Long Term Evolution (LTE) Radio Access Network Planning Guide

Long Term Evolution (LTE) Radio Access Network Planning Guide
1 How to Use This Guide ..............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Introduction ...............................................................................................................................................1 1.2 General Radio Network Planning Process ....................................................................................................1 1.3 Quick Guide to Content of Each Section .....................................................................................................2 2 LTE Fundamentals & Key Technologies .......................................................................................................3

2.1 Overview of Data Market as a Whole ..........................................................................................................3 2.2 3GPP Evolution and Market Expectation .....................................................................................................3 2.3 LTE Modulation Technology Highlight .........................................................................................................4
2.3.1 OFDM Fundamental .....................................................................................................................................................................5 ................................................................................................................................................................7 2.3.2 SC-FDMA Fundamental

2.4 LTE Frame Structure ....................................................................................................................................8 2.5 LTE Resource Block Architecture ..................................................................................................................9 2.6 Reference Signal Structure ........................................................................................................................10 2.7 Timing and Sampling Architecture ............................................................................................................11
2.7.1 Normal and Extended Cyclic Prefix 2.7.2 Synchronization Channel .............................................................................................................................................12 ............................................................................................................................................................13

2.8 Uplink Physical Channel Structure

.............................................................................................................13
............................................................................14

2.8.1 FDD Uplink Control, Sounding and Demodulation Reference Signal Structure

2.9 Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO)
2.9.1 3GPP MIMO Mode Definition 2.9.2 Open Loop MIMO 2.9.3 Closed Loop MIMO 2.9.4 Pre-coding Matrix 2.9.5 Beam Forming

....................................................................................................15

.....................................................................................................................................................15

......................................................................................................................................................................16 ....................................................................................................................................................................17 ......................................................................................................................................................................18

...........................................................................................................................................................................20

2.10 LTE FDD vs LTE TDD Main Features Comparison ......................................................................................21 2.11 LTE Channels Hierarchy Overview ............................................................................................................22
2.11.1 Physical Channel Modulation Schemes .....................................................................................................................................22 .............................................................................................................................23 2.11.2 Downlink Channel Functionality Breakdown 2.11.3 Uplink Channel Functionality Breakdown 2.11.4 Channel Functionality Description in Detail

.................................................................................................................................23 ...............................................................................................................................23 .........................................................................................................25

2.11.5 Downlink Control Channel and RE Mapping Relationship

2.12 Cell Search, Synchronization & Mobility–UE Call Flow View
2.12.1 Cell Search and Synchronization

.....................................................................25
...........26

...............................................................................................................................................25

2.12.2 UE Procedure for Reporting Channel Quality Indication (CQI), Precoding Matrix indicator (PMI) and rank indication (RI) 2.12.3 System Information Bit Definition 2.12.4 Mobility Management

.............................................................................................................................................27

..............................................................................................................................................................27

2.12.5 EUTRAN Hierarchy and Interface Overview

...............................................................................................................................27 .....................................................................................................28

2.12.6 Summary of Handover Call Flow – 3GPP Example TS36.300

2.13 Example of Peak Data Rate Calculation 3 LTE Frequency and Spectrum Planning

...................................................................................................29

.....................................................................................................30

3.1 Frequency Spectrum Overview - FDD ........................................................................................................30 3.2 Frequency Spectrum Overview - TDD ........................................................................................................30 3.3 Channel Bandwidth and Subcarrier Allocation ...........................................................................................31 3.4 Channel Arrangement ...............................................................................................................................32
3.4.1 Channel Spacing 3.4.2 Channel Raster ........................................................................................................................................................................32 ...........................................................................................................................................................................32 ...................................................................................................................................................33

3.4.3 Carrier Frequency and EARFCN

3.5 Frequency Planning Recommendations
3.5.1 Conventional Frequency Reuse Scheme 1*3*1 3.5.2 SFR 1*3*1 – Downlink and Uplink

.....................................................................................................34
............................................................................................................................34

..............................................................................................................................................35 ........................................................................................................................36

3.5.3 TDD Specific Frequency Planning Considerations 3.5.4 Frequency Band Selection 3.5.5 Cyclic Prefix Planning

..........................................................................................................................................................37

.................................................................................................................................................................38 ...........................................................................................................38

3.5.6 Placing Multiple Technologies@Multiple Frequency Band

4 Link Budget and Coverage Planning

.........................................................................................................40

4.1 Conventional Link Budget .........................................................................................................................41 4.2 Propagation Parameters ............................................................................................................................42
4.2.1 Channel Model ..........................................................................................................................................................................42 .............................................................................................................................43 4.2.2 3GPP Value for Multipath and Doppler Effect 4.2.3 Propagation Model 4.2.4 Penetration Loss 4.2.5 Body Loss 4.2.6 Feeder Loss

....................................................................................................................................................................45

.........................................................................................................................................................................50

...................................................................................................................................................................................51 ................................................................................................................................................................................52 ......................................................................................................................................................................53

4.2.7 Background Noise

4.3 Equipment-Related Parameters
4.3.1 Transmit Power 4.3.2 Receiver Sensitivity 4.3.3 Noise Figure 4.3.4 Antenna Gain

.................................................................................................................53

..........................................................................................................................................................................53 .....................................................................................................................................................................54

...............................................................................................................................................................................54 .............................................................................................................................................................................54

4.4 LTE-Related Parameters
4.4.1 MIMO Gains 4.4.2 Cell Edge Rate

.............................................................................................................................56

..............................................................................................................................................................................56 ............................................................................................................................................................................57 ...................................................................................................................................................................59

4.4.3 Interference Margin 4.4.4 Beam Forming

...........................................................................................................................................................................59

4.5 System Reliability

......................................................................................................................................60
...................................................................................................................................................................60 ............................................................................................................................................................62 ....................................................................................................................62

4.5.1 Slow Fading Margin

4.5.2 Effect of Earth Curvature

4.5.3 Absence of Fast Fading and Soft Handover Margin

.....................2................................................78 5.....................................................................................................................................................................91 6..........................3....................................................................80 5.........RSRP ................................................3.........................................1 Overview 5..............................................................................9 Application of Special Antenna Technologies (MIMO/BF/V MIMO) 6..........................................................................................2................................................................................................................11 Actual Cell Site Placement in Relation to Traffic ...............................................................................................................5 Radio (Transmitter) Power Availability 6............................................8 S1/X2 Capacity ........................94 6......................................................80 .....................................................................................................................93 ......................................................................................................3 Theoretical Analysis of Interference under Site Sharing 5.......................5........................................62 ....................................................................................75 ...........................................................3............................91 6...........1 Operating Frequency Band 6...........................................................................................6..............................93 ................................................................3 Impact of Interference on Capacity 6................................4 Signal Interference Noise Ratio and Adaptive Coding 6.....................................3...........................................................2 Interference Between TDD Systems 5...............................81 5......................................................10 Scheduling Mode ......................................79 5.....................................................................................................73 5...............................................................................2...............................................................................................................74 5..........................94 .................82 .........................................................2 Interference within the Same Carrier ....................................96 6....94 6.....................89 6....6........................................................................................2 GSM Spectrum Refarming 5.......................................87 5.........................................................3....................................95 ......3 Interference Rejection Combining 4........................................94 ..........94 .............................................................................................2 GSM-LTE Co-Location Examples .........................................................................................6..........................75 ....................................................................................................................................................63 ..........................................................5 Spectrum Refarming for LTE ............................................................................................3 Introduction of Buffer Zone 5............................................................89 6..............82 ............................................1.............................................................3...................6.........6...............................................4 Theoretical Analysis of Interference: Non Colocated eNodeB 5..............................................................................................4 GuardBand Requirement: LTE FDD vs LTE TDD ........3..............3.....................................................................6 Spectrum Bandwidth Availability ....................1 Summary ...........2 3GPP Services Classification ...........................................................1 Basic Concepts ......................4...4 Reference Signal Power Boosting Gain 4..............6 Radio Access Technologies Co-location Strategies 5.............................................................................................................................5...................................3.2 TTI Bundling ................................5.....................................6 Specific Factors in Link Budget Consideration 4.........................................3 Guard Band Requirement: LTE-FDD vs GSM/UMTS ...65 4.....................................................1 Definition of Capacity ....................6......................1 Features Overview 4................69 ..........................................................................................................................................................................62 ...........94 6................................................................5 Remote Radio Unit and eNodeB Portfolio 4........................................................................................................................................................................................................1 Interference between Different Carriers 5..............................................................................................................................................2 Analysis of Background Noise 5............................................65 .....3..3.......................................7 Base Band Channel Card Processing Capacity 6.......63 .........................................................69 ....................................................80 ........................................................2 RF coverage ...65 .......................7 Summary of Variables inside Link Budget Tools 5 Interference and Guard Band Analysis 5.............1 Overview 5...........................................79 5......................6.................82 ............................................................3 EUTRAN Capacity Limiting Factors ........................................................................................................................6.....................76 ..........................................................................................................................3 LTE TDD and WiMAX Systems Co-Location 6 LTE Access Network Capacity Planning .....92 ..............................2...................................................................................................69 ...................................................................................1...............3 Impact of Interference ..............1...................77 .........................

....................................................................................................................5...........137 7.........5...................................................................................................................................7.128 ..........................................................................................................................5 X2 Bandwidth Dimensioning Procedure .............................7 Inter Radio Access Technology Handover Considerations .............................7............................................................................................5.....5 Mobility Types 7...........................104 7...........................................................................................................................................................................................1 Predictions .......3...............................................................................................................................................6 Impact of Latency of X2 on Cell Throughput ...................................115 7.......................7.........................118 7.................... Cell and Transmitter Listing 7....................6 Properties of a Single Transmitter 7.....................................................................................................135 7....6 Services ..2 Load Setting ............97 6........................................107 ...............................5.............................................6............................................................141 ...............................6..................................7 Properties of a eNodeB Template 7.............................113 ..........4 Site.................................8............................................................5..............................................................103 7..................104 .......................................5 Equipment Parameter 7......................................................................................3 Creating Project ...........15 Cyclical Prefix Allocation .........................................................136 ...................................119 ............................................................................................1 Introduction .........................3 Equipment ...7 Traffic Map 7...............................................................................................................................................................................................96 ....119 ..............................................................................................125 7....................................................6..............................98 6.........................................................................7.........................................................................................................................6 Propagation Model Selection 7......................................................................1 Power Setting 7........................3 Properties of Clutter Class .......105 7.....7 Clutter Related Modelling ....................................................100 6.............................................................................................................................................................................................2 Defining Coordinate Systems 7.................................................104 7.5...........................................................................................................................4.............................................................................................................................................8 Impact of Parameter Setting on Prediction and Simulation 7........................................................................................................................5..........106 7....................................................................5.......................14 Time Slot Allocation for Uplink and Downlink – TDD specific 6...................................132 ................................................................................................133 ........................4 Geographical Information ...........................................................................107 .................103 7.....4....................................................................................13 User Traffic Mix and Call Modelling 6.......................................6...................................................................................7 LTE Traffic Model Parameters 7.................7.........................................5 Antenna Property .................................................................97 ................132 ....................................................................................................................12 UE Capability ...7.............................................................................2 Network Settings 7............................................1 Quick Import Function ...................................4 S1 Bandwidth Dimensioning Procedure .......113 ..........................................100 7 U-Net Simulation and Operation ..................................98 6....................................................................................................121 ..............................................3 User Profiles 7...........................................................107 ........................103 7.....................................1 Overview 7..............................................3...................................................3.......130 7...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................115 .....................6..........................................................4 Scheduling Parameters 7.....................4 Terminals .................................................................................134 .............................................................................................................3..................6...................122 .........2 Environments 7............................................5 Viewing “Hidden” Parameters 7......4.....126 .....................118 ......................................................6 Engineering Parameter 7.......................................................................6.....2 Simulation Process .................................................................................................141 .................7.............................................................................................................................................8 Prediction and Simulation 7................................................................................................................................................1 Overview 7..........................................................3 Frequency Planning 7................................................................................................6..........................132 ...........................................99 6..................................................................................................................................................................................

......................................11 U-Net Planning Case ................................1 Overview of Planning Area 7...................................2..................................................................................168 ..2......................................................2...166 ..........19 UE Distribution and Channel Model : Pedestrian vs High Mobility ..............8 Scheduler Selection .......................156 7.........2.........171 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................165 8.......................................................................152 7.........154 7......................................................11...169 ...............................................10 RF Cell Planning Optimization .............................................................1 Understanding Customer Spectrum Bandwidth Availability 9...............2 Site Distribution ...........................................................2........3 Signal Analysis 7.................9 Point Analysis Tool 7................................................................................2..........................................................................163 8.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................151 .....................2 KPI Acceptance Procedure ..........................................169 ...........2........................145 7..................3 Parameter Configuration and General Assumption 7.....2...................................................152 7..........................................................................163 8.........164 8.........155 ...........................................................11.160 8 LTE Network Key Performance Indicators ..5 Proposed Key Performance Indicators .2...........................13 Interference Protection and Isolation Requirement 9.....6 Proposed KPIs for Final Acceptance (Stability Acceptance........................................................164 8..171 9.............................................2..............................................................................................................171 ....................................................2...................................................................166 9...........................................................168 ..........................17 Cyclic Prefix Planning .............................................................2 Reception ............................................................169 .........................................4 Network Coverage Predictions 7.....................................................................................................................2.............................................................1 KPI Measurement Methodology ........................................................169 ............4 Location of Customer Coverage Requirement 9.................154 ......................................................4 Result ..........................................5 Highway and Tunnel Coverage Requirement ...................157 .........................................................11.............................................................4 Cluster and Test Route ........................................................................1 Profile 7.....................................172 ...........2........166 9..................11 Call Model and SmartPhone Penetration Growth Considerations 9......................................................................2 Simulation .................................................................................................................7.................18 Understanding of Current Transmission Backhaul Network Capability 9.........................................................10 Cell Edge Throughput Requirement 9.............151 ...............................................165 9 Network Planning Checklist ......1 Introduction .....................................2...............................................................................................................................12 Base Station Antenna and Other Co-siting Equipment Selection 9..............171 ............167 9...............................................................................................................6 Evaluate Existing Network Condition for InterRAT 9................5 Network Capacity Simulation ......................................................2.....................................................................................9....................................................................................................14 Radio Related Equipment Selection ..163 8............11..................................................................168 9...........166 9...................................................................................................................... Optional) ...166 .................................................................................................................................152 7............................................................................................................3 Frequency Band Refarming Requirement for LTE 9.......................................2.........15 Network and Spectrum Evolution Consideration 9..................................172 9.........................................................................................................................2............................................................2......................................................................................................................................................................................................151 ................11...........2...........................................................................8.................................9 Indoor Coverage Requirement 9..............................................................................................................9.3 Service KPIs and Network KPIs ...........7 Terrain and Clutter Database Availability and Accuracy 9...................................................................................................................9.......2 Actual Frequency Band Allocation for LTE ....................167 ...........................................................................................................................2 Checklist Items Consideration ..........................16 MIMO and Beam Forming Implementation 9....................170 ..............................9...............................................................170 9...............................................

.........................3.......................................................................................................................14 Passive Intermodulation (PIM) 10.......................................................................................174 10................................................21 Customized Camouflage 10.....174 10..........................2 Directivity ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................1 Work Band 10..............................................................10 VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) 10......................................181 ....179 .....181 10.....................3.....................................13 Input Port of Antenna 10.................179 .............................................................................................................................................................................3.........................................................................................................................................22 Outlook Camouflage .............................................18 Lightning Protection 10.....3......................................................180 .................180 .....................................................184 ....175 ...........181 10..........................................3....................................3...............................................................................................................178 ..............................................................................................................................................................................3...............................................3......................................................................................................3............3.......................................9 Down Tilt ......3..................................................................2............16 Wind Load ....................................................................20 Camouflaged Antenna Scheme for Sites 10................................................................................................2......12 Power Capacity .....1 Frequency 10......................................3...........................................3.........................................21 Power Boosting Configuration ......................................15 Dimensions and Weight of Antenna 10.........................19 Three-proof Capability .......................................................................................................................................................................3...............................................174 10...3........................................................1 Overview ........................................................................5 Relation between Beamwidth and Gain 10..............182 .............................172 .................................................................181 .................................................3 Main Specifications of Antenna 10.....................3..............................................................2 Antenna Classification ..........177 ..............................180 ...........................................3.........................................................................3........................174 ..............................................................................178 10...................................................6 Front-to-rear Ratio .........................4 Beamwidth ................................23 Antenna Camouflage in Special Environment 11 References .................................................175 ......................................................7 Upper Side Lobe Suppression 10...183 .......11 Port Isolation 10.......................................20 TDD Specific Uplink and Downlink Configuration 9........................................................................181 ....................................................8 Polarization Mode 10......................................................................................17 Work Temperature and Humidity 10.........................................................................................................................................................................................181 10.....................................................................................................................................................3.....174 ...........................................................................3...3............................................................183 10............................................................................176 ..................2...........2 Antenna Gain 10.........2.........................................................................................179 10.......................................................................3............................174 10.................180 ...............................................................................................................................................................................177 10.............................9................................................................................................3......................172 10 Appendix: RF Antenna Systems ..................................................................................3 Antenna Pattern 10............................................

1 . most of the content provided in this planning guide can be applied to LTE system design with field implementation considerations.2 General Radio Network Planning Process The flow diagram below shows one of the more common work procedures recommended by the Radio network planning team. It covers all the major area that requires technical attention from the conceptual beginning of a network design to the provisioning of final network parameters required for the deployment phases.1 Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide systems engineers/planners with a set of guidelines and introductions to LTE deployment planning that may aid the design of a high quality Long Term Evolution (LTE) RF System. Although there are numerous and detailed references made to particular tools.1 How to Use This Guide 1. Please refer to the official publications of the respective product/tool for their most up to date functionality. Specific RF planning information unique to Huawei’s LTE EUTRAN product is also provided. 1. it is not the purpose of this planning document to replace any product and tools' operating manual/instruction. In general.

Provide LTE KPIs classification and KPI Acceptance Procedure Provide a list of items that Planning engineers need to consider and ideally have answers from customer before performing any detail planning. Table 1-1 Quick Guide Chapter # 1 2 Chapter Title How to Use this Guide LTE Fundamentals & Key Technologies Frequency and Spectrum Planning Link Budget and Coverage Planning Interference. 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 . Overview of LTE capacity planning as well as highlight all the critical factors and considerations that will affect capacity for an LTE network. Overview of LTE Spectrum definition as in 3GPP. Guard band and Refarming Analysis LTE Access Network Capacity Planning U-Net Simulation and Operation LTE Network Key Performance Indicators Network Planning Checklist Detailed Description Understand the contents of this document. ACLR. etc. Learn LTE fundamental which includes PHY and MAC layer technology. Meanwhile. Understanding the various reuse options available to LTE as well as band selection and combination overview Understand the parameters that comprise the LTE RF Link Budget. Understand some basic concept for interference analyze such as ACS. The table below outlines the key features of each Chapter. High level view on how to predict and simulate based on U-Net. Learn about some of the basic propagation models as well as critical features that affect link budget values. Learn definition of different parameters such as equipment parameters. Learn different interference between two different systems among serials TDD and FDD system. some key LTE technologies such as MIMO and FFR will be presented in this section.3 Quick Guide to Content of Each Section The LTE RF Planning Guide is a collection of fairly independent chapters covering various aspects of LTE system RF design and implementation. Understand U-Net operations.1. engineering parameters. etc. traffic model parameters.

1 Overview of Data Market as a Whole Challenges: Limited Investment but 500x Capacity Increment 2.2 LTE Fundamentals & Key Technologies 2.2 3GPP Evolution and Market Expectation Source: Global mobile Suppliers Association – October 2010 3 .

5. 3GPP began a project to define the long-term evolution (LTE) of Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) cellular technology. 10. 50 Mbit/s peak uplink • 1G for LTE Advanced • Higher cell edge performance • Reduced latency in setup time. 3.4.2. shorter handover latency and interruption time for better user experience • Support of variable and scalable bandwidth (1. namely time and frequency as shown in the figure below for downlink. The main goal is to provide • Higher throughput performance • 100 Mbit/s peak downlink. Shorter transfer delay.3 LTE Modulation Technology Highlight In Nov. 2004. • Wide application • TDD (unpaired) and FDD (paired) spectrum modes • Mobility up to 450km/h • Large range of terminals (phones and PCs to cameras) LTE employs Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) for downlink data transmission and Single Carrier FDMA (SC-FDMA) for uplink transmission. 4 . It is also important to remember that LTE systems operate in two separate domains. 15 and 20 MHz) • Backwards compatible with Existing 3G technologies • Works with GSM/EDGE/UMTS systems • Utilizes existing 2G and 3G spectrum and new spectrum • Supports hand-over and roaming to existing mobile networks • Quality of Service Support.

1 OFDM Fundamental OFDM was selected for the downlink because it can • Improved spectral efficiency • Reduce ISI effect by multipath • Provide better Protection against frequency selective fading OFDM is a scheme that offers good resistance to multipath and is now widely recognized as the method of choice for mitigating multipath for broadband wireless. 2.Figure below is the LTE uplink allocation structure from a time and frequency perspective. It can be straightforwardly extended to a multi-access scheme called OFDMA. I. where each user is assigned a different set of subcarriers.3. 5 . Frequency Spectral Efficiency Improvement OFDM increases spectral efficiency by incorporating multiple carriers in the same frequency space as a single carrier.

II. As a result. 6 . Reducing the Impact by Inter Symbol Interference (ISI) Improvement of frequency spectral efficiency requires the reduction of Inter symbol interference (ISI). This is achieved by tighter frequency roll off and alignment of nulls and peaks between different frequencies. Better Protection Against Frequency Fading Smaller subcarrier and resource block bandwidth increase robustness against frequency related fading With this smaller carrier bandwidth. the frequency coherence bandwidth is much smaller than 3G systems while and correlation factor is much higher. it will also be much easier to implement scheduling algorithm based on Frequency Selective Scheduling to improve system throughput in the manner shown below. III.

which means that the peak value of 7 . SC-FDMA can be viewed as a special OFDMA system with the user’s signal pre-encoded by discrete Fourier transform (DFT). which benefits the mobile users in terms of battery life and power efficiency. One prominent advantage of SC-FDMA over OFDMA is the lower PAPR (peak-to-average power ratio) of the transmit waveform for loworder modulations like QPSK and BPSK. hence also known as DFT-pre-coded OFDMA or DFT-spread OFDMA. OFDM signals have a higher peak-to-average ratio (PAR)—often called a peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR)—than single-carrier signals do. At some time instances. The reason is that in the time domain.2 SC-FDMA Fundamental Single Carrier-FDMA is a recently developed single carrier multiple access technique which has similar structure and performance to OFDMA. this sum is large and at other times is small.3. a multicarrier signal is the sum of many narrowband signals.Frequency Selective Fading Resistance 2.

4 LTE Frame Structure The figure below shows the frame structure for LTE under Time division mode (TDD) Type 2 and Frequency Division mode (FDD) Type 1. Main differences between the two modes are • Frame 0 and frame 5 (always downlink in TDD) • Frame 1 and frame 6 is always used as for synchronization in TDD • Frame allocation for Uplink and Downlink is settable in TDD The sampling rate in both FDD and TDD is the same and both technologies operate under a 1-ms sub-frame (TTITransmission Time Interval) and 0. This high PAR is one of the most important implementation challenges that face OFDM. whereas in downlink each subcarrier only carries information related to one specific modulation symbol.the signal is substantially larger than the average value. The major difference between the downlink and uplink transmission scheme is that each subcarrier in the uplink carries information about each transmitted modulation symbol as shown in figure below. The first 3 configurations (0-2) for TDD can also be viewed as 5ms allocation due to repetition. because it reduces the efficiency and hence increases the cost of the RF power amplifier. The figure below shows the relationship between OFDM and SC-FDMA in LTE. As a result. the uplink power level due to SC-FDMA also need to be increased by 2~3dB to compensate for the extra noise due to more spreading. 2. The figure below shows a detailed relationship between rates and frame structure. 8 . which is one of the most expensive components in the radio.5us timeslot definition.

• There are 7 symbols (normal cyclic prefix) per time slot in the time domain or 6 symbols in long cyclic prefix. • One frame is 10ms and it consists of 10 sub-frames • One subframe is 1ms and contains 2 slots • One slot is 0.5 LTE Resource Block Architecture The building block of LTE is a physical resource block (PRB) and all of the allocation of physical resource blocks (PRBs) is handled by a scheduling function at the 3GPP base station (eNodeB). In summary.5ms in time domain and each 0. • One resource block is 0. 9 .2.5ms and contains 12 subcarriers for each OFDM symbol in frequency domain. Resource element is the smallest unit of resource assignment and its relationship to resource block is shown as below from both a timing and frequency perspective.5ms assignment can contain N resource blocks [6 < N < 110] depending on the bandwidth allocation and resource availability.

2. The figure below shows the locations of the reference signal within each sub-frame when transmit antennae are used by the cell.6 Reference Signal Structure Reference signal is the “UMTS Pilot” equivalent and it is used by UE to predict the likely coverage condition on offer for each of the eNodeB cell received. 10 .

due to channel reciprocity. 11 . the eNodeB can then use the UL channel as an estimate of the DL channel. A quick summary of all the physical layer information for LTE is shown below. If the UL and DL channels are properly calibrated. it can have more than two transmit antennae and in order to avoid reference signals from the same cell interfering with each other.As LTE is a MIMO based technology. different antennae will be transmitting reference signal at different time and frequency and how these are allocated are shown below. 2. As defined in the standard for TDD operations. the channel-sounding mechanism involves the UE’s transmitting a deterministic signal that can be used by the eNodeB to estimate the UL channel from the UE.7 Timing and Sampling Architecture Sampling frequency varies under different bandwidth configuration in LTE and the table below summarizes the possible combinations.

Also. which has low complexity. although elegant and simple.1 Normal and Extended Cyclic Prefix The key to making OFDM realizable in practice is the use of the FFT algorithm. the required bandwidth for OFDM also increases. 12 . Adding cyclic prefix to the transmitted signal to create a signal that appears to be just like circular convolution and this is done by copying the last part of each OFDM symbol to the front of each symbol with the length of a guard interval. to form a cyclic prefix (CP). In order for the IFFT/FFT to create an ISI-free channel. Hence. The “wasted” power has increased importance in an interference-limited wireless system. Since redundant symbols are sent. is not entirely free. to prevent the guard interval from destroying the inter-sub-carrier orthogonality. Similarly.2. the channel must appear to provide a circular convolution. It comes with both a bandwidth and power penalty. an additional symbol must be counted against the transmit-power budget. the cyclic prefix carries a power penalty of v dB in addition to the bandwidth penalty. In summary. causing interference to neighboring users.7. the delay of each path should not exceed the guard interval where the number of waveforms within the integral time of the FFT is an integer The cyclic prefix. the use of the cyclic prefix entails data rate and power losses.

an extended CP option can be used.g.2 Synchronization Channel The diagram below shows the relative position of Primary Synchronization (PSS) and Secondary Synchronization (SSS) within the radio frame in a FDD LTE system. e. The figure below shows the location of PSS and SSS in LTE-TDD and the major difference from LTE FDD is that LTE TDD embedding the Primary Sync channel in the DwPTS so the location will not be affected by different DL/UL combination ratio 2. One uplink Slot is as below.8 Uplink Physical Channel Structure It is worth mentioning the physical structure of uplink channel. 13 . In the case where there is a large delay spread.Where L is the power used for non CP transmission. 2. due to large cell radius.7.

8.2. Sounding and Demodulation Reference Signal Structure The figure below shows the relative position of uplink control channels in the frequency domain in relation to the entire channel bandwidth. In summary.1 FDD Uplink Control. 1) PUCCH resources are located at the edges of the spectrum • To maximize frequency diversity 2) Multiple UEs can share the same PUCCH resource block 3) PUCCH is never transmitted simultaneously with PUSCH from the same UE 4) Two consecutive PUCCH slots in Time-Frequency Hopping at the slot boundary 14 .

9. For LTE TDD only. processing is required at both the transmitter and the receiver in order to achieve gain while removing or at least attenuating the spatial interference. By using multiple antenna to transmit multiple path of information to UEs. 2. SRSs can be transmitted in an ordinary sub-frame or in UpPTS sub-frame to improve spectral efficiency. A high level signal processing diagram is shown below. it uses UpPTS sub-frame. Multiple antennae transmit schemes—both transmit diversity and spatial multiplexing—are often categorized as either open loop or closed loop. the incremental cost of using them for transmit diversity is very low.1 3GPP MIMO Mode Definition The table below shows the 8 definition used by 3GPP for MIMO modes 15 . 2.The Figure below shows respective position of the uplink demodulation reference signal in FDD LTE uplink frame structure including sounding reference signal position.9 Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) MIMO and other transmit spatial diversity scheme is a newer application than receive diversity and has become widely implemented only in the early 2000s. In general there are two mode of MIMO. As the signals sent from different transmit antennas interfere with one another. Additionally. Normally. if the multiple antennae are already at the base station for uplink receive diversity. open and closed loop. either better throughput or lower SINR requirement can be achieved and the frequency selective characteristics of LTE is perfect for the implementation of such technologies.

9.2. The figure below shows a possible N Antennae + M input layers setup in spatial multiplexing 16 . open loop operations occur when the access network does not have information or feedback from the UE to do coding adjustment or signal is not good enough. As a result.2 Open Loop MIMO Open-loop systems do not require knowledge of the channel at the transmitter.

The figure below shows where the pre-coding function may exist in a N Antennae with M input layers In mode 5 (Multi-user MIMO). As a result. closed-loop systems require channel knowledge at the transmitter. unlike open loop. different UEs are receiving downlink data from different antenna. The figure below shows a functional view of closed loop MIMO. 17 .2. Hence. possible in TDD—or more commonly a feedback channel from the receiver to the transmitter. closed loop operations occur when the access network execute dynamic adjustment based on feedback from the UE. thus necessitating either channel reciprocity—same uplink and downlink channel. As a result.9. the overall throughput per cell is increased. a more accurate coding application can be applied to the communication with the UE.3 Closed Loop MIMO On the contrary.

using diversity pre-coding. but this trade-off is often very attractive for a small number of antennas. spatial multiplexing is optimal. grows as when the SINR is large. LTE can still support spatial multiplexing by coding across multiple users in the uplink. Although capacity gain is much smaller than at high SINR. The cost of each additional antenna. 18 . However. unlike transmit diversity and beam-forming. A 2 × 2 MIMO system doubles the peak throughput capability of LTE but this is unlikely to be possible for all users in the cell due to variation in SINR. or maximum data rate. Spatial Multiplexing Matrix Using Two Antenna Ports with Cell-Specific Reference Signals Spatial multiplexing is where multiple independent streams are transmitted across multiple antennas. If the mobile station has only one antenna. the capacity still grows approximately linearly with since capacity is linear with SINR in the low-SINR regime. If the receiver also has multiple antennas. Instead of increasing diversity.9. When the SNR is high. the capacity maximizing strategy is to send a single stream of data. On the other hand. the capacity of the system can theoretically be increased linearly with the number of antennas when performing spatial multiplexing.The capacity. Even two appropriately spaced antennas appear to be sufficient to eliminate most deep fades. its RF chain. and the associated signal processing required to modulate or demodulate multiple spatial streams may not be negligible. the streams can be separated out using spatial multiplexing.4 Pre-coding Matrix 3GPP 36-211 defines the types of matrix need to be used when multiple antennae are to be used for different conditions. The matrix used for two antennae spatial multiplexing is shown below. which paints a promising picture for the potential benefits of spatial diversity. In a rich multipath environment. The following is a quick summary of some possible pre-coding matrix combination under different scenarios I. spatial multiplexing works mainly under good SINR conditions. when the SINR is low. This is called Multi-User MIMO (MU-MIMO). One main advantage of spatial diversity relative to time and frequency diversity is that no additional bandwidth or power is needed in order to take advantage of spatial diversity.2. multiple antennas in this case are used to increase the data rate or capacity of the system.

II. Transmit Diversity Matrix Using Two Antenna Ports The following matrix applies to input x is and y is the resulting output using a two antenna output configuration. Spatial Multiplexing Matrix Using Four Antenna Ports with Cell-Specific Reference Signals 19 . III.

20 . which in the case of TDD is easily available owing to channel reciprocity but for FDD requires a feedback channel to learn the channel characteristics so it is not implemented in LTE Release 8 or 9 yet. Beamforming can provide significant improvement in the coverage range. capacity. and reliability.5 Beam Forming Multiple antennas in LTE may also be used to transmit the same signal appropriately weighted for each antenna element such that the effect is to focus the transmitted beam in the direction of the receiver and away from interference. thereby improving the received SINR.9. To perform transmit beamforming. As of today. beam forming is specific only to LTE TDD and can operate either under 4x4 or 8x2 configurations. The beam-forming weight vector should increase the antenna gain in the direction of the desired user while simultaneously minimizing the gain in the directions of interferers. 2.IV. Transmit Diversity Matrix Using Four Antenna Ports The following matrix applies to input x is and y is the resulting output under a four antenna output configuration. the transmitter needs to have accurate knowledge of the channel.

the DOA based beam-former is viable only in LOS environments or in environments with limited local scattering around the transmitter.One popular beam-forming algorithm is based on Direction of Arrival where the incoming signals to a receiver may consist of desired energy and interference energy—for example. Each DOA can be estimated by using EUTRAN signal-processing techniques as requested in 3GPP-TS 36-214. a beam-former extracts a weighting vector for the antenna elements and uses it to transmit or receive the desired signal of a specific user while suppressing the undesired interference signals. Typically. 2. each resolvable multipath is likely to comprise several unresolved components coming from significantly different angles. there exists a trade-off between interference null and desired gain lost. From these acquired DOAs. we have assumed that the array response vectors of different users with corresponding AOAs are known. The various signals can be characterized in terms of the DOA or the angle of arrival (AOA) of each received signal. from other users or from multipath reflections. The DOA-based beam-former in this case is often called the null-steering beam-former.10 LTE FDD vs LTE TDD Main Features Comparison The following table summarizes the major similarity between LTE FDD and LTE TDD The table below summarizes the difference between the two technologies. the beam-former has unity gain for the desired user and two nulls at the directions of two interferers and can place nulls in the directions of interferers. Therefore. The null-steering beam-former can be designed to completely cancel out interfering signals only if the number of such signals is strictly less than the number of antenna elements. Ideally. Thus far. In this case. In practice. it is not possible to associate a discrete AOA with a signal impinging the antenna array. 21 .

1 Physical Channel Modulation Schemes Supported modulation schemes in LTE are: QPSK.2. Broadcast channel only uses QPSK and are shown below. 16QAM. 22 . Maximum information block size = 6144 bits and CRC-24 is used for error detection.11 LTE Channels Hierarchy Overview 2.11. 64QAM.

4 Channel Functionality Description in Detail Physical channels • PDSCH: Physical Downlink Shared Channel • PBCH: Physical broadcast channel • PMCH: Physical multicast channel • PDCCH: Physical Downlink Control Channel • PCFICH: Physical control format indicator channel • PHICH: Physical Hybrid ARQ Indicator Channel 23 .11.3 Uplink Channel Functionality Breakdown 2.11.2.2 Downlink Channel Functionality Breakdown 2.11.

composed of control channel elements (CCEs) • 4 Res = Resource element group (REG) • 9 REGs = 1 CCE PCFICH – Physical Control Format Indicator Channel • # of OFDM symbols of control region PHICH – Physical Hybrid ARQ Channel • ACK/NACK signalling PDCCH – Physical Downlink Control Channel • Scheduling • UL power control 24 .Reference Signal (RS) • Cell specific RS • UE-specific RS • MBSFN RS Synchronization Signal (SCH) • Primary Synchronization Signal (P-SCH) • Secondary Synchronization Signal (S-SCH) SCH used for: • Symbol synchronization • Frame synchronization • Cell-ID determination SCH/BCH each occupy 72 center subcarriers regardless of system bandwidth BCH indicates: • Basic L1/L2 system parameters • Downlink system bandwidth • Reference-signal transmit power • Multi-media Broadcast over a Single Frequency Network (MBSFN)-related parameters • Number of transmit antennas • HARQ resource allocation Control region is 1-3 OFDM symbols at the beginning of each subframe.

1 Cell Search and Synchronization 25 . Synchronization & Mobility–UE Call Flow View 2.11.5 Downlink Control Channel and RE Mapping Relationship 2.12.12 Cell Search.2.

where the UE shall use the same PUCCH-based periodic CQI/PMI or RI reporting format on PUSCH. CQI. A UE shall transmit periodic CQI/PMI or RI reporting on PUSCH as defined hereafter in sub-frames with PUSCH allocation. and RI reporting is periodic or a-periodic. and RI are controlled by the eNodeB. and RI reporting on PUSCH if the conditions specified hereafter are met. Figure below shows which channels will be used for different CQI reporting scenario 26 . otherwise.2 UE Procedure for Reporting Channel Quality Indication (CQI). For transmit diversity RI is equal to one.2.12. the UE shall determine a RI corresponding to the number of useful transmission layers. Precoding Matrix Indicator (PMI) and Rank Indication (RI) As stated in TS 36-213. A UE in transmission mode 8 is configured with PMI/RI reporting if the parameter PMI-RI-Report is configured by higher layer signaling. For spatial multiplexing. A UE shall transmit a-periodic CQI/PMI. or RI reporting on PUCCH as defined hereafter in sub-frames with no PUSCH allocation. PMI. PMI. A UE shall transmit periodic CQI/PMI. RI reporting is transmitted only if configured CQI/PMI/RI feedback type supports RI reporting. For a-periodic CQI reporting. the time and frequency resources that can be used by the UE to report CQI. it is configured without PMI/RI reporting.

12.4 Mobility Management 2.12.3 System Information Bit Definition 2.5 EUTRAN Hierarchy and Interface Overview 27 .12.2.

300 28 .2.12.6 Summary of Handover Call Flow – 3GPP Example TS36.

2.13 Example of Peak Data Rate Calculation 29 .

FDD 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Release 8/9 (3GPP TS36. AWS (Band 4) and 700MHz (Band 12) while momentum is being built up also for 1800MHz (Band 3) as well as Public Safety spectrum (Band 14) According to 3GPP TS 36. The table below shows the actual frequency range listed per the specification for the TDD version.104-860 Table 5.4. Figure 3-1 LTE FDD Spectrum Allocation The most popular commercial LTE bands are 2.1 Frequency Spectrum Overview .6GHz (Band 7). 3.2 Frequency Spectrum Overview .5-1 E-UTRA frequency bands) has also defined the operating frequency for Time Division Duplex (TDD) based LTE technology in various frequency bands in order to operate in different parts of the world.3 LTE Frequency and Spectrum Planning 3. The table below shows the actual frequency range listed per the specification for the Frequency Division Duplex (FDD) version.104-860 Table 5.TDD 3GPP Release 8/9 (3GPP TS36.104 V9.0 (2010-06). 30 . Band 6 is no longer applicable and Band 15 and Band 16 are listed as Reserved.5-1 E-UTRA frequency bands) has clearly defined LTE as a system that can operate in various frequency bands into order to suit the need of different operators in the world.

it is an ideal opportunity to evolve their network back into the mainstream LTE technologies.3GHz band (Band 40). i. at FC +/.Figure 3-2 LTE TDD Spectrum Allocation It is worth noting that around the 2.BWChannel /2.e.3 Channel Bandwidth and Subcarrier Allocation According to 3GPP specification. Operators can assign different channel bandwidth to suit their particular needs per the figure below. Figure 3-3 Transmission bandwidth configuration NRB in E-UTRA channel bandwidths The channel edges are defined as the lowest and highest frequencies of the carrier separated by the channel bandwidth. 3. 31 . To many WiMAX operators currently in this frequency band. The number of RB supported for each bandwidth is equal to number of sub-carriers divided by 12. there is a significant frequency spectrum overlap (100MHz) between LTE TDD with WiMAX.

The channel spacing can be adjusted to optimize performance in a particular deployment scenario. 3.1 Channel Spacing The spacing between carriers will depend on the deployment scenario. 3. the size of the frequency block available and the channel bandwidths.4. NRB and Transmission Bandwidth Configuration 3. which means that the carrier centre frequency must be an integer multiple of 100 kHz. 32 .2 Channel Raster The channel raster is 100 kHz for all bands.4. operators can assign different channel bandwidth to suit their particular needs per the table below. The nominal channel spacing between two adjacent E-UTRA carriers is defined as following: Nominal Channel spacing = (BWChannel(1) + BWChannel(2))/2 where BWChannel(1) and BWChannel(2) are the channel bandwidths of the two respective E-UTRA carriers.Figure 3-4 Definition of Channel Bandwidth and Transmission Bandwidth Configuration for one E-UTRA carrier Figure 3-5 Visualizing the Relationship between Channel Bandwidth.4 Channel Arrangement According to 3GPP specification.

3-1 and NDL is the downlink EARFCN.599 600 .23999 24000 .1(NDL – NOffs-DL) The relation between EARFCN and carrier frequency in MHz for the uplink is given by the following equation where FUL_low and NOffs-UL are given in table 5.21449 21450 .36199 36200 .22749 22750 .9 2110 1475.9 729 746 758 734 860 875 791 1495.2749 2750 .9 1900 2010 NOffs-DL 0 600 1200 1950 2400 2650 2750 3450 3800 4150 4750 5010 5180 5280 5730 5850 6000 6150 6450 36000 36200 Range of NDL 0 . For example.23379 23730 .4. FDL = FDL_low + 0. using channel 99 as center frequency will extend the LTE carrier below the allocated spectrum (99*0.18599 18600 .23279 23280 .3.23179 23180 .23849 23850 . 24.1 = 9.5279 5280 .22149 22150 .4949 5010 .3-1 and NUL is the uplink EARFCN.9 1900 2010 Uplink NOffs-UL 18000 18600 19200 19950 20400 20650 20750 21450 21800 22150 22750 23010 23180 23280 23730 23850 24000 24150 24450 36000 36200 Range of NUL 18000 .1949 1950 .36349 .36349 FUL_low [MHz] 1920 1850 1710 1710 824 830 2500 880 1749.9 699 777 788 704 815 830 832 1447.5849 5850 .6149 6150 . The relation between EARFCN and carrier frequency in MHz for the downlink is given by the following equation.24449 24450 .3 Carrier Frequency and EARFCN The carrier frequency in the uplink and downlink is designated by the E-UTRA Absolute Radio Frequency Channel Number (EARFCN) in the range 0 .5179 5180 .7.3799 3800 .5999 6000 . 74 and 99 channel numbers at the upper operating band edge shall not be used for channel bandwidths of 1.19199 19200 .3449 3450 . 10.1(NUL – NOffs-UL) NOTE: The channel numbers that designate central carrier frequencies so close to the operating band edges that the carrier extends beyond the operating band edge shall not be used.6449 6450 . for a 20MHz carrier.24149 24150 .20399 20400 .4749 4750 . where FDL_low and NOffs-DL are given in table 5.1199 1200 .4.9 1710 1427.65535.24599 36000 .22949 23010 . 3. 15. 5.20649 20650 .36199 36200 .2649 2650 .4149 4150 .21799 21800 .9MHz but actual requirement is 10MHz from lower edge) E-UTRA Operating Band 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 … 17 18 19 20 21 … 33 34 33 Downlink FDL_low [MHz] 2110 1930 1805 2110 869 875 2620 925 1844. 14.19949 19950 . 25. This implies that the first 7. FUL = FUL_low + 0.2399 2400 . 75 and 100 channel numbers at the lower operating band edge and the last 6.7.6599 36000 . 49. 50.5379 5730 .20749 20750 . 15 and 20 MHz respectively because of the bandwidth requirement.

43589 43590 . 5. 75 and 100 channel numbers at the lower operating band edge and the last 6.E-UTRA Operating Band 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 Downlink FDL_low [MHz] 1850 1930 1910 2570 1880 2300 2496 3400 3600 NOffs-DL 36350 36950 37550 37750 38250 38650 39650 41590 43590 Range of NDL 36350 . 74 and 99 channel numbers at the upper operating band edge shall not be used for channel bandwidths of 1. it also opens the door for inter-site and inter-sector interference which is detrimental for urban LTE deployment due to the high site density. 10.36949 36950 . Although it eliminates the need of any frequency planning considerations. 15 and 20 MHz respectively.38649 38650 . Figure 3-6 E-UTRA channel numbers – 3GPP 36104-A10 – Table 5. 49.3-1 3.43589 43590 .41589 41590 .1 Conventional Frequency Reuse Scheme 1*3*1 Under this scheme.5. • Possible application in highly isolated rural scenario where users are also highly scattered 34 . 50. 24. This implies that the first 7.38249 38250 . 14.7.39649 39650 .37749 37750 .45589 NOTE: The channel numbers that designate carrier frequencies so close to the operating band edges that the carrier extends beyond the operating band edge shall not be used.37749 37750 .45589 FUL_low [MHz] 1850 1930 1910 2570 1880 2300 2496 3400 3600 Uplink NOffs-UL 36350 36950 37550 37750 38250 38650 39650 41590 43590 Range of NUL 36350 .39649 39650 .4. a single frequency will be used for the entire system. Figure 3-7 Conventional 1*3*1 frequency planning scheme Application scenario • Limited application scenario in urban and suburban environment without impacting QoS/QoE.37549 37550 .36949 36950 . 15.37549 37550 . 25.38249 38250 .38649 38650 .41589 41590 .5 Frequency Planning Recommendations 3. 3.

5. each sector will only use one of the sub-sections.2 SFR 1*3*1 – Downlink and Uplink SFR (Soft Frequency reuse) is the recommended frequency reuse methodology. The SFR concept is based on dividing the entire LTE carrier bandwidth into 3 sub-sections as shown below Figure 3-8 SFR 1*3*1 Downlink frequency division scheme Under this configuration. to serve the cell edge users. which is the remaining “2/3” of the carrier bandwidth. • Easy to deploy. The figure below depicts the actual layout Figure 3-9 SFR 1*3*1 Downlink frequency planning scheme 35 .Advantage • High spectral efficiency and high throughput per site. which “1/3” of the entire carrier bandwidth. • Coverage control of cells becomes an important factor in achieving a high throughput level 3. Both FDD and TDD can use this interference reduction method. also known as the secondary band. For those users location near the center of the cell. the interference level between sectors can be reduced. As a result. thereby enhancing the throughput of those users. also known as the primary band. the other 2 sections. • No special scheduling algorithm required Disadvantage • High level of interference especially on cell edge area • Low throughput on cell boundary and lower QoS/QoE for users on boundary area. will be used to serve these users.

Failure to include enough separation will create a lot of co-channel interference which will degrade the throughput performance significantly Figure 3-10 Uplink-Downlink Pilot Time Slot and Guard band Configuration Schemes Lastly. 36 . GP and UpPTS).Application scenario • Recommended configuration to satisfy high traffic and high site density requirement. co-frequency and time sharing nature between uplink and downlink in TDD also require careful selection of guard band and pilot time slot (DwPTS. the coexistence of WiMAX within the same TDD spectrum is also very common and this has further complicated the carrier and bandwidth planning for LTE TDD network from a carrier planning perspective. • Improve cell edge user throughput and quality of experience. Planning engineers need to take all these variations along with customer throughput and coverage requirement into account when it comes to TDD frequency planning. 3. Moreover. • Best results will require the introduction of Inter Cell Interference Coordination (ICIC) Advantage • Reduce inter-cell interference under a high site density deployment.3 TDD Specific Frequency Planning Considerations It is very common for telecom Operators within the TDD band of LTE have a wider unpaired spectrum than the bandwidth defined maximum carrier bandwidth of 20MHz. carrier bandwidth. As a result. all cells must be operating in time synchronous mode to avoid any extra interference being introduced to the network. for TDD to work properly.5. IEEE 1588v2 implementation is recommended and will help to ensure the integrity of time synchronization within the LTE TDD network. Besides. the selection of carrier bandwidth for multiple carrier condition is also more complex in TDD than FDD.

choosing which band to use for LTE is always an important consideration. propagation characteristics. power amplifier output. Parameters that will affect the overall cell coverage will be discussed in the next chapter.Result Figure 3-12 Cell Coverage Comparison (UL@128kbps) between various frequency bands 37 . Final results are highly dependent on the actual parameters used for customer design.4 Frequency Band Selection As many Operators worldwide possess spectrum in various frequency bands. Results shown below are typical comparison in coverage radius between different frequency bands. For example.Figure 3-11 Synchronization Solution based on IPclk or 1588v2 3. feeder loss. cell edge user throughput and penetration loss are all dependent on the operating frequency chosen. it is important to remember many components on the radio path will have slightly different properties at different frequency bands which will modify the final cell coverage radius. antenna gain. Cell Range in Uplink Case -.5. However.

Cell Range in Downlink Case -. This is also known as long CP. By carrying a smaller number of symbols (6).5. CBD).Result Figure 3-13 Cell Coverage Comparison (DL@1024kbps) between various frequency bands 3. Typically.6 Placing Multiple Technologies@Multiple Frequency Band Choosing which technologies for which spectrum is a major challenge for many Operators worldwide. LTE is more likely the technology of choice for most Operators looking at launching data services in the higher 38 .g. 7 symbols configuration (norma lCP) against 6 symbols (long CP configuration) Figure 3-14 Cyclic Prefix Comparison 3.5. The figure below shows the difference in symbol configurations between the normal. a bigger cyclic prefix is configured per cell to allow a bigger delay in propagation. It is highly dependent on what the Operator already owned and what is their future business plan.5 Cyclic Prefix Planning Although Cyclic Prefix is not directly related to frequency or spectrum allocation. it will impact the actual cell range that can be served from a logical and signal processing perspective. As a result. higher frequency bands are likely to deploy more data centric services for high density area (e.

UMTS and LTE • It can remarkably reduce operational cost and improve efficiency. better user experience. It is the responsibility of the radio planner and account managers to work with customer to determine the best combination to meet their interest. 39 . The figure below just some 1 example of what customer may do with multiple technologies and their evolution in different frequency band. Dual-band Network Deployment is a trend Figure 3-15 Example of Multiple Technologies Deployment to Various Frequency Band SingleSON Solution Benefits: • SingleSON brings synergized automation for GSM.frequency band.

capacity. The aim of radio network planning is to balance coverage. quality. GENEX U-net. Various factors must be considered during LTE system coverage planning and setting of these parameters will affect coverage radius and the quantity of base stations. The coverage area offered by a 3 sector and Omni site along with coverage planning flow is shown below Figure 4-1 Radio network coverage pre-planning flow 40 .4 Link Budget and Coverage Planning Operators are rightfully focused on the service quality of a system and coverage is an important part of the service quality of a system. Network planning tool. will provide site deployment specific simulation analysis to obtain the number of required base stations in the target area. and cost so none of these can be considered in isolation. Coverage and design requirement must be analyzed in choosing parameters within the following parameter groups: • Propagation-related • Equipment-related • LTE-specific • System Reliability • Specific Considerations Achievable cell radius can be derived from the Excel based link budget tools.

such as slow fading margin • Specific features that will affect the final path gain The figure below shows factors that will affect the link budget calculation process. 41 . and background noise • Equipment dependent parameters. such as the pilot power boosting gain. receiver sensitivity. edge coverage rate. and the interference margin of radio links to calculate all gains and losses that will affect the final cell coverage • To estimate the maximum link loss allowed based on the maximum transmit power of the terminal and eNodeB transmit power allocation.1 Conventional Link Budget The purpose of link budget in LTE network planning is: • To use such factors as building penetration loss. repeated coding gain. interference margin. Link budget parameters are grouped as follows: • Propagation (Transmission) related parameters. and fast fading margin • System reliability parameters. Coverage radius of a base station can be obtained according to the maximum link loss allowance under a certain propagation model. feeder loss. The radius can be used in subsequent design. such as the transmit power. System simulation will be described in Chapter7. body loss. and antenna gain • LTE-specific parameters. such as the penetration loss. feeder loss. Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) gain. antenna gain.This chapter will focus on the RF link budget itself and radio transmission model. 4.

fading. and the terminal motion speed of the channel. Common channel models in LTE systems include EPA (Extended Pedestrian A). and are related to the environment of radio wave transmission. ETU120. you must set the propagation parameters to be the same values.101 where the test condition was specified. EVA30.Figure 4-2 Link budget model – Downlink and Uplink 4. feeder loss. ETU60. and background noise. Common models include speed at 3km/h. body loss.1 Channel Model Channel models used for LTE are defined in 3GPP TS 36. 42 . EPA3 and ETU3 are applicable to fixed services or pedestrian speed services. EVA60 and EVA 120 are applicable to vehicular services.2. If required. 4. ETU30. Items covered include multi-path conditions.2 Propagation Parameters Propagation-related parameters have no relationship with technical systems or equipment vendors. To obtain an objective value when comparing the link budget information of two equipment vendors. Such parameters include the penetration loss. Propagation-related gains or losses are constant. EVA (Extended Vehicular Model A) and ETU3 (Extended Typical Urban Model at 3km/hr). different speed/condition can also be introduced and simulated according to specific needs. 30km. 60km and 120km.

6 -9.EPA Excess tap delay [ns] 0 30 70 90 110 190 410 Relative power [dB] 0. medium & high Doppler frequencies Model EPA 5Hz EVA 5Hz EVA 70Hz ETU 70Hz ETU 300Hz Maximum Doppler frequency 5 Hz 5 Hz 70 Hz 70 Hz 300 Hz Table below shows possible variation of received power in multi-path fading environment under the various extended delay spread conditions listed below Extended Pedestrian A Model .0 -1.0 Delay (ns) -8.0 -7.0 Extended Typical Urban model 9 0 50 120 200 230 500 1600 2300 5000 PDP # of Paths 4.0 -3.0 -1.2 -20.0 Relative Path Power (dB) -3.0 -1.0 -1.0 -2.0 0.0 -1.2.0 -17.1 -7.0 0.0 -3.2 3GPP Value for Multipath and Doppler Effect Table below shows some of the propagation conditions that are used for performance measurements in multi-path fading environment at low.0 -17.0 -1.0 0.0 -5.0 .6 -0.Table 4-1 Typical Propagation Channel Models used for LTE Extended Pedestrian A model 7 0.8 0 30 70 90 110 190 410 0.0 -8.0 -16.5 -1.4 -3.9 Extended Vehicular A model 9 0 30 150 310 370 710 1090 1730 2510 -1.2 -20.8 Extended Typical Urban Model – ETU Excess tap delay [ns] 0 50 43 Relative power [dB] -1.0 -2.0 -12.

0 -16.0 -3.0 -1.0 -12. V is the velocity of the train in m/seconds.0 -5.Excess tap delay [ns] 120 200 230 500 1600 2300 5000 Relative power [dB] -1.0 0.6 -0. both in meters.0 0.0 Extended Vehicular A Model – EVA Excess tap delay [ns] 0 30 150 310 370 710 1090 1730 2510 Relative power [dB] 0.1 -7.6 -9. The assumption for this model is where Ds/2 is the initial distance of the train from eNodeB. 44 .0 0.0 -7.5 -1.9 A separate high speed train model is also defined and the Doppler shift trajectory is shown in the diagram below. and Dmin is eNodeB Railway track distance.4 -3.

Indicates a coefficient related to Effective height of Transmitter. The coverage radius of a base station is obtained based on the maximum propagation loss allowance in the link budget. 45 . Indicates a coefficient related to the receiver height. In an outdoor environment.3 Propagation Model The radio propagation model plays a key role in the link budget. the propagation models are generally based around modifying the following K factors. Indoor propagation model features low RF transmit power. must be considered. • 2-Epstein-Peterson • This calculation method is the same as Deygout. landforms and obstructions on the propagation path. • 4-Millington • This diffraction algorithm calculates the diffraction of only one obstacle.2. such as buildings and trees. • 0-No Diffraction • Do not count the diffraction loss. K1-los K2-los K1-nlos K2-nlos K3 K4 Indicate K1 and K2 in the line-of-sight condition. Indicates a coefficient related to diffraction loss. These two types of propagation models involve different factors. Other parameters Indicates a coefficient related to the propagation distance and the effective height of the transmitter. except that the method for calculating the height of obstacles is different. Indicate K1 and K2 in the none-line-of-sight condition. a short coverage distance and complicated environmental changes. • 3-Deygout with correction • Correct the distance based on the Deygout calculation method. Indicates a coefficient related to clutter loss. • 1-Deygout • This diffraction algorithm calculates the diffraction of a maximum of three obstacles. The fading of signals is larger than free space when radio waves propagate in open areas/suburban areas and fading rate is the largest in urban/dense urban areas. Although every planning tool will use slightly different method in their propagation calculation. Propagation in free space gives the lowest fade rate. Radio propagation models are classified into outdoor and indoor propagation models.4. Signals fade at varying rates in different environments. Method K5 K6 Kclutter This section describes the common propagation models in LTE planning. Method of calculating diffraction includes.

then path loss complies with the free space model. The unit is MHz.9 × lg( f ) . even. HBS indicates the height of the base station antenna. a(hss) indicates the terminal gain function. Terminal antenna height: 1 meter to 10 meters Distance between the transmitter and receiver: 1 km to 20 km The Cost231-Hata model can be expressed by the following formula: Total = L . The unit is km. scattering. f indicates the working frequency of the system. d indicates the distance between the terminal and the base station. This model is applicable to the scenario when the antennas of the base station and terminal are mounted at considerable height and CLOS exists between the base station and the terminal. Free Space Model Free space indicates an ideal. and isotropic medium of space.I. When electromagnetic waves are transmitted in this medium.a(Hss) + Cm L = 46.13. If a clear line of sight (CLOS) exists between the transmit antenna and receive antenna.large city in the related protocol) 46 . The value of Cm depends on the terrain type. The application range is as follows: Frequency band: 1500 MHz to 2000 MHz Base station height: 30 meters to 200 meters. d indicates the distance between the terminal and the base station. The preceding formula does not consider the impact of ground reflection. the antennae of the base station and terminal can be mounted at any height. The base station must be higher than the surrounding buildings. The unit is km. and thus often underestimates propagation loss. or absorption occurs.4 + 20log(d ) + 20log( f ) Where. refraction.6. The values of Cm in the standard Cost231-Hata are as follows: In large cities: Cm = 3 (as defined in Urban . The unit is MHz. Satellite communication and microwave line-of-sight (LOS) communication are typical examples of free space propagation. LOS communication between the base station and the terminal is implemented. no reflection. In certain conditions. HSS indicates the height of the terminal antenna. f indicates the carrier frequency. The unit is m. The unit is m.82 × lg(HBS) + (44. II.3 + 33. Propagation losses are caused only by the energy spread of electromagnetic waves. In this case.55 × lg(HBS)) × lg(d ) Where. The propagation losses in the free space model are as follows: PL = 32.9 . Cost231-Hata Model Cost231-Hata model can be used in macro cells as the propagation model. This function is related to the antenna height and working frequency of the terminal and the environment.

4dB (as defined in Urban – Suburban in the related protocol) In rural open areas: Cm = -4. UMTS. Therefore. a set of Cm has been created in the experienced model. The model may be used for any technology.94 (As defined in Rural (quasi-open) – countryside where the terminal is unobstructed for 100 meters in the front in the related protocol) Since some of the working frequencies of the LTE networks are 2.33 × lg( f ) -35.94 (As defined in Rural (open) – desert in the related protocol) In highways: Cm = -4.3 GHz and 2. 47 . 150 MHz to 2000 MHz.6 GHz have exceeded the band range of the standard Cost 231-Hata model. K4 has to be a positive number Losses due to diffraction over an obstructed path(dB) Multiplying factor for log(d)log(HTxeff) Multiplying factor for HRxeff Mobile antenna height (m) Multiplying factor for f(clutter) Average of weighted losses due to clutter The standard propagation model can be used for propagation model calibration through CW (Continuous Wave) test by using simulation tools. that is. the standard Cost231-Hata model must be corrected based on the CW test result. diffraction mechanisms (calculated in several ways) and take into account clutter classes and effective antenna heights in order to calculate path loss.33 × lg( f ) -40. This model uses the terrain profile.78 × (lg( f ))2 + 18. CDMA2000. Standard Propagation Model (SPM) The standard propagation model is a model (deduced from the Hata formula) particularly suitable for predication in the 150MHz~3500MHz band over long distance (1Km<d<20Km) and is very adapted to GSM900/1800. III. WiMAX and LTE technologies.78 × (lg( f ))2 + 18. According to the planning experience and actual CW test results in multiple scenarios. in the actual LTE system design.5.GENEX U-Net. it is based on the following formula: LSPM = K1 + K2 log (d )+ K3 log (H Txeff)+ K4 Diffractio nLoss + K5 log (d )log (H Txeff)+ K6 H Rxeff + K cluttrt f (clutter) Where: K1 K2 d K3 HTxeff K4 Diffraction loss K5 K6 HRxeff KClutter f(clutter) Constant offset (dB) Multiplying factor for log(d) Distance between the receiver and the transmitter (m) Multiplying factor for log(HTxeff) Effective height of the transmitter antenna(m) Multiplying factor for diffraction calculation.In medium-sized cities: Cm = 0 (as defined in Urban – small city in the related protocol) In suburban areas: Cm = -2(log( f /28))2 .

IV. Okumura model was originally built into three modes. is the most widely used radio frequency propagation model for predicting the behavior of cellular propagation in built up areas. one for urban. Japan. This model incorporates the graphical information from Okumura model and develops it further to realize the effects of diffraction. 48 . The model served as a base for the Hata Model and the following assumptions apply to the use of Okumura Hata model. The traditional Okumura Hata model formula is shown below: V. reflection and scattering caused by city structures. also known as the Okumura-Hata model for being a developed version of the Okumura Model. Okumura-Hata Model The Hata Model for Urban Areas. The expression of this model is as follows: Where. ITU Indoor Model The IEEE documents provide a propagation loss model in the indoor base station environment. Frequency: 150 MHz to 1500 MHz Mobile Station Antenna Height: between 1 m and 10 m Base station Antenna Height: between 30 m and 200 m Link distance: between 1 km and 20 km. The original Okumura model for Urban Areas is a radio propagation model that was built using the data collected in the city of Tokyo. The model for urban areas was built first and used as the base for others The Okumura Hata model also has two more varieties for propagation in Suburban Areas and Open Areas. suburban and open areas. This model is based on the Cost231 model. The model is ideal for using in cities with many urban structures but not many tall blocking structures.

indicates the loss brought by penetration through walls in i mode.g. In this case. the value of n is 4. Identify all the propagation routes from the transmission source to each receive point. the ray tracing method can be used to analyze wave propagation. indicates the number of penetrated floors. Ray Tracing Model The ray tracing model involves analyzing electric wave propagation by using the ray tracing method and obtaining the field strength of received signals through theoretical calculation. that is. according to the features and layout of the buildings on the 3D map. windows) Internal walls • Concrete. offices) • Hollow pot tiles • Reinforced concrete • Thickness typ.4 Lw2 6. obstructions in the propagation environment are often larger than the wavelength of the radio wave. Determine reflection and diffraction losses based on the Fresnel equation and the geometrical or uniform theory of diffraction. indicates the loss of neighboring floors. indicates the constant loss. the value can be changed to 3.e. VI. For capacity calculations in moderately pessimistic environments. In addition.LFS Lc kwi n Lwi Lf b indicates the propagation losses in free space. The wavelength of the radio wave is several centimeters. In normal indoor offices. geological information technologies allow you to identify each building in a city as a right prism in a high precision degree. Such a right prism is identified by the top coordinate of the polygon at the bottom and height. Table 4-2 Weighted average for loss categories Loss category Typical floor structures (i. often the antenna height of the base station or terminal is not specified and the deviation of shadow fading in log-normal distribution is often 12 dB. In this case. indicates the number of walls in type i penetration.9 Caution: In an indoor cell.6 GHz. the test point. 49 . The basic idea of the ray tracing method is as follows: Determine the position of a transmission source. indicates the experience parameter.3 Lw1 3. The value of Lc is often 37 dB. Therefore. brick • Minimum number of holes Description Factor (dB) Lf 18. < 30 cm Light internal walls • Plasterboard • Walls with large numbers of holes (e. Some LTE network uses the higher part of the UHF band such as 2.3 GHz and 2.

height. • The transmitter and receiver are located in a same building. the ray tracing model is used only in network planning in densely populated areas of large cities. For an indoor receiver to maintain normal communications. The prediction accuracy of the model is closely related to the precision of the digital maps and accuracy of site engineering parameters. The propagation modes of electromagnetic waves are as follows: direct radiation. Due to the cost.6 Concrete Wall 15~30 Brick Wall 10 Wooden Floor 5 Thick Glass Wall 3~5 Thin Glass Wall 1~3 Lift Door 20-30 50 . Simulation software GENEX U-Net uses a 3D ray tracing model. 4. Table below lists the penetration losses associated with typical buildings. Therefore.8~2. Perform the same point coherence stacking of field strengths of all routes to obtain the total received field strength of each test point. direction angle. The ray tracing model is integrated in common commercial planning software. the indoor penetration loss is related to the incident angle. however. building materials. inverse radiation. diffraction. electromagnetic wave signals are obtained through diffraction and scattering. penetration. In areas where no indoor distributed system is deployed. The indoor receiver obtains radio signals in the following scenarios: • The indoor receiver obtains signals from an outdoor transmitter. such as the antenna position. See Figure below Figure 4-3 Indoor propagation scenario The link budget is only concerned with the scenario in which an outdoor transmitter is used and the signals penetrate only one wall. the signal must be sufficiently strong.the field strength of each route to each test point can be obtained. and scattering.4 Penetration Loss Penetration loss indicates the fading of radio signals from an indoor terminal to a base station due to obstruction by a building. terrain.2. Table 4-3 Typical building penetration losses Typical Penetration Loss (dB) Frequency (GHz) 1. and down-tilt angle. and working frequency. This model. requires highly precise (at least to within 5 meters) digital maps that contain 3D building information.

In the link budget, penetration loss values depend on the coverage scenario. Therefore, coverage target areas are classified into densely populated urban areas, common urban areas, suburban areas, rural areas, and highways. Table below lists the area classification principles. Table 4-4 Principles for classifying coverage scenarios
Scenario Name Description In this scenario, buildings are densely distributed, and the average building height exceeds 30 m. In certain areas, buildings are distributed in order. The distance between buildings is narrow and is not fixed. The average distance between buildings is 10 m to 20 m. Most streets that are not main avenues are narrow. These areas are densely populated. In this scenario, the average building height is about 20 m. The average distance between buildings is similar to the average building height. Such areas contain a certain amount of open spaces and greenery. In this scenario, the average building height is about 10 m. Buildings are scattered and the average distance between buildings is 30 to 50 m. The streets are wide. Such areas may contain much greenery and many open spaces. In this scenario, buildings are scarce. The average building height is about 5 m. Such areas are likely to contain vast open spaces, fields, greenery, and roads.

Densely populated urban area

Common urban area

Suburban area

Rural area

The building penetration loss ranges from 5 dB to 40 dB. In link budget, if no actual test data in the target area is available, an assumed penetration loss value must be used. The final assumption is also highly dependent on local customer requirement. For example in sophisticated Asian Metropolis like Hong Kong, Singapore and Shanghai, the indoor coverage expectation will be very high, hence requiring a high penetration loss provisioning. On the other hand, in less developed market such as Africa and Latin America, customer expectation is lower so the penetration loss requirement can be reduced to reduce overall cost involved. During network planning, if no actual field testing data is available, refer to the penetration loss values listed in Table below. Table 4-5 Example of penetration loss
Scenario Densely populated urban area Common urban area Suburban area Rural area Penetration Loss 18 - 25 dB 15 - 18 dB 10 - 12 dB 6 - 8 dB

4.2.5 Body Loss
Body loss indicates the loss generated due to signal blocking and absorption when a terminal antenna is close to the body. This affects handsets in particular. Body loss depends on the position of the terminal. For fixed service, normally USB dongle is used. Terminals, such as indoor and outdoor CPEs, are often mounted on roofs, windows, or desks. An eNodeB antenna is mounted at a height of tens of meters, in which case body loss can be ignored as the body loss value is 0 dB. For mobile applications, especially PDA-based VoIP services, body loss must be considered and in this instance, the body loss is about 3 dB.
51

4.2.6 Feeder Loss
Feeder loss indicates the signal loss caused by various devices that are located on the path of the antenna to the receiver. Any device using an external antenna for service provision at either the base station side or terminal side must consider feeder loss. If a USB dongle, an indoor CPE, or an outdoor CPE integrated with an antenna is used, feeder loss can be ignored at the terminal side, but not at the base station side. In the actual link budget, you must calculate feeder loss according to feeder type and length and connector type. Figure below shows the typical connections of the antenna feeder system in an indoor base station.

Figure 4-4 Connections of the antenna feeder system The formula for calculating the feeder loss according to the feeder type and length is as follows: Feeder loss (dB) = Feeder loss per 100 m (dB/100 m) × feeder length (m)/100 The feeder loss per 100 meters is related to the frequency band. Table below lists typical feeder losses. Table 4-6 Typical feeder losses
Frequency (MHz) 450 800 900 1500 1800 2000 2300 1/2" 4.683 6.396 6.822 9.000 10.099 10.693 11.543 7/8" 2.644 3.594 3.861 5.129 5.693 6.089 6.624 5/4" 1.871 2.564 2.762 3.693 4.228 4.416 4.919
52

Frequency (MHz) 2400 2500 3000 3300 3500

1/2" 11.733 12.035 13.218 13.932 14.348

7/8" 6.733 6.906 7.525 7.932 8.169

5/4" 5.000 5.129 5.624 5.928 6.105

If a base station is mounted indoors, the link budget must include the losses of all devices from the RF port of the base station to the antenna interface, including the indoor jumper, connector, main transmission feeder, combiners, splitters and the outdoor jumper. If the RRU of a distributed base station is mounted on the tower top, you need to consider only the loss of the outdoor 1/2" jumper. In this case, the total cable loss can be greatly reduced to approximately 0.5dB.

4.2.7 Background Noise
The background noise of the LTE system is the same as that of other communication systems. The calculation formula is as follows: Nth = KTB. K indicates the Boltzmann constant. The value is as follows: 1.38 x 10 ^ (- 23)J/K. T indicates absolute temperature at a value of 290K. The result of KT is the density of the heat noise power spectrum and the value is -174dBm/Hz. B indicates channel bandwidth and in LTE, it can be 1.4MHz/3MHz/5 MHz/10 MHz/15 MHz/20 MHz

4.3 Equipment-Related Parameters
Equipment-related parameters include the base station, antenna, and terminal. The link budget parameters vary with the base stations, antennas, and terminals of different vendors. These parameters affect the link budget result. As a result, the downlink is unaffected in most scenarios.

4.3.1 Transmit Power
Transmit power includes that of the base station and terminal sides. The transmit power at the base station side affects the downlink budget. The transmit power at the terminal side affects the uplink budget. With the adoption of MIMO technology, two or more antennae are used at the same time at the base station for transmission. Therefore, the power combining gain must be considered. The formula for calculating the power combining gain is as follows: Power Combining Gain=10*Log(N) Where, N indicates the number of transmit channels of the base station. For example, when a base station contains two transmitters and two receivers, the power combining gain is 3 dB. Therefore, the transmit power in each sector (2T2R) is as follows: 46 dBm (40 Watt) in total for a 2x2 system with 20W from each transmit path
53

3 Noise Figure Noise figure is the ratio of the SINR at the input end to the SINR at the output end of the receiver. In link budget tool. In this formula.4. The antenna gain quantifies the degree to which an antenna transmits input power in concentration. Nfloor indicates the multiplication result of K and T and is the density of the thermal white noise power. The SINR used in the link budget is obtained from the system simulation result. 4. A and B indicate the horizontal beamwidth and vertical beamwidth. 54 . The NF of a common LTE terminal is generally 6 dB to 8 dB and the typical value used is 7 dB. Noise figure is highly dependent on both operating bandwidth and eNodeB type. horizontal beamwidth. G indicates antenna gain. To increase the gain.g. NF is an important index used to measure the performance of a receiver.2 Receiver Sensitivity The receiver sensitivity indicates the minimum signal strength required to enable decoding by the eNodeB or UE receiver if there is no interference.3. Figure below shows the relationship between dBi and dBd.4 Antenna Gain The antenna gain indicates the power density ratio of the signals generated from the same point by the actual antenna and ideal radiation unit when the input power is identical.3. and vertical beamwidth is as follows: G(dBi)=10*log[32000/(A*B)]. Figure 4-5 Relationship between dBi and dBd The relationship between antenna gain. The dBi indicates the gain of the antenna compared with the isotropic radiator to all directions. The value is -174 dBm/Hz. Two units are used to indicate antenna gain: dBi and dBd. MIMO and Coding repetition. each of the subcarrier receiver sensitivity can be calculated by the following formula: Sensitivity = SINR + N floor + 10.log[15000] + NF SINR indicates the demodulation threshold of the receiver. The dBd indicates the gain of the antenna compared with the symmetric oscillator.3. 4. The formula for the conversion between these two units is as follows: dBi = dBd + 2. reduce the lobe width of the radiation at the vertical plane and maintain the omni-directional radiation performance at the horizontal plane. the BLER chosen and whether other quality affecting features are implemented e. The demodulation threshold is related to the specific code modulation mode involved. The unit is dB.15.

we often use 65° 18-dBi directional antennas and 11-dBi omni-directional antennas as the antennas in base stations.In LTE system. Horizontal pattern Vertical pattern Figure 4-6 65° 18-dBi directional antenna Horizontal Pattern Vertical Pattern Figure 4-7 11-dBi omni-directional antenna Figure 4-8 Definition of Features on Horizontal & vertical patterns of directional antenna 55 . Figure 4-6 and Figure 4-7 show the antenna lobes of the 65° 18-dBi directional antenna and 11-dBi omni-directional antenna.

The 33° horizontal beamwidth antennas can be used for highway coverage. 4. MIMO gain is unique parameters of LTE technology. since CPE antenna is external. The figure below shows one example for Transmit Diversity system structure. Figure 4-9 Transmit Diversity and Spatial Multiplexing MIMO TS36. and the fast fading margin. gain similar to those currently available in 3G/WiMAX product is expected.3-1) 56 . The values of the interference margin and the fast fading margin in the LTE system differ from those in other systems. CW0 and CW1 will be fed by 2 different payload streams. which helps increase coverage radius.We recommend the 65° dual-polarized 18-dBi directional antennas for the base stations that are distributed in densely populated urban areas and common urban areas.4 LTE-Related Parameters LTE-related parameters include MIMO gains. especially in isolated towns. the interference margin. For a traditional single-antenna system.4. the MIMO technology can be classified into Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO) and Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) according to the number of antennas at the transmit and receive ends.211 (fig 6. We recommend the 11-dBi omnidirectional antennas for coverage in rural areas. However.1 MIMO Gains MIMO configuration indicates that multiple antennas are used for signal transmission at the transmit end and signal reception at the receive end to improve the quality of service (QoS) for each subscriber. such as CDMA and UMTS. The antenna gains of the terminals in the LTE system vary. The gain of such antennas can reach 21 dBi. the repeated coding gain. This results in a large difference in the coverage scopes of different terminals. For Spatial Multiplexing MIMO. the specified uplink/downlink rate at the coverage edge. The 90° or 65° directional antennas can be used for base stations in suburban areas. However. 4. the LTE terminal market is dominated by USB dongle at this stage and CPE antenna gain values will be based on final product availability.

In this case. a single data input stream is used to feed two separate antennae but it is equally possible to feed two different input data streams into this setup to provide higher data rate and it is the fundamental principle for Multiple Code Word (MCW) in LTE. The lower the 57 . Multi-antenna technology can improve system capacity and coverage without largely increasing cost. the interference signal is colored noise. Spatial multiplexing gain The spatial multiplexing gain indicates the improvement of data throughput or transmission rate when the transmit power and bandwidth remain unchanged. the LTE features a rate layering feature. If a single antenna is used to transmit signals. 4. the total transmit power is equal to N times the transmit power from a single antenna signal transmission. In this case. such as CDMA2000 EVDO. Space diversity gain Due to the fading nature of wireless channels. Various multi-antenna systems can obtain the array gain. array gain. space diversity gain. inter-cell interference cannot be ignored due to the frequency sharing and multiplexing nature both within and between cells. Array gain The array gain indicates an improvement in the average signal noise ratio (SINR) at the receive end when the total transmit power is the same. you can also increase the transmit power. the requirements for the power amplifier are high. This section describes the various gains brought by the MIMO. The spatial multiplexing gain is used to increase system capacity. the receiving SINR can be improved. after the multi-antenna technology is used. This is the basis of Interference Reduction Combining feature. Interference reduction gain In mobile cellular communications system. and interference reduction gain. a power gain of 10log(N) dB can be obtained.4. Therefore. however. different from white noise. Power combining gain When multiple antennae (N) are used to transmit signals. 4. the higher the required edge rate. That is. which is mainly used to increase the system capacity. In addition. and implementation cost is complex and increased. 2. However. This is because the multi-antenna technology gives the following gains: power combining gain. 5. 1. You can obtain a spatial multiplexing gain by transmitting multiple parallel data streams over the same time-frequency resources. As a result.In the example above. N transmit channels are available. The array gain can be obtained through the coherent combining of various antenna signals. In a multi-antenna system. the signals in a single-antenna system suffer from deep fading. thus improving received signal quality. This ensures that the signal fading of an antenna is independent. That is.2 Cell Edge Rate Similar to other wireless communications systems. the distance between antennae is often large. the MIMO achieves a spatial multiplexing gain. WiMAX and HSPA. You can combine the expected signals and suppress the interference signal through proper multiantenna spatial weight at the receiving end to improve the average SINR at the receiving end. the smaller the cell coverage radius. 3. the SINR fluctuation of the received signals after combining stabilizes.

the settings of the uplink/downlink cell edge rates (in particular the uplink cell edge rate) will determine the final cell coverage radius. a maximum of 3 symbols (36 Res) can be consumed per frame (10ms) for control channel signaling purposes and there is at least 6 more extra RE can be used for Downlink Reference signaling per TTI (1ms). Downlink ICIC also disabled). assuming there is no power control (i. Number of available Traffic carrying Resource Element per Resource Block indicates the number of RE available for each resource block. In TDD system.e. an understanding of edge coverage requirement is very critical from a network planning perspective. the lower the cell edge rate. The smaller the number of resource blocks assigned. downlink power control must be enabled also (which is executed at 20ms intervals based on UE BER reported value) and edge rate calculation will be more complex and 58 . the value should be 1 for single antenna port transmission mode 7 (port 7 or 8). RB can be assigned down to a per TTI level (1 ms duration) Number of Different data stream transmitted is related to the number of data stream being simultaneously transmitted. If Downlink ICIC is enabled. and 2 streams for dual antenna port transmission mode 8 (port 7 and 8). Modulation model level indicates the number of bits in the modulation mode. Number of Resource Block Assigned (a single RB is the basic resource assignment level) reflects the number of resource blocks used by user at the edge of the sector. For example. the frame size in LTE networks is 10 ms. Coding rate indicates the volume coding rate of the channel code. and 6 respectively. receive sensitivity of a base station is defined by the bandwidth of the RB which is 180 kHz. Number can be ranging from 1 (SFBC) to 2 (MCW 2x2). More recent version are using per subcarrier as basis of receiver sensitivity and the conversion value is simply 10log10(12). Hence. In previous version of link budget tools. This comes about due to the fixed power offered by UE (normally 23dBm) being spread evenly to the number of RBs involved in the modulation scheme assigned. In FDD system.Where. due to frequency sharing and time gap requirement for switching between uplink and downlink. Duration of each frame indicates the frame size. the volume coding rate of QPSK1/2 is 1/2. In case of BF. As regulated by the protocols. 6 symbols equivalent (72 Res) will be the minimum overhead requirement per TTI. the modulation mode levels of QPSK. A minimum of 1 symbol (12 Res) will be required per RB for control signaling purposes. and the volume coding rate of 16QAM3/4 is 3/4. In the link budget. and 64QAM are 2. For example. 4. the larger the cell coverage radius. Some of the factors that affect the edge rate in the LTE system are as follows: • Uplink/downlink TDD proportion • MIMO schemes chosen • eNodeB Power Amplifier power (affect downlink only) • Number of RB used at the sector edge • Modulation mode (1 of 29 coding methods) • Repeated coding times The formula for calculating the downlink cell edge rate is as follows: Cell edge rate_Phy = Number of Different data stream transmitted x Number of Resource Block assigned to user per frame x Number of available Traffic carrying Resource Element per Resource Block x Coding rate x Modulation model level / Duration of each frame . 16QAM.required edge rate.

It is mainly based on an adaptive beam patterns that acts to make the strongest point of main-lobe of the system output always be toward the direction of the expected UE and hence reducing the overall interference level for the whole cell. we still need a margin for the other cell interference. 4. LTE uplink is orthogonal if it is within the same cell so there is no intra-cell interference.g.4.4 Beam Forming Currently. FemtoCell. Beam forming scheme is a signal processing technology that is used to direct radio transmission in a chosen angular direction. beam forming is only applicable for TDD version of LTE. there is also a close correlation between actual traffic load and interference margin experienced by the network. the cell edge data rate requirement will still be the single most important factor in any cell planning activities. Relay. Figure 4-10 Visualization of Beam Forming 59 . Coordinated Multi-Point) are being proposed by the industry to reduce the level of interference over thermal increase which will further improves the capacity and throughput offered by LTE in the future.beyond the formula listed above. The interference margin indicates the degradation of system receive performance caused by internal interference in the system due to system traffic. However. However.4. In fact. The interference margin in practice depends heavily on the planned capacity so there is a tradeoff between capacity and coverage just like other cellular technologies. the orthogonal nature of LTE allows a smaller provisioning of cell breathing and interference margin when compared with WCDMA/HSUPA/ EVDO. The time synchronous version of LTE TDD on uplink and downlink also makes the implementation of beam forming more attractive than in LTE FDD. 4. Nonetheless. Various techniques (e. Its algorithm is highly complex and utilizes channel state information to achieve array processing SINR gain.3 Interference Margin Interference margin accounts for the increase in the terminal noise level caused by the interference from other users. due to the frequency division nature of LTE.

and is thus called “slow fading”. The main drawback here is there is also the requirement of either 4 (4x4) or 8 (8x2) transmit path from the eNodeB side which could make this more expensive to implement. To minimize the effect of shadow fading and ensure a certain edge coverage probability. Fading caused by location (mainly from obstruction) far exceeds fading caused by time. Mode 7 supports only single data flow so it can mainly improve coverage but Mode 8 can support multiplexing dual data stream as well which means it can improve both throughput and coverage. certain allowances must be made. 4. Mode 7 (Rel 8) and Mode 8 (Rel 9).1 Slow Fading Margin Shadow fading indicates the fading brought by obstruction due to a building or a natural feature. Statistics repeatedly show that the median levels of received signals follow log-normal distribution with the time and location at a certain distance. This is called the “slow fading margin”. or the “shadow fading margin”. There are two type of beam forming mode defined by 3GPP. including: • Feedback from receiver • Estimation from reverse link assuming channel reciprocity (particularly true for TDD) As it is based on a multiple transmit configuration.Channel state information that is required includes: • Fast fading channel coefficient • Direction of arrival (DoA) of signal • CQI information Channel state information can be obtained by different way. Shadow fading changes slowly.5 System Reliability 4.5. the major concern for shadow fading is those caused by location changes. this feature can significantly improve downlink system throughput and coverage performance and also provide good user experience by offering higher data rates. 60 . Therefore. Figure below shows the relationship between the slow fading margin and cell edge probability.

Table 4-7 Typical example of standard deviations in slow fading Scenario Densely populated urban area Common urban area Suburban area Rural area Standard Deