit was established in 2004, and is managed centrally. To support the central function, student liaison ocers have been identied on each campus. The unit oers the following services: Counselling: Learners with learning barriers are normally referred to professionals at the education district level. Career guidance has a direct bearing on retention and throughput rates. Financial Aid: The college has a few bursaries awarded to the best-performing and needy students. Comprehensive Information Services: Information brochures and newsletters are dispatched to the campuses. Two campuses have libraries with access to e-mail and the internet. Students also have access to the use of the University of the Free States library. Student Representative Council: The SRC represents students on the college council, academic board and other committees. Sports: The college shares facilities with other sports bodies in our areas. Induction Programmes: Orientation and information sessions for new students are held on trimester and semester basis. A college policy on HIV/Aids is in place.

We seek to inspire and enable students to develop their capabilities to the highest levels throughout life, so that they grow intellectually, are adequately equipped for the world of work and are positioned to contribute meaningfully to society

(CEO Dr Sipho Manese)

Strategic Partnerships

he college has forged formal collaboration and co-operation agreements with the following sectors to become more responsive to community and industry needs. Agriculture: Eskom provided two broiler houses through Agrelek to be used in the training of emergent farmers in broiler management. The infrastructure helped strengthen the skills base in the area the college serves. The Seotlong Hotel and Agriculture School provides the college with farmland for students of primary agriculture. Marketing: The Sasko Milling and Baking plant in Bethlehem identied a need to up-skill their sta in marketing. The colleges Bethlehem campus offered them in-house training in this area and all trainees acquired a nationally recognised qualication. Municipality: The college is the preferred training provider for the Maluti-A-Phofung Local Municipality. Already it has trained employees in mechanics and IT. Government Department: The Free State Department of Local Government and Housing approached the college to oer a learnership in community development. As a result, the college is working with the department and the Local Government SETA. HIV/Aids: The college is working with a consortium of community-based organisations. The college provided oce space, while the consortium helps the college in dealing with HIV/Aids.

Engineering: Toring Engineering provides welding students from the Itemoheleng campus with workplace exposure. Eleven learners have been placed at Nestles Harrismith plant for exposure to Engineering and Fitting & Turning. Unisa: The college is working with Unisas Adult Basic Education and Training Institute. Unisas College for Economic Management Science is involved in sta training. IT: Bytes Technology uses the college as a service provider for learnerships in IT. The following areas are being targeted for future partnerships: Agriculture: The college will approach the National African Farmers Union to identify and customise programmes to address their training needs. The college also plans to work with the Small Grain Institute where experts will support college lecturers in the areas of soil sampling and related activities. In addition, the college wants to explore areas of possible collaboration with Potato South Africa while a memorandum of understanding with the Glen Institute of Agriculture to share expertise is at an advanced stage. International: The college has been in contact with Het Roc Twente Plus, a vocational and adult education institution in the Netherlands, to establish an exchange programme for students and lecturers. Municipality: A memorandum of agreement is being developed with the Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipality to oer training in areas of critical need identied by the district.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Hospitality Primary Agriculture Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction IT and Computer Science Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration Campus Kwetlisong and Phuthaditjhaba Sekeng Kwetlisong and Itemoheleng Kwetlisong and Itemoheleng Lere la Tshepe Bethlehem, Harrismith and Bonamelo Bethlehem, Harrismith and Bonamelo

Contact Details

www.malutifet.edu.za

Telephone: (058) 713-0612 Fax: (058) 713-5638 Postal Address: Private Bag X807, Phuthaditjhaba 9866 E-mail: centraloce@malutifet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

73

Motheo
Training for employability

FET College

Our Story
and oers a selection of programmes in Engineering. For some years, the college has been providing training to the South African National Defence Force, Telkom and the automotive industry. Bloemfontein campus runs programmes in the Hospitality services, Management Science, the Humanities, Hair Care and Cosmetology as well as Education. Both Hillside View and Bloemfontein campuses have advanced computer laboratories. On the Thaba Nchu campus are modern science laboratories and facilities for Hospitality, Clothing Design and Agricultural Sciences. It is also a delivery site for programmes in Construction Sciences, Engineering, Management Sciences and Clothing Technology. The college tries to deliver learnerships and skills programmes for industry and is pursuing international partnerships with organisations such as Creative Room for Art and Computing. It also has a bursary grant from Liverpool Community College in Britain.

otheo College was formed after the merger of the former Bloemfontein and Hillside View technical colleges, the Thaba Nchu Manpower Centre and the Kagisanong College of Education. The college runs a number of satellite campuses and projects throughout the central Free State and Gariep, from Jacobsdal to Koefontein, from Zastron to Rouxville. The catchment areas range from urban to peri-urban to rural, from the more auent communities to the nancially disadvantaged. Given its reach, the college is one of only eight public FET colleges in the country with a full-time equivalent enrolment in excess of 5 000 and a headcount of about 14 000. Campuses are Bloemfontein, on the edge of the Bloemfontein CBD, Hillside View, on the outskirts of the township of Mangaung in Bloemfontein and Thaba Nchu in Thaba Nchu. Hillside View campus boasts sophisticated engineering workshop facilities including an automotive spray-painting unit,

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 13 919 Full-time equavalents: 5 000 Location: Free State Campuses: Bloemfontein (two) and Thaba Nchu. Critical Skills: Engineering, including Automotive Mechanics, Vehicle Body Repair and Electrical Engineering. Some of the colleges sites are accredited to deliver traditional automotive trade tests. Other critical skills on oer include: Computer skills, Agricultural training in areas such as poultry and piggery; Arts and Crafts, Administration and Managerial skills, New Venture Creation and Welding. Through an agricultural project with local farmers, the college responds to the needs of the agricultural sector as a key economic activity in the region. Key Strengths: Aordability; high-quality training; community-driven vocational training; top facilities; longstanding partnerships and international linkages.

Student Support Services


The college introduced student support services in 2004 to serve students needs beyond the classroom/lecture room. These services are meant to better prepare the students for adulthood, the world of work, higher education and self-employment. The services are available at three of Motheos centres where full-time student co-ordinaters are mandated to work on a daily basis even on weekends. Services include: Assistance to students with special needs; A student induction programme; Educational advice; Study skills; Language and computer assistance; Learnership placements; Occupational and subject choices; Financial Aid, including bursaries; Entrepreneurial skills training; Sport and cultural activities; and Social adjustment programmes. The college is planning to appoint an HIV/ Aids co-ordinator, a psychologist to support counselling activities and a job-placement ocer. At present, the unit consist of a senior manager, a manager, three student co-ordinators, a sport ocer, career counsellor, community outreach ocer, three librarians, three campus assistant managers, three choir conductors and nine Student Representative Council members.

Our intention is to facilitate, through our training, the transition of young people from school into the world of work and, just as importantly, to provide the world of work with an employable product

(CEO Simon Maboya)

Strategic Partnerships

earnership agreements and placements for students involve the following partners: General: Barloworld; Eskom Ellerines; Human Auto; John William Motors (Bloemfontein and Welkom); Kia Motors; Labuschagne & Sons Furniture Manufacturers; Oce Furniture and Equipment; OHRD: Business Administration; Oranje Toyota; Premier Auto; Raubex, a company involved in road construction; Rodercik Nissan; Textile Upholsterers; the Umsobomvu Youth Fund. Municipalities: Mangaung, Mantrap, Nailed, Ngwathe and Tswelopele. Government: The Free State Department of Local Government and Housing; the South African National Defence Force. SETAs: They include: Construction, Forest Industry, Local Government, Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services and the Mining Quality Authority of the Mining and Minerals Sector. Educare: Students benet from practical training, thanks to a number of institutions. They are

the Hannatjie Penning Drama Training, Smile Education and St John Ambulance as well as several pre-schools: Kontiki, Tinktinkieland, Josephine Pritchard, Sunlawns, Tjokkies, Bloem Wieg en Kleuterskool, Hansie en Grietjie. Hair Care: Students complete Hair Care through partnerships with salons (Advance Cutting; Campbells Hair Design; Chateau de Vie; Cut & Curl; Cutting Edge; Deue Donne; Elfrieda; Faces Hair Studio; Hair Friends; Hair Options; Images; In the Mood; Joe and Friends; La Cheri; La Finesse; Maison Costa; Maison Elzona; Masters of Style; Professional Hair Design; Salon Bloemgate; Salon Fantastique; Salon Handre; Salon Louise; Salon Serita; Salon Systems; Scissors; Varsity Hair Studio) and stockists (Biokinetics; Dark and Lovely Bongani; Hannon; Head to Toe; Schwarzkopf; St Johns; Sharlines; Signo; Wella).

Given its reach, the college is one of only eight public FET colleges in the country with a full-time equivalent enrolment in excess of 5 000 and a headcount of about 14 000

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Electrical Infrastructure Construction Civil Engineering and Buliding Construction Engineering and Related Design IT and Computer Science Marketing Management Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration Hospitality Tourism Campus Hillside View and Thaba Nchu Thaba Nchu Hillside View and Thaba Nchu Hillside View Bloemfontein Bloemfontein and Thaba Nchu Thaba Nchu and Bloemfontein Bloemfontein Bloemfontein Bloemfontein

Contact Details
Telephone: (051) 411-2000 Fax (051) 447-0486 Postal address: Private Bag X20542, Bloemfontein 9300 E-mail: marketing@motheofet.co.za

www.motheofet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

75

Central Johannesburg
Creating Jozi champions
FET College

Our Story
poverty areas such as Region 6, Soweto West, where most people, that is about 250 000, earn less than R800 a month. In response to the socioeconomic conditions that surround its campuses, the college has a pending co-operation agreement with Joburg Metros Economic Development Unit, particularly in skills development. The college has identied ve areas in which it can support the city to alleviate poverty. These areas include SMME development; matching and building skills to encourage employment growth; fostering urban infrastructural development and agriculture by creating opportunities and infrastructure for training, access to nance; access to the market place and access to land use; embracing empowerment by creating information, advice and support structures; and mobilising communities around childcare, youth development and action against HIV/Aids. These areas are linked to strategies such as learnerships and building community enterprises using co-operatives as a business development strategy.

entral Johannesburg College (CJC) was born in September 2001 as a merger between the Alexandra Technical College, Eastside Technical College, Highveld Technical College, Johannesburg Technical College and Parktown College. The former colleges have become the campuses of CJC and oer eight sites of delivery, namely: Alexandra, incorporating the Motswedi Skills Centre in Kew, Ellis Park in Doornfontein, Highveld Campus in Riverlea with sites in Crown Mines and Langlaagte, Parktown Campus and the Troyeville ICT Learning Resource Centre. The distribution of the campuses touches a wide variety of communities that are undergoing a combination of urban renewal and development in all facets. These include infrastructural, economic, social and cultural dimensions. As such, the fact that the youth population of the city is the largest and fastest-growing, puts the youth at the centre of CJC services. These campuses serve a vast catchment area right in the heart of Gauteng, including high-prole

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: Approximately 12 000 Full-time equivalents: 7 500 Location: Central Gauteng Campuses: Alexandra, Johannesburg; Doornfontein, Riverlea and Parktown (incorporating the Eastside Campus) and four sites of delivery, one each in Troyeville, Kew, Crown Mines and Langlaagte. Critical Skills: Cabinetmaking, community house-building, Construction Carpentry, Construction Plumbing, Electrical Engineering, Metal Fabrication, Vehicle Servicing and Financial Management. Key Strengths: The colleges sta, the majority of whom are well-trained in their areas of speciality, are committed; modern and fairly well-equipped infrastructure; strong partnerships and the location of the campuses, which are accessible and close to strategic industries.

Student Support Services


Financial Aid: The college has a bursary scheme for students. Career Guidance: This includes course selection relating to career interest and aptitude. Academic Support: Peer tutoring, forming of study groups, creating study areas, including the use of classrooms for study purposes, academic excursions, imparting study and life skills. Students Representative Council: The SRC participates in governance structures. Health: HIV/Aids programmes and counselling, rst aid, health services and adequate sport and recreation facilities. Youth Advisory Centre: Initially for the Alexandra community, this will be a walk-in centre that provides information to assist young people in making informed decisions about their livelihoods. The YAC will form partnerships with local government and community structures to empower young people in their communities, oer business skills, prepare young people for the labour market and explain how to take advantage of career opportunities. It will also teach CV-writing and interview skills and provide information on scholarships and bursaries as well as contact details for educational institutions and internships.

This is an exciting era for the college in its quest to meet the challenges presented by government, commerce , industry and communities; positioning itself as a college of rst choice, oering programmes that will meet clients needs

(CEO Motsumi Makhene)

Strategic Partnerships

overnment Departments: The college has entered into an agreement with the Department of Labour to train 150 students in dierent construction skills. These students will then be utilised in the construction of housing in Alexandra as part of the Presidents Alexandra Renewal Project. The Gauteng Department of Health has employed 15 N6 learners and placed them at a number of hospitals for on-the-job training, which is a requirement for them to obtain their diplomas. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: At the beginning of 2006, the college entered into an agreement with Umsobomvu to train 150 unemployed graduates in life and other skills, including computer literacy. Umsobomvu Youth Fund will also assist with establishing a Youth Advisory Centre at the college and fund the salaries of two ocers for the year. Initially, the centre will be for the Alexandra community. Industry: A total of 25 students have been trained in entrepreneurial and motorbike driving skills and will be assisted by Nestl to establish micro enterprises and market their products. Furthermore, Panasonic is sponsoring 15 learners fees for tuition and stationery and paying a monthly stipend to each. The learners are trained during their study breaks at the company. Municipalities: In a partnership with the South African Local Government Association (Salga), the

college trained 20 Local Economic Development Level 4 learners in conjunction with the Johannesburg and Ekurhuleni municipalities, which provided the practical training. The training was aimed at giving the learners the skills to identify and create entrepreneurial ventures in their communities. Kaizer Chiefs Football Club: The college is accommodating the clubs development team at a campus with a view to oering them sport-related programmes. Also, the club will assist the college in establishing a sport academy for the 2010 Soccer World Cup. Eskom: The college is training 30 unemployed learners in Financial Management over a period of three years for Eskom. Educational Institutions: LearnScapes will assist the college in developing e-learning content, while supplying it with existing e-learning content. Summat Institute will address capacity-building within the college and help it to respond immediately to possible training opportunities from commerce and industry, while a partnership with the Pace Career Centre will assist learners in entrepreneurial development and to guide them in suitable career paths. SETAs: The Transport Education and Training Authority (TETA) will use the college to train 20 informally employed students to support the South African Taxi Association in vehicle repair and maintenance for a year.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Civil Engineering & Buliding Construction Management Marketing Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration Tourism Hospitality IT and Computer Science Campus Ellis Park Ellis Park Ellis Park Parktown Parktown Parktown Parktown Parktown Parktown Troyeville ICT Centre and the Highveld campus

Contact Details
Telephone: (011) 484-1388 Fax: (011) 642-7358 Postal address: Private Bag 70500, Houghton 2041 E-mail: info@cjc@co.za

www.cjc.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

77

Ekurhuleni East
Your partner to a brighter future
kurhuleni East College for FET was established following a merger of individual technical colleges which have all existed for about 20 years. Benoni, Brakpan, Daveyton (Isidingo), Springs and Kwa-Thema (Tlamoha) campuses brought together diverse skills, resources and leadership that have combined into a force in the FET arena. The college exists to enhance education, training and development in the Ekurhuleni East Metropolis on Gautengs East Rand by promoting learnerships, skills programmes and community development . Ekurhuleni East College serves a population of 1 308 330. Sixty percent of the economically active people in the region are employed. The 15 to 64 age group constitutes 68% of the population, with the 25 to 29 age group having the highest number of people. The college serves a geographical area of 4 787 km, by far the biggest in Gauteng. This has enabled it to take advantage of many develop-

FET College

Our Story
ment opportunities. Consequently, the college provides a range of learning programmes in Clothing and Textiles, Construction, Cultural Industries, Energy, Engineering, Hospitality, Information and Communication Technology, Manufacturing, services and tourism sectors and sub-sectors. The ve campuses and the niche programmes they oer are Brakpan campus which specialises in Information and Communication Technology; Benoni and Springs campuses which specialise in Business and Creative and Social Services and Kwa-Thema and Daveyton, which specialise in Engineering. The college has established a strong unit to support students as they progress from a training environment into the workplace. Among the support facilities, its Job Shop ensures learners preparedness for the workplace in terms of their CVs and interview preparations. This facility also oers assistance with the work placement of learners and a free placement service to employers.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 20 000 Full-time equivalents: 6 758 Location: Ekurhuleni East, on the East Rand of Gauteng. Campuses: Benoni, Brakpan, Daveyton, Kwa-Thema and Springs. Critical Skills: Programmes in Clothing and Textiles, Construction, Cultural Industries, Energy, Engineering, Hospitality, Information and Communication Technology, Manufacturing, services and tourism sectors and sub-sectors Key Strengths: Learners are work-ready when they leave. This is ensured through partnership agreements with employers. Learners do the fundamental (classroom) learning and core (workshop) learning components of the qualication and are then placed with employers for the workplace experience component. Such projects include PGBison, which oers training in Fitting and Machining, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering and the Automotive Industry Development Centre. The college also has a Job Shop and a Youth Advisory Centre which are among the best in South Africa. The Job Shop ensures learners orientation for the workplace. It oers assistance with the work placement of learners and a free placement service to employers.

Student Support Services


The college helps its students who are from widely dierent backgrounds by providing for their emotional, nancial, social, health and vocational needs. Student support services include the following: Counselling: The college provides life skills, health and wellness education. Career Guidance: The college assists learners with occupational and subject choices and to develop occupational skills; it conducts psychometric assessments and assists learners to nd jobs as well as oer jobhunting skills and advice on how to become entrepreneurs. Academic Support: The college helps learners who experience barriers to learning and development by giving language assistance, bridging programmes, learning and remedial support. Student Representative Council: The SRC represents students on the colleges council, nance committee and academic board. Bursaries: Bursaries are oered to students who are needy and for academic achievements. Students Resource Centres: Information services on skills; career guidance; nancial aid; internet caf, and so on. Health and Wellness: EEC has a voluntary counselling and testing centre for HIV and Aids which is funded by the Right to Care group which runs this initiative through USAID funding.

We create a college environment that anticipates and meets the educational training and developmental needs of our clients by providing intermediate- to high-level skills in keeping with international standards of academic and technical quality

(CEO Dr Clarence Alfred Pereira)

Strategic Partnerships

ngineering: Ekurhuleni East college is currently in partnership with PICTEA, a private institution set up to educate and train high-calibre and globally competitive engineers in the eld of Information and Communications Technology. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The college has also been contracted by the Umsobomvu Youth Fund to deliver training in the eld of Engineering, to unemployed youth between the ages of 18 and 35. This falls within the School to Work programme of the fund. Umsobomvu projects also include the Graduate Development Programme, which enables graduates to acquire professional and life skills, including drivers licences. Industry: The college has a partnership with PG Bison, oering training nationally to employees of PG Bison in Fitting and Machining, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering and related activities at NQF Levels 2 and 3. Learnerships: The college has an ongoing partnership with the Automotive Industry Development Centre (AIDC) Employment and Skills Development Lead Employers (ESDLE), whereby Ekurhuleni East College oers training in learnerships to the unemployed in Manufacturing Engineering and related programmes. International: EEC is in partnership with Kilmarnock College, Scotland and Le Monye-Owen College in Memphis, Tennesssee whereby edu-

cational and cultural exchange programmes are established. Business Skills: The college has a partnership with Impala Platinum and Springs Business Linkage Centre to provide small and medium enterprise (SMME) training. A total of 480 entrepreneurs trained as from 2003 and assisted in establishing SMMEs. Municipality: The partnership with Ekurhuleni Municipal Metro is as a service provider of community development projects that include agricultural projects. Training in Food Security is oered to the community, while land and seeds are provided free for the initiative. Incubation: The college is a partner of a consortium comprising the Small Enterprise Development Agency, Kumba Resources, Impala Platinum, and the Ekurhuleni Metro to establish a Metalbase Technology incubator. The college is responsible for writing the curriculum of the incubator. Construction: The two-year partnership with TJEKA as a sub-provider of training of the fundamentals of seven dierent construction trades. Already, 300 learners have been trained. Government Departments: The college is a registered service provider of the national Department of Labour whereby it is training the unemployed in dierent programmes. At present, the college is training hair salon owners at the Daveyton campus in business skills.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Ekurhuleni East College has established Specialised Centres of Excellence as of January 2007. In terms of delivery of the new NC(V) curriculum; Benoni and Springs campuses will specialise in Business and Creative and Social Services; Kwa-Thema and Daveyton campuses will specialise in Engineering and Brakpan campus in Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Programme Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Marketing Oce Admnistration Tourism Hospitality

Campus Kwa-Thema and Daveyton Kwa-Thema and Daveyton Kwa-Thema and Daveyton Benoni and Springs Benoni and Springs Benoni and Springs Benoni and Springs Springs Springs

Contact Details

www.eec.edu.za

Telephone: (011) 736-4400 Fax: (011) 736-1489/736-9909 Postal address: Private Bag X52, Springs 1560 Email: rendaniv@eed.edu.ca

50 colleges, 1 goal

79

Ekurhuleni West
Empowering learners

FET College

Our Story
ity and IT; Boksburg: Business Studies and later, for 2008, Engineering Studies; Germiston: Engineering Studies, Management, Hospitality and Early Childhood Development (ECD); Kathorus: Engineering Studies; Kempton Park: Engineering Studies, Tourism and Hospitality and Tembisa: Civil Engineering and Marketing. The colleges logo demonstrates its commitment to contributing to the alleviation of unemployment and poverty and to contributing to the socioeconomic growth of the country. The golden spheres represent the former independent colleges gravitating simultaneously towards one entity. The blue sphere represents the synergistic amalgamation of all the former colleges under one effective umbrella. The yellow swoosh indicates the ever-changing needs of the learners, while the blue swoosh depicts the colleges constant striving to nd and develop applicable programmes that suit the needs of the ever-changing requirements of the workplace and communities.

he name Ekurhuleni West College (EWC) originated from the geographical and municipal area where the college is situated. Ekurhuleni was taken from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and West from the western belt within this municipal area in the east of Gauteng. The Tsonga word ekurhuleni means place of peace and is symbolic of the diversity of the city, and college and of their joint vision of an equitable and progressive community. Ekurhuleni West College was established in 2002 when six former technical colleges joined forces: Alberton, Boksburg, Germiston, Kempton Park, Lazarus Nhlapo in Tembisa and Usizo in Katlehong. Thanks to the reach of its campuses, the college contributes to the upliftment and empowerment of the Alberton, Boksburg, Reigerpark, Thokoza, Germiston, Katlehong, Palm Ridge, Zonkezizwe, Kempton Park, Edenvale and Tembisa communities. EWC had identied certain niche areas for each of its campuses: Alberton: Business Studies, Hospital-

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 6 805 (January 2006) Full-time equivalents: 4 543 (January 2006) Location: Ekurhuleni West, in the east of Gauteng. Campuses: Alberton, Boksburg, Germiston, Kathorus (in Katlehong/Vosloorus), Kempton Park and Tembisa. Critical Skills: The college focuses on Engineering, Business and Utility Studies training which relates directly to the needs identied by AsgiSA and JIPSA for skilled people in the engineering, nancial and managerial elds while it is also addressing needs for skilled artisans, IT technicians and ECD practitioners. The need for skilled construction workers for the 2010 FIFA World Cup will be addressed by EWCs Tembisa campus, which will be oering Civil Engineering and Building Construction. Key Strengths: The campuses are in an area experiencing economic growth and high employment possibilities. The college has well-equipped workshops, computer centres, hair and cosmetology salons and industrial kitchens. The top-class business and administrative system covers student management, nancial management, human resources (personnel) and payroll systems, a library system and management information systems.

Student Support Services


The college oers student support services at all its campuses. Entry-level support: Financial Aid: The indigent bursary is awarded to current as well as newly registered students in nancial need; the merit bursary is to inspire students who excel in their elds of study; the Student Representative bursary is performance-based to encourage SRC members to manage their SRC duties as well as their academic responsibilities. Induction: It entails orientating new learners about the programmes, services, activities and facilities at the college. On-course support: Academic Support: Media and study centres and educational tours assist students with research and to understand subject content. Social Support: This is provided through counselling services; HIV/Aids and substance awareness programmes; SRC training and peer mediation training and social functions, sport, arts and cultural activities. Exit-level support: This is provided through job placement and alumni relations. The CVs of students at exit level are submitted to prospective employers regularly for consideration in employment, learnerships or apprenticeships. Feedback is required on whether the students have been placed.

Ekurhuleni West College is dynamic, responsive and clientorientated - moving forward by empowering the unemployed with skills, addressing the developmental needs of young and old, as well as those of communities and commerce

(CEO Clive Mtshisa)

Strategic Partnerships

ome of EWCs students are employed at the following companies after qualifying in the following elds: Business Studies and Business Management: Protekon in Elandsfontein; Tlamatsang Primary School in Tembisa and Sandvik in Kanthal. Business Studies and Financial Management: South African Police Services in Germiston; Absa in Alberton and Johannesburg. Business Studies and Management Assistant: EWCs Germiston campus; the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipalitys oces in Edenvale and Alberton and the Gauteng Department of Education district oce in Alberton. Business Studies and Human Resources: Gauteng Department of Educations oce in Alberton. Engineering Studies Electrical Engineering: LG Electronics in Isando; Unilever SA Foods in Boksburg; Alstom SA in Benoni and Denel Aviation, also in Benoni. Engineering Studies Mechanical Engineering: Scaw Metals and Transwerk in Germiston and SAB (apprenticeship) in Alberton. Utility Studies Catering & Hospitality Services: The Saint Dominics tuck shop in Boksburg and Emperors Palace in Kempton Park.

Utility Studies Cosmetology: Clinique Stuttafords in Sandton and Rosebank. Utility Studies Educare/ECD: The Kurisani Crche in Khokhovela; the Choo Choo Christian Nursery school in Kempton Park and Brackendowns Nursery school in Alberton. In addition, EWC has formed strategic alliances with: Bosch: The donation of automotive equipment and computers for the Tembisa campus; SAA Technical: The donation of an old Impala aircraft for training purposes at the Kempton campus; ADT Security & Kwapele: A National Certicate in Alarm Installations on NQF Level 4 is oered; African Explosives Limited: The company is involved in the training of engineering students; EWC, East Rand Youth Trust (Emperors Palace) and Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality are involved in a joint venture to deal with unemployment.

The Tsonga word ekurhuleni means place of peace and is symbolic of the diversity of the city and college and of their joint vision of an equitable and progressive community.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme
Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Oce Administration Marketing Electrical Infrastructure Construction Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering and Related Design IT and Computer Science Tourism Hospitality

Campus
Alberton, Boksburg, Germiston, Kathorus, Tembisa Germiston Alberton, Boksburg, Germiston, Kathorus, Kempton Park, Tembisa Boksburg and Tembisa Germiston, Kathorus, Kempton Park, Tembisa Tembisa Germiston, Kathorus, Kempton Park and Tembisa Alberton, Germiston, Kathorus, and Tembisa Kempton Park Alberton, Germiston and Kempton Park

Contact Details

www.ewc.edu.za

Telephone: (011) 972-4247 X 338, 342, 344, 345 or 0861 EWC111/ 0861 392 111 Fax: (011) 972-3615 Postal address: Private Bag X1030, Germiston 1400 E-mail: info@ewc.edu.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

81

Sedibeng
FET College

Grow with the ow

edibeng College for FET is situated in the Vaal region of the southern Gauteng province that stretches from Vanderbijlpark in the west to Heidelberg and Devon in the east. The name Sedibeng was taken from the geographical municipal district of Sedibeng. It is a Sesotho word meaning a well of water, since there are three rivers in the region, the best known being the Vaal. The three rivers, Vaal, Klip and Suikerbos, come together in a small suburb known as Three Rivers. The college was established in 2002 through a merger of three former technical colleges, namely Lekoa/Sebokeng, Vanderbijlpark and Vereeniging. Today Sedibeng college has three campuses catering for a diversity of learners. The Vereeniging site also has a satellite campus in Heidelberg which was established with the nancial assistance of British American Tobacco South Africa (BATSA). All the campuses, except the Heidelberg satellite campus, are situated within a radius of 15km from the Vereeniging campus and in a region which has a high unemployment rate.

Our Story
In the Vaal region the community, social and personal services sector is the largest employer, involving 33% of all formal workers. The manufacturing sector is the second-largest employer, with 23%, while the wholesale and retail sector and the nancial, insurance, real estate and business services sector follow with 14% and 9% respectively. The college is in the process of implementing its strategic plan developed and approved by the Gauteng Department of Education in 2004. It is based on key priorities which include increasing participation and improving student achievement, retention and throughput; achieving excellence in stang and improving equity at all levels.

The name Sedibeng was taken from the geographical municipal district of Sedibeng. It is a Sesotho word meaning a well of water, since there are three rivers in the region, the best known being the Vaal.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 14 677 Full-time equivalents: 4 566 Location: Vaal Triangle in southern Gauteng. Campuses: Sebokeng, Vanderbijlpark, Vereeniging and Heidelberg. Critical Skills: The college oers workshop training in Boilermaking; Fitting and Turning; Electrical light and heavy currents; Auto Motor Repairs; Motor Mechanics; Civil Engineering and Building Construction. It also oers Art and Graphic design; Clothing Production; Hair Care and Cosmetology and Hospitality. The Vanderbijpark campus will become a campus of excellence for Business Studies and the Vereeniging campus one for Engineering Studies. Key Strengths: Highly motivated and qualied sta; well equipped workshops; a high pass rate, IT laboratories equipped with the latest software; modern student centres; competitive fees; job placement; training for employability; an excellent geographical location and liaison with commerce and industry and international partnerships.

Student Support Services


Tracking: A student tracking system is directed by Anthony Gewer from Insight Strategies to develop information on the student prole; assess students needs on entry into the college; monitor their progress during the course of their studies and prior to exiting the college; keep track of students once they leave the institution and the factors that have contributed to, or inhibited their progress in the labour market by means of a tracer instrument such as telephonic interviews. Sport and Culture: The college participates in events of the Gauteng United Colleges in Sport and Culture Association; sport (netball, volleyball, chess, basketball, ladies and mens soccer); and has an award-winning choir. Life Skills: The Gauteng Department of Education organised for class representatives to be facilitated by Thanya Training Solutions, an accredited training provider on issues such as substance abuse and teenage pregnancy. HIV/Aids: The college has an HIV/Aids counsellor available to all campuses. A local clinic helps with testing. Students have support groups to share problems and support each other.

We are adamant that we will contribute to the improved growth rate of South Africa and the alleviation of unemployment
(CEO Dr Abe Mashele)

Strategic Partnerships

efore the merger many companies were reluctant to get involved with the three technical colleges. Vereeniging campus had two or three companies which would send their employees for practical training and trade-test preparation. In some special instances, they would also give employment to students. After the merger, which led to the establishment of a central marketing department, many companies have started to take an interest in the college. The college has also invited major companies to serve on its council. From last year, the number of companies involved with the college have increased, some by means of sponsorship of equipment or student employment. Partnerships include: Steel: The college has an agreement with one of the largest steel companies, Mittal Steel, to train workshop lecturers in modern technology machines. The company also oers bursaries to students who excel in the trade theories. Government Department: The Vanderbijlpark campus is a service provider to the National Department of Labour oering skills courses in sewing, beading, material painting and knitting. Unemployed women who have been identied by the department participate in these projects. Hospitality students are also involved with the Provincial Department of Health via Kopanong

Provincial Hospital where they assist with cooking as part of their experiential training. Municipalities: The Sedibeng District Municipality, comprising Emfuleni, Lesedi and Midvaal Local Municipalities, are having discussions with the college related to the districts poverty-alleviation programme. The college will provide training in the provisioning of and preparation of wholesome, aordable meals. Educational Institutions: The college has partnerships with other educational institutions of the region such as the Vaal University of Technology, North West University and Vaal Damelin College. International: Another partnership is with the Regionaal Opleidingen Centrum (ROC) in the Netherlands where there is an exchange programme for lecturers and students in the Hospitality department. The Colleges interested students will write SA national exams and the ROCs practical exams. This will help students to obtain an international qualication. Through the Recapitalisation Fund for FET Colleges from the national government, the infrastructure will be improved and workshops will be provided with modern equipment. This will help the college to have more partners from commerce and industry. The marketing department is working on establishing more linkages with commerce and industry, which will lead to more student placements.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Marketing Tourism Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration Hospitality Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design IT and Computer Science Civil Engineering & Building Construction Campus Sebokeng, Vanderbijlpark and Heidelberg Sebokeng and Vanderbijlpark Vanderbijlpark (from 2008) Sebokeng and Vanderbijlpark Sebokeng, Vanderbijlpark and Heidelberg Vanderbijlpark Sebokeng, Vereeeniging and Heidelberg Sebokeng, Vereeeniging and Heidelberg Vereeniging campus (from 2008) Sebokeng campus (from 2008)

Contact Details
Telephone: (016) 422-6645/422-6648 Fax: (016) 422-6646 Postal address: Private Bag X020, Vereeniging 1930 E-mail: info@sedcol.co.za

www.sedcol.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

83

South West Gauteng


Education of distinction
outh West Gauteng College is spread over the geographical area of Mogale City (Krugersdorp), Roodeport and the whole of Soweto in the southwestern pocket of Gauteng. Created through the merger of ve former technical colleges, the institution has grown to eight sites, including a head oce in Soweto. These are the Molapo campus (which houses the head oce), Dobsonville campus, George Tabor campus (all of which are in Soweto), Krugersdorp and Roodepoort campuses, both of which focus on Business and General Studies, and Roodepoort West and Krugersdorp West campuses, which oer Engineering studies. The Dobsonville campus saw the need for Transport Logistics and implemented this succesfully in 2005. It also houses the SMME Centre, which oers services to budding entrepreneurs. The Molapo campus has various practical workshops Carpentry, Bricklaying, Plumbing. George Tabor campus is a skills centre that spe-

FET College

Our Story
cialises in courses such as Jewellery Design that has its accreditation with the Services SETA. Roodepoort West campus has a Sound Engineering workshop, which oers training that is high in demand, while the Roodepoort campus strengths are Haircare and Cosmetolgy. Students in these elds practise in a simulated industry enviroment and oer the public services in these elds. They then gain exposure and training handling real clients. With its personnel complement of 350 and a budget in excess of R28-million a year, the college serves a student population of about 13 000 a year. They are mainly from Soweto, Roodepoort and Krugersdorp. At present the college is also navigating through many positive changes a multimillion-rand recapitalisation process, including a new curriculum with one aim in mind: that of delivering education of distinction.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 13 000 (approx.) Full-time equivalents: 7 000 (approx.; 1 500 are part-time students) Location: Southwestern Gauteng. Campuses: Molapo, Dobsonville and George Tabor located in Dube Village in Soweto; Krugersdorp, Krugersdorp West located in Mogale City, Roodepoort and Roodepoort West located in Horison, Critical Skills: A leading provider of a technologically ecient labour force which will build a needed supply of entrepreneurs and increase the number of productive people by oering relevant and industry-driven programmes and skills in the elds of Services, Engineering and Business/Commerce. Key Strengths: Programmes and training that are unique to SWGC include Sound Engineering, a variety of skills courses (table attendant, bar attendant, assistant chef and fast food training are oered at the Dimonate Restaurant and Conferencing Centre); ICDL (testing at the prometric testing centre) and Transport Logistics.

Student Support Services


The services provided by the colleges student support services unit include the: Students Representative Council: The college provides training for the SRC and the induction of SRC campus representatives. Health and Wellness: The SA National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence assists the college in organising substance abuse workshops. Students can also participate in rst aid training and training in the eld of HIV/Aids. Peer Mediation Workshops: Peer support structures are available for students with academic problems. Career Guidance: Psychometric testing is available to students with the help of consulting psychologists. Sport and Leisure and Social Activities: The college oers soccer (women and men), netball, volleyball, chess and basketball. Student Support Interns: The interns work for the college for 18 months. Financial Aid: This is a special strength of the student support division. In 2006, R190 000 was available to 285 students from all departments Engineering, General Studies and Business Studies. The nancial scheme, which covers 50% to 100% of students studies, was approved by the college management and council.

To turn societys dreams of a better life for all into reality, South West Gauteng College is providing education and training programmes that are in tune with the economic and social demands of the present and the future

(CEO Dan Nkosi)

Strategic Partnerships

ETAs: The college has made some strategic interventions to obtain SETA approval to oer programmes. The Engineering workshops at Molapo campus, Dobsonville campus and George Tabor campus were upgraded so that the college can oer training in Motor Mechanics, Motorbody Repair, Welding, Fitting and Machining, Electrical House-wiring and Furniture-making. The colleges School of General Studies also has partnerships with a number of SETAs. Tourism: The SA Tourism Board, Gauteng Tourism Board and other local tourism boards work with the college for the purposes of exposing students to industry and to create opportunities for student employment. South African Airways (SAA) and other airlines also oer employment opportunities to students from the Tourism department. Hospitality: The Hospitality department renewed its membership with the South African Chefs Association (SACA) which will ensure that learners have the opportunity to participate in events held by the association such as Infochefs and The Oyster Festival. Through these events, they gain exposure to the industry which leads to employment opportunities. The industrial catering company Fedics and the Johannesburg Country Club also provide employment to skilled students. Cosmetology and Haircare: The college has linkages with major product houses in the elds of cosmetology and haircare. Students often get the

opportunity to showcase their skills at gala events such as the SABC Superstar Evening held by Matlaa-bana and the Monique and Callie Strydom Trust, the Beauty Africa Competition and professional beauty shows. Automotive Industry Development Centre (AIDC) and the MERSETA: A new partnership in engineering was established with the AIDC and MERSETA. The college trained 50 learners in the NQF Level 1 course from January to November 2005. An agreement was reached whereby another 75 learners were registered with the college for NQF Level 2 training in 2006. Other Partnerships: The college has partnerships with the American Heart Association, the University of South Africa (Unisa), the South African Association of Health and Skincare Professionals, the Department of Labour and the National Arts Council of SA. International: SWGC has entered into a partnership with Noordepoort College in Netherlands for nancial assistance over a three-year period. This will go towards the setting up of Information Technology Centres and Resource Centres at the Soweto campuses. In addition, the partnership will enable the sharing of best practices through sta exchanges. The college has also entered into a partnership with Filton College in UK, which also entails the sharing of best practices and sponsorship of computers.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Marketing IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure Construction Finance, Economics and Accounting Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering and Related Design Oce Administration Hospitality Tourism Campus Dobsonville, Molapo and Roodepoort Dobsoville and Molapo George Tabor Dobsonville, Molapo and Roodepoort West Dobsonville, Molapo and Roodepoort Molapo Dobsonville, Molapo and Roodepoort West Dobsonville, Molapo and Roodepoort Roodepoort George Tabor

Contact Details

www.swgc.co.za

Due to changes in provincial borders, the colleges Krugersdorp and Krugersdorp West campus has moved to Westcol and Technisa has been incorporated into SWGC.

Telephone: (011) 984-1260 Fax: (011) 984-1262 Postal Address: Private Bag X33, Tshiawelo 1817

50 colleges, 1 goal

85

Tshwane North
Inspiring individuals

FET College

Our Story
In December 1995, Pretoria Technical Colleges name was changed to Pretoria College when all technical courses such as Engineering and Fitting and Turning were moved to Pretoria West Technical College because of a lack of space. The three largest departments at this campus are those of Grade 12, Business Studies and Social and Utility Studies (including Hair Care and Hospitality Services). The Mamelodi campus, in eastern Pretoria, was founded in 1982. Mamelodi also has a satellite campus in Kwaggafontein, about 120km northeast of Mamelodi, serving learners on the Gauteng and Mpumalanga border in Business Studies. The Rosslyn campus, in the industrial heartland of Tshwane, was added in January 2005. This campus was known as the National Skills Academy until TNC bought it. It oers skills courses and learnerships, with its main focus on the motor industry.

shwane North College (TNC) for FET comprises seven campuses and one satellite. The main campuses are in Mamelodi, Pretoria, Soshanguve and Rosslyn, while the central oce is also in Pretoria. The satellite site is in Kwaggafontein, bordering Gauteng and Mpumalanga. The Soshanguve South campus, in the north of the greater Tshwane area, was founded in 1987, and takes its name from the population groups the campus serves -- Sotho, Shangaan, Nguni and Venda. The Soshanguve North campus, which specialises in skills training and used to be a satellite campus, is becoming a fully edged campus. The Pretoria campus was established in 1981 as the Pretoria Technical College. However, it dates back to 1900 when a school for adults and adolescents was founded on the same spot to serve the educational needs of Pretoria during the Second Anglo-Boer War.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 23 012 (2006) Full-time equivalents: Not available Location: North Tshwane in Gauteng Campuses: Mamelodi, Soshanguve (two), Pretoria and Rosslyn with a satellite to Mamelodi in Kwaggafontein. Critical Skills: Courses in Business Development Studies, Social and Utility Studies, Engineering Studies, National Senior Certicate (Grade 12) and Enrichment courses. Learnerships in New Venture Creation, Motor Service Repair and Engineering Fabrication. Skills courses in Sewing, Communication, Welding, Bricklaying, Plastering and Building. Preparation of students for trade test training. Key Strengths: A number of businesses, such as a restaurant and beauty salon, as well as cafeterias at the Reserve Bank and Avbob are run by the college, either on-campus or o-site, not only to generate funds for the college but also to give students the benet of experiential training. The college also has an oce simulation centre and language laboratories to strengthen students language skills.

Student Support Services


Oered on all the main campuses, the unit oers the following services: Financial Aid: Needy students can receive up to 50% discount on their tuition fees and academic achievers up to 65%. Counselling: The college psychologist is on each campus at least once a week to assist students with personal problems. Health: Each college has a nurse to assist students with medical problems and advice on issues such as family planning, abortion and sexually transmitted diseases. Career Guidance: The service includes career counselling, pre-enrolment testing for placement in the correct course, psychometric testing, and induction of new students. Students also have access to life-skills courses ranging from study skills to job-hunting skills and motivation. Student Activities: There are a wide variety of activities co-ordinated by the student support services oce and the SRC. Job Placements: Graduates are invited to submit their CVs so they can be assisted with job placements in relevant elds. Support: Student services is also involved in the registration and support of foreign and disabled students.

Tshwane North College is regarded as one of the forerunners in delivering FET, based not only on learner enrolments, student reention and pass rates, but also in respect of its responsiveness to the needs of industry and the community

(Council Chairperson Peter Mashego)

Strategic Partnerships

ETAs: TNC is engaged in more than 19 learnerships, 31 skills programmes and 22 workshop programmes. These courses are oered in conjunction with: the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA), the Construction SETA (CETA), the Forest Industry SETA and the Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA). Currently, the college is awaiting accreditation from the Services SETA and the Transport SETA. Business Skills Training: An incubation initiative has been adopted whereby former students or members of the community are taught a skill and then helped to establish a business. They can also rent space from the college to set up a business for a limited time period until they are self-sustainable. Presently, these include: a shop (Rosslyn campus), a laundry (Soshanguve North) and a vegetable growing project (Mamelodi Incubation Centre). Desto, a private training company, helps to mentor New Venture Creation students. The Small Enterprise Development Agency, in turn, sponsors students for small and medium enterprise training. Automotive Industry: TNC works with the Automotive Industry Development Centre (AIDC) and Nissan in the oering of learnerships.

It also has a public/private partnership with Ford. Government Departments: TNC oers training to sta from the Department of Agriculture, usually in Business Administration training. The Department of Labour uses TNC to oer skills courses like Sewing, Welding, Painting and Plastering to unemployed people. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The Youth Fund provided money to establish a Youth Advisory Centre on the Soshanguve North campus. Other Partnerships: The college is also involved in various partnerships with Absa, Telkom, the Eskom Foundation, Workmed and Growth-Link.

An incubation initiative has been adopted whereby former students or members of the community are taught a skill and then helped to establish a business. They can also rent space from the college to set up a business for a limited time period until they are self-sustainable.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Hospitality Tourism Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting Marketing IT and Computer Science Campus Mamelodi and Soshanguve Mamelodi, Soshanguve and Rosslyn Soshanguve Pretoria Pretoria campus; Mamelodi, Pretoria and Soshanguve Mamelodi, Pretoria and Soshanguve Pretoria Mamelodi

Contact Details
Telephone: (012) 323-8623 or (012) 401-1600 Fax: (012) 323-8683 Postal address: PO Box 26193, Arcadia 0007 E-mail: Enquiries@tnc4fet.co.za

www.tnc4fet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

87

Tshwane South
Achieve the future

FET College

Our Story
provided practical training for unemployed students. This college is one that can provide artisans (millwrights, tters and turners, electricians and skills in Process Instrumentation, Boilermaking and Motor and Diesel Mechanics) after 84 weeks of training. Atteridgeville College was established in 1991 with funds donated by Anglo American and De Beers Chairmans Fund. The following satellite campuses were established: Citicol for Grades 10 to 12, Kidicol for nursery school children, Busicol for entrepreneurship courses and Twin Palms as a training restaurant. The college attracts learners from Tshwane, the rest of South Africa and from outside the countrys borders. For instance, the college is currently providing training to 40 members from the Mozambican Defence Force. This can be attributed to the location of the Centurion campus on the TEK base, convenient for training to SANDF members. The college has a formal agreement with NASCHEM to deliver training to students from the United Arab Emirate in the areas of Electronics, Electrical, Fitting, Turning and Metrology.

shwane South College came into being in 2002, following the merger of former technical colleges in Centurion, Pretoria West and Atteridgeville. Centurion Technical College was established in 1937 as the School for Technical Training and part of the Artillery and Aircraft Depot at Roberts Heights, now known as Thaba Tshwane, where training for the then Union Defence Force was conducted. In 1992, the SANDF took over and funded the college until it was declared an FET college in 2001. Pretoria West College came into being in 1975 to oer theoretical training mainly to apprentices. In 1994, the name changed to Pretoria West College of Engineering and together with Iscor and Premos (the Pretoria municipal training centre)

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 27 777 Full-time equivalents: 8 702 Location: To the south within the borders of the Tshwane Municipality. Campuses: Centurion, Pretoria-West and Atteridgeville and Odi (Odi campus was added to Tshwane South after the borders between the North West and Gauteng provinces were adjusted). Critical Skills: Engineering, in particular the training of millwrights; tters and turners; electricians and engineers who work on process instrumentation; Boilermaking and Motor and Diesel Mechanics. The college is very strong in the eld of Construction education - Atteridgeville campus is one of two delivery sites selected in South Africa to oer Civil Engineering and Building Construction in conjunction with Murray&Roberts, Aveng, WBHO, Group Five and Basil Read. Key Strengths: Companies like BMW, Mercedes and Kumba Resources send their employees to the college for training. It is involved in various community initiatives, such as Busicol where aspiring entrepreneurs from the community are trained and can participate in an incubation programme. Situated on SANDF terrain, the Centurion campus, together with the SANDF, launched an initiative for training MK and APLA cadres for integration into the SANDF in 1994. This gave birth to an Adult Basic Education and Training centre. In many instances such as Computer Numerical Controller (CNC), we oer one of only a few training facilities in South Africa. The college also has excellent facilities and strong partnerships.

Student Support Services


General and Health Services: Guidance and counselling, a First Aid and Trauma unit (this facility is available to students through a partnership with the Pretoria Academic Hospital), an ongoing HIV/Aids awareness campaign, career pathing, job placement, an orientation programme, a community outreach programme, life skills programmes, peer counsellors programme and an alumni programme. The learner support unit also covers the SRC election and educational tours. Financial Aid: The bursary scheme at Tshwane South College is extensive. Various companies also oer bursaries to students in the dierent programmes. Towards September each year, bursaries are advertised nationally. The target group is prospective students from rural areas. Accommodation: Hostel accommodation is provided on the Centurion campus for 50 male SAAB (Swedish Aerospace) bursary students. The female students are accommodated on the Pretoria West campus in a private hostel. Sport: There is a dedicated sports co-ordinator at Tshwane South. The college has teams participating in the Gauteng United Colleges Sports and Culture Association.

Tshwane South College is dynamic, responsive and innovative. It provides quality education and training at the various campuses in response to the national outcry for skilled people, and strives to empower people through knowledge and skills

(CEO Joe Chiloane)

Strategic Partnerships

ircraft Sheet Metal Work: The Aircraft Sheet Metal Work programme is in partnership with the French AERO SUD Industries. This comprises the training of aircraft sheetmetal riveting operators for the new Air Buses. Auto Body Repair and Spray Painting: In partnership with Technical Training SA and the South African Motor Body Repairers Association. Automotive Electronics Courses: Training of new and existing auto electricians in motor vehicle electronics. The equipment was donated by Germany. The students are able to work on simulators to test the actual values and responses to fault injection on the system. Six types of electronic ignition systems, fuel injection and diesel injection systems as well as automatic braking systems are tested. Autotronic: In partnership with Tshwane University of Technology for the training of Autotronics NQF Levels 2 to 4 and covers basic auto electronic training to megatronics (robotics). This partnership gives the college access to training equipment and simulators. The goal is to achieve a seamless transition from FET band to the higher education band for the student. The college delivers training for Ford SA, Tracker and the Automotive Industry Development Centre. Barloworld Equipment: This is the biggest supplier of earthmoving equipment for the mining and building industries. It is the workplace provider for the Boilermaking or Fabrication learnership offered in partnership with MERSETA. SAAB: For Computer Numerical Controlled ma-

chine training, Denel SAAB donated the machines and continuously upgrades the equipment. The lecturers underwent training in Sweden. SAAB Industries is also a partner in training and sponsorship of the Metrology (calibration and recordkeeping of measuring instruments) centre. Probus Advance Process Instrumentation: This facility is one of a few in South Africa. It involves the monitoring of ow, level, pressure, temperature and viscosity in plants. Endress and Hauser: Specialises in providing and servicing process automation. It provides training equipment and oers an award and bursary scheme. AITeC: Automotive Institute for Technical Competency has an oce on college premises and provides access to the Autobody Repairers Association and the Retail Motor Industry (RMI). Through the RMI, the college has access to new technology, the availability of training facilities at Tshwane South College and can deliver training on new models of motor vehicles before they are released. Brkert: Specialises in uid control systems. Oers workplace experience for college graduates and sponsors bursaries for students in instrumentation control. Snap On: Specialises in wheel services, wheel alignment and wheel balancing. The companys national training centre is on the Centurion campus. Launch Technologies (China): Through the partnership, the college can introduce new technology garage and diagnostic equipment in training programmes.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Oce Administration Marketing Electrical Infrastructure Construction Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering & Related Design IT and Computer Science Tourism Hospitality Campus Atteridgeville, Centurion and Odi Odi campus from 2008 Atteridgeville, Centurion and Odi Atteridgeville campus from 2008 All four campuses Atteridgeville and Odi All four campuses Atteridgeville, Centurion and Pretoria West Odi Centurion and Odi

Contact Details

www.tscol.co.za

Telephone: (012) 660-8500/ 660-8501/ 660-8502/ 660-8503 Fax: (012) 660-8547 Postal address: Post Bag X1018, Lyttelton 0140 E-mail: shirley.mamaleka@cencol.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

89

Westcol
Were on the ball

FET College

Our Story
merce and industry and the gold, the mining sector. Westcols mission is, among others, to bring quality education and training to the West Rand; uplift the entire community; optimise the utilisation and upgrading of existing resources and develop holistically demand-driven, sustainable education and training programmes. The mission ties in with the colleges target market, which is the previously disadvantaged communities that live in high-density informal settlements which are not situated close to the existing FET colleges and cannot access them due to nancial constraints. In another move to broaden access, Westcol intends to oer online programmes by 2008. The college council recognises that restructuring must redress the inequities of the past and it has put in place advancement programmes designed to redress past disadvantages in designated groups.

he Western College for FET (Westcol) has a catchment area of 4 538km, which reaches into both Gauteng and North West province. During the merger processes in 2002, when 50 new FET colleges were created, Westcol also came into being with the coming together of the former Carletonville and Randfontein technical colleges. The colleges became two of Westcols campuses, both situated in the industrial and mining as well as the commercial heartland of Gautengs West Rand, with mines such as Harmony and Goldelds within a radius of 30km from the colleges. As a result, Engineering is a special area of strength for Westcol. The logo captures Westcols history until now: the unity of the newly merged institutions with its circles representing dynamics and energy and the smaller spheres the two campuses. Furthermore, the green sphere represents growth, initiative and innovation; the red represents com-

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 800 (Randfontein campus only) Full-time equivalents: 2 544 (both campuses) Location: West Rand of Gauteng Campuses: Randfontein, Krugersdorp, Krugersdorp West and Carletonville. Critical Skills: The college provides skills that commerce and industry identies as critical. Key Strengths: The college is: exible, responsive to training needs, aordable and reaches out to the community, with curricular programmes according to the needs of its customers.

Student Support Services


Counselling: This is available to all students, free of charge. Students can make an appointment at the colleges unit for student support services. This department can give counselling, advice and guide students with emotional, personal and study problems. Extreme cases will be referred to specialised institutions. An AIDS counsellor is available on campus at designated times. Academic Guidance: The service includes vocational guidance and counselling on subject choices and study problems. Trained sta can help individuals or groups to improve their marks with study methods. An appointment can be made at this department for specialised help. Peer Learning Programme: In order to assist learners to do their best, supervised peer learning opportunities are available in the afternoons. When necessary, extra tuition is scheduled. The student support centre manages these activities. Supplemental Learning Instruction: A compulsory programme is available in highrisk subjects in which trained students from a higher level facilitate interactive learning sessions with students on a lower level. Employment Bureau: Sta help students to nd part-time and full-time, as well as temporary emloyment. They will also help with CV-writing, job-hunting and interview techniques.

Engineering is a special

area of strength for Westcol

Westcol provides lifelong learning to all South Africans to make them employable. We create learning opportunities for everybody with our working relationships and agreements with commerce, trade and industry and FET institutions, locally and internationally

(CEO Louis Coetzer)

Strategic Partnerships

epartment of Labour: Westcol has interdepartmental linkages with the Department of Labour and its SETAs. On the Randfontein campus, the department sponsors unemployed students for Hospitality training. ABET: The Randfontein campus is in negotiation with the local government council to oer Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) to its workers. Engineering: The Engineering students will have access to a training college, which is accredited by the Energy SETA and the Mining Qualications Authority (Mining and Minerals SETA). Community Partnerships: The college has established satellite campuses in the community. These include: The Engineering Skills Training Centre (ESTC) of Anglo Platinum, based in Randfontein; Goldelds Academy in Carletonville; Pro Practicum School; Tshikondeni; Carol Shaw; Namibia Private School; Roodepark School; Riebeeck Rand School; Anglo Platinum; Placer Dome; Harmony; Pelicon Engineering; Goldelds; Khutsong; Kagiso;

Magalies Gliding Club for Aviation; Potch Flying School; Unisa; Futurekids South Africa; Kilmarnock College (UK); and Park Lane College (UK). Agriculture: The college is working with the Agricultural Sector Education and Training Authority (Agri-SETA). So far, two learnerships were completed. NQF Level 1 Plant Production, a project done in conjunction with the local farming community that is surrounding the college. NQF Level 2 Farming, which entailed training at Merafong Flora. This was a project of the Westrand District Municipality in Carltonville. Department of Labour: During 2006 the college was involved in several projects together with the Department of Labour. They included: The training of the communities of Bekkersdal and Toekomsrus in vegetable production; and The training of people with disabilities to repair wheelchairs. Projects in 2007: Agriculture: The college is training 45 part-time and seasonal workers in ower farming (Merafong Flora). Aviation: The college is involved in Aviation training and other community projects.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Finance, Economics and Accounting; Hospitality; Management; Oce Administration; Electrical Infrastructure Construction; Engineering and Related Design; IT and Computer Science;

Contact Details
Telephone (011) 693-3608 Fax: (011) 693-1877 Postal address: Private Bag X17, Randfontein 1760 E-mail: principal@westcol.co.za

www.westcol.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

91

Coastal KZN
FET College

Your pioneering centre of excellence

Our Story
However, its catchment area stretches beyond KwaZulu-Natal since its residence facilities attract students from across South Africa and neighbouring states. At present, Coastal KZN FET College is one of the largest colleges in KwaZulu-Natal, currently averaging about 12 500 full-time equivalent students and about 521 sta. The college is well known for its adult (both unemployed and employed) learner programmes. It is also popular with out-of-school youth and project-linked trainees, ranging from learners with a low academic background to those who have had opportunities to enhance their educational level. The college is positioning itself to be able to take leadership in addressing the socioeconomic needs to equip the unemployed with skills that will empower them for employment and self-employment.

he Coastal KZN FET College was established on 11 April 2002 following a merger of the former Durban Technical College, Swinton Road Technical College, Umlazi V Technical College and Umlazi BB Technical College. It includes the former Umbumbulu College of Education and a number of skills centres in the areas between Durban and Port Shepstone. The colleges main campuses are at Congella in Durban, Swinton in Mobeni, Umlazi BB, Umlazi V and Umbumbulu in KwaMakhutha, the semi-rural setting of its central administration oce. In addition, its skills centres are Ubuhle-Bogu in KwaQiko, As-Salaam near Braemer and the Maths and Science Centre at Mangosuthu Technikon in Umlazi. The location of campuses and skills centres means that Coastal KZN Colleges catchment area is south of Durban and continues for a strip of about 80km towards the South Coast.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 19 600 Full-time equivalents: 12 500 Location: KwaZulu-Natal Campuses: Congella, Mobeni, Umlazi (two), KwaMakhutha; and three satellite campuses at Braemer, Umlazi and KwaQiko. Critical Skills: Engineering, Manufacturing, Construction, Business Administration and Management, Computer skills, Hairdressing, Beauty Technology and Food Services. Key Strengths: Responsive learning programmes, a good repution in Engineering and Manufacturing, eective partnerships, innovation and adaptation and a well-established brand name.

Student Support Services


Financial Aid: The college provides bursaries to deserving students; Academic Support: Study skills, time management, peer and group mentoring and examination skills. Workplace Support: The institution assists students to access job opportunities; does placement for in-service-training and identies students for learnerships. Job Placement: A Youth Advisory Centre was set up in partnership with the Umsobomvu Youth Fund. It targets youth development and the Graduate Development Program which empowers young unemployed graduates with skills making them more marketable. This includes basic computer and life skills as well as a drivers licence and an Enterprise Development Programme to enable them to start their own businesses. Coastal KZN FET College worked with Ethekwini Municipality to locate the graduates for the programme. Health: The college has established relationships with the Treatment Action Campaign; the HIV/Aids NGO Lovelife; the Provincial Department of Health; National Association of People living with HIV/Aids; the South African Police Service; New Start (a non-prot programme for HIV counselling and testing), the SA National Cancer Association and other NGOs.

The college is well known for its adult (both unemployed and employed) learner programmes. It is also popular with out-of-school youth and project-linked trainees, ranging from learners with a low academic background to those who have had opportunities to enhance their educational level.

The college is a pioneering centre of excellence


(CEO Wilson Nzimande)

Strategic Partnerships
enery Industries: The South African Petrol Renerys petrochemical initiative sought to involve the FET sector in developing NQF-aligned programmes to service renery

needs. The initiative involves the Chemical Industries SETA and the surrounding oil renery industries. Coastal KZN FET College has been working co-operatively with the Sapref petrochemical initiative to ensure that this becomes a success. Toolmaking: The Toolmaking Association of South Africas (TASA) Tooling Initiative seeks to ll areas of skills shortage in South Africa, developing competent craftsmen and women who can compete internationally. A Centre of Excellence is being established at Coastal KZN FET Colleges Durban campus. It will cover the following learning programmes: Machining, involving the Computerised Numerical Control; Tool and Die; Tool Setter; and ComputerAided Drafting/Computer-Aided Machining. The college will use the expertise of graduates from the Indoor German Tool Room (IGTR) training centre. Partners involved are the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education through Coastal KZN FET College and Umgungundlovu FET College; IGTR, TASA and the MERSETA-ISOE (Institute of Sectoral & Occupational Excellence). Boat building: The Boat Building Initiative has Coastal KZN and False Bay colleges making inroads into the marine industry, heading up this initiative

which is gearing them up to oer two specialist marine qualications: National Certicate in Small Craft Construction NQF Level 2 to 4; and National Certicate in Polymer Composite Fabrication NQF Level 2 to 4. The Boat Building Initiative involves the Cape Town Boat Builders Industries Association; Durban Boat Builders Industries Association; Scott Bader; Coastal KZN FET College; MerSETA; and False Bay FET College. Educational Institutions: The Sta and Student Exchange Programme eminates from a sister-sister relationship between Durban and Chicago State in US and is a vibrant consortium between Coastal KZN FET College, the University of Zululand and Chicago State University. This has resulted in sta and student exchange programmes which ensure world-class standards in diverse areas. The Technofutur (Belgium) involves sta development in specialised welding and tooling maintenance. The Syntra Midden Flanderren (Belgium) is a partnership in entrepreneurship development support and learning materials design. Government Departments: The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Economic Development is involved in the funding and research of the Tooling and Maritime Programmes. It is also a partner in the training and support of co-operatives. Schools: The college has a good relationship with schools and provides free access to its career guidance facilities.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Primary Agriculture Oce Administration Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Finance, Economics and Accounting Engineering and Related Design Marketing Campus Umlazi V Umlazi BB, Swinton, Umbumbulu and As-Salaam Umlazi V and Swinton As-Salaam, Durban, Swinton, Umbumbulu and Umlazi V Umlazi BB, Umbumbulu and As-Salaam Umlazi V, Durban, Swinton and As-Salaam Umbumbulu and As-Salaam

Contact Details
Telephone: (031) 905-7000/ 905-7001 Fax: (031) 905-1399 Postal address: PO Box 1795, Amanzimtoti 4126 E-mail: cao@coastalkzn.co.za

www.coastalkzn.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

93

Elangeni

FET College

Future on Track - Go places with the best education behind you

Our Story
For instance, KwaMashu provides Business Studies and skills training, whereas Ntuzuma campus focuses on Engineering and skills training. Both run short Computer Studies programmes. The colleges Hospitality and Tourism departments at the Pinetown campus have received recognition for their outstanding achievements. The Mpumalanga campus oers an NQF-aligned Organic Farming course and Engineering Studies. In conjunction with a private provider, Mpumalanga is registered and utilised for training in Nursing. Because of the high demand within the area, various new courses are planned. Qadi concentrates on skills development, in line with the National Skills Development Act, and caters for the people of Bothas Hill, Nyuswa and Emolweni. These communities require skills in areas such as construction (Plumbing, Bricklaying), Garment-making and Tourism. Elangeni College strives to serve the communities and industries of the northwestern district of Durban by providing quality education and training. This is echoed in the Elangeni College motto: Ad Meliora Towards Betterment.

he name change from previously known Sivananda FET College to Elangeni College for FET was approved by the KZN MEC for Education on 31 October 2005. The name Elangeni College became ocial in March 2006 when it was published in the KZN Provincial Gazette. Historically, the area served by the college in KwaZulu-Natal (including Inchanga, Valley of a Thousand Hills, Pinetown, Claremont, Inanda, Ntuzuma, KwaMashu, Ndwedwe and Mpumalanga) represents the home of Queen Nandi, the mother of King Shaka, known as Elangeni. Translated, the word means: a start of a new day or opportunity; a place in the sun; place of the sun or where the sun shines through. In its vision statement, the college declares its intention to provide quality education and training to meet the demands of the communities it serves. It does so through its six campuses, some of which have been providing education and training for more than 30 years. They are KwaMashu, Mpumalanga, Ndwedwe, Ntuzuma, Pinetown and Qadi (Bothas Hill). Ndwedwe is a newly established campus specialising in skills training, especially construction. Activities on the campuses vary.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 5 661 Full-time equivalents: 1 226 Location: KwaZulu-Natal Campuses: KwaMashu, Mpumalanga, Ndwedwe, Ntuzuma, Pinetown and Qadi (Bothas Hill). Critical Skills: Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET), Business Studies, Construction skills, basic ITC, Plumbing, Refrigeration, Organic Farming, Tourism and Hospitality, Call Centres, New Venture Creation and Crafts. Key Strengths: The college oers training that speaks to the needs in the area that it serves; it has sound partnerships and strong student support services.

Student Support Services


Each campus has a student liaison ocer who reports to the student support unit. A student representative body, which consists of class representatives, acts for members of the student community. Its aim is to contribute towards the advancement of students on an academic, sports and cultural level. In addition, the following services are provided: Inclusive Education: Support is provided to students who face physical, social and health barriers; Career Guidance: The college oers two career guidance programmes to students: Brain proling and Pace; Tutorial Support: Should students feel a need for extra tuition, a class of at least 10 people must report the problem to the student liaison ocer. The ocer will then organise a tutor for free tutorial classes. Education and Training Support: The PLATO programme is available on all four delivery sites to improve English, science and mathematical literacy; HIV/Aids: The college has incorporated a computerised HIV/Aids programme into the curriculum. This programme also consists of life skills and basic computer literacy.

The SESD programme has assisted participating colleges to become exceptional institutions to be emulated by others in terms of their governance; management; responsiveness and systems development

A public FET provider, Elangeni College has six campuses that strive to provide quality education and training to the communities and industries of the northwestern district of Durban

(CEO Hans Labuschagne)

Strategic Partnerships

ETAs: The college has partnerships with the Public Service Sector SETA; Services SETA; Education Training and Development Practices SETA; Insurance SETA; Chemical Industries SETA; and the Wholesale and Retail SETA. The college is also in the process of attaining full accreditation as a training provider from the following SETAS: Forest Industry, Tourism and Hospitality and Construction Education and Training Authority. Educational Institutions: The college has partnerships with the following higher education institutions: Southern Business School; Durban University of Technology; Mangosuthu Technikon and ILM Australia. A partnership between Elangeni College and the University of KwaZulu-Natals student support services allow the college to use the services of the universitys intern psychologists for student counselling. The services include, but are not limited to: career and vocational counselling; counselling for depression; stress management; substance abuse; trauma and crisis counselling; and HIV/Aids counselling and management. Tourism and Hospitality: The colleges Tourism and Hospitality students received practical training with the following members of industry: Butcher Block (Pinetown and Hillcrest); Ciao Italia (Westville); Pinedene Hotel (Pinetown); Knowles Superstore (Pinetown); and Holiday Inn Elangeni (Durban). Other Partnerships: Telkom, Riverside Panel Beaters and National Business Initiative (NBI). Other agreements have been entered into with: Qubelisa

Investments and Projects, Rainman Landcare Foundation and Umsobomvu Youth Fund. International: Elangeni College has been involved in the Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) programme, a Danish Government-funded initiative. The SESD programme has assisted participating colleges to become exceptional institutions to be emulated by others in terms of their governance; management; responsiveness and systems development. Through the SESD partnership, Elangeni College has managed to implement various projects and receive training. These include: twelve educators enrolled for a National Professional Diploma in Education; 12 students enrolled for a Post-Graduate Diploma in Project Management and Leadership; the college obtaining the People Learning and Training Online (PLATO) programme which assists in improving the academic performance of learners in Maths, Science and English; a partnership agreement that allows certain trained sta members to oer Dr Kobus Neethlings brain proling and creativity and innovation studies; college sta having creative thinking and brain-prole training (Neethling Brain Instrument); six sta members completed a BEd (Hons) which focused on FET Management; establishing an Organic Farming training programme; and various workshops leading to the improvement of academic competence of Maths, Science and Technology lecturers. The SESD programme has also contributed to the improvement of training facilities and equipment to ensure a high level of education and training.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Finance, Economics and Accounting Hospitality IT & Computer Science Management Marketing Oce Administration Primary Agriculture Tourism Campus Ntuzuma and Qadi Ntuzuma Ntuzuma Pinetown KwaMashu and Pinetown KwaMashu, Mpumalanga and Pinetown KwaMashu, Mpumalanga and Pinetown Pinetown Pinetown Mpumalanga Pinetown and Qadi

Contact Details

www.efet.co.za

Telephone: (031) 267-8050 Fax: (031) 267-8060 Postal address: Private Bag X13, Westville 3630 E-mail: info@sfet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

95

Esayidi
Gibela Nathi to the future

FET College

Our Story
The rural areas, stretching from Scottsburgh to Ixopo in the north and from Port Edward on the Eastern Cape border inland to Kokstad in the south, are characterised by high levels of poverty. The college has embarked on an expansion plan aimed at satisfying the training needs of an even wider rural community. Skills and craft courses are planned for the skills centres to help alleviate poverty. The college also oers Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) in partnership with organisations such as Eskom and the Sharks Board to counter high illiteracy in the region. The college delivers training at various levels in elds such as Tourism, Local Government, Motor Industry, Electrical and Electronics, Business Studies, Hospitality and Catering services to satisfy the recruitment needs of local business and industry by providing a high standard of relevant tuition and training.

n 2002, Port Shepstone and Enyenyezi Technical Colleges merged to form Esayidi FET College. Then the Kokstad campus was added. This campus was orginally a community centre funded by the premier of KwaZulu-Natal. Esayidi was asked to take it over as an education and training facility. As a result, Esayidi has ve campuses: Enyenyezi in Boboyi, 10km from Port Shepstone; Gamalakhe, built originally as a teachers college about 20km from Port Shepstone; Kokstad; Port Shepstone in Oslo Beach and Umzimkulu. In addition, the college has nine community development centres: St Marys in Ixopo; Gcingangempi in Izingolweni; Harding; Malebukeni in Mfume (Umgababa); Nqamusa in Munster; Gamalakhe; Sizanani; Clydesdale in Umzimkulu, and Mthwalume. With its colleges and community development centres spread across southern KwaZulu-Natal, the college is positioned to serve both urban and rural areas over a wide geographic area.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 54 000 Full-time equivalents: 9 680 Location: Southern KwaZulu-Natal Campuses: Boboyi, Gamalakhe, Kokstad, Port Shepstone and Umzimkulu. Critical Skills: ABET, Tourism, Agriculture, Bricklaying, co-operatives, Health Care, motor vehicle repairs, Refrigeration, Upholstery, Arts And Crafts, cellphone repairs, Garmentmaking, home appliance repairs, Panelbeating, Spraypainting And Welding. Key Strengths: Rural reach through nine community development centres. A beadwork workshop was established in March 2006. It forms part of the Sewing and Craft course and is a sustainable skill leading to job creation. The MEC for Education ordered 700 items to be used as gifts during the Budget Speech on 25 April 2006. Bead workers from the Gamalakhe community were enlisted to help the students on this large order. This created jobs and helped people realise their talents and abilities which gave them the courage to begin generating a sustainable income. The MEC ordered more beadwork which she took to Cuba as gifts.

Student Support Services


Esayidi FET College has a student support unit managed and controlled at the central oce in Port Shepstone by an assistant manager and administrative support sta. Each delivery site nominates one lecturer who acts as a student liaison ocer to communicate on behalf of students with the campus sta and management. The core functions of this unit include, but are not limited to: Counselling; Career guidance; Life skills; Health and wellness programmes which focus on, among others, HIV/Aids and drug and substance abuse awareness programmes; Academic support, including remedial programmes and tutorials; Extra-curricular activities such as sport and culture; Financial aid; and A Students Representative Council, which is responsible for planning student activities such as fun and sports days and fundraising. The SRC also undergoes leadership training. The president or deputy president of the SRC represents students at the colleges council and academic board meetings.

It takes 21 years and nine months to produce a well-qualied individual. We, therefore, need to ensure that relevant programmes and training are presented in order to achieve this objective.

(CEO Dr Sipho Nzimande)

Strategic Partnerships

BET and Life Skills: The college has various partners, including Eskom South Coast; the Genesis Trust in Port Shepstone; the Sharks Board in Kingsway and Ziphagamise in Port Shepstone. The college is actively involved in assisting in training in a variety of circumstances depending on the needs of the target audience. Some are specic to the students own working environment, whereas others are more general. The basic ABET training is standard, however, according to the level being studied. There exists a great need for this type of training and the college plans to have an ABET programme at all its delivery sites. This does not preclude the college from oering the same service to other interested organisations. Community projects: The college is working with an organisation, Coastal Care. The Hibiscus Municipality Agricultural Project (Enyenyezi Campus) is a project conducted together with Coastal Care and has been designed for selected unemployed people from the south coast area. A specially designed programme makes provision for both life and practical skills. Special elements such as alien plant control were included to assist local authorities in combating this problem. Participants are paid to become actively involved in destroying alien plants. Arts and Crafts Projects: The Margate Art Museum provides training to existing students at the Sizinani Community Development Centre (CDC), who are studying bead and craft work. Advice is

also given in other areas where the college is actively establishing response projects such as pottery to the hearing-impaired, carpet weaving and candle-making. Miscellaneous projects: The college works with the Lions organisation, Port Shepstone; the Rotary club; the UGU regional council; the Hibiscus Coast Municipality; the Services and the Wholesale and Retail SETAs. Many ad hoc projects occur from time to time and the college becomes a willing partner by providing either training or sharing management advice. There is close co-operation with local authorities and agreements exist whereby both parties agree to share resources, where such a need exists, to promote the wellbeing of the community in the southern KwaZulu-Natal region. An example of a current co-operative eort is with Hibiscus Tourism, which wants to introduce Rural Tours from 2007 to encourage visitors to venture away from the sea to the many scenic and interesting places in our area. In this way, not only will tourism be promoted, but employment can also be created. Workshops are held to share ideas and plan the way forward so that the project will be a success.

The college also oers Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) in partnership with organisations such as Eskom and the Sharks Board to counter high illiteracy in the region.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Hospitality Tourism Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting Engineering and Related Design IT and Computer Science Campus Kokstad Enyenezi Gamalakhe Gamalakhe Kokstad and Enyenyezi Port Shepstone Port Shepstone Port Shepstone

Contact Details
Telephone: (039) 318-1433 Fax: (039) 318-1514 Postal address: Private Bag 713, Port Shepstone 4240

50 colleges, 1 goal

97

Majuba

FET College

Reaching greater heights together

Our Story
cuses on the establishment of co-operatives with the purpose of establishing entrepreneurs in the community. It is known for skills and short-course training in decor, dressmaking and computers. These courses are oered on demand. The Majuba Technology Centre is also in Madadeni. This is a dynamic and fast-growing campus, well-known for skills training in carpentry, building, construction, electrical and mechanical engineering as well as computers. With 11 000 students enrolled at the ve centres, Majuba is one of the biggest FET colleges in KwaZulu-Natal. Students come from a widespread area stretching from Dundee, Dannhauser, Newcastle and Vryheid to Pongola in northern KwaZulu-Natal. The college also attracts learners from as far away as the Free State and Gauteng and even from several countries in the Southern African Development Community region, including Mozambique, Swaziland, Lesotho and Botswana.

n 2003 the technical colleges in Newcastle, Madadeni and Osizweni merged to become Majuba College of FET. All sta gave input in deciding on a name and, since the mountain Majuba is a landmark, Majuba College was the obvious choice. The dove was chosen as logo for two reasons: to symbolise peace and the Zulu word amajuba, which means dove. There are ve campuses with names that describe the character or activities of each. The Newcastle Training Centre (NTC) is in Newcastle where the focus is to form partnerships with business and industry. Business and industry send employees to qualify as boilermakers, tters, turners and electricians or to do trade tests. The Newcastle Technology Centre focuses on oering Mechanical and Electrical Engineering courses. The IT and Business Campus focuses on IT and Computer Science, Finance, Economics and Accounting and Hospitality. The Centre for People Development in Madadeni near Newcastle fo-

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 25 000 (approx.) Full-time equivalents: 11 000 (approx.) Location: Northern KwaZulu-Natal Campuses: Madadeni (two) and Newcastle (three). Critical Skills: The college excels in the offering of Engineering and Business-related skills. It runs an Open Learning Unit and contact sessions are scheduled to accommodate employed learners and to embark on lifelong learning. Key Strengths: The sta and student body have embraced the development of learning and teaching materials for new skills programmes. The colleges competitive advantages are its Centre for People Development which can seat 5 000 guests; the highest number of national examiners in the country; two national marking centres; the Newcastle Training Centre, one of the largest in South Africa; real-life simulated workshops to equip learners with the skills needed for the job market; it is one of the rst public FET colleges in KZN to receive the ISO 9001:2000 Certicate, enabling the college to ensure the quality of its internal processes.

Student Support Services


Student support committees are functioning on all campuses at Majuba FET College. Their services include: Health and Wellness: Awareness campaigns such as about HIV/Aids, drug and alcohol abuse; motivational speakers, often ex-learners of Majuba FET, are invited to campus. Sport, Arts and Cultural Activities: Student activities such as a beauty pageant, sports days, cultural days, Heritage Day and Spring Day cater for all interests and oer healthy entertainment. Career Guidance: The student support unit is investigating possibilities of training sta to oer career guidance to students to ensure access and exposure to dierent elds of education and training. Development of Leaders: SRC members are trained in management and leadership, giving them the opportunity to contribute to the colleges growth and development. When SRC members plan events, they have the opportunity to practise the principles of planning, delegation and supervising with the guidance of sta members. Class Representative System: This allows students to solve class- and peer-related problems.

Co-operation with industry and the community has been the dening factor in Majuba Colleges growth and status. I can unashamedly state that Majuba College, appropriately resourced and motivated, will become the

foremost institution for skills development, and worthy of emulation (CEO Cas Prinsloo)

ewcastle Training Centre (NTC): A nationally renowned training centre servicing needs in South Africa, Angola, Mozambique and Botswana, NTC received the Gold Certicate of College-Industry partnerships in securing business with companies like Mittal Steel and parastatal Eskom. Wholesale and Retail Sector: The Business Studies divisions of Majuba FET College (IT and Business Campus) formed partnerships with more than 10 local businesses in the wholesale and retail sector and learnerships are still oered to employed learners. Partners include businesses such Pick n Pay, Top Parts, Waltons and shopping outlets such as Value City and North City. Government Departments: The Centre for People Development is involved in the training of co-operatives with the aim of establishing entrepreneurs in the community. This project is a partnership between the Centre for People Development and the Provincial Departments of Education and Economic Aairs. Many entrepreneurs have successfully applied for loans at Ithala Bank and are currently established in their communities. Construction: Through its partnership initiatives with the local municipality, the Amajuba District Council and the Construction SETA, the college has secured training to skill people in the construction of RDP houses.

Strategic Partnerships

Building and construction is extremely important, given the rate at which houses and townhouses are built in Newcastle, Madadeni and Osizweni. Correctional Services: An agreement between the Majuba Technology Centre and Ekuseni Youth Centre, a correctional facility, means that Majuba FET College has the responsibility for all the education and training at the centre. Initially, 150 students will enrol in programmes such as Civil Engineering Construction, Fitting and Machining, Motor Mechanics, Electrical Engineering and Fabrication and Extraction. A further 250 will be trained in SETA-approved skills programmes. The provincial Department of Education and of Correctional Services respectively made R3-million and R10,5million available for this pilot project. The college and the Provincial Department of Correctional Services are in talks to expand the partnership. Agriculture: The Majuba Technology Centre is in partnership with the Amajuba District Municipality, the Provincial Department of Agriculture and the Amajuba Agricultural Co-operative. The Hydroponics Project at the Majuba Technology Centre contributes to the attainment of the colleges strategic vision by tackling poverty alleviation, skills training and job-creation. Hydroponics is a form of crop production by which plants grow in mineral nutrient solutions instead of soil containing silt and clay. At Majuba, it is an entrepreneurial initiative comprising six production tunnels, four training tunnels, two cold rooms and a storage facility.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Civil Engineering & Building Construction Primary Agriculture Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce administration Hospitality IT and Computer Science Campus Newcastle Technology Centre and the Majuba Technology Centre Newcastle and Majuba Technology centres Majuba Technology Centre Majuba Technology Centre IT and Business Centre and the Centre for People Development Centre for People Development Centre for People Development and the IT and Business Centre IT and Business Centre

Contact Details
Telephone: (034) 326-4888/326-4596 Fax: (034) 326-4889/326-4855 Postal address: PO Box X6602, Newcastle 2490 E-mail: pricillae@majuba.edu.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

99

Mnambithi
FET College

Skills and education to build a better nation

Our Story
In addition, the college oers a variety of courses ranging from basic technical skills to computer and business skills. Its Linkages and Programmes Unit can oer skills on demand, limited only to a slight degree by the availability of physical resources. The college plays an important role in tackling health problems in KwaZulu-Natal. It oers the Senior Certicate in Health and Community Care, which includes intensive learning on the prevention of HIV and Aids and the care of people living with the disease. In addition, the college oers a First Aid Certicate issued by the Red Cross. Selected students progress into the Ladysmith Nursing School, the private nursing school of Mnambithi FET College. The Nursing School, registered with the South African Nursing Council, has a long waiting list and the college hopes to nd more clinical venues to train more nurses and health caregivers.

nambithi College was born in 2002 from the merger of the Ladysmith Technical College, the Ezakheni Technical College and the Ezakheni Skills Centre situated within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands. The colleges central oce and its Ladysmith campus are on the banks of the Klip River with the majestic Drakensberg in the background while the Ezakheni campus and skills centre are situated approximately 25km from Ladysmith. With three more satellite campuses opening in the near future, Mnambithi Colleges aim is to reach more people. In 2005, the college started a training programme for rural Early Childhood Development (ECD) practitioners in some of the provinces poorest pockets within the uThukela District Municipality. Through the training, many other rural training needs, including Food and Nutrition programmes, Sewing and Food Production, became evident and will be addressed in 2007.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 175 (2005) Full-time equivalents: 2 275 Location: KwaZulu-Natal Campuses: Ladysmith, Ezakheni. Critical Skills: Nursing and health care training and ECD. Key Strengths: Flexibility, as the colleges Linkages and Programmes Unit can oer skills on demand, limited only to a slight degree by the availability of physical resources. Another key strength is its work in the health sector. The college oers the Senior Certicate in Health and Community Care which includes intensive learning on the prevention of HIV and care of people with HIV and Aids. Selected students progress into the Ladysmith Nursing School, the private nursing school of Mnambithi FET College.

Student Support Services


An assistant manager heads the student support unit, helped by six student liaison ocers (SLOs). Mnambithi is one of only two colleges in the province that oer psychological services free of charge. One of the units sta members is registered with the Health Professionals Council of South Africa as a psychometrist who can do testing as part of providing career guidance to students. The unit also provides the following services: Financial Aid: A bursary scheme exists for students who excelled and who do not have the nances to complete their studies. Study Support: There is a literacy programme for students who want to improve their English communication skills. Career Guidance: Students have access to the PACE computerised career guidance programme. Workplace Support: Students get help with compiling their CVs and practise interview skills. A placement programme has started. Students are placed in business to gain practical experience. HIV/Aids: Video presentations and workshops are conducted to create awareness. Student Representative Council: Members undergo leadership training and organise college activities.

The college plays an important role in tackling health problems in KwaZulu-Natal. It oers the Senior Certicate in Health and Community Care, which includes intensive learning on the prevention of HIV and Aids and the care of people living with the disease.

We jump-start careers and dreams. With us, you will use tomorrow what you learnt today. Mnambithi FETC provides a culture of excellence in education, oering skills that go beyond the workplace; graduates who impact on the world

(CEO Jay Naidoo)

Strategic Partnerships

ETAs: One of the rst partnerships Mnambithi FET College entered into was with the Wholesale and Retail SETA. This involved local wholesale and retail companies placing unemployed learners on a learnership. The project started o with 20 learners. On completion of the learnership after a year, the students obtained a Shop Floor NQF Level 4 qualication. The qualication covered communication in the wholesale and retail environment, computer literacy, stocktaking, customer service and nancial management. Ten of the learners secured permanent employment on completion of their learnership and are still employed. Local Industry: Industries have responded to their own skills needs by implementing Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA learnerships on NQF Level 1. Employed and unemployed learners were placed on a block rotation system. The training covers generic Engineering and Manufacturing and students aim to further their training by getting involved in learnerships on higher NQF levels. Municipalities: Partnerships have been formed with the Uthukela District Municipality incorporating the municipalities of Emnambithi, Ukhahlamba, Umtshezi, Imbabazane and Indaka for the training of plumbers and Waste Water Treatment operators. Some of the students are unemployed people from the areas surrounding Ladysmith.

Mnambithi FET College has signed a lease agreement with the local municipality for a vacant piece of land next to the Tugela River to develop its activities in agriculture. The aim will be to involve rural communities and train them in agriculture, starting with the basics of cultivating seedlings to the more elaborate process of hydroponics. The produce from the project will be sold locally and the money generated will fund the next group of learners. Furthermore, learners will obtain a qualication that will enable them to practise their skill to uplift their lifestyles. Government Department: The college is the training provider for the Local Skills Development Programme for the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Health. Local Economic Development Ocers have undergone training at the college. The students became involved with local projects and have been a huge asset to the local municipality. Tourism: Mnambithi FET College aims to become involved in partnerships in the Tourism and Arts and Crafts sectors which are underdeveloped in the greater Ladysmith area. Strategically, the town is well placed in a rich historical and cultural environment. With an eye on the 2010 Soccer World Cup, Ladysmith can market itself as a tourist destination that is centrally placed between most of the major soccer venues.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Marketing Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Oce Administration Hospitality Campus Ladysmith Ladysmith Ladysmith and Ezakheni Ezakheni Ladysmith Ladysmith

Contact Details
Telephone: (036) 638- 3800 Fax: (036) 631-4146 Postal address: Private Bag X9903, Ladysmith 3370 E-mail: info@mfet.co.za

www.mfet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

101

Mthashana
FET College

To be the preferred learning centre of excellence

Our Story
resources to alleviate poverty. A factor assisting Mthashana to turn its mission into reality is that it nds itself in the fortunate position in which South Africa, Mozambique and Swaziland are co-operating cross-border in tourism and agriculture. Areas of development in which the college is, or will be, playing a role include agriculture, tourism, business development (in the form of SMME development, informal trading support and youth development), mining, forestry, HIV/Aids (HomeBased Care, Early Childhood Development), and Adult Basic Education and Training.

thashana FET college is situated in the northern region of KwaZulu-Natal and its catchment area stretches for approximately 600km, from Nkandla in the southwest of KwaZulu-Natal to the Mozambique border in the northeast. When one state-aided institution was created on 11 April 2002 by merging Nongoma and Vryheid technical colleges and a number of skills centres, King Goodwill Zwelithini named it Mthashana. In 2002, Mthashana acquired two additional campuses, KwaGqikazi College of Education and Babanango Skills Campus. In 2003, Emandleni Matleng Campus (youth centre) was amalgamated into Mthashana. The colleges Maputa campus was established in 2005 in the Umkhanyakude district in Manguse. The establishment of further campuses at Nkandla, Nqutu, Pongola and Jozini is under way. Among the population of 1,4 million people in the area, less than half - only 45% - of the economically active are employed. A total of 7% of the people have Grade 4 as their highest level of education and 36% had no formal schooling. The socioeconomic conditions underpin the colleges mission to establish demand-led centres of learning; empowering people with appropriate skills to create employment and utilising regional

Student Support Services


The vision of the college is to provide holistic support to all students and to maximise their full potential. Its student support services unit is active in a range of elds, including: Induction: On arrival, new students sign a code of conduct and are familiarised with activities and the facilities oered by their respective campuses. Upgrading of Existing Skills: Three campuses have access to the PLATO programme which enables students with language and mathematical barriers to improve their skills, helping them to meet the required level for successful academic results. This programme forms part of the timetable of all students. Career Guidance: Students are guided by student support ocers at each campus with advice on registering for the most suitable courses. Preparation for Employment: A Business Unit has been established where qualied students (N6) receive practical training relating to their courses. They are enrolled for 10 weeks at the Business Unit and receive training in CV-writing and interview techniques, the arrangement of all meetings at the campus, ling and all other relevant oce duties. Entrepreneurial skills and basic computer literacy are part of the units role in enhancing students employability. Life Skills: Students receive support in life skills and health education, such as information on subjects like HIV/Aids. Counselling: Students in crisis can receive guidance from trained sta in a barrier-free physical environment. The student support unit wants to expand its work to include study techniques, stress management and emotional intelligence.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 3 114 (2005) Full-time equivalents: Not available Location: Northern region of KwaZulu-Natal. Campuses: Vryheid (Vryheid area), Emandleni (Ulundi area), Maputa (Kwangwanase area), Nongoma and KwaGqikazi (Nongoma area), Babanango (Babanango area), St Augustine Centre (Nqutu rural area). Critical Skills: The region is dependent on transport so the college focuses on Mechanical Engineering (automotive repairs and maintenance). Another critical skills area in which it is active is Agriculture. Key Strengths: Training in Agriculture, Tourism, Forestry and support to SMMEs.

There has never been a more important and promising era in the lives of our people than now. It is now that all of us must ensure that, through the programmes we oer, we better the lives of all

(CEO Phakama Langa)

Strategic Partnerships

he college has, or is planning, partnerships in the areas of tourism, agriculture, coal mining and SMMEs. Partnerships are planned with municipalities and local communities. Because of the region the college serves, its partnerships will involve mostly communities in rural and deep rural areas. The college is currently in the process of rethinking with whom and where to form partnerships. Tourism: Successful examples of community tourism initiatives in Zululand are limited and guidelines need to be developed for the involvement of communities in tourism developments. The colleges strategic partnerships regarding tourism involve KwaZulu-Natal Tourism and Ezemvelo KwaZulu Natal Wildlife. Agriculture: The agricultural sector in the area has signicant potential for growth in terms of the development of the secondary processing of the products being produced. There is also potential for an Agricultural Support Programme. Strategic partnerships are planned in this eld with the support of emerging farmers, farmers associations, the Provincial Departments of Agriculture and Land Aairs, corporate agricultural businesses, and agribusiness organisations. Mining: Historically, coal mining provided a major impetus to the economy of northern KwaZuluNatal. However, over the past 15 years, a number of mines in the area ceased operation.

However, considerable opportunity exists for small-scale mining and there is a strong mining skills base in all communities. Strategic mining partnerships are planned with existing small-scale miners. Forestry: Since the decline of the mining industry, forestry has played an increasing role in the local economy. Ongoing and planned strategic partnerships involve Mondi, Sappi and the Department of Water Aairs and Forestry. Business Skills: There is a need to establish initiatives focusing on business-related capacity-building, training and support, for instance, skills to prepare the youth for entering the job market and to develop entrepreneurship skills. Strategic partnerships that have been planned in this focus area involve four district municipalities: Zululand, Umkhanyakude, Umzinyathi and Uthungulu.

Among the population of 1,4 million people in the area, less than half - only 45% of the economically active are employed. A total of 7% of the people have Grade 4 as their highest level of education and 36% had no formal schooling.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Oce Administration Tourism Primary Agriculture Hospitality Engineering and Related Design Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Campus KwaGqikazi KwaGqikazi and Vryheid Vryheid Emandleni Emandleni Nongoma and Vryheid Nongoma Nongoma and Vryheid

Contact Details
Telephone: (034) 980-1010 Fax: (034) 980-1012 Postal address: Private Bag X9424, Vryheid 3100 E-mail: mthashana@telkomsa.net

www.kzneducation.gov.za/fet/mthashana

50 colleges, 1 goal

103

Thekwini
Opening doors to your future

FET College

Our Story
The college has adopted the name of the eThekwini municipality (Durban). eThekwini was the name used by the Zulu people who resided in this area before the arrival of the rst white settlers. The campuses are Springeld, Cato Manor, Centec, Melbourne, Umbilo and Asherville. Asherville also houses the Central Administration oces. The skills development needs of the greater eThekwini region, which the college is responding to, are in areas such as small, medium and large business enterprises, Electrical Engineering (light and heavy), Business Studies, Hospitality as well as Art and Design. The upcoming 2010 World Cup and the opportunities that it promises will be increasingly a focus of the college.

n 2001, Cato Manor Technical College, Durban Central Technical College and LC Johnson Technical College merged to form Thekwini FET College. In May 2003, the rst Rector of Thekwini College, Brian Raimoodein Cadir, was appointed. One of his rst priorities was to realign the college to a strategic plan. What emerged was a vision to be a centre of excellence for the provision of FET programmes and a mission to provide clientele with accredited and responsive programmes, to optimally utilise resources and to provide a high-quality service for the best education and training in KwaZulu-Natal. Strategic goals include providing clients with highquality accredited further education and training programmes from NQF Level 2 to Level 5; and to transform the college into a self-reliant, eective and vibrant centre of community life.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 9 276 Full-time equivalents: 4 917 (weighted) Location: KwaZulu-Natal. Campuses: Asherville, Centec, Cato Manor, Melbourne, Springeld and Umbilo in the greater Durban area, known as the eThekwini Municipality. Critical Skills: Business Studies, Engineering, Hospitality, Utility Studies and the provisioning of training to learners with special education needs in the areas of Engineering and Business. The college has developed distance education capacity and has a Matric School. Initially, the Matric School focused on learners who failed and wanted to improve their matriculation status. Later, it became an opportunity for students who wanted to work and study at the same time. Key Strengths: Highly qualied sta; the colleges urban location is an advantage; it has a strong relationship with industry. Its Human Resources and Development department keeps abreast of new developments and changes.

Student Support Services


The college has not established formal student support units on campuses. However, full-time lecturers double up as student liaison ocers. Support services include: Sign-language facilitators for deaf learners; Job placement for all students, including those with special needs, Pace career counselling as well as general career counselling and an ongoing HIV/Aids campaign and information-sharing sessions. Extra tuition if necessary. A skills unit with faciliators who have regular contact with students. The skills unit communicates student support issues to industry and, together, they nd solutions. The colleges Simulated Enterprise is an example of student support in terms of workplace training issues. A need was identied, funding was acquired and the enterprise was set up. Students participating in co-operative learning were oered transport. Since 2004, Thekwini College has oered a two-year Special Needs Inclusive Programme (SNIP). Students are placed in various companies to obtain practical experience in industry. Feedback concerning the performance of student trainees has been positive and heartening. This also helps companies, since employers need to meet the Employment Equity Acts requirements to employ people with disabilities. Eight SNIP learners have found permanent employment.

Thekwini FET College is aiming to be a centre of excellence in KZN


(CEO Brian Cadir)

Strategic Partnerships

harks Academy: The college has a partnership with the Sharks Academy, an extension of the Natal Rugby Board, whereby learners are trained to become Sport Administrators. Approximately 60 learners were registered for the National Marketing Diploma at the Centec campus and practicals are done on-site at the Natal Rugby Stadium. Swimming: The Asherville campus has formed a partnership with Otto Swimming Club where swimming classes are conducted on Saturdays in the Olympic-sized pool. Natal Early Learning Resource Unit (NELRU): The Springeld campus oers fundamental skills programmes on NQF Level 4 in Early Childhood Development (ECD). This is a partnership between the college and NELRU, an informal ECD provider. The college undertook the training in the fundamentals, Mathematics, Literacy and Communication. Schools: The college has loose partnerships with special schools, psychological and guidance services and independent psychologists in the Durban area. There is also a partnership with psychological services in the Pinetown area. Psychological guidance services assist with referrals. Skills Training: The college has a skills unit that focuses on National Department of Labour programmes and learnerships. It is located at the Engineering Training Centre on the Cato Manor campus. Programmes are oered full-time (learnerships) and part-time (skills programmes and short

courses). The programmes are all NQF-aligned and funded by SETAs, the Department of Labour and by industry. The KZN Development Foundation, a Black Economic Empowerment training provider accredited with the Wholesale and Retail SETA, delivered NQF Level 2 learnership programmes for 35 students in the Tongaat and Verulam area under the auspices of the Thekwini College Skills Centre. The security company ADT has also allocated students to the Thekwini Skills Centre since 2004. Other FET colleges in the province are also in partnership with the skills centre for the delivery of learnerships in certain areas. SMMEs: The college works with 85 small and medium enterprises from the greater Durban area. Maritime Programmes: Thekwini College has recently entered into a partnership with Durban University of Technology with regard to maritime programmes. Job Placement: A partnership with TEKmation and Endress & Hauser is in the process of being signed. The TEKmation Training Institute oers community-based as well as industrial skills training and development, while Endress & Hauser is a leading supplier of measuring instruments and automation solutions for the industrial process engineering industry. N6 students from Thekwini College will benet with up to R10 000 if they are top of their class. Two top learners will also get the opportunity to work for the company.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Oce Administration Marketing Finance, Economics and Accounting IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure Construction Campus Umbilo Centec Springeld Centec Asherville Springeld

Contact Details
Telephone: (031) 250-8400 Fax: (031) 250-8414 Postal address: Private Bag X06, Dormerton 4015 E-mail: info@thekwinicollege.co.za

www.thekwinicollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

105

Umfolozi

FET College

Stand out from the crowd with Umfolozi College

Our Story
With these campuses and centres, the college serves a population of 762 792 in the Uthungulu District Municipality. Some 80% of the region is rural; there are limited job opportunities, contributing to an unemployment rate of 50%. The college oers national diploma and certicate programmes for the prospective employees of the large industries in the area. Extensive skills training, learnerships and co-operative programmes are aimed at the rural communities to help them nd employment or start their own businesses. Umfolozi College aims to form the heart of education and training in the region, bringing nourishment to hungry minds and, thus, sustainability to poverty-stricken communities. This is reected by its name. Umfolozi refers to the White Umfolozi and the Black Umfolozi rivers which form the heart of the water base in Zululand.

he Umfolozi College for FET was formed in 2002 following a merger between the Richtek Technical College, Mandeni College and the former Eshowe Teachers College of Education as well as several skills centres. In 2005, the former Esikhawini Teachers College (in Esikhawini, on the outskirts of Empangeni and Richards Bay) was incorporated into the college. At present, Umfolozi has eight skills centres complementing its four main campuses, which are Richtek in Richards Bay; Mandeni near Stanger and Eshowe and Esikhawini near Empangeni. The skills centres are Sundumbili in Mandeni; Albert Luthuli in Groutville (Stanger); Isithebe Computer Centre in Isithebe (Mandeni); Jininindomnyama in Eshowe; Nseleni in Nseleni (between Empangeni and Richards Bay); Thubelihle in Esikhawini; Sikhanyisele in Ntambanana, north of Richards Bay, and the Umfolozi Training Unit at the Zululand Chamber of Business Foundation Community Park (ZCBF) in the Richards Bay CBD.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 10 977 (including learnerships) Full-time equivalents: 4 988 (weighted) Location: KwaZulu-Natal. Campuses: Richards Bay, Stanger, Eshowe and Esikhawini. Critical Skills: In relation to critical skills as identied by the governments Joint Initiative on Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA), the college is meeting national needs through developing artisan and technical skills as well as skills in the following areas: ICT, engineering and planning, management, mathematics, science and language skills. Key Strengths: Strong partnerships, sound academic record as Umfolozi was named the number one college in terms of its Department of Education (NATED) Programmes examination statistics in KwaZulu-Natal for two consecutive years (2004 and 2005). In addition, the college provides education and training in urban and rural locations and has strong co-operative programmes, which include the training and mentoring of entrepreneurs, yielding many successfull businesess. Umfolozi College also oers most of its courses using distance education as delivery mode.

Student Support Services


An assistant manager oversees activities on all campuses. Each campus also has a student liaison ocer (SLO). A registered counsellor follows up on cases falling outside the scope of competence of the SLO. Services include: Student Support Centres: Students can obtain counselling on anything from subject choice to personal problems such as substance abuse. Internet Cafs (Resource Centre): Access to the internet is available at a nominal fee. Study centres: A place to study when students are not in class; many do not have study space at home. Career Pathing: The college uses various programmes and employs a registered counsellor specialising in career counselling. Youth Advisory Centre: Established by the Umsobomvu Youth Fund at the Eshowe Campus. It provides student support and life skills to the youth of the Eshowe area. Student Representative Council: SRC Ofces have been developed at each of the campuses. Zululand Career Centre: Students make use of its career guidance and other services, while the leadership adventure course is used for both leadership training and teambuilding.

Umfolozi College provides quality education and training in urban and rural settings across Zululand and engages extensively in partnerships to full its FET mandate: playing a catalytic role in the economic empowerment of its communities

(CEO Piet van Schalkwyk)

Strategic Partnerships

mfolozi College has always enjoyed extensive partnerships with industry in its region. These relationships have frequently allowed for the upgrading or even provisioning of new facilities. In 2005: Facilities: Selrod Welding Centre and RBCT (Richards Bay Coal Terminal) joined forces to assist in the refurbishment of the Welding Centre at Umfolozis Nseleni Skills Campus. In addition, Selrod Welding Centre assisted with the upgrade of the welding centre at Sundumbili. Learnerships: Powertrans, an engineering company in Isithebe that does repairs on heavy equipment such as earthmoving equipment, employed 50 NQF Level 1 manufacturing learnerships who successfully completed their studies. The latter project enjoyed an exceptional 92% retention and success rate and most of the learners went on to an NQF Level 2 learnership with the college and its project partners. In 2006: Training: Sappi continues to provide the facilities from which the Mandeni campus operates and negotiations are under way with Sappi to possibly relocate its training unit to this campus. In response to the engineering training needs of local industry, the college is driving a project to establish a technical training centre in Richards Bay. Partners in the project include Richards Bay Minerals, Richards Bay Coal Terminal, BHP Billiton Aluminium, Mondi Business Paper, and Bell Equipment. The aim is that the centre will become the pre-

ferred service provider of engineering training to the employees of local industry. The Zululand Career Centre, formerly a project of the ZCBF, was established in the mid-1990s to provide career counselling services to under-resourced schools of Zululand. With the support of local industries, the centre has grown so that 25 000 scholars now visit it annually. In 2006, Umfolozi College took over the management of the centre. It includes interactive exhibits that encourage scholars to explore potential careers in a hands-on way. Career assessments and counselling take place with the use of various workshops and specically developed programmes. One of the most popular workshops, the centres Grade 9 subject choice workshops, provides a perfect opportunity for the college to present the National Department of Educations new National Certicate (Vocational) programmes to scholars. Talks are in progress with the City of uMhlathuze (municipality) to develop a sports complex in Esikhawini by renovating existing facilities at the campus that include an Olympic-size swimming pool, a diving pool, squash courts and indoor basketball facilities.

With these campuses and centres, the college serves a population of 762 792 in the Uthungulu District Municipality. Some 80% of the region is rural; there are limited job opportunities, contributing to an unemployment rate of 50%.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Finance, Economics and Accounting Hospitality IT and Computer Science Oce Administration Campus Richtek Esikhawini, Eshowe and Richtek as well as the Sundumbili Skills Centre; Esikhawini and Richtek Eshowe and Richtek Richtek Eshowe, Mandeni and Richtek

Contact Details
Telephone: (035) 902-9501 Fax: (035) 789-2585 Postal address: Private Bag X5023, Richards Bay 3900 E-mail: rector@richtek.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

107

Umgungundlovu
FET College

College of choice

mgungundlovu FET College is located in the Pietermaritzburg/ Midlands area of KwaZulu-Natal. It has ve well-established campuses that have specialised to meet the needs of the students it attracts from Pietermaritzburg. Each campus has its own rich history, with the oldest one, Msunduzi campus, dating back to 1902. The colleges home base, Pietermaritzburg, has the proud distinction of being the most well-preserved Victorian-era city in the world. In acknowledgement of this, the college has chosen one of the citys old buildings in which to house its central oce. The campuses, all of them in Pietermaritzburg, are Edendale, the centre of excellence for the Construction and Building programmes; Midlands, which oers the Engineering theory classes as well as the part-time programmes; Msunduzi for Business Studies and which is located in the city centre; Northdale which specialises in Electrical

Our Story
programmes for engineering learners and Financial programmes; and Plessislaer which oers Mechanical Engineering and Human Resource Management programmes. The college has opened two satellite campuses: in Richmond and Msinga where Business Studies and Engineering Studies are oered. The college is also expanding its reach to Howick, Bulwer and Greytown in the Midlands. Through its campuses and satellite sites, the college serves a geographical region that extends into Greytown in the east, Mooiriver in the north, Camperdown in the south and Bulwer in the west. This emphasises two critical aspects of the college, namely, its vast rural geographical client base and the fact that all campuses are located in urban areas. In these areas there are extreme contrasts between auence and poverty, unemployment and high-skills industries, sophisticated urban and deep rural communities.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 13 946 (for 2005) Full-time equivalents: 21 798 Location: KwaZulu-Natal. Campuses: Pietermaritzburg (ve) and two satellite campuses in Richmond and Msinga. Critical Skills: Entrepreneurial skills and skills for Civil Engineering, which include Bricklaying, Plumbing, Welding and Carpentry. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering are also provided. Key Strengths: Highly qualied sta, upto-date training facilities such as workshops and laboratories, links with industry and the colleges central location.

Student Support Services


Student Representative Council: SRC members are elected in February each year and immediately begin to plan their rst social activities, which include a Valentines Ball. The SRC is sent on a leadership camp where executive members are elected after attending a budgeting workshop. SRC members attend two South African Council of Students Association conferences to discuss SRC issues on a national level. Sport: An inter-campus sports day is held each year with a variety of sports played, such as soccer, table tennis, volleyball, netball and pool. Entrepreneurship: During Entrepreneurship Month, students are motivated by obtaining start-up capital of R1 000 to set up small businesses. Financial Aid: The College Bursary Scheme oers nancial assistance. Workplace Support: Students are placed in various companies for in-service training and job placements. Student Support: Student liaison ocers are based on each campus to help with academic, career, health and wellness requirements. Academic Support: Poetry and reading clubs have been established at Msunduzi campus aimed at improving literacy levels. These clubs also promote creative writing.

Each campus has its own rich history, with the oldest one, Msunduzi campus, dating back to 1902. The colleges home base, Pietermaritzburg, has the proud distinction of being the most well-preserved Victorian-era city in the world. In acknowledgement of this, the college has chosen one of the citys old buildings in which to house its central oce.

The Umgungundlovu FET College is a world-class organisation with each of its seven campuses serving a dierent niche market as well as the needs of the community

(CEO Sipho Khuzwayo)

Strategic Partnerships

ommunities: The college developed infrastructure for a computer centre at Shayabantu High School in Sweetwaters. This required the facilitators and their students to be involved in planning, measuring, quoting and executing necessary tasks to build the centre. Further, practical skills such as welding, carpentry, and electrication were also applied to give the college students the opportunity to apply their knowledge. The Dambusa Community Project involved students attending a workshop in Basic Pottery, after which nine were identied to develop their skills in this eld. Government Departments: The Pottery and Ceramics division makes seven products according to orders placed. A number of orders have been received from the KwaZulu-Natal Departments of Health and Education which include 750 gift bowls ordered by the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Health. In 2006, the college signed a contract with Gijima KZN, the Provincial Department of Economic Affairs. This contract formalised the awarding of European Union funds to the college to develop a business plan for the development of a construction centre of excellence and SMME incubator at Edendale campus. The Engineering division started a partnership with the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Education to train students in Bricklaying, Plumbing and Carpentry. These students will be part of the departments

water and sanitation project, which provides these services to rural schools. Tourism: The college signed an agreement whereby it will oer tour guiding in conjunction with the Msunduzi Tourism Association in the Pietermaritzburg region. Construction: Pietermaritzburg is experiencing an upsurge in the construction industry due mainly to its capital city status and the relocation of government departments to the city. This, coupled with its commitment to the development of historically disadvantaged areas of the city, led to a decision to create a construction centre of excellence. This centre will be a manifestation of the colleges commitment to the provision of sustainable education and training to historically disadvantaged communities. The Edendale campus is earmarked for this project which will unfold within the context of a partnership between government (Department of Education), business (Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Business) and the Msunduzi Municipality (Greater Edendale Development Initiative). Municipalities: The college has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Msunduzi Municipality to provide training as well as the placement of learners. International: Umgungundlovu has had a wellestablished partnership with the Bronx Community College (BCC) from New York in the United States for the past 10 years. One of the main aims of this partnership is to assist the college in coping with students problems in Communication and Mathematics.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Marketing IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure Construction Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering and Related Design Oce Administration Hospitality Tourism Management Finance, Accounting & Economics Campus Mzunduzi Midlands Northdale Edendale Pleassislaer Msunduzi Northdale Msunduzi Plessislaer Northdale

Contact Details

www.ufetcollege.co.za

Telephone: (033) 341-2100 Fax: (033) 345-9827 Postal address: 47 Prince Alfred Street, Pietermaritzburg 3200 E-mail: info@ufetcollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

109

Capricorn
FET College

Achieving Excellence Together

Our Story
trade. For instance, the college is participating in the College Industry Partnership which, among other things, is involved in the development of responsive mining programmes. Rapid growth in the Blouberg Municipality, where the Senwabarwana campus is situated, has created the ideal environment to introduce business programmes. Thanks to its well-established links with the many lodges, hotels, industries, parastatals, government departments and businesses in Polokwane, where students can participate in experiential training, the college is set to make an impact on the region. The governments recapitalisation programme will be used to develop the colleges existing infrastructure, in particular, electrical, welding, vehicle servicing, tting and machining workshops as well as science and computer laboratories. This is part of the colleges preparation for an expected growth in student numbers from the region as well as from the neighbouring states.

apricorn College for FET derived its name from the geographical line the Tropic of Capricorn which cuts across Limpopo, South Africas northernmost province. Two of the colleges three campuses the Polokwane and Seshego campuses -- are located in Polokwane (formerly Pietersburg), capital city of Limpopo, and in the Capricorn District Municipality, one of six local governments in the province. The college has a third campus, Senwabarwana, in the Blouberg Municipality, which has jurisdiction over the towns of Mogwadi (formerly Dendron), Morebeng (formerly Soekmekaar), Alldays and Senwabarwana (formerly Bochum). Capricorn college was created after a merger of the former Pietersburg Technical College (built for whites in the heyday of apartheid), the former Bochum College of Education, a state institution built to train black teachers, and the former Northern Province Community College, created after an earlier merger between Tseke Maboe and Shikoane Matlala technical colleges. Situated in a fast growing economic area where there is a shortage of skills, Capricorn College has positioned itself to oer programmes in line with the main industries and economic activities in the region, notably mining, tourism, construction and

Student Support Services


Capricorn College established a student support service in 2002 with a mandate to develop academic support programmes, tracking and tracing services, and relationships with Alumni. Services include: Financial Aid Student Support Services: Helps students with information about bursaries, scholarships and loans by making available the national Bursary Register. The college oers merit bursaries to registered students, obtained with the assistance of the student support services unit. Student Counselling: The student support services unit oers free counselling and guides students with emotional and personal problems as well as study diculties. Extreme cases are referred to relevant specialised institutions. An Aids counsellor is available. Academic Guidance: Students are helped with vocational guidance, subject choices and study programmes. Trained sta help individuals or groups to improve their marks. Peer Learning Programme: Supervised peer learning opportunities are available. When necessary, extra tuition is arranged. Supplementary Instructional Programme: A programme is available in high-risk subjects such as Fitting and Turning, Welding and Electrical in which trained students from a higher level facilitate interactive learning sessions. Employment Bureau: An Employment Bureau assists students to nd work. It also helps students prepare CVs, and with job hunting and interview techniques. The unit keeps a database of students CVs for companies to access.

Fast Facts
Number of Students: Headcount: 5 500 Full-time equivalents: 3 568 Location: Limpopo Campuses: Polokwane (two), Senwabarwana. Critical Skills: The college oers skills that match the needs of the main industries and activities in the area in which it is located, including mining, tourism, construction and trade. Key Strengths: The college has strong partnerships with organisations such as the Peoples Information and Communication Technology Engineering Academy (PICTEA), a private institution set up to educate and train high-calibre engineers in the eld of information and communication technology (ICT). In addition, its partnership with the Mining Quality Authority (MQA) has supported sta in developing learning materials and has yielded engineering bursaries for students. The location of Capricorns Seshego and Polokwane campuses in Polokwane is another strength, making it easily accessible to students from the region and neighbouring states as well as for industry partners.

If all college stakeholders pull their resources together through dedication, sacrice and perseverance, we will be able to achieve excellence together in what we do
(CEO K.R. Madzhie)

Strategic Partnerships

he college has partnerships with, among others, the Umsobomvu Youth Fund, the Mpumalanga Training Trust, the Department of Labour, the Mining Quality Authority (MQA), the Pelindaba Skills Institute and PICTEA, a private, non-prot institution that provides training in the ICT eld. Mpumalanga Training Trust: The trust proposed a partnership with Capricorn College for FET after it won a tender to train 76 women in construction. To train the students, the trust needed workshops that the college could provide easily. The partnership was later extended to train an additional 110 students in Plumbing and Bricklaying. This was part of a learnership funded by the Department of Public Works. SABMiller: The college has entered into a partnership with SABMiller in Polokwane to train learners in packaging. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The fund has supported the college in training 62 students in Boilermaking. Mining Quality Authority and Pelindaba Skills Institute: The college has approached the Mining Quality Authority for help in developing programmes on mining and the Pelindaba Skills Institute, a nationally recognised training facility for technical and engineering skills, to assist in the training of academic sta. The college also participates in the Mining Forum, which enables it to respond to training needs in the sector. PICTEA: The college was approached by PICTEA to introduce an ICT Engineering Programme.

Students with a Grade 9 certicate will be able to enrol for a three-year introductory course that will introduce them to the world of ICT Engineering. The course entails practical work to lay a rm foundation. Partnership Unit: The college has also established a department that will focus on establishing partnerships. Some of the priority areas include: Establishing partnerships with industries for the new National Department of Education programmes to be introduced from 2007. This is to secure placements for students, funding and the training of facilitators; Establishing partnerships with organised community structures youth and women organisations, specically to disseminate information about the college and its work to the community; Partnering with dierent government departments to play a role in reducing scarce skills; and Establishing links with recruitment companies to determine what the labour market wants from graduates. International Partnerships: The college is establishing international partnerships. It has started talks with institutions in Australia and the United Kingdom to build links aimed at: Exchange programmes for students and sta members; Funding from external donors; Support with quality assurance; Sharing of best practices; and Advice on curriculum development.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Management Finance, Economics and Accounting Tourism Oce Administration Hospitality Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Marketing Oce Administration

Contact Details
Telephone: (015) 297-8367/297-8389 Fax: (015) 297-5448 Postal address: Private Bag X9674, Polokwane 0700

www.capricorncollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

111

Lephalale
FET College

Get in gear for your career

ephalale FET College is located in the town of Lephalale, formerly known as Ellisras, a peri-urban area in the western or bushveld region of Limpopo. The closest large town is the provincial capital, Polokwane (formerly Pietersburg), some 275km away and the next FET college campus is some 180km away in the town of Mokopane (formerly known as Potgietersrus). This makes Lephalale College an important resource in the western region of Limpopo. The college was established in 1979 with the joint funding of Iscor and the then Department of Education and Culture. It is a standalone college, but to increase its reach it has established satellite campuses in the areas of Modimolle, Amandelbult/Northam, Thabazimi and Libertas in the Witpoort/Seleka district. The college is surrounded by game farms and

Our Story
nature reserves, making tourism and gaming key industries in the area. In the beginning of 2002 the college undertook research into the need for employees for these industries. It was found that they were fast-growing sectors. This led to the establishment of the colleges Skills Training Centre. Its main objective is to provide training for working in the ecotourism and hunting industries and to provide the unemployed with an opportunity to obtain qualications and jobs. The college also oers Open Learning opportunities in Business Studies, Educare and Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET). The college has a student support centre where learners can study, take out reading material, use the computer, fax and copy facilities and consult a clinic sister and social worker. This facility won the 2003 Ministerial Award as the Best Student Support provided by a FET college.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 836 Full-time equivalents: 913 Location: Western Limpopo Campuses: Lephalale with satellites in: Amandelbult/Northam, Modimolle, Thabazimbi and Libertas in the Witpoort/Seleka area. Critical Skills: Business Studies and Engineering, short courses in basic computer literacy and the skills needed to run a game farm successfully. The college also oers courses in key areas such as accommodation services, Educare and ABET. Key Strengths: Positive atmosphere within the college; ecient management; strong co-operation between the council, management and sta; good results; good infrastructure and facilities; good co-operation with industry and the community, nancially strong; well-qualied sta; a proper support system for sta; appropriate placement in learning areas; aordable class fees; focus on the needs of the community; student motivation and a bursary system. The college has a sound reputation and community, sta and students are proud of it.

Student Support Services


The college was the winner of the 2003 Ministerial Award for the Best Student Support provided by a FET college. The services oered by Lephalale FET College cover the areas of academic, nancial, personal and leadership support as well as work placement. The aim of student support services is to enable students to: Develop their potential; Function optimally in every aspect of student life; Enjoy a safe, orderly education environment; and Obtain a personal vision of the future. One of the special initiatives at Lephalale is called tracking. This is a system to track students once they have completed their studies. Its aim is to establish: What students are doing; what kinds of jobs they are doing if they are working; and whether they are doing jobs related to what they were trained for. Feedback from students helps the institution to review its curriculum and to inform the design of new programmes and courses.

The college is surrounded by game farms and nature reserves, making tourism and gaming key industries in the area. In the beginning of 2002 the college undertook research into the need for employees for these industries. It was found that they were fast-growing sectors.

We prepare students with skills that are relevant to industry. We give them the opportunity to be the entrepreneurs of tomorrow. We strive to improve the growth of our country as well as to uplift our community

(CEO Johann Raath)

Strategic Partnerships

ndustry: The Grovos Training Centre provides facilities for students to witness demonstrations of equipment that they use in their dierent trades. The college pays the centre for these facilities. Government Departments: The Limpopo Department of Welfare provides a welfare worker to attend to the needs of students, while the college provides training to sta members when necessary. Tourism: Lephalale provides students, facilities and lectures to undergo Recognition of Prior Learning assessment in Tour Guiding. The Drumbeat Academy provides assessors, moderators, training material and programme approval from the Tourism and Hospitality SETA. Students fees are divided between Drumbeat and the college. SETAs: The Integrated Nature-Based Tourism and Conservation (INTAC) Management Project is a three-and-a-half year project to train 6 500 people from communities close to nature-based tourism areas. The training has been focused on unemployed people, new small and medium enterprises in the tourism industry, community leadership and public management authorities involved at the project site. The training has focused on areas such as tourist guiding, customer service, small accommodation management, front-of-house service, reception, food preparation and cooking and conservation management. The college has been providing the facilities and lecturers and Waterberg consortium was the service provider. The Department of Labour has been funding INTAC through the National Skills Fund

and the Tourism and Hospitality SETA provided accreditation and quality management. The pilot phase of the project, completed in 2003, was implemented at 10 sites in seven provinces. They were the Kgalagadi Trans-Frontier Conservation Area in the Northern Cape, the Greater Addo Elephant National Park in the Eastern Cape; River Rafters in the Eastern Cape and Thunga-Thunga Tourism Route, also in the Eastern Cape. Mining: The Amandelbult mine sends students to the college for training and makes facilities available for training. In turn, the college provides lecturers. Municipality: Many institutions and companies have joined hands with the Lephalale Municipality in the ght against HIV/Aids. The college is part of this forum. When an event is hosted by the college, the forum will arrange speakers or a drama on the topic of HIV/Aids. A facilitator provides a workshop to students during their rst trimester/semester at this college. A clinic sister from the municipality also visits the college once a week to attend to the sick.

The Integrated Nature-Based Tourism and Conservation (INTAC) Management Project is a three-and-a-half year project to train 6 500 people from communities close to nature-based tourism areas. The training has been focused on unemployed people, new small and medium enterprises in the tourism industry, community leadership and public management authorities involved at the project site.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Management Finance, Economics and Accounting Tourism Oce Administration Hospitality Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering & Related Design

Contact Details

www.ellisrascollege.co.za

Telephone: (014) 763-2252/ 763-2254 Fax: (014) 763-2253 Postal address: Private Bag X210, Lephalale 0555 E-mail: raath@z.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

113

Letaba
Knowledge is life

FET College

etaba FET College was ocially established in 2002 following the merger between the former Giyani Technical College, Maake Technical College, Modjadji Community College and Tzaneen Technical College. Initially, the college was called Mopani East FET College, but in 2004 the name changed to Letaba FET College, reecting the geographical location of the institution. The name Letaba originates from the African word lehlaba, which means sandy river. The main sources of water of the Letaba River are found in the drainage of the mountain escarpment above Tzaneen where it forms the Great Letaba River near the areas of Tzaneen and Maake and in the towns of Lenyenye, Burgersdorp and Nkowa-Nkowa. Situated in the lowveld region, the college services the broader, northeastern part of Limpopo, South Africa. It has four campuses spread across the region and

Our Story
the areas of Duiwelskloof, Ga-Kgapane, Giyani, Haenertsburg, Letsitele, Shingwedzi and Tzaneen. The college sees one of its biggest challenges as the placement of students with relevant business employers or to support them in becoming entrepreneurs. Letaba FET College is also cognisant that it is operating within an environment characterised by the needs of local businesses, industry and communities therefore, our curriculum development is focused not only on local economic development growth targets but also on the broader context to meet provincial and national economic and social targets. The skills needs of the country, the unemployment rate and illiteracy levels have prompted us also to make access a key priority. Consequently, the college has opened access to a variety of students: unemployed youth, youth at risk, adults, employed people who need up-skilling or reskilling and the disabled.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 411 Full-time equivalents: 1 446 Location: Limpopo Campuses: Giyani, Lenyenye, Ga-Kgapane near Modjadjiskloof and Tzaneen. Critical Skills: Mechanical, Electrical and Civil Engineering skills and National Certicate courses; Business Studies such as Management Assistant, Business Management and Personnel Management courses as well as Utility Studies courses: Hospitality and Catering, Agriculture and Tourism. Key Strengths: Electrical Infrastructure Construction, Automotive Repair, Finance, Economics and Accounting. Letabas students are sought after in the areas of Business Studies and Electrical Infrastructure Construction.

Student Support Services


The college has a student liaison ocer based at its central oce in Tzaneen and a student support services ocer in each of our four campuses. Service includes induction; free learning materials and a Student Representative Council that organises sport, cultural and social activities. In addition, the college oers: Financial Aid: The college has a bursary discount scheme for students enrolled in full-time recognised courses. The scheme is based on students national results on a percentage scale. For instance, a student who passes all subjects with a sub-minimum of 40% in a recognised full-time course with an average of between 60% and 69% qualies for a discount in class fees to the value of 25%. Workplace Support: Students are recommended and placed with employers when the college is contacted about positions. Experiential Learning: Letaba FET College provides experiential learning opportunities within the college, which employs students for administrative duties for up to 18 months. Since June 2005, the college has had six trainees placed.

At our college youll have every opportunity to succeed as an individual and as part of a team. We are on track, we are creating value, and we still have much more to oer

(CEO Martie Botha)

Strategic Partnerships

overnment Departments: The college has a partnership contract with the Limpopo Department of Trade and Investment which is committed to nance deserving students. Thus far, it has contributed R20 000 and has pledged more for the coming years. Tourism: The Limpopo Tourism Parks Board is committed to assist students who are studying Tourism and Hospitality by providing placement opportunities for students; they will also award bursaries to deserving students. Community Support: A partnership between the Limpopo Department of Transport, the local municipality and the college has been set up for a mini town trac centre. A fourth partner, Rotary International, is currently also involved in supporting the college with cycles. The main purpose of this partnership is to promote road safety to especially younger children in the villages in and around the Maake campus. Automotive: The college is working on a partnership with Toyota SA. The college will train students in the Engineering-Related Design Automotive Repair workshop to train students to service Toyota vehicles at the Giyani campus. We are also negotiating with Toyota SA to enter into a formal partnership with the Maake campus to train students to service Toyota vehicles. Agriculture: The college is investigating the possibility of goat farming partnerships with local farmers with the assistance of unemployed women, the Greater Tzaneen Municipality, the Shoprite/Check-

ers group, the European Union (EU) and the South African Goat Farmers Association. This project aims to have a sustainable and established market for goat farming and to promote economic growth, eradicate poverty and provide employment in rural areas in particular. Municipalities and Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The college has a joint partnership with the Greater Tzaneen Municipality and the Umsobomvu Youth Fund for the training of at least 100 unemployed youth between the ages of 18 and 35 resident within the Greater Tzaneen Municipality in Building Construction. The participants will be registered for the NQF Level 2 qualications with 60 participants enrolled for the National Home Builder qualication and the remaining 40 enrolled for the National Certicate in Construction Contracting. Gardening: We are in the process of developing a community-based project to train employed gardeners and unemployed community members with the assistance of a professional landscaper to provide them with the necessary skills to become certied gardeners.

Rotary International is currently involved in supporting the college... The main purpose of this partnership is to promote road safety to especially younger children in the villages in and around the Maake campus.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Management Electrical Infrastructure Construction Finance, Economics and Accounting Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering & Related Design Oce Administration Campus Giyani Giyani and Maake Tzaneen Maake Giyani and Maake Giyani and Tzaneen

Contact Details
Telephone: (015) 307-5440/ 307-3955 Fax: (015) 307-2204 Postal address: Private Bag X4017, Tzaneen 0850 E-mail: centraloce@letabafet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

115

Mopani South East


Excellence is always our choice!

FET College

Our Story
Pele Service Excellence Award in 2004 in recognition of quality service, systems in monitoring, customer feedback methods and consultation. With its R50 000 prize, the college invested in sta development. This achievement illustrates that Mopani South East FET College is providing high-quality education and training, producing skilled and knowledgeable individuals, equipped to operate within the acceptable norms of society. It expresses the colleges values of ubuntu, excellence, integrity, unity, discipline, competence, commitment and passion. The college named itself after the evergreen mopani (Colophospermum mopane) tree, indigenous to the area. The ability of the tree to survive seasonal changes symbolises the colleges goal of keeping abreast of knowledge in the areas that it teaches, thus remaining evergreen -- mohlakamotala.

opani South East FET College was founded after Phalaborwa Technical College, Mapulaneng Technical College and Sir Val Duncan Technical college merged in 2002. The college is in the southeastern part of the Mopani (greater Phalaborwa, Tzaneen, Letaba, Giyani) and Bohlabela districts (Acornhoek, Bushbuckridge, Hoedspruit) in Limpopo province. It comprises three campuses and a hotel school. The Sir Val Duncan campus is in Namakgale near Phalaborwa, the Mapulaneng campus is in Acornhoek and the Phalaborwa campus and the Mosate Hotel School are in Phalaborwa. The college oers a variety of programmes and skills and learnership programmes in partnerships with SETAs to contribute to the governments AsgiSA and JIPSA. In this way, the college aims to ll the economic demands of society and communities. This quality of service earned the college a Batho

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 547 Full-time equivalents: 1 164 Location: Limpopo Campuses: Phalaborwa (two), Namakgale and Acornhoek. Critical Skills: The Engineering programmes oered by the institution help to supply the critical skills required by the mining and construction sectors. The colleges location in an area regarded as a tourism attraction conrms the relevancy of the skills it oers in professional cookery, hospitality and tourism. It has been providing nancial institutions, banks in particular, with skilled business studies students. Key Strengths: Skilled personnel, wellequipped facilities, including workshops, student support services and strong partnerships with surrounding industries.

Student Support Services


The college oers a range of services to support students in their endeavours to be successful in their studies and in life. These include: Career Guidance: The college helps with career guidance, provides advice on the labour market, distributes career information, helps with job searches and with the development of CVs, and oers support with job applications and preparations for interviews. Academic Support: This comes in the form of induction, orientation, support with the preparation for examinations, the clarication of regulations for examinations and classrooms skills such as improved concentration, note-taking, summarising, better memory, research and the writing of reports. Psychological and Spiritual Services: These are aimed at providing students with skills to cope with emotional and personal barriers that might prevent them from successfully completing their studies. The college employs a full-time counsellor who provides services on all three campuses. Life Skills Programmes: These provide developmental opportunities in a wide range of subjects, including sexuality, improved communication skills, goal-setting and the management of personal nances.

Students often secure employment with lodges, hotels and game farms in the area before even completing their studies. The lodges, hotels and game farms also provide workplace exposure and internships to Mopani students.

When we speak of a skills revolution, we see ourselves as part of this picture, involving industry in the implementation of skills development. We, therefore, see ourselves as a hub of skills and knowledge

(CEO Sibongile Sehlake)

Strategic Partnerships

he college has well-established partnerships across various elds of study, which are creating opportunities to students to learn hands-on. Mining: The Palaborwa Mining Company and the college agreed early last year (2006) to have Engineering students visit the mine training facilities on site to be lectured on the trade as well as to get an orientation of the mining industry. The chemical and fertilizer mineral mining company Foskor, with operations in Phalaborwa in Limpopo and Richards Bay in KwaZulu-Natal, has made available a house for the running of the colleges Mosate Hotel School. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The fund has provided the money for a learnership, the National Certicate: Professional Cookery (NQF Level 4) to at least 20 unemployed and disadvantaged youth in the community. In addition, the fund also supported the establishment of a Youth Advisory Centre at the Sir Val Duncan campus in Namakgale. The centre provides information on bursaries and entrepreneurial and skills and also acts as a referral service for HIV/Aids, rape, abuse and related problems. In addition, it teaches basic computer skills and has established outreach programmes to the community. SETAs: The college obtained funding from the Wholesale and Retail SETA to oer a learnership,

the National Certicate: Wholesale and Retail Sales Practice (NQF Level 3) and National Certicate: Retail & Wholesale, Sales and Service Technology (NQF Level 4). Government Departments: The Provincial Department of Public Works is funding a learnership for 50 employees to teach them the technical skills of Boilermaking. Hospitality: The college has an agreement with the Impala Hotel to allow food services students, in particular in the eld of professional cookery, workplace exposure. Students often secure employment with lodges, hotels and game farms in the area before even completing their studies. The lodges, hotels and game farms also provide workplace exposure and internships to Mopani students. Students who are participating in programmes at the Mosate Hotel School have been the primary beneciaries. Municipality: The college has partnered with the local municipality to provide skills training to sta. Administrative and technical sta members, including tters and turners, builders, electricians, have been participating in computer skills training. Thanks to the Umsobomvu Youth Fund, the municipality has helped with the selection of participants and the administration of the training.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Management Finance, Economics and Accounting Tourism Oce Administration Hospitality Civil Engineering & Buliding Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design IT and Computer Science

Contact Details
Changes in the provincial border between Limpopo and Mpumalanga meant that Mopani South Easts Mapulaneng campus in Acornhoek became part of Ehlanzeni FET College in Mpumalanga.

Telephone: (015) 781-5721/ 781-5725 Fax: (015) 781-5346 Postal address: Private Bag X01024, Phalaborwa 1390 E-mail: marketing@mopanisefet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

117

Sekhukhune
FET College

Reaching goals together

ekhukhune FET College emerged in 2003 from the merger between two colleges, namely CS Barlow Technical College and CN Phatudi College of Education. CS Barlow is in Motetema village, about 3km north of the town of Groblersdal, surrounded by farms. It was a former technical college oering mainly N1 to N6 theoretical and skills training programmes as well as N3 to N6 Business Studies. CN Phatudi, formerly a College of Education, trained teachers, and is located in Praktiseer village, 17km north of Burgersfort, a town known as the Platinum City because it is surrounded by platinum mines. The location of Sekhukhune College, in the southeastern part of Limpopo, allows it to provide education and training to a vast rural area in the Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality. This district incorporates ve local municipalities: Ellias Motswaledi, Greater Marble Hall, Greater Tubatse,

Our Story
Makhuduthamaga and Fetakgomo. The college, given its location, faces an important task. Limpopo, a province rich in natural resources, has an 89% rural population and a very high percentage of illiteracy and unemployed youth. In an attempt to tackle these challenges, the college will be oering several of the National Department of Educations new National Certicate (Vocational) programmes at NQF Levels 2, 3 and 4. These have been particularly designed to counter unemployment and South Africas skills decit. The college also provides skills development in the promotion of small- and medium enterprise development and entrepreneurship training and capacity-building, business support and mentoring, student support services and other SETA-approved skills programmes for social and economic development which include Building Construction, Welding, Motor Mechanics, Cabinetmaking and Electrical Engineering.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 268 Full-time equivalents: 1 694 Location: Southeastern Limpopo province Campuses: Motetema village and Praktiseer village. Critical Skills: The regions economic growth is tied to the provisioning of the mining and tourism sectors as well as the promotion of SMMEs. These are areas in which the college is oering education and training. Key Strengths: The ability to respond to the needs of the surrounding communities. The college also has sound linkages with a range of partners in industry and in the government.

Student Support Services


Sekhukhune FET College has established student support development units at all its campuses. Support follows through from the pre-admission and on-course phases to exit. This enables sta in general to track students as they progress. The unit provides the following services to learners and the local communities: Career guidance; Academic development; Information resource centre; Entrepreneurship skills training; Student leadership training programme; Learner admission and induction; Financial support; Counselling and psychological support; Student liaison; Job placement, tracking and experiential training Internships and learnerships; Recognition of prior learning advisers; Health and safety, life orientation and HIV/Aids awareness; Sport, arts and cultural activities; and Marketing and community outreach projects. The primary objectives of the unit are to promote access to education to all sectors of the population. In addition, it aims to help students to achieve and progress to further studies, employment or self-employment, and to create opportunities and oer encouragement.

The college, given its location, faces an important task. Limpopo, a province rich in natural resources, has an 89% rural population and a very high percentage of illiteracy and unemployed youth.

Nothing is simple in the world of education and job creation. But Sekhukune FET College is serious about xing some problems quickly, especially the shortage of people with skills that the economy desperately needs

(CEO Tebogo Kekana)

Strategic Partnerships

earnerships: A learnership initiative was launched in 2006 at CS Barlow campus. This is a partnership between the college, the Limpopo Department of Roads and Transport and the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA). Thirty learners signed contracts in learnerships. These will result in qualications such as the Certicate in Motor Vehicle Repair and Maintenance on NQF Level 2. MERSETA is responsible for the content and quality of the learnership. Sekhukhune FET College is responsible for the facilitation of the theoretical component of the learnership. The Provincial Department of Roads and Transport requested the learnership in terms of its skills needs. The workplace training is happening at the premises of the CS Barlow campus. Educational Institutions: The Paul Rapetsoa Institute for Dramatic Art (PRIDA) and several schools have a partnership with the college. Government Departments: Partnerships with: the Limpopo Department of Education for training in computer literacy; the Limpopo Department of Labour; the National Department of Communication for training in IT;

the National Department of Public Enterprises for Call Centre Operations training. Mining: The college has a partnership with the Samancor Mine. This is for the purpose of training in Adult Basic Education and Training. Businesses and Other: The college has a partnership with Ntwampe Village. The partnership is for training in computer literacy. It also includes links with employment agencies, banks and other businesses across the college curriculum oerings for workplace experience and graduate placement.

MERSETA is responsible for the content and quality of the learnership, Sekhukhune FET College is responsible for the facilitation of the theoretical component of the learnership, while the Provincial Department of Roads and Transport requested the learnership in terms of its skills needs.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Civil Engineering & Building Construction; Electrical Infrastructure Construction; Management; Marketing; Oce Administration; Tourism; Finance, Economics and Accounting; IT and Computer Science

Contact Details
Telephone: (013) 269-0278 Fax: (013) 269-0450 Postal address: Private Bag X8660, Groblersdal 0407 E-mail: sekfetcol@sekfetcol.co.za

www.sekfetcol.com

50 colleges, 1 goal

119

Vhembe
Providing skills for a better life
hembe FET College is named after the Limpopo River, which is called Vhembe in Tshivenda. The college came into existence following the merger process of colleges and the promulgation of the FET Act 98 of 1998. The former Techniven College (now East campus) in Sibasa in the Thulamela Municipality, Mavhoi (now the Central campus) at Dzanani and Mashamba Experimental Farm (now the South campus) situated in the Makhado Municipality, combined to create Vhembe FET College. Techniven College was established in 1963 as the Sibasa Bantu Trade School with 20 learners. Later, in 1986, it was named Finyazwanda Technical College before becoming a campus of Vhembe FET College. The vision of Vhembe FET College is to play an active part in providing a better life for the local community, in particular, by allowing for equitable access to quality education and training programmes that could bring about sustainable development. The spread of the campuses is symptomatic of the regions economic development. The South campus specialises only in Agriculturerelated programmes and received a donation of 30 hectares of land from Chief Mashamba for this purpose. The East campus is mainly located at the bustling commercial centre of Thohoyandou. There, the Business department, Mechanical Engineering

FET College

Our Story
and Related Design as well as Hospitality, form the key programmes. The Mavhoi campus located in the Nzhelele Corridor is proud of its Civil Engineering and Construction programmes. The main oce at Makhado commercial centre has plans to provide courses in Banking, Retail and Wholesale, Accounting and Business-related programmes. The future of Vhembe FET College is bright in terms of the dynamic development in Vhembes four municipalities and their Integrated Development Plans, which are mainly linked with the programmes oered by Vhembe FET college.

Student Support Services


The college has a student support services section with well-qualied personnel mandated to develop guidance and counselling and HIV education, sports and recreation, academic support, nancial aid, tracking and tracing services as well as alumni relations. The student support services unit is active in the following areas: Guidance, Counselling and HIV Education: Apart from the internal guidance and counselling oered to learners, an intensive campaign is on the way to educate learners and youth in the community on HIV in collaboration with the Youth Advisory Centre (YAC) located at the East campus. Financial Aid: Through the student support services unit, the Faculty Administration and the college council, a bursary fund has been established by the college to provide some nancial support to desperate students who meet the criteria for the funds. Active networking is presently going on with a view to augmenting the meagre funds the college has. Sport and Recreation: To improve the colleges image, several sporting activities are conducted in the course of the year in the elds of athletics, football and netball to provide opportunities to aspirant learners in this regard. Academic Support: Trained personnel help individuals and groups to improve their academic work. Peer learning is also encouraged as a form of assisting each other. Extra tuition is recommended to lecturers to assist learners. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: Umsobomvu is active in providing advice about career choices. Several programmes are arranged for internet surng, mainly in obtaining information on bursaries, businesses and careers.

Fast Facts
Total number of students: Headcount: 4 500 Full-time equivalents: 1 820 Location: Limpopo Campuses: Makwarele, a suburb of Thohoyandou, under Thulamela municipality, Makongoza village, a suburb of Dzanani municipality in the Nzhelele municipality, Mashamba village under Makhado municipality. Critical Skills: Critical skills oered by the college follow the pattern of economic activities in the community: Primary Agriculture, Business Management, Engineering, Mining Construction, Hospitality and Tourism. Key Strengths: The colleges geographical location in terms of the spread of its campuses allows it to provide a variety of programmes to large numbers of youth, especially in the Thulamela and Makhado Municipalities. Its link with the local agriculture co-operative provides valuable information that feeds into its programmes.

Vhembe FET College should seize the opportunities of the FET sector, overcome challenges and welcome innovations to ensure progress
(CEO Hamilton Mafohlo Mnisi)

Strategic Partnerships

he college has established a partnerships unit that focuses on establishing strategic relationships with government, local communities and businesses. With government departments the aim is to provide education and training to reduce scarce skills. With local communities, the unit disseminates information about the college and assists with community projects that aim at reducing unemployment. The unit works with business to assist in the placement of learners from the college and to provide hands-on experiential learning The college has partnerships with the following organisations: Limpopo Department of Public Works; Fhatalushaka Training Centre; Umsobomvu Youth Fund; municipalities; as well as local hotels and motels, game reserves, and engineering and related design industries. Department of Public Works: Twenty learnerships in Welding NQF Level 1 were awarded to Vhembe FET in April 2006. The learnerships have progressed smoothly. The fundamentals, and core subjects, practicals and workplace assessment have all being completed with relevant reports. Retraining and nal reporting will be completed by March 2007. So far, the recommendation from the Limpopo Department of Public Works is that Vhembe FET

College has done a wonderful job. Fhatalushaka Training Centre: Vhembe FET has established a partnership with Fhatalushaka Training Centre to facilitate the running of learnerships. The centres recent participation was in the 20 learnerships awarded by the Provincial Department of Public Works. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The colleges partnership with the Umsobomvu Youth Fund has resulted in the establishment of the Youth Advisory Centre at the East campus as from 1 January 2006 for three years. Makhado Municipality: The colleges partnership with Makhado Municipality has resulted in 200 students who will be trained by Vhembe FET in various programmes. Hospitality and Tourism: The Hospitality section is placing students in various hotels and motels. The relationship with these hotels is encouraging for the professional development of our students.

The South campus specialises only in Agriculture-related programmes and received a donation of 30 hectares of land from Chief Mashamba for this purpose. The East campus is mainly located at the bustling commercial centre of Thohoyandou. There, the Business department, Mechanical Engineering and Related Design as well as Hospitality, form the key programmes.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Primary Agriculture; Management; Hospitality; Finance, Economics and Accounting; Marketing; IT and Computer Science; Engineering and Related Design; Civil Engineering & Building Construction; and Electrical Infrastructure Construction.

Contact Details
Telephone: (015) 516-4773/ 516-4774 Fax: (015) 516-4772/3 Postal address: Private Bag X2415, Makhado 0920 Email: fetcol@mweb.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

121

Waterberg
FET College

Together ensuring success

Our Story
There is also a farm for agricultural training in the Sterkrivier area near Naboomspruit. Waterberg College uses these centres to put into action its vision -- to be a leader in the provision of quality learning and marketable skills. The name Waterberg was chosen for the college as four of its centres are situated in the Waterberg region. As this is a region characterised by its many tourist attractions and destinations, there is a need to empower the people in this region with tourism and hospitality skills. Waterberg is also a mining area, thus Engineering is one of the key programmes oered by the college. Similarly, the college considers agricultural skills as an important area of training. Many of the communities surrounding the college make their living from farming. This is why the college oers a learnership in Agriculture. Through the implementation of the skills mentioned, the college is responding to the communities it serves, while it remains alert to new skills needs that may emerge.

aterberg FET College in South Africas Limpopo province was created after a merger between Potgietersrus Technical College and Lebowakgomo Commercial College in 2002. The college operates across two municipal districts, Lepelle-Nkumbi (which includes Polokwane, formerly Pietersburg) and Mogalakwene (Mokopane, formerly known as Potgietersrus) through ve business centres. These centres, previously known as campuses, were created in 2006. Each centre specialises in a specic area of study, as is indicated by their names. The centres are: Business Studies Centre (previously known as the Mahwelereng campus) Information Technology and Computer Science Centre (previously the Mokopane campus), Hospitality and Tourism training centre (a new development site), an Engineering and Skills Training Centre (previously known as the Lebowakgomo campus).

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 484 Full-time equivalents: 1 282 Location: Limpopo Campuses: Mokopane, Mahwelereng, and Lebowakgomo. Critical Skills: Agriculture, Horticulture, Tourism, Hospitality. Key Strengths: A strong focus on student support, a focused marketing strategy and partnerships to provide learnership training.

Student Support Services


The student support unit aims to help students to improve their academic performance and to cope with life challenges that could aect their studies. The college has the following: Career Guidance: Students are introduced to information about careers, partnerships with potential employers and training environments; Life Skills: With a reading excellence programme, the college helps to improve learners language skills, a critical requirement for employers. Professional Sta: A social worker and a nurse visit all the colleges centres on a fortnightly rotational level. They provide a referral service to health professionals and speak to groups of learners on health and social issues. Counselling: Student support ocers undergo continuous training to do counselling, trauma de-brieng and life skills coaching. Financial Aid: The student support unit established a bursary fund with seed funding from businesses. Annually, more students benet from the money. Workplace Support: The college has a tracking service to keep in touch with learners. When employers approach the college with job vacancies, the college, in turn, contacts its graduates.

The Capricorn Municipality is funding a short course which is titled the Establishment for Comprehensive Youth Development. The subjects that will be taught include basic computer skills, including word processing, the use of basic spreadsheets and e-mail. The students involved are municipal employees. The college has made its facilities available for the training.

We live our slogan: Together ensuring success. We recognise that to be successful requires honesty in everything we do, excellent service, integrity, accountability, unity in our work, recognition of diversity and respect for dierences of opinion

(CEO Patrick Mailula)

Strategic Partnerships

lothing Production: The college oers a course in clothing production on NQF Level 2. Its partners in this venture are clothing production companies Astra and Barbarian. The goals of this partnership are to expose students to the industry equipment they will work with; to make students available to work in the factories when the companies have larger orders and to reduce unemployment since skilled students can be employed when the factory needs sta. Motor Mechanics: Waterberg FET college has entered into a partnership with Limpopo Toyota. The goals of the partnership are to use the companys sta to help the college develop programmes acceptable to the motor industry. Furthermore, the company makes its facilities available for student apprentices, while it could also oer placements to students upon completion of their studies. The company has also been donating disused parts to the motor mechanical workshop to be utilised for training. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The fund has instituted an Agricultural learnership that enables 37 sudents to obtain National Certicates in Farming at NQF Level 2. A signicant oshoot of this partnership is that the college is producing vegetables for Fruit & Veg City in Mokopane. In addition, the fund has enabled students to do a learnership in Plant

Production NQF Level 2. The learnership started in April 2005 with 50 students, with 24 of them receiving certicates. The fund had undertaken to take the remaining 13 students into incubation for a period of six months to train them in business skills. Government Departments: The Department of Public Works has funded 67 students to participate in a Horticulture learnership on NQF Level 1. The project runs over a year. The learnership started in May 2006. At the end of the programme, these students will receive certicates from the Agricultural Sector SETA. The college also has a partnership with the Molaodi Community Developers for the moderation of students and a local hotel, the Park Hotel, for their placement. SETAs: Education, Training and Development Practices (ETDP) SETA is using the college to train 60 students in the eld of Early Childhood Development. Municipalities: The Capricorn Municipality is funding a short course which is titled the Establishment for Comprehensive Youth Development. The subjects that will be taught include basic computer skills, including word processing, the use of basic spreadsheets and e-mail. The students involved are municipal employees. The college has made its facilities available for the training.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme 2007: Tourism IT and Computer Science Finance, Economics and Accounting Engineering and Related Design Primary Agriculture Oce Administration Hospitality 2008: Marketing Management Electrical Infrastructure Construction Civil Engineering & Building Construction Campus Business Studies, Hospitality and Tourism centres; IT and Computer Science centres Business Studies Centre Engineering and Skills Training centre Sterkrivier farm Business Studies Centre Business Studies, Hospitality and Tourism centres. Business Studies Centre Business Studies Centre Engineering and Skills Training Centre Engineering and Skills Training Centre

Contact Details
Telephone: (015) 491-8581/ 860-2297 or 860- 8367 or 860-8389 Fax: (015) 491-8579 Postal address: PostNet Suite 59, Private Bag X2449, Mokopane 0600 E-mail: hq@waterbergcollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

123

Ehlanzeni
FET College

...striving towards excellence

hlanzeni FET College comprises seven campuses. The campuses of Nelspruit, Mlumati and kaNyamazane used to be technical colleges. The former Waterval Boven Environmental Centre and the Mthimba Foundation for Education with Production were also incorporated into Ehlanzeni. The kaNyamazane and Barberton campuses were given campus status as they previously operated as satellites of Nelspruit. The Mapulaneng Campus is a new addition following changes to the Ehlanzeni region. With the exception of Nelspruit, the college inherited campuses that were almost dysfunctional and dilapidated. The college has worked hard to remedy the situation with renovations and the construction of additional facilities. For instance, all campuses have been provided with computer facilities. Mlumati Campus also has new kitchen facilities and renovated residences, classrooms and an administration block. Under the governments recapitalisation programme, the further development of the colleges infrastructure will strengthen its ability to deliver high-quality education and training. As part of the recapitalisation process, the college will be introducing six of the new National Certicate (Vocational) programmes. In addition, it will continue to oer learnerships and skills pro-

Our Story
grammes which are aimed at providing skills to adults, the unemployed and out-of-school youth. Already, the college has delivered learnerships in the areas of local economic development and public administration successfully. Skills programmes include Computer Skills, Dressmaking, Carpentry and Plumbing. From 2007 onwards, the college is oering Concrete Moulding and Drivers Licence skills. It will also continue to provide focused programmes for business in the area. For instance, it is providing Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) for the employees of paper-manufacturing company Sappi. From 2003 to 2006, the college successfully implemented its strategic plan, which has culminated in numerous achievements. The rst three years were aimed at consolidating the goals of the merger process, which focused on infrastructure, curriculum development, student support, human resource development, marketing and communication, projects and partnerships and good governance. The college is now entering a new era that will focus on increasing enrolments at all sites, meaningful participation by business, commerce and industry and the delivery of high technical skills that will lead to employment and better opportunities for students. All its activities are geared towards its vision: Striving towards excellence in education and training.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 5 487 Full-time equivalents: Not available Location: Mpumalanga. Campuses: Nelspruit (two), Malelane, Hazyview, Bushbuckridge, Barberton and Waterval Boven. Critical Skills: Engineering and Business Studies. The college is oering learnerships and skills programmes which are aimed at providing skills to adults and out of school youth. Computer skills, Dressmaking, Carpentry and Plumbing are being oered as skills programmes. Concrete Moulding and Drivers Licence skills will be provided from 2007 onwards. Key Strengths: The programmes oered by the college are relevant to the economic demands of the region; all of its sites are equipped with computers; lecturers at the college are trained for new programmes; most of the colleges posts are lled for ecient delivery of education and training; and there is strong support for the colleges eight sites from the central oce.

Student Support Services


The college oers support to students through the following services: HIV/Aids counselling; A Youth Advisory Centre; Sports and recreation; Educational excursions; Academic counselling; Residences for students; Financial aid; A Student Representative Council; A Student Support Committee; Career guidance; Help with job-hunting and placement; and A post-graduate employment programme.

... the college inherited campuses that were almost dysfunctional and dilapidated... [and] has worked hard to remedy the situation with renovations and the construction of additional facilities... [including] computer facilities.

I pledge to commit myself, the management, governance structures and all stakeholders towards development of the countrys human resources in order to realise economic and social prosperity locally and internationally

(CEO Pat Zwane)

Strategic Partnerships

appi: Twenty students are trained annually and placed at Sappi (South African Pulp and Paper Industry). There is a mutual sharing of resources and training provision between the college and Sappi. Students benet from workplace experience and exposure to industry. Learnerships: Nineteen students completed a learnership in local economic development in 2005 and all of them are employed in the Ehlanzeni Municipality. The learnership was oered in partnership with the Local Goverment SETA (LGSETA). The college also oers a learnership in Public Administration and is working together with the Tourism and Hospitality SETA (THETA) to develop new curricula for THETA skills programmes. Government Departments: The college is oering skills training to the Mpumalanga Department of Education in the areas of dressmaking and welding. It has also placed former students at the department for internship periods of 18 months. Municipalities: The college is in partnership with Nkomazi and Mbombela Municipalities, where the college has placed books in the public libraries. Both college students and residents in the municipalities have access to the books. International: The Japanese Overseas Co-operation Volunteer (JOCV) program deploys volunteers at the college to provide technical assistance. The mathematics and practical expertise brought

by the volunteers is expected to help the college implement the new National Certicate (Vocational). HIV/Aids: The college works with the National Association for People Living With Aids (NAPWA). The partnership helps college students with HIV and AIDS awareness campaigns. NAPWA gives information on VCT and support programmes. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: UYF set up a Youth Advisory Centre at the colleges Mthimba campus. The centre provides information ranging from life skills, computer skills, job hunting and placement, CV-writing, HIV and AIDS programmes, nancial aid, entrepreneurship and career guidance. Educational Institutions: Unisa and Ehlanzeni have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to allow college students to take up further studies at UNISA after they complete their FET level business studies course at the college.

The centre provides information ranging from life skills, computer skills, job hunting and placement, CV-writing, HIV and AIDS programmes, nancial aid, entrepreneurship and career guidance.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Primary Agriculture Tourism Campus Nelspruit Nelspruit Nelspruit Mlumati, kaNyamazane and Mapulaneng Mthimba Waterval Boven

Contact Details
Telephone: (013) 752-7105 Fax: (013) 752-4902 Postal address: Private Bag X11297, Nelspruit 1200 E-mail: pszwane@nel.mpu.gov.za

www.ehlanzenifet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

125

Gert Sibande
FET College

Where quality meets potential in creating your tomorrow today

ert Sibande, a farm labourer from the Ermelo area, was nicknamed the Lion of the East for his political protest during the 1930s. Rising through the ranks of the ANC to become a member of its National Executive Committee, he was one of the accused in the Treason Trial of 1956 to1961. When a new college with four campuses was created in Mpumalanga in 2002, it was named after the late activist. Gert Sibande FET College is spread out across the towns of Ermelo, Evander and Standerton. The campuses in these towns were supplemented recently when the Sibanesetfu campus was opened in July 2005. It is located in the rural outskirts of Mpumalanga, close to the border of Swaziland, where it serves students in the areas of Glenmore, Mpuluzi, Dundonald, Mayower and Elukwatini. This campus fulls a crucial educational and training role in an area where, before, young people were forced to stay home after completing school

Our Story
because of a lack of tertiary training opportunities in the area and the cost of travelling and staying elsewhere to study. One of the areas Sibanesetfu Campus is focusing on in its education and training is to empower its students to start their own businesses. The three other campuses have also developed special strengths. For instance, the Ermelo Campus has been among the top colleges in South Africa with a pass rate of 85%. In Evander, the college has continued to grow over the years and has had the benet of strong support from concerns such as chemical and fuel company Sasol and Harmony Gold Mine. The strength of the Standerton Campus has been its ability to oer a diversity of courses to cater for the needs of the community. There are skills training for the unemployed, advanced corporate training courses and Adult Basic Education and Training. This campus also has wellequipped facilities for practical training, in particular in the subject areas of Engineering and Oce Administration.

Fast Facts
Total number of students: Headcount: 7 287 Full-time equivalents: 4 442 Location: Mpumalanga Campuses: Ermelo, Evander, Standerton, Sibanesetfu. Critical Skills: Artisans skills, coded Welding, Fitting and Turning, Boilermaking, Woodwork, Tiling and Masonry, Electricity, Poultry Farming, Control and Instruments, Agriculture, Bricklaying and Carpentry. Key Strengths: Chemical plant operation and chemistry. The college is an ISO 9001certied institution. Excellent academic results; highly qualied and skilled lecturers. Bursary opportunities; student support; excellent facilities; aordable fees; extramural activities; safe and secure environment; a responsive curriculum; outstanding job placement record; healthy partnerships; career-specic and practical training for the world of work.

Student Support Services


Gert Sibande College has a student support team distributed across its various campuses. They are tasked with a range of activities, including: Career Guidance: Students receive assistance with choosing possible career paths and can get help to develop better study methods; Workplace Support: Students receive support in a range of elds to prepare them for the world of work. Job-hunting skills such as CV-writing, preparing students for interviews, identifying available jobs, assisting with job applications, loading their CVs on to databases, such as the Umsobomvu Youth Funds database, are provided; Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture: Ensuring participation of students. Financial Aid: The college identies students who qualify for bursaries and assists them to obtain nancial aid; Student Representative Council: SRC elections take place at campus level; oce-bearers are inducted and meet regularly with campus and college management. Life Skills: Life skills are covered in workshops; HIV/Aids Support: The college hosts awareness campaigns and invites speakers from the Provincial Department of Health to speak to students.

This campus fulls a crucial educational and training role in an area where, before, young people were forced to stay home after completing school because of a lack of tertiary training opportunities in the area and the cost of travelling and staying elsewhere to study.

Gert Sibande College actively pursues the development of partnerships and service to customers. As an institution that values service excellence, we aspire to respond to the specic needs of industries

(CEO Dr Edwin Hawthorn)

Strategic Partnerships

ert Sibande College has either formal or informal partnerships with: The Petrochemical industry: Gert Sibande is the only FET college to oer Chemical Plant Operation and Chemistry specically for Sasol employees. Sasol also sends employees to be trained as electricians, boilermakers, tters and welders. Mining: Harmony Gold Mine sends students to be trained as electricians, boilermakers, tters and welders. In the mining industry, the college also works with New Denmark Colliery and Spitzkop Mine, which provide college students with placements for practical experience. Skills Training: Eskom uses the college to provide skills training and computer literacy to its employees. It also oers student placements for students in the areas of both business studies and engineering, Early Bird uses the college for computer training; Stocktaking: Students can do practical work in stocktaking at OTK, Edcon and Ackermans. Construction: The college works with THUSWA, an NGO, in the area of civil construction. Student Placements: Many businesses provide student placements. They include: Absa Bank, Standard Bank, Spoornet, Pick n Pay, Stein Muller,

Vos, Steyn & Van Zyl, the Gert Sibande District Municipality, and various provincial government departments (Education, Agriculture and Land Administration, Health and Community Service, Economic Aairs, Tourism and Wildlife and Home Aairs). Municipalities: The Gert Sibande District Municipality also oers bursaries for engineering students. The college also provides learnerships for municipal employees in areas such as electricity and local economic development and computer training. SETAs: The college has partnerships with the following SETAs: Manufacturing, Engineering & Related Services, Local Government and Agriculture. Educational Institutions: The college has a partnership with the North-West University for the usage of their infrastructure.

Eskom uses the college to provide skills training and computer literacy to its employees. It also oers student placements for students in the areas of both business studies and engineering, Early Bird uses the college for computer training

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Finance, Economics and Accounting Marketing Oce Administration Campus Evander, Standerton and Sibanesetfu Ermelo, Evander and Standerton Evander and Standerton Ermelo, Evander and Standerton Ermelo, Evander and Standerton Ermelo, Evander, Standerton and Sibanesetfu

Contact Details
Telephone: (017) 712-9040 Fax: (017) 712-9059 Postal address: PO Box 3475, Standerton 2430 E-mail: ceo@gsc4u.com

50 colleges, 1 goal

127

Nkangala
FET College
Providing education and training opportunities of world-class quality standards
kangala is one of the largest educational institutions and the biggest FET college in Mpumalanga. Its four campuses, CN Mahlangu (Siyabuswa), Middelburg, Mpondozankomo (Witbank-Ackerville) and Witbank, are situated in the Nkangala region, hence the name Nkangala FET College. The college aims to respond to South Africas need for more engineers; managers such as nancial personnel and project managers as well as skilled technical employees such as artisans and IT technicians. These are also the needs that have been identied by the key economic sectors that surround the college: steel production, mining (coal) and electricity (power station). In addition, training in Agriculture (farming) has also been identied as a need in the area. All Nkangalas courses are career-orientated in or-

Our Story
der to make FET accessible to an increasing number of students in need of accredited qualications that will open doors to the labour market or selfemployment opportunities. The college is proud that it was one of the rst FET colleges in South Africa to be ISO (International Standards Organisation)-certied. This international certication recognises production excellence worldwide. Its vision is to be a centre of excellence that provides education and training opportunities of world-class quality standards, while its mission speaks of ensuring access, redress and equity in a transformed working and learning environment for those citizens who require a bridge to become economically active. The college also aims to improve continuously the service, products and environment that it provides to its customers and aspires to high standards and excellence in all aspects of services rendered.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 15 025 Full-time equivalents: 4 424 Location: Mpumalanga Campuses: CN Mahlangu (Siyabuswa), Middelburg, Mpondozankomo (WitbankAckerville) and Witbank. Critical Skills: The college aims to respond to South Africas need for more engineers; managers such as nancial personnel and project managers as well as skilled technical employees such as artisans and IT technicians. These are also the needs that have been identied by the key economic sectors that surround the college, namely: steel production, mining and electricity. Key Strengths: ISO-accredited, the college attracts students from afar, thanks to its hostel facilities, and it is ideally positioned to feed key skills needs in the region.

Student Support Services


Starting a new life at college can be frightening and confusing, which is why Nkangala FET College set up Student Support Centres on each of its campuses in 2004. Each centre has professional sta members and reports from students indicate that they are beneting from the services on oer. The student support centres oer a wide variety of services aimed at making campus life as exciting and easy as possible. These include the following: Counselling and academic as well as non-academic support; Career guidance; Financial assistance; Job placement; Study support, which includes assistance to students with study methods, examination preparation and time management; Induction, which includes introducing new students to the campus, programmes and activities; Job-hunting skills, such as how to develop a good CV and interview coaching; Information and support on HIV and Aids-related matters; Fully equipped computer labs (for extra practical time); Counselling and referral to other professionals; A Youth Advisory Centre and Sports activities.

The college aims to respond to South Africas need for more engineers; managers such as nancial personnel and project managers as well as skilled technical employees such as artisans and IT technicians. These are also the needs that have been identied by the key economic sectors that surround the college: steel production, mining (coal) and electricity (power station)

We are constantly reviewing mechanisms to develop relevant skills and academic courses to meet the criteria of the sectors we serve
(CEO Dr Sibuyiselo Peter Qwabe)

Strategic Partnerships

kgangala FET College has adhered to the call from the government to become responsive in addressing the skills needs in South Africa. As a result the college has established an Extended Learning Unit (ELU). The ELU was born in February 2006 with the sole purpose of addressing the occupational leg of the college. This has already yielded some successes outlined below. SETAs: The college completed a national contract with the Public Service Sector SETA (PSETA) for the training of students and achieved a competency rate of 95%. A Wholesale and Retail SETA learnership started in January 2006 with 40 learners and a competency rate of 75% was achieved. This learnership was concluded at the end of September 2006. Provincial Government: The college clinched a learnership contract with the Mpumalanga Provincial Government in August 2006 to train 127 students scattered across the province and its three regions (Nkangala, Gert Sibande and Ehlanzeni). Steel Industry: In August 2006 a total of 20 employees from Highveld Steel were trained on three IT unit standards in a pilot project. Subsequently, in November 2006, a second rollout followed. Due to the success of the training a further roll-out of 1 000 students will take place between March 2007 and September 2007. The partnership entails the joint development and

delivery of high-quality programmes and services that are relevant and responsive to the needs of the industry. In addition, it focuses on the strengthening and the capacity-building of governance structures and management systems in colleges. It also provides joint career guidance for learners and joint interventions to promote the employability of students. Adult Basic Education and Training: A partnerships exists between Nkangala FET College and Gert Sibande FET College for the provisioning of ABET. Chamber of Mines of South Africa: The college and the chamber identify, discuss and resolve matters that aect the delivery of training. The partnership also involves the development of workplace models and assists with the eective and ecient training of competent employees.

The college is proud that it was one of the rst FET colleges in South Africa to be ISO (International Standards Organisation)-certied. This international certication recognises production excellence worldwide.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Engineering and Related Design Electrical Infrastructure Construction Civil Engineering & Building Construction Finance, Economics and Accounting IT and Computer Science Hospitality Campus CN Mahlangu, Middelburg and Witbank CN Mahlangu, Middelburg and Mpondozankomo CN Mahlangu; Middelburg and Mpondozankomo CN Mahlangu Middelburg Middelburg and Mpondozankomo Witbank

Contact Details
Telephone: (013) 690-1430 Fax: (013) 690-1450 Postal address: PO Box 2282, Witbank 1035

www.nkangalafet.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

129

ORBIT

FET College

Your Gateway to Opportunities

n 1 November 2002, four technical colleges in the North West province of South Africa merged to create a new institution: ORBIT FET College. These technical colleges were: Rustenburg College, Brits College, Odi Manpower Centre in Mabopane, north west of Tshwane, and Temba College in Hammanskraal. The rst letters of the names of each of the former training institutions created the word ORBIT (O from Odi, R from Rustenburg, B from Brits and T from Temba, while the letter I was added from the word institution). On a symbolic level, the name ORBIT symbolises the fact that the merger has put the institution into an orbit towards South Africas new FET landscape. Furthermore, to respond to its community needs, the college believes that it will have to move continuously into a new orbit. Since January 2006, the college has been extended to include Mankwe campus which is situated in

Our Story
the Moses Kotane district adjacent to the Pilanesberg Game Reserve. Apart from its state-of-the-art facilities, this campus also oers hostel facilities that can accommodate the large number of students from the surrounding and more remote rural areas. While gaining one campus, changes in the provincial border between Gauteng and North West meant that two of ORBIT FET Colleges campuses, Odi and Temba, were transferred to Gauteng on 1 January 2007. The college serves communities that are immersed in various types of economic activities, in particular mining and agriculture. ORBIT has strong partnerships in these areas, for instance, a new jewellery-making programme with the Platinum Trust of South Africa is rolling out from 2007. In addition, its ISO 9001 accredited quality management system, which has been developed since 2005, has opened up new opportunities for the college as a training provider.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 11 985 Full-time equivalents: 5 684 Location: North West Campuses: Rustenburg, Brits and Mankwe. Critical Skills: Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET), Early Childhood Development (ECD), Information Technology related skills in both computer hardware and software, engineering-related skills with a focus on the mining industry, entrepreneurial skills development, business and commerce-related skills training and music skills programmes. Key Strengths: A diverse range of programmes, well-trained sta, competitive fees, state-of-the-art facilities, strong partnerships and a quality management system that is enabling the college to compete for lucrative contracts.

Student Support Services


ORBIT FET College views student support services as one of its crucial activities to ensure that students develop holistically. It has a student support unit, which supports students at pre-entry level, entry level, during their studies and at exit level. For instance, a student who has completed his or her N6 course successfully can apply to become an experiential trainee at the college where he or she will receive practical training for six months. The Deputy CEO and the student support co-ordinator at the colleges corporate centre in Rustenburg co-ordinate all studentrelated issues together with the campus manager and the student support ocer at each campus. Currently, ORBIT College oers the following student support services: Academic development and support; Induction and orientation of new students; Financial support; Student liaison and leadership development; Job placement, tracking and experiential training; Life Skills programmes including drivers licence training; HIV/Aids awareness programmes such as E-Thena, which is a mobile training unit; Assistance with recreational activities; and Community outreach projects.

Apart from its state-of-the-art facilities, this campus also oers hostel facilities that can accommodate the large number of students from the surrounding and more remote rural areas.

ORBIT FET college is committed to a strategy of responsiveness and quality which we pursue by embracing the future, promoting new initiatives, taking risks, celebrating achievements, assessing failures and by serving as a leadership incubator

(CEO Maryna Marais)

Strategic Partnerships

ndustries: The college has a partnership with Sandvik, an international mechanised and automated mining manufacturing company. It also has partnerships with Rustenburg Steel Construction, Sectional Poles and Phillips Industries. They are employing students who have completed an NQF Level 2 learnership in boilermaking. ECD: A2B (Addicted to Business) supported the college with ECD programmes in the rural areas. Information and Communication Technology: CompTia and the Peoples Information and Communication Technology Engineering Academy are all involved in rolling out an ITC programme offered at the Rustenburg campus. Jewellery-making: The college has entered into a partnership with the Platinum Trust of South Africa for the manufacturing and design of jewellery. The project is rolling out from 2007 at the Rustenburg campus. Government Departments: The college worked with the North West Department of Educations directorates for ABET and FET to establish eight ABET centres of excellence in the areas of Makapanstad near Hammanskraal, Hebron near Ga-Rankuwa, Letlhabile near Brits and Luka around Rustenburg. At the centres, unit standard-based skills programmes are oered, including Bricklaying and Plastering, Carpentry and Plumbing. Facilitators at the dierent centres are monitoring

the achievement of the projects objectives. In another partnership, the North West Department of Educations ECD directorate has identied about 630 practitioners who need urgent training in ECD. ORBIT college will be the lead training provider in the project which is involving the other two FET colleges in the province as well. SETAs: The Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA) has partnered with the college to deliver STEP, which stands for the Skills Transfer and Empowerment Programme, at its Rustenburg campus. STEP was initiated by the MERSETA with the aim of developing and upskilling both the unemployed and employed within the fuel retail industry. The main focus of the project is Service Station Operations Training training for service station attendants -- which happens at NQF Level 2 and stretches over a period of 12 months. The project started in 2006 with 600 students. Besides the training in Service Station Operations, additional tourism-related unit standards will also be oered to help South Africa to prepare for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The UYF funded a Graduate Development Programme and has also supported the establishment of a Youth Advisory Centre. The college wants to extend the service to all campuses.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Civil Engineering & Building Construction Engineering & Related Design Electrical Infrastructure Construction Management Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting IT and Computer Science Hospitality Tourism Campus Brits Mankwe, Rustenburg Rustenburg, Mankwe Mankwe Rustenburg, Brits and Mankwe Rustenburg and Brits Rustenburg Odi and Mankwe Mankwe

Contact Details
Telephone: (014) 592-7014 Fax: (014) 592-7013 Postal address: Fatima Bhayat Street, Rustenburg 0300 E-mail: marynamarais@telkomsa.net

www.orbitcollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

131

Taletso
Growing skilled people

FET College

Our Story
want to improve their matric results in these key subjects. In addition, the college has set up a Linkages and Programmes Unit aimed developing partnerships with trade and industry and addressing scarce skills in North West. The unit will help the college to tackle some of the challenges it faces in terms of its geographical position. For instance, there are no big industries or mining houses in the central region of the province, which makes the possibility of oering learnerships remote. The geographical location of the college is not only a limitation. It simply emphasises the role of the college as a provider of lifelong learning in the communities it serves. This is why the college is focusing on the needs for training and re-skilling of the community, in particular by oering training on a part-time basis.

aletso FET College is the smallest college in the North West province where it provides education and training at three campuses: Makeng, which is the provincial capital, Lichtenburg and Lehurutshe, about 20km from the town of Zeerust. It also has a corporate centre in Riviera Park. The college was founded in 2002 as a result of the merger between the former Lehurutshe College of Education, the Makeng Manpower Centre and the Lichtenburg Technical Council. On these campuses, a diversity of students is served. However, due to its location, the Lichtenburg campus, in the town of Lichtenburg, has more Afrikaans-speaking students, while the campuses in Lehurutshe and Makeng serve predominantly African students from these areas, many of them from disadvantaged communities. At its various campuses the college oers dierent programmes under the umbrella of Business, Engineering and General Studies. The college has established a Mathematics and Science Upgrading Programme, known as MASCUP, at its Lehurutshe campus. The aim is to help Grade 12 learners who

Student Support Services


Taletso College has a student support division that oers a variety of services to students, including: Academic Development and support to ensure that students succeed in their studies; Support in the administration of a range of student activities; Communication with parents, guardians, employers and hostel managers about any matter that is aecting students; Training, guidance and support to members of the Students Representative Council. The SRC is a separate unit within the student support division. On each campus are SRC representatives who serve in dierent portfolios ranging from education and advocacy to entertainment and sports. Organisation of links with health and social services such as doctors and psychologists for the referral of learners who need specialist support; Co-ordination and organisation of induction programmes for newly registered learners to familiarise them with the college and its activities; Establishment of social, health and academic enrichment programmes for students as the need arises; and The creation of an environment in which students, when they require any form of assistance or support, can approach the student support division.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 318 Full-time equivalents: 2 151 Location: North West Campuses: Lichtenburg, Makeng and Lehurutshe. Critical Skills: The college has a Mathematics and Science Upgrading Programme, known as MASCUP, at its Lehurutshe campus. The aim is to help Grade 12 learners who want to improve their matric results in these key subjects. It provides training and re-skilling of individuals to enhance opportunities for employment and self-employment. Key Strengths: The location of its campuses, in central North West, means the college can provide training in areas where there are limited post-schooling opportunities. A student support services unit, with a dedicated student support ocer, is present on each campus. College councillors who represent various elds including SETAs, Department of Tourism, Department of Labour, community leaders, and the legal fraternity, govern the college. A dedicated Linkages and Programmes Unit which develops partnerships, does research and applies for accreditation and programme approval with the SETAs.

Taletso FET College strives to make a socioeconomic dierence to the communities it serves.
(CEO Sybil Gelderbloem)

Strategic Partnerships

aletso FET College has partnerships and liaises with various stakeholders in an attempt to make training accessible to as many people as possible: Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The Fund operates a Graduate Development Programme and a Youth Advisory Centre at the Makeng campus. It also partners with the college in a School-toWork Programme by means of a NQF Level 2 Learnership in Agriculture at the Lichtenburg campus . North West Education Department: The college participates in an ABET Expansion Programme which gives ABET students training in vocational skills such as Bricklaying and Plumbing. Expanded Public Works Programme: Together with Africon, the college trained 30 farm workers on an NQF level 2 learnership on site at Modimola. Stakeholders in the project included Agriseta, Africon, and the Department of Labour. Local Municipalities: The Ditsobotla Local Municipality and the Ramotshere Moiloa Municipality frequently use the college for training their sta. SMME Training: The college partners with the MERSETA in the training of SMMEs, and is partnering in the establishment of a decentralised trade test centre for motor mechanics. Local High Schools: The college oers computer practice classes at local high schools. DANIDA: The college participates in DANIDAs Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) Programme. Eduland: Students undergo leadership and lifeskills training with this specialist organisation.

Department of Communication: A programme in ICT will be run at the Lehurutshe campus in conjunction with the department in 2007. Zero Degree: This is a company that specialises in the beneciation of textiles. The college places learners there for workplace experience in the clothing industry.

... the college has set up a Linkages and Programmes Unit [to] help the college to tackle some of the challenges it faces in terms of its geographical position... there are no big industries or mining houses in the central region of the province, which makes the possibility of oering learnerships remote. The geographical location of the college is not only a limitation. It simply emphasises the role of the college as a provider of lifelong learning in the communities it serves. This is why the college is focusing on the needs for training and re-skilling of the community, in particular by oering training on a part-time basis.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Electrical Infrastructure Construction; Civil Engineering & Building Construction; Oce Administration; Management; and IT and Computer Science.

Contact Details
Telephone: (018) 381-7074 Fax: (018) 381-7410 Postal address: Private Bag X128, Mmabatho 2735 E-mail: sybilgelderbloem@telkomsa.net

www.fetcollege.edu.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

133

Vuselela
Empowerment through training
uselela FET College serves the greater southern and western areas of South Africas North West province. The catchment area stretches from Taung in the far west, along the N12 route between Johannesburg and Cape Town, into Potchefstroom and then towards the east. There are ve campuses. The Jouberton campus is close to Klerksdorps industrial area, where wholesale and retail activities, in particular fresh produce, and the manufacturing of electrical and mechanical components are dominant. Though the mines have been key employers of the areas residents, the sector is in decline. This has enabled the college to play a key role in re-skilling the local community. It has focused on developmental activities of the Matlosana Municipality (Hartbeesfontein, Stilfontein, Orkney and Klerksdorp), in areas including construction, electrication, water and primary health care. Klerksdorp is in a commercial, nancial and service hub supplementing mining as a key economic activity. The campus, therefore, provides for Engineering Studies, Business Studies and general utilities. The Potchefstroom campus will increasingly serve the growing tourism and information technology

FET College

Our Story
industries. The city is close to the Vredefort Dome and the Cradle of Humankind, both World Heritage Sites. Potchefstroom wants to become a Cyber City by 2010, which will provide opportunities for IT development. Matlosana campus is a practical training centre for the colleges Engineering courses. In the heart of mining activities, the centre has responded to the need for specialised refresher programmes and the re-skilling of retrenched employees. The Taung campus is surrounded by a rural area, many small businesses, subsistence farming, tourism and game farming. Community projects supported by the municipality are emerging for youth development including water sanitation, capacity-building of counsellors, agriculture and tourism.

Student Support Services


Student support is structured on three levels at Vuselela FET College. They include: A provincial student support forum: Representatives of the North West Department of Education and the three FET colleges in the province meet regarding training, bursaries and partnerships. A college student support committee: The committee includes the Deputy CEO, student support manager and student support ocials from the campuses and the SRC. It is involved in all day-to-day student support activities, thus ensuring the service runs uniformly across campuses. A campus student support committee: Consists of the campus student support ofcer, SRC members and lecturers of various departments. The committee must ensure that decisions of the college committee are implemented according to the needs of the campus. Services include: Financial aid; Student governance; Counselling: Sport and culture; Tracking and the placement of students to follow their post-graduation experiences and provide them with placement for practical training; An Achievers Day and a Diploma Awards Ceremony is held to give recognition to achievers; Life skills campaigns and Leadership training for students from all campuses four times a year.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 11 694 Full-time equivalents: 3 134 Location: North West Campuses: Jouberton, Klerksdorp, Matlosana, Potchefstroom, Taung. Critical Skills: Boilermaking, computer technicians, building-related skills, Fashion and Design and Tourism. Key Strengths: Dedicated and committed sta who contribute to the colleges good results and quality education, who analyse the needs of the community and then oer skills for their benet. Another strength is the focus of the college on re-skilling people who have lost their jobs in the shrinking economic sectors such as mining.

Vuselela FET College has an important role to play to ensure that an increasing number of learners are given the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills to be able to participate fully in the economy

(CEO Dr Desmond Moagiemang Mochwanaesi)

Strategic Partnerships

dult Basic Education and Training (ABET): The college is involved in ABET at the Tecford Centre for the Disabled in Jouberton outside Klerksdrop, at the Kanana Disabled Centre, where it is also providing computer, entrepreneurship and garment-making skills. Department of Labour: The college is registered as a provider for the National Skills Fund. In terms of skills development, it is oering courses in gardening, landscaping and maintenance to the unemployed. North West Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Environment (DACE): The college has a partnership with the Vredefort Domes central reservations and marketing oce and Venterskroon Estates. These partnerships assist DACE at the Vredefort Dome Heritage Site. The college has established a reservations oce at the site which will service all the guesthouses, lodges and other tourist destinations. Tourism and hospitality students from Potchefstroom campus will do workplace training at the site. Field guide training is also being oered here. Municipalities: The college is providing a local economic development learnership to employees from the Bophirima and Bojanala municipalities. Addtitionally, it is providing computer training to ocials of the Matlosana and Southern District Municipality. Business: An IT learnership beneting 40 learners involves Bytes Technology. The college provides computer literacy to retrenched employees from the South African National Defence Force.

Umsobomvu Youth Fund: The fund has established a Youth Advisory Centre at the colleges Taung campus. Mining: Uranium One Mine is involved in the training of tters, electricians and boilermakers by the college. AngloGold Ashanti will oer the Engineering students on-the-job training while the North West Department of Educations ABET Directorate is also using the college to provide ABET. The college provides practical institutional training and refresher training for artisans and artisan helpers for Simmer & Jack mine. Educational institutions: The college is involved with the North-West Universitys academic bridging programmes, psychology and social work departments. Students are doing programmes on various social issues such as self-esteem, personal relationships, recreation and future vision. SETAs: Programme approval has been received from the Sevices SETA, Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA, the Education, Training and Development Practices SETA, the Mining Qualications Authority, ISETT SETA and the Tourism and Hospitality SETA. Future Partnerships include the provisioning of computer and engineering skills to the Provincial Department of Correctional Services. Applications for programme approval were handed to the Agricultural SETA, the Transport SETA, Safety and Security SETA and the Information Systems, Electronics and Telecommunications Technologies SETA.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering & Related Design Tourism Campus Jouberton, Klerksdorp, Potchefstroom and Taung Jouberton and Potchefstroom Jouberton, Klerksdorp, Potchefstroom and Taung Jouberton and Klerksdorp Potchefstroom

Contact Details
Telephone: (018) 462-4255 Fax: (018) 462-7549 Postal address: PO Box 10107, Klerksdorp 2570 E-mail: enquiries@vuselelacollege.co.za

www.vuselelacollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

135

Northern Cape Rural


Quality education for all
FET College
orthern Cape Rural FET College emerged from the coming together of technical colleges in Okiep, De Aar, Kathu, Upington and Kuruman. With its campuses scattered throughout one of the most economically deprived areas of South Africa, the college considers itself to be a provider to the community. It gives access to students for training opportunities that speak directly to the needs of the area, including learnerships in Viticulture,

Our Story
Wine-production, Ceramics, Local Economic Development, Early Childhood Development (ECD), Healthcare and Arts and Crafts. The colleges headquarters are in Upington about 4km from the centre of town. To the southwest of Upington, the Namaqualand Technical Training Institute, (now Namaqualand campus) is located in Okiep, which is approximately 7km from Springbok in Namaqualand. The De Aar campus is situated approximately 2km to the south of the De Aar town centre. The campus was established in 1995 as a satellite of Bloemfontein Technical College. In 1995, it became part of the Kimberley College (which is now part of the Northern Cape Urban FET College) and attained its independence in 2001 before becoming part of the Northern Cape Rural FET College. In 1980, the Kathu campus, on route between Kuruman and Upington, started as a college to train artisans in the academic and theoretical education needed for the mining sector. Kuruman campus started in 1996 as an institution that provided evening classes for computer studies (using a local schools classrooms). By 1999, the demand had grown for other courses to be oered. In 2000, the campus hired buildings from the Kalahari Regional Council and became a satellite of the Kathu campus.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcounts: 6 010 Full-time equivalents: 1 860 Location: Northern Cape Campuses: Kathu, Upington, De Aar, Namaqualand and Kuruman. Critical Skills: The Northern Cape has the lowest population density of South Africas nine provinces. The college assessed comprehensive research into employment, unemployment and the skills matrix that characterises the area and read this against an analysis of the provincial growth and development strategy. In respect of the provincial needs analysis, the following areas were identied as needing skills: Agriculture and Mining, where current operations by BHP Billiton, Kumba Resources and the Associated Manganese Mines of South Africa (Assmang) will be hugely expanded and the range of new mining activities being initiated in Namaqualand. As a result of the above, considerable resources and planning will be committed to the identied sectors for future growth by the government and the business sector in the province. Thus, the following are the needs on a provincial level, where skills are required to match the projected growth: Tourism, Mining, Manufacturing, Mariculture and Construction driven by initiatives such as the governments Expanded Public Works Programme. Key Strengths: The college has developed an outreach strategy to reach the provinces population. The key issues in relation to meeting the areas social needs include the creation of near-to-home education and training to students and to embark on exible delivery to continue services. Thus, the college is exploring the possibilities of a weekend college and open- and distancelearning.

Student Support Services


The colleges student support initiatives are strictly aligned to its performance measures. It has specic targets in respect of throughput rates, take-up rates into the labour market and progression rates into higher education. Having committed itself to these targets, it is treating student service as a business imperative as the college does in all its endeavours. The college conducts upfront potential assessments to properly advise students on programmes and qualications that their potential lends itself to. Tutorial Support becomes ongoing upon registration. The college focuses on specic opportunities for students who complete their studies to increase their self-selling skills. It sensitises students to the advantages of the present specic learning paths. An Employee Assistance Programme is being designed so that the services on oer are of a high standard.

The Northern Cape Rural FET College ensures that it contributes to government initiatives and adopts appropriate good practices, at the same time sharing its own good practice with others. Only by accessing a quality provision can our students secure achievements

(CEO Percy Sago)

Strategic Partnerships

he following strategic partnerships exist: De Beers: The partnerships between the college and De Beers focuses on the infrastructural upgrading of the Namaqualand campus and the training of employees and artisans. Sishen Iron Company (previously Kumba Resources): The college has a partnership with the Sishen Iron Companys Siviele Ingenieurswese en Vakopleidingsentrum (SIVOS) training centre. The centre recruits students from the college. Those who pass a psychometric test can be accepted into an artisans learnership for employment with the company. Municipalities: Northern Cape Rural FET College has partnerships with municipalities in the region for the oering of Local Economic Development learnerships. SETAs: The college has partnerships with various SETAs for the oering of short skills courses and learnerships. The SETAs include the Media, Advertising, Publishing, Printing and Packaging SETA (MAPPP SETA); the Health and Welfare SETA (HWSETA); the Wholesale and Retail SETA (W&RSETA); the Education, Training and Development Practices SETA (ETDP SETA); the Tourism and Hospitality SETA (THETA), the Services SETA and the Local Government SETA (LGSETA). SAD: At its Upington campus SAD employees are trained on site. International: The colleges De Aar campus formed a partnership with Nobel Gymnasiet, an engineering college, in Sweden in 2002. Together with the college, the campus built an Eco house, designed by Nobel Gymnasiet, which is now used as a guesthouse. The campus received R38 000

from the Karlstad Municipality in Sweden to build the house. The Welding department designed the solar heated water systems and has now secured a contract to build it. In 2003 the college also entered into a partnership with Tulholmsgymnasiet, a college specialising in Hospitality. The principal and three lecturers of Tulholmsgymnasiet visited Northern Cape Rural FET College in October 2003. One of the ideas from the Tulhomsgymnasiet visitors that the college wants to pursue is to set up a bakery on the campus. In 2004 lecturers and students from Sweden visited the De Aar campus and worked in its restuarant, while De Aar campus sta and students visited Sweden in 2005. Part of the partnerships is to have sta and student exhanges to share best practices. These partnerships also have the potential of opening up more opportunities for the college to establish international linkages. The college is pursuing a number of partnerships: Departments of Agriculture and Land Aairs: The college is ideally positioned to provide Farm worker/Owner learnerships for the beneciaries of land claims; IT: There are oportunities to seek greater market share in computer training via strategic partnerships with all provincial and local government institutions for the towns in which the college has delivery sites. Provincial Department of Education: The college can deliver on Adult Basic Education & Training. Mines: There are opportunities to consolidate partnerships with mines in Kathu and Namaqualand for the training of artisans. Private Enterprise: The college is keen to grow its bursary scheme through partnerships with the private sector.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Engineering and Related Design Management Marketing Tourism IT and Computer Science, and Finance, Economics and Accounting.

Contact Details
Telephone: (054) 331-3836 Fax: (054) 331-3966 Postal address: Private Bag X5975, Upington 8800 E-mail: sago@lantic.net

50 colleges, 1 goal

137

Northern Cape Urban


We can change your future
n 1 April 2002, Kimberley College and the Northern Cape Technical College amalgamated to become the Northern Cape Urban FET College. The college operates on two campuses in Kimberley. One is in the central business district and is known as the City campus. The other is in Vergenoeg, a township of Kimberley, and is known as the Moremogolo campus. The Kimberley College was created in 1997 when two colleges, the Moremogolo Technical College and R C Elliot Technical College, merged. This was the rst phase in the establishment of a unitary college for Kimberley and the surrounding district. Later, this college became the Moremogolo campus. The Northern Cape Technical College, in turn, started with the technical training of artisans in the SA School of Mines building in Hull Street, Kimberley, in 1896, with practical work being done at the old workshops of diamond gaint De Beers. In later years, this facility moved to Johannesburg and became the University of the Witwatersrand. This formed the basis, though, for the establishment of the Northern Cape Technical College in 1943.

FET College

Our Story
The colleges vision is to be a dynamic partner in the socioeconomic improvement of the region by providing optimal access to learners; complementing general education and training or school education and higher education or university education by lling the gap between the two sectors; creatively developing entrepreneurs and providing market-related vocational training. One of the colleges strengths is its sport. Rugby and cricket academies have been established, with soccer and netball to follow. The rugby academy attracts many students and has been feeding the Griqua u/19; u/21 and u/23 teams.

The colleges Wise Bus mobile computer centre is equipped with computers and caters for 22 learners. Only one school in Kimberleys Galeshwe township has computers

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 4 629 Full-time equivalents: 2507 Location: Northern Cape Campuses: Kimberley (two) Critical Skills: The Northern Cape has semi-precious stones such as rose quartz and amethyst that are unique to the province. In the colleges stone-cutting and polishing workshops, these stones are cut and polished for jewellery. In the diamond valuation and jewellery manufacturing workshops, the students have started learning the valuation of diamonds. Other critical skills offered at the Moremogolo campus include Cabinetmaking and Carpentry, Hospitality and Catering, Plumbing, Electrical Engineering, Motor Mechanics, Welding, Upholstery, Building and Clothing Production. Key Strengths: A proud heritage, good facilities which are accessible to learners, sound administrative and nancial management practices, a reputation for exceptional service to disenfranchised groups, longstanding relationship with the corporate sector and reputable corporate learning practices, high pass rate and aordability.

Student Support Services


The college oers a range of services, including: Counselling: One of the most important student support services. Since the onset of counselling and the employment of a psychologist, at-risk students have become more condent to come forward with their problems, which helps both lecturers and students. Career Guidance and Job Placement: The college appointed its rst job placement ofcer a year ago. Her oce deals with the placement of former students as well as students who have just completed their N6 studies. So far, all N6 students of November 2004 and June 2005 have been placed. Life Skills: The areas covered include stress and time and conict management. Sport: The college oers rugby, soccer, cricket, netball, beach volleyball and tennis, which serve to strengthen the morale of the college community. Financial Aid: Bursaries are oered. Health Awareness: The service is linked to clinics and focuses on areas such as HIV/Aids and teenage pregnancies.

The Northern Cape Urban FET College is a dynamic partner in the socioeconomic improvement of the region by creatively developing entrepreneurs and well-prepared citizens with contextually relevant competencies

(CEO Cliord Barnes)

Strategic Partnerships

ETAs: The college has links with 12 SETAs: Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services, Energy, Construction, Education, Training and Development Practices, Tourism and Hospitality, Forest Industries, Wholesale and Retail, Chemical Industries, Mining and Minerals and the Financial and Accounting Services SETAs. Learnerships: The college successfully completed seven learnerships in the past two years. These included an Umsobomvu Learnership in the Servicing of Light Motor Vehicles, two learnerships in Air-conditioning, Refrigeration and Ventilation, one in Electrical Engineering, one in Television repairs and one for a National Certicate in Public Financing. In addition, the colleges Early Childhood Development learnership, in conjunction with the Provincial Department of Social Services, involves 100 learners at six sites in the Northern Cape. Community: The colleges Wise Bus mobile computer centre is equipped with computers and caters for 22 learners. Only one school in Kimberleys Galeshwe township has computers. The Tlaloganyang Early Learning Centre is a college project that is sponsored by De Beers Consolidated Mines and the Equal Opportunity Trust. Training institutions: Jewellry Manufacturing and Stone Cutting is run in conjunction with Vukani-Ubuntu, a training project for jewellers from disadvantaged communities. Jewellry Manufacturing is a learnership with the Mining Qualications Authority.

Government departments: The college is working with the Provincial Department of Education to provide teachers with competency in computer skills and advanced computer training. It also has a partnership with the Provincial Department of Health to train disadvantaged students in the National Senior Certicate so that they can continue with further training. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: In addition to one learnership, the fund is also involved with a Graduate Development Programme to equip graduates with life skills, a drivers licence and computer skills to enhance their employability. Mining: The college is in a partnership with De Beers Consolidated Mines to deliver an Electrical learnership in Kimberley. Simulation: Simulated Enterprises South Africa and the college are working together to provide simulated training for students. Information Technology: An IT diploma as well as the Cost and Management diploma is oered in conjunction with Unisa. After completing the three years of study, students receive a diploma from Unisa. Certicates in Computer Technician, MCSE/A (a Microsoft Certied System Engineer), the International Computer Drivers Licence and Web & Application Development are also oered. The college is the only accredited Cisco Academy in the province. The academy provides skills to students to work in the IT eld.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme IT and Computer Science Finance, Economics and Accounting Oce Administration Tourism Management Marketing Hospitality Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering & Related Design Campus Both campuses City Both campuses City Moremogolo Both campuses from 2008 Moremogolo from 2008 Moremogolo City City

Contact Details

www.ncufetcollege.ac.za

Telephone: (053) 839-2000 Fax: (053) 832-1713 Postal address: Private Bag X5031, Jan Smuts Boulevard Kimberley 8300 E-mail: tech@kimberley.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

139

Boland
Education in Action

FET College

oland College consists of ve campuses in Caledon, Paarl, Stellenbosch, Strand and Worcester. Four of these were amalgamated between 1998 and 2001 and the Caledon campus was opened in January 2002. Stellenbosch is the oldest campus, founded in 1918. Strand campus opened in 1963 with evening classes. Paarl campus also began as an evening school in 1968 and became a technical institute in 1979. Worcester campus started in 1970 as a Technical Institute and merged with Shnge Teachers College in 1998 to form the Worcester Community College. The college serves a geographical area known as the Boland in the Western Cape, of which 65% of the provincial population is under 35. Because Boland College is aware that there is a desperate shortage of skills and the high unemployment and illiteracy levels which are aecting our economy, one of the colleges strategic objectives is to take relevant, needs-driven education and training (that can lead to employment) to the people who need it most. This means that the college must become more accessible to a variety of dierent types of learners, namely unemployed youth, youth at risk, adults,

Our Story
the employed who need upskilling or re-skilling and second-chance learners who did not have the opportunity before. The college will also have to become more exible in its delivery to accommodate these learners with regard to: Time (to be open over weekends, in the evenings and all year round); Place (to be prepared to take training to the learner wherever he or she may be); Delivery mode (dierent ways of learning). To respond to the above, the college has Skills Centres at each of its ve campuses.

Student Support Services


The student support unit at Boland College consists of a Director: Student Support Services and support sta members at each of the ve campuses. Comprehensive entry, on-course and exit support is provided to deal with personal, education and training needs. Entry support comprises: Referral and follow-up of specically identied students for determining skills levels; Conducting interviews using the PACE career guidance programme; Referral of students with accommodation needs; Induction of new students; Support of students with special needs; Referral of students in need of nancial support; Promotion of student support services. On-course support comprises: Needs analysis to identify student support priorities; Promotion of health and wellness through programmes such as sport, culture and recreation; Conducting advisory and referral services such as health services and nancial aid; Identifying student leadership development needs; Developing student leadership. Exit support comprises: Referring and recording requests for job placement; Identifying potential job placement partners; Providing details about further education and training; Maintaining contact with students, via e-mail where possible.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 7 000 Full-time equivalent: 4 500. Location: Western Cape Campuses: Caledon, Paarl, Stellenbosch, Strand and Worcester. Critical Skills: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, Tourism and Eco-tourism, Entertainment, hi-tech enterprises, Finance, Film-making, cheeses and dairy products secondary production, fruit juices, Jewellery Design/Manufacturing, Ceramics Design/Manufacturing and security practices. Key Strengths: Boland College is positioned to serve the rural areas of the Overberg, Helderberg, Winelands, Breede River Valley and Overstrand areas. It is responsive as it oers only scarce and critical skills. It has dedicated sta members and good facilities, has established a quality assurance directorate to develop and implement a quality assurance system and delivers, through strategic planning, the mandate required from FET colleges. It oers exible learning as it trains on- and o-site wherever there is a need and oers training in the rst language of the largest component of students. It also oers extensive student support.

It is Boland Colleges vision to be a leader in innovation; to provide quality education and training responsive to community needs and management that aords equal opportunities to the individual to reach his or her full potential

(CEO Chops Fourie)

Strategic Partnerships

he national objective of forming at least 10 good partnerships, is at the core of Boland Colleges future focus. Where the college does not have all the resources, training is undertaken in partnership with organisations that do. This applies to partnerships with industry for work-based specialist training (construction) or with higher education institutions. The college is also able to oer training in other provinces in partnership with other FET institutions. Government Departments: The college is training inmates at correctional services throughout the Western Cape for the Department of Labour (DoL) in programmes such as Cultivation of Vegetables and Clothing Production. The college is also a partner in the Isivuno Employment and Skills Development Lead Employer project (ESDLE) in Stellenbosch and has been appointed as a training provider for many of its envisaged learnerships. It has been appointed lead provider for the Western Capes Department of Public Works and Transports Extended Public Works Programme in the Winelands and Overberg region for a variety of learnerships. Municipality: In July 2001, the colleges rst Skills Training Centre was opened in partnership with the Drakenstein Municipality in Mbekweni, a township outside Paarl, where Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) Literacy and Numeracy training takes place, as well as training in building

skills and ceramics. Some learnerships and short courses are oered in partnership with the West Coast District Municipality Centre for Extended Learning. Construction: Another new skills centre has been erected on campus in Paarl in partnership with a private provider, Tjeka Training Matters and Tjeka Development Solutions, and the Boland Master Builders Association, to attend to the training of all the building skills and civil engineering, such as roadworks, in the region. Tjeka, in partnership with Boland College, has applied to be a Centre of Excellence in the construction industry. Basic Skills: Skills Training Centres have been completed in the Strand, Caledon, Stellenbosch and Worcester (where the college will also oer training to the Breede River Municipality). A Boland Educational Trust, underwritten by Absa Bank, has been established to help fund this. SETAs: The College has recently completed the third roll-out of training retrenchees for the Wholesale & Retail SETAs Project Rave to become entrepreneurs. Boland College has been awarded a contract to do skills training for SEIFSA (Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of SA), the steel chamber of MERSETA. Last year, the college was awarded the contract for Mechanical Upgrade, which included training in reghting.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Marketing Finance, Economics and Accounting IT and Computer Science Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design Primary Agriculture Hospitality Tourism Campus Caledon, Paarl, Strand and Worcester Caledon, Paarl, Strand and Worcester Paarl, Strand and Worcester Worcester Caledon and Strand Worcester Worcester Paarl Stellenbosch

Contact Details
Telephone: (021) 886-7111/ 886-7112 Fax: (021) 886-8260 Postal address: Private Bag X5068, Stellenbosch 7599 E-mail: hq@bolandcollege.com

www.bolandcollege.com

50 colleges, 1 goal

141

College of Cape Town


Learning for Life
Our Story

FET College

ollege of Cape Town is the oldest college in South Africa, dating back to 1902 when the South African College Authorities rst instituted evening classes in Cape Town. This was the inception of the Cape Technical College. In 1907, the Senate of the South African College introduced a three-year Engineering and Mechanical Engineering course in addition to the other courses. Students enrolled numbered 184, of whom 132 had signed up for the rst years engineering course. By 1909, classes were oered in 22 subjects, with 200 students enrolled. Today, the College of Cape Town has one the largest number of enrolments of any South African FET college. Situated in the central area of the Peninsula, the

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 9 954 Full-time equivalent: 4 443 Location: Western Cape Campuses: Athlone, City, Crawford, Gardens, Guguletu, Pinelands, Salt River, Thornton and Wynberg. Critical Skills: Building and Civil Engineering Construction, Welding, Early Childhood Development, Tourism and Hospitality. The college actively participates in all SETA activities that tackle skills shortages through learnerships and new venture creation. Key Strengths: A comprehensive variety of programmes; the biggest market share in Engineering in the Western Cape; all courses are NQF-related and industry-aligned, and widely accredited by relevant stakeholders such as SETAs and industry institutes and boards; a department, one of only a few in South Africa, which focuses on the fundamental subjects. Modules include numeracy, literacy, languages, mathematical literacy, and ITC. Academic areas of excellence are its Jewellery Manufacturing and Graphic Design departments; Early Childhood Development NQFaligned and Higher Education; International Computer Driver Licence (ICDL), Mechanical, Civil and Electrical departments; New Venture Creation (NVC); Business Studies and Financial Management. Provision of student support services at all our campuses; and the Open Learning Centre at Crawford Campus.

college serves the greater Cape Town area, including a signicant percentage of traditionally disadvantaged areas and townships. The College of Cape Town acquired its present name in 2002 when four colleges (Sivuyile College, Athlone Technical College, Cape College and the Western Province College) merged. Today, there are nine campuses, each with workshops, lecture rooms, computer rooms and studios for practical work in Athlone, City, Crawford, Gardens, Guguletu, Pinelands, Salt River, Thornton and Wynberg. There are three residences: in the city and at Crawford and Thornton. The Crawford and City campuses have open learning centres oering the latest technology with services including student counselling, career guidance, a library, computer and internet access, as well as printing, faxing and photocopying facilities. This service will be extended to other campuses. The colleges vision is to be the preferred provider of FET. Its mission is to be an institution of excellence that develops the potential of clients through quality education and training in response to the skills development needs of the country.

Student Support Services


There are a variety of support services to help students cope with a range of problems and diculties, whether personal or academic. The student support services unit consists of a manager and a student ocer per campus. They oer the following: Counselling: Counselling services include private, condential individual sessions as well as support groups. Academic Development: Students can be assisted with improving academic performance, study methods, exam preparation and time management. There are services for disabled and special-needs students. Workplace Preparation: The college oers career guidance and career-interest assessments, workshops and training for job-hunting, CV writing and interview skills and job shadowing. Students Representative Council: The student support services also co-ordinates and supports the SRC, co-ordinates social and cultural activities on campus and co-ordinates and supports a student newsletter. Life Skills: It hosts workshop and information sessions on topics such as HIV/Aids, sex and sexuality and substance abuse.

We work hard at creating an environment that is conducive to learning. Our facilities are easily accessible. We pride ourselves on of quality in terms of teaching, learning and service. having competent and committed sta. We emphasise the provision

(CEO Jannie Isaacs)

Strategic Partnerships

ETAs: The College of Cape Town and SETA strategic partnerships include joint projects and programmes with the following SETAs: Construction SETA (CETA); Chemical SETA (CHIETA); Education, Training and Development Practices (ETDP) SETA; Energy SETA (ESETA); Forest Industries Education and Training Authority (FIETA); Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry (Foodbev) SETA; Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority SETA (INSETA); Media, Advertising, Publishing, Printing and Packaging (MAPPP) SETA; Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA); Mining Qualications Authority (MQA) SETA; Services SETA and Wholesale and Retail (W&R) SETA. Future SETA Partnerships Include: Clothing Textiles Footwear and Leather (CTFL) SETA; Financial and Accounting Services SETA; Information Systems Electronics and Telecomunication Technologies (ISETT) SETA and Tourism and Hospitality SETA (THETA). Government Departments: Partnerships include Pollsmoor Correctional Services and Western Cape Education Department (WCED). Educational Institutions: FET colleges such as Boland College, Northlink FET College, South Cape College, False Bay College, West Coast College and Bualo City College. The higher education institutions Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), University of Western Cape and the University of South Africa (Unisa) also form part of our list of strategic partnerships. Future partnerships in this category are INTEC College and the University of Cape Town. Other

partnerships are with Cape IT Initiative (CTI); Cape Routes Unlimited; Chamber of Mines; Computer Society; Cisco Systems; Computer Industry Association (CompTIA); Crysillis Academy; Hilton Ross; Institute of Chartered Bookkeepers; Institute of Marketing Management; Kgabane; Learning Resources; Leogog Business Solutions; Livni-train Management Consultants; League of Friends of the Blind (LOFOB); Master Builders Association (MBA); Neil Miller Construction; Steel and Engineering Industries Federation of South Africa (SEIFSA); Umsobomvu Youth Fund and Waters Firearm Training and Assessment Centre CC. Future Partnerships in this Category Include: BMW, BP, Cogsi, Deaf Federation of South Africa (DEAFSA), Dell Computers, Fabric Zone, the Federated Hospitality Association of South Africa (FEDHASA), Kehis Upholsterers, MAC Brothers, SA Chefs Association, SA Wine Academy, Vitafoam and Vulcan. International Partnerships Include: South African/German Technical Co-Operation (GTZ); Evangelische Berufsschularbeit Berlin; Handswerkkammer Potsdam, Germany; Phoenix Contact, Germany; Haugaland College, Norway; Rain4all Research and Development Ltd, Netherlands and RKK, Norway; Koning Willem I College, Netherlands; British Council; and DANIDAs Support to Education & Skills Development (SESD) programme. Partnerships with Non-governmental Organisations Include: Centre for Early Childhood Development; Early Learning Resource Unit; Ekuhleni Community Project and Grassroots.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Civil Engineering & Buliding Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction IT & Computer Science Engineering & Related Design Tourism Hospitality 2008 Marketing Campus Guguletu City and Crawford City Thornton Pinelands, Guguletu, Crawford Crawford Athlone City City

Contact Details
Telephone: 086 010 3682 Fax: (021) 687-9152 Postal address: PO Box 1054, Cape Town 8000 E-mail: info@cct.edu.za

www.cct.edu.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

143

False Bay
FET College

Building a rm foundation through education

Our Story
The college also runs successful bridging programmes for students wanting to study science and engineering at higher education institutions, but who do not have the required school-leaving results. To alleviate the critical shortage of electrical engineers in South Africa, the college has focused on growing two departments: Electrical Engineering and Mechatronics. The integrated skills of electronics, IT and mechanics taught in Mechatronics are critical for South Africas automotive, chemical, and plant manufacturing industries. The electrical engineering department has recognition from the national energy provider, Eskom. In 2005, three of the colleges engineering lecturers were recognised for their expertise by the Western Cape Department of Education. The college is extremely successful in placing graduates in jobs in the elds of tourism, nance, industry, and government.

alse Bay College for FET was founded in September 2002 when South Peninsula College and Westlake Technical College merged. Today, the college comprises ve campuses which cover the False Bay area from Cape Point to Khayelitsha. They are the Good Hope campus in Khayelitsha, the Mitchells Plain delivery site at Portlands Primary, the Muizenberg campus, Westlake campus in Tokai and the Noordhoek campus in Sunnydale. The False Bay coastal region of Cape Town is home to many impoverished people, so the colleges focus is not only on vocational training but on generally improving opportunities for people who live in the area. The colleges Centre for Science and Technology prepares disadvantaged schoolgoers for university by teaching mathematics, physical science, biology, and computer studies. This full-time, three-year programme is oered in both English and Xhosa and has had a 100% pass rate for several years running.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 6 500 Full-time equivalents: 2 670 (2005) Location: Western Cape Campuses: Khayelitsha, Mitchells Plain, Muizenberg, and Noordhoek (Sunnydale). Critical Skills: Boatbuilding, the Centre for Science and Technology, Leadership, Education and Advancement Foundations, Electrical Engineering and Mechatronics. Key Strengths: The college is able to respond quickly to training opportunities and is located in two Presidential nodal zones, or special areas of development, to which it offers training. It is dedicated to provide access and support to students with disabilities and has strong partnerships with industries, government departments and SETAs.

Student Support Services


False Bay College has a strong student support services department with one dedicated student support ocer on each campus. These ocers oer the following services: Careers and personal counselling: Learning Assistance: The college assists students with life skills such as study methods and time management. Workshops and Seminars: The college runs awareness workshops and programmes on health and wellness. Job Placement Support: At present, the college is expanding its placement support to graduates to help them to nd work. In addition, the college oers job preparedness workshops throughout the year. Financial Aid: Loans and bursaries are available. Inclusion: The college provides support to students with barriers to learning through, among others, a dedicated full-time occupational therapist. The college is committed to creating an enabling environment for students with disabilities (such as cerebral palsy and learning disabilities). It has partnered with Highline Community College in Seattle, US, which has developed a practical model for inclusion of students with disabilities. The resulting Inclusivity Project is one of the rst for South African FET.

The integrated skills of electronics, IT and mechanics taught in Mechatronics are critical for South Africas automotive, chemical, and plant manufacturing industries

We focus on courses that are relevant locally while positioning ourselves nationally to be the leaders in niche areas. Our vision is to develop people by serving as a gateway to employment, small business development, and higher education. (CEO Cassie Kruger)

Strategic Partnerships

arastatals: The college partnered with Eskoms corporate social responsibility programme through which previously disadvantaged students from universities of technology were sent to complete their practical training at the colleges Westlake campus. International: The Leadership, Education and Advancement Foundation (LEAF) has been funded by Irish Aid, providing funding for students from previously disadvantaged communities to attend this bridging programme and gain entry into higher education. COSAT: The Centre of Science and Technology is funded by Sanlam, Upstream Development Trust, Vodacom, Breadline Africa and Telkom. The partners provide for and fund up to 500 students to prepare them to access higher education, provide computer infrastructure, a student feeding scheme, student bursaries and outreach programmes into the community. Xhosa, Afrikaans and English are oered together with Physical Science, Mathematics, Biology, Computer Science and a choice between Technology or Entrepreneurship. Skills: Operation Chrysalis is a skills training partnership with the Chrysalis Academy and the Provincial Department of Safety and Security. It provides opportunities for youth-at-risk in townships to transform themselves into positive rolemodel leaders. The college provides three weeks of workshopbased skills training in basic engineering skills.

SETAs: In 2003, 31 young men and women were trained in an Electrical learnership on NQF Levels 2, 3 and 4 in partnership with the Energy SETA and Eskom. Furthermore, 20 unemployed people with disabilities were trained on a Generic Business Administration learnership in partnership with the Insurance SETA and three insurance companies, including Old Mutual. From 2007, the college will oer the Department of Educations new National Certicate (Vocational) in IT and Computer Science. This will be in partnership with the ISETTSETA (Information Systems, Electronics and Telecommunications Technologies) as well as the departments of Communuication and Labour to provide this vocational course to disadvantaged youth in Khayelitsha. Boatbuilding is oered in partnership with the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services SETA (MERSETA), which is the accreditation and certicating body. Full-time students enrol for a year in groups of 15. In this time, they receive theoretical and practical training in small-craft construction with content about joinery (woodwork), composites (breglass), electrical, welding and basic hand skills. Students have to spend time in industry to achieve industry-related experience.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Oce Administration Finance, Economics and Accounting Hospitality Engineering and Related Design Engineering and Related Design Civil Engineering & Building Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction IT & Computer Science Campus Muizenberg and Good Hope Muizenberg and Good Hope Muizenberg and Good Hope Westlake Westlake Westlake Westlake and Good Hope Good Hope

Contact Details
Telephone: (021) 712 1080 Fax: (021) 712-1092 Postal address: Private Bag X25, Tokai 7966 E-mail: jeanne.bonnema@falsebaycollege.co.za

www.falsebaycollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

145

Northlink
FET College

The Education Connection

orthlink College was created in 2002 following the merger of four colleges in the northern suburbs of the greater Cape Town metropole. The colleges were: Wingeld Technical College (three campuses: Wingeld, Goodwood and Table Bay), Protea College, Tygerberg College (two campuses: Tygerberg and Parow) and Bellville Technical College. In 2005 Northlink bought Belhar College, a private institution. The name is a combination of North, reecting the geographical positioning of the institution in Cape Town, and link, which describes the initial linking of the former colleges but, more importantly, the critical link between school education and the world of work. One of Northlink Colleges strengths innovation in meeting skills needs has been expressed in a number of ways. For instance, Northlink was the rst to develop a Simulated Enterprise (SE) in 1999. This is a mock company. Northlinks rst SE

Our Story
was created on the Parow campus following the donation of furniture from Sanlam. This created a workplace mirroring that of a courier company with Skynet WorldWide Express as the mentor. In 2006, with a grant from the Western Cape governments Ikapa Elihlumayo Development Fund, Northlink launched a soft drink SE. Other rsts include the establishment, in 2000, of the Northlink Golf School that oers a pre-matric and matric academic and professional golf programme. The objective is to allow top players to complete grades 10 and 11 in one year, grade 12 in another and at the same time begin a process of enhancing their golng skills towards a professional level. In 2004, three students won the World Student Golf Championship. Northlink has three business units: Hair and Cosmetology, the Clothing Factory and a Restaurant and Conference Centre.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 16 000 Full-time equivalents: 5 566 Location: Western Cape Campuses: Bellville, Belhar, Goodwood, Parow, Protea, Table Bay, Tygerberg and Wingeld Critical Skills: Toolmaking, Autotronics, Maritime Studies, Pipe-tting, Civil Construction, Drama, Sport Management, including a golf school, Tourism, Hospitality, Financial Management and Information Technology. Key Strengths: Innovative in meeting skills demands; visionary leadership; highly qualied and committed sta; modern facilities and equipment; strong links with commerce and industry; growing links with SETAs in 2004/2005 Northlink oered the highest number of learnerships in the public FET sector; a total quality management system and learning organisation approach; various simulators in which students can gain workplace experience. Northlink also provides bursaries to the value of R400 000 per year.

Student Support Services


In 2003, Northlink College established a unit to provide holistic support to students. The centralised unit has student support ocers on each campus comprising a senior manager and three managers (responsible respectively for counselling to business studies and engineering studies students as well as one for the student support ocers). There are also eight student support ocers. Spread over three broad areas entry, on course and exit support the following services are available: Financial Aid: Northlink annually provides internal bursaries to the value of about R400 000. Career Guidance: Northlink provides the Pace career guidance programme as well as support from counsellors. Academic Support: This focuses on life skills, study methods and programme guidance. Health and Wellness: Drug awareness, trauma counselling, HIV/Aids awareness campaigns and support to aected and infected students. Student Representative Council: Student Governance aims at enabling students to be active in leadership and governance roles. Sport: Northlink College has a variety of sport clubs and related activities in rugby, netball, hockey, athletics, karate and soccer.

Northlink College is committed to excellent service and meeting national and provincial needs by exposing students to the world of work; providing bursaries and by being a quality destination for learnership training
(CEO Leon Beech)

Strategic Partnerships

ndustries: BP South Africa donated a truck for training. Caltex, through the National Shutdown Forum (NSF) donated training equipment. The Tool Making Association of South Africa (TASA) in the Western Cape gave equipment at very reduced prices and, through their intervention, Northlink received R200 000 from the provincial government. Atlantic Forge, manufacturers of vehicle components, allowed the college to use equipment on its site to train. Cape Manufacturing Engineer (CME) also allowed Northlink to use equipment on its site. Cape Global, a construction enterprise, made its site available to train and assess students. Freddy Hirsch and Crown National, two suppliers of butchery equipment, are supporting Northlink. They have been instrumental in the initial planning for the erection of a training centre of excellence for fresh-meat processing. Government Departments: The Western Cape Department of Public Works allowed Northlink to use its facilities to train where it did not have the equipment for the training of vehicle servicing and vehicle maintenance. For the Western Cape Department of Education, Northlink is oering a teaching assistant project to train assistants for Grade R educators, especially to enhance the numerical and literacy skills of children. Learnerships: Northlink has a strong partnership with Business Survival Solutions Training for the delivery of various learnerships under Learnership

1000, an initiative from the Western Cape departments of transport and public works. In addition, Northlink has a partnership with a driving school, which is also part of Learnership 1000. Northlink delivers a range of skills programmes and learnerships for the Wholesale and Retail SETA in partnership with companies such as Ultra Liquors and Pick n Pay. Educational Institutions: Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) allowed Northlink to use its facilities to train machinists and toolmakers in cases where Northlink did not have the equipment. Stellenbosch University helped Northlink with the development of learning material for a learnership in Fresh Meat Processing. Experiential Training: Workplaces that allow students to do experiential training in the hospitality industry include: Party Design, Global Conference Centre, Feedam, Kolping Guest House, Pavilion, Encore, Leatherman, Maroela House, Kent Conferencing Centre, Vals Catering, Institute for the Deaf, Red Cross Hospital, Noluthando School for the Deaf, Dominican School and Club Mykonos. SETAs: Northlink College has partnerships with 12 dierent SETAs in the following areas: Services, Food and Beverage, Manufacturing Industry, Tourism and Hospitality, Transport, Chemical Industries, Construction, Education and Training, Local Government, Energy, Education Training and Development Practices, Financial and Accounting Services, Wholesale and Retail.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Marketing Finance, Economics and Accounting Management Oce Administration IT and Computer Science Tourism Hospitality Civil Engineering Construction Electrical Infrastructure Construction Engineering and Related Design

Contact Details
Telephone: (021) 930-0957 Fax: (021) 930-5729 Postal address: Private Bag X1, Panorama 7506

www.northlink.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

147

South Cape
FET College

Let your dreams come true . . .

Our Story
The college, which has its central oce in George, also oers programmes on school sites in Knysna and Riversdale. In 1994, after three years of deliberations between the Western Cape Department of Education and techncial colleges in the southern Cape the institution was established. This was an amalgamation of the George Technical College (initially the George Technical Institute, founded in 1968), Oudtshoorn Technical College (initially the Technical Institute in Oudtshoorn, founded in 1981), the South Cape Technical Institute in George, which started its rst activities in the early 1980s, and Mossel Bay which started operating in 1993 as a satellite of the Oudtshoorn Technical College. This created South Cape College - a rst for South Africa. In the rest of the country, college mergers started from 2002 onwards.

he catchment area of the South Cape College (80 822 km) is the largest of the six FET colleges in the Western Cape. It includes Beaufort West in the north, Heidelberg in the west and Plettenberg Bay in the east, as well as the coastal line. There is a population of 500 000 in South Cape Colleges catchment area. The college oers programmes to approximately 1% of the population, but its dream is to grow the number to 5% over the next 10 years. There are seven campuses. Three are in George: George campus, Outeniqua campus and the Skills Centre in Thembalethu; Mossel Bay campus; Oudtshoorn campus with its Fosters Manor Guest House which serves as a training centre for Hospitality and Tourism students; Beaufort West campus (Presidential nodal zone or special development area) and Bitou campus in Plettenberg Bay. There are hostels at George and the Skills Centre, in Mossel Bay and in Oudtshoorn.

Fast Facts
Total number of students: Headcount: 4 247 Full-time equivalents: 2 653. Location: Southern part of the Western Cape Campuses: George (three), Oudtshoorn, Mossel Bay, Bitou (Plettenberg Bay) and Beaufort West. Critical Skills: Hospitality, Tourism, Oce Administration and Electrical Engineering. The college contributes to the communities in its catchment area with training in Building, Vehicle Servicing, Electrical Work, Hairdressing, Plumbing and Spray-painting. It also provides skills to students in prisons. Its Skills Centre won the award for the best external service provider to the Western Cape Department of Correctional Services in George in 2006. Key Strengths: Each campus focuses on a niche market: Oudtshoorn on Hospitality and Tourism Studies, Mossel Bay and Beaufort West on Engineering and George on Business. The college oers custom-made packages to suit specic needs. For example, the college trained 20 entrepreneurs in Beaufort West to manage their own business hives and about 80 people in the greater Karoo region to obtain their Code 10 Heavy vehicle drivers licences.

Student Support Services


Student support services at the college are aimed at enabling students to meet learning challenges and maximise their potential in answer to labour needs. Services include: Induction: During orientation week a guide answers questions on how, what, where and when things happen on campus. Counselling: Students have access to professional counsellors and the student support department also oers support in study skills and time management. Career Guidance: The Open Learning Centre has DVDs on study skills. There is an interest test to help with career guidance and an initial assessment test on numeracy and literacy will be applied in 2007 to enhance eective placement of students in programmes. Financial Aid: Financial aid is available to all full-time students. Bursaries of merit are available to those students with special achievement in academic, leadership or sports. Workplace Preparation: Through workreadiness workshops and a referral system, students are assisted with CV writing, interview success and employment with local industry. Student Representative Councils: There are SRCs at each campus. Sport, culture and social activities take place regularly.

Our highest priority is to contribute positively to the employment, self-employment and career advancement of the communities in our catchment area

(CEO William Holtshousen)

Strategic Partnerships

outh Cape Colleges partnerships on a national and provincial level are with the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, SETAs, Absa, Unisa, Free State University, DANIDAs Support to Education and Skills Development (SESD) Programme and PetroSA. PetroSA: PetroSA donated its prefabricated buildings to South Cape College in 1993; these buildings were used to establish the Mossel Bay campus of South Cape College. Being in partnership with PetroSA means that the colleges learners are trained in Welding and placed in jobs at PetroSA. The General Manager of PetroSA currently serves on the South Cape College council. Government Departments: One of the bigger and most strategic partnerships the South Cape FET College had prior to 2006 was with the Department of Labours pilot project of the Employment and Skills Development Lead Employer (ESDLE). The launching of the ESDLEs were as a result of governments belief that they would assist in ensuring that larger numbers of unemployed people, especially in rural areas, were placed in small and medium enterprises. It aimed to place 80 000 people in learnerships by March 2005 and South Cape College trained 250 learners across 11 programmes to help achieve the national target. Incubation:The biggest envisaged partnership is with the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Universitys

(NMMU) George campus regarding the implementation of business incubation models. Business incubation is a public and/or private process designed to nurture business ideas and startup companies and, through a comprehensive business support programme, help them establish and accelerate their growth and success. Incubation has become a major vehicle for SMME development and forms the cornerstone of successful innovation systems as well as providing specialised services to assist entrepreneurs to establish and grow businesses. These specialised services from the college will include, but are not limited to, personal support, mentoring and development assistance for the entrepreneur; and pre-incubation programmes. This helps sta development as well as the development of a second-sector economy in which learners will become employers who will employ the unemployed.

Incubation has become a major vehicle for SMME development and forms the cornerstone of successful innovation systems as well as providing specialised services to assist entrepreneurs to establish and grow businesses

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Marketing; IT and Computer Science; Electrical Infrastructure Construction; Finance, Economics and Accounting; Civil Engineering & Building Construction; Engineering and Related Design; Oce Administration; Hospitality; and Tourism.

Contact Details
Telephone: (044) 884-0359 Fax: (044) 884-0361 Postal address: PO Box 10400, George 6530 E-mail: rector@sccol.co.za

www.sccollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

149

West Coast
FET College

Institution of Excellence

Our Story
Vredenburg was the rst college in South Africa to be awarded the title Welding School of Excellence, an international ISO 9000 accreditation. The Vredendal Campus in Namaqualand caters to the needs of the dwindling shing industry. It opened in 1997 for Engineering students from the district and in 2003 began to oer courses in Business Studies. The colleges learners are mainly Afrikaans speakers aged 16 to 35 and one of the colleges challenges is to make them fully bilingual to equip them for the workplace. West Coast Colleges mission is to be the focal point of the community and its industries, which centre on agriculture, shing and forestry. With oil and gas exploration, engineering is coming to the fore. With the expansion of the Saldanha Deep Sea Harbour and the skills corridor identied by the Department of Trade and Industry, West Coast College is positioning itself for growth.

est Coast College, proclaimed as a FET college in August 1999, covers a distance of 450km between its campuses, of which there are ve: in Atlantis, Citrusdal, Malmesbury, Vredendal and Vredenburg. The college provides education and training in the West Coast District Municipality, which covers the Matzikama, Cederberg, Bergrivier, Saldanha Bay and Swartland local municipalities. The Atlantis campus was established in the 1980s as the Atlantis Technical Institute. In 1993, it became part of the Protea College, merging with West Coast College in 2002. The Citrusdal campus started in January 1999 as the Citrusdal Centre for FET. In August 1999 it became part of West Coast College. The Malmesbury campus opened in January 2005. The Vredenburg campus was formerly known as the Westlake College and became part of the West Coast College in August 1999.

Fast Facts
Total Number of Students: Headcount: 2 573 Full-time equivalents: 1 303. Location: Western Cape Campuses: Atlantis, Citrusdal, Malmesbury, Vredendal and Vredenburg Critical Skills: The college delivers agriculture, welding, engineering and business studies skills. Agriculture is a key activity in the Western Cape while the Vredenburg National and International Welding School of Excellence does all the training in the province. Vredendal also services the mining industry. Its engineering and business studies are expected to ll the imminent skills gap with the new copper exploration in the area. The college is also providing critical skills to Atlantis. It was a ourishing industrial area until the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) withdrew its subsidies and industry left. Due to SETAs and learnerships, this disillusioned community is becoming motivated and the college is providing vocational training for its four high schools. Key Strengths: Most adults in the area are employed in shing and agriculture. The college lls the skills gap with commercial and engineering studies. Its loan scheme helps students to access programmes.

Student Support Services


Because of the social and economic deprivation of the area, the college has appointed a dedicated and qualied student support ocer at each campus. This person serves in the following ways: Personal Counselling: Students are welcome to arrange a condential appointment with their ocer. Career Guidance: The Pace computer programme helps students with career pathing and they are advised to use the bilingual programme PLATO to enhance their literacy skills. Career guidance and development includes preparing for interviews. Academic Support: This entails helping students to develop good study habits. Wellness and Healthy Living: Student support services oers awareness periods. Weekly tutorials and displays are put on with the assistance of peer educators on each campus. Financial Aid: Financial assistance come to the college through the iKapa Elihlumayo Financial Aid programme. Student Representative Council: The SRC presents the views of students to college management and sta. Parents: The college oers parental guidance on what a proper education can do for their children and society. Sport: Emphasis is placed on sport for morale-building. This includes rugby, bodybuilding and netball.

West Coast FET College oers programmes and short skills which give opportunity for employment, higher education and entrepreneurship. It oers lifelong learning and further education and training to further the economy and our communities

(CEO Osma Jooste-Mokgethi)

Strategic Partnerships

ome of the West Coast Colleges partnerships have not yet been formalised, but they include: Agriculture: Goedgedacht Agricultural Trust the partnership involves training in the agricultural eld and the sharing of resources. Umsobomvu Youth Fund: It involves providing 40 students from disadvantaged backgrounds between the ages of 18 and 35 with skills in Welding and Fabrication. SETAs and Government Departments: The SETA for Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services (MERSETA) Welding Centre of Excellence a formal service level agreement exists and the Welding Centre of Excellence oers training in topend Welding skills for the Vredenburg-Saldanha Bay areas. The project is in partnership with the Western Cape departments of education and labour, the Energy SETA and MERSETA. At Voorberg, a rehabilitation prison in Malmesbury a formal agreement exists for the training of inmates in various skills and the sharing of resources. The Teacher Assistance Programme for the Western Cape Education Department is concentrated at Vredendal and Malmesbury to help deal with the huge shortage of teachers. Municipality: West Coast District Municipality short courses are given in such skills as roadbuilding at the Centre for Extended Learning in Vredenburg. Industries: Tutoring welding apprentices at the

Atlantic campus for the Atlantis Foundry; distance learning at Saldanha including deep-sea harbour rules and regulations, shing law, and how to swim, all for Sea Harvest. Mathematics and science courses are also oered on behalf of Sea Harvest. Agricultural skills training in citrus and tea at Ratelgat near Citrusdal. Hand skills for Koekenaap Mines and Oryz at Vredenburg campus in agreement with Boland Collage. ICDL (International Computer Drivers Licence) for the Diazville Secondary School in Vredenburg. Food and beverage skills on the Vredendal campus, in conjunction with Boland College. Early Childhood Development at Malmesbury campus, together with Boland College. Training in life skills for the Department of Health at Malmesbury campus. Learnerships: The Malmesbury campus is involved in the construction industry, oering 18month programmes in subjects such as Plumbing, Masonry, Building and Bricklaying. Learnerships for Hegnes Engineering at Vredenburg campus. The college is the lead training provider for Ankile Engineering for both learnerships and skills programmes. The Department of Labours training for the Atlantis Education and Training Institute in such subjects as Electrical Work and Fitting and Turning for industry in Atlantis. Learnerships for Spares-building and Engine-building on the West Coast.

National Certicate Vocational Qualications


Programme Engineering and Related Design Hospitality Oce Administration Electrical Infrastructure Construction Campus Malmesbury, Atlantis, Vredendal, Vredenburg and Citrusdal Malmesbury and Vredendal Malmesbury, Atlantis, Vredendal, Vredenburg and Citrusdal Atlantis, Vredendal, Vredenburg and Citrusdal

Contact Details
Telephone: (022) 482-1143 Fax: (022) 487-3983 Postal address: PO Box 935, Malmesbury 7299 E-mail: info@westcoastcollege.co.za

www.westcoastcollege.co.za

50 colleges, 1 goal

151

College Contact Details


See page 51 for an index of each colleges showcase in this publication KWAZULU-NATAL Mthashana FET College Umfolozi FET College Majuba FET College Mnambithi FET College Elangeni FET College Coastal KZN FET College Thekwini FET College Umgungundlovu FET College Esayidi FET College LIMPOPO Lephalale FET College Capricorn FET College Waterberg FET College Vhembe FET College Private Bag X367, Polokwane, 0700 Private Bag X367, Polokwane, 0700 Private Bag X2449, Mokopane, 0600 Private Bag X2415, Makhado, 0920 (015) 297-8367 (015) 297-8389 (015) 297-8367 (015) 297-8389 (015) 491-8581 (015) 516-4774 (015) 516-4783 (015) 781-5725 (015) 781-5721 (015) 307-5440 (015) 307-4493 (013) 269-0278 (015) 297-5448 (015) 297-5448 (015) 491-8579 (015) 873-2483 (015) 516-4772 (015) 781-5346 (015) 307-2204 (013) 269-0278 PO Box 9424, Vryheid, 3100 Private Bag X5023, Richards Bay, 3900 Private Bag X5020, Newcastle, 2940 Private Bag X9903, Ladysmith, 3370 Private Bag X13, Westville, 3630 PO Box 1795, Amanzimtoti, 4125 Private Bag X06, Dormerton, 4015 Private Bag X9060, Pietermaritzburg, 3200 Private Bag X713, Port-Shepstone, 4240 Telephone (034) 980-1010 (035) 789-1101 (035) 902-9500 (034) 329-1184 (034) 329-2004 (034) 326-4888 (036) 638-3800 (031) 267-8055 (083) 557-9248 (031) 905-7000 (031) 905-2595 (031) 250-8400 (033) 341-2100 (039) 318-1433 Fax (034) 980-1012 (035) 789-2585 (034) 329-2580 (034) 326-4889 (036) 631-4146 (031) 267-8060 (031) 267-8061 (031) 905-1319 (031) 905-1399 (031) 208-3653 (033) 345-9827 (039) 318-1514

Mopani South East FET College Private Bag X01024, Phalaborwa, 1390 Letaba FET College Sekhukhune FET College MPUMALANGA Ehlanzeni FET College Nkangala FET College Gert Sibande FET College NORTHERN CAPE Northern Cape Urban FET College Northern Cape Rural FET College NORTH WEST Taletso FET College Vuselela FET College Orbit FET College Pl Private Bag X128, Mmabatho, 2735 PO Box 10107, Klerksdorp, 2570 Private Bag X82096, Rustenburg, 0300 Private Bag X11297, Nelspruit, 1200 PO Box 2282, Witbank, 1035 Private Bag X3475, Standerton, 2430 Private Bag X4017, Tzaneen, 0850 Private Bag X8660, Groblersdal, 0470

(013) 752-7105 (013) 690-1430 (013) 690-3824 (017) 712-9040

(013) 752-4902 (013) 752-8214 (013) 690-1450 (017) 712-9059

Private Bag X5031, Kimberley, 8300 PO Box X1834, Steve Naude Street, Upington, 8800

(053) 839-2000 (054) 331-3836

(053) 832-1713 (053) 839-2068 (054) 331-3966

(018) 381-7074 (018) 462-5821 (018) 462-4255 (014) 592-8461 (014) 592-8462

(018) 381-7410 (018) 462-7549 (014) 592-7013

WESTERN CAPE West Coast FET College Boland FET College South Cape FET College Northlink FET College College of Cape Town FET College False Bay FET College EASTERN CAPE Port Elizabeth FET College East Cape Midlands FET College Buffalo City FET College Lovedale FET College King Sabata Dalindyebo FET College Ingwe FET College Ikhala FET College King Hintsa FET College FREE STATE Goldelds FET College Motheo FET College Maluti FET College Flavius Mareka GAUTENG Tshwane South FET College Tshwane North FET College Ekurhuleni West FET College Ekurhuleni East FET College South West Gauteng FET College Central Johannesburg FET College Westcol FET College Sedibeng FET College Private Bag X1018, Lyttelton, 0140 PO Box 26193, Arcadia, 0007 Private Bag X1030, Germiston, 1400 Private Bag X52, Springs, 1560 PO Box 164, Florida, 1710 Private Bag X2336, Houghton, 2041 Private Bag X17, Randfontein, 1760 Private Bag X020, Vereeniging, 1930 Private Bag X95, Welkom, 9460 Private Bag X20509, Bloemfontein, 9300 Private Bag X870, Mampoi Street, Witsieshoek, 9870 Private Bag X22, Kroonstad, 9500 Private Bag X6040, Port Elizabeth, 6000 Private Bag X35, Uitenhage, 6230 Private Bag 9016, East London, 5200 PO Box 2156, King Williams Town, 5600 Private Bag X5011, Umtata, 5099 PO Box 92491, Mt Frere, 5090 Private Bag X7110, Queenstown, 5320 Private Bag X3018, Butterworth, 4960 PO Box 935, Malmesbury, 7300 Private Bag 5068, Stellenbosch, 7599 PO Box 10400, George, 6530 Private Bag X1, Panorama, 7506 PO Box 1054, Cape Town, 8000 Private Bag X25, Tokai, 7988

Telephone (022) 482-1143 (022) 482-1179 (022) 482-1195 (021) 886-7111 (044) 884-0359 (021) 930-0957 (021) 687-9150 (021) 712-1080

Fax (022) 487-3983 (021) 886-8182 (044) 884-0361 (021) 930-5729 (021) 558-1120 (021) 687-9151 (021) 712-1092

(041) 585-7771 (041) 922-7132 (043) 704-9201 (043) 642-1331 (047) 536-0923 (047) 536-0924 (039) 255-0346 (045) 839-5880 (047) 491-3731

(041) 582-2281 (041) 992-5929 (043) 743-4254 (043) 642-1388 (047) 536-0932 (039) 255-0347 (045) 839-5882 (045) 839-5997 (047) 491-3730

(057) 395-1301 (051) 409-3300 (058) 713-6100 (058) 713-6695 (016) 976-0815

(057) 395-1304 (051) 435-7602 (058) 713-6492 (016) 973-1618 (016) 976-3485 (012) 660-8547 (012) 323-8683 (011) 876-6941 (011) 736-9909 (011) 736-1489 (011) 984-0136 (011) 984-1262 (011) 642-7358 (011) 412-3047 (016) 422-6930

(012) 660-8581 (012) 323-8623 (011) 876-6958 (011) 736-4400 (011) 984-1260 (011) 484-1388 (011) 693-3608 (016) 422-6645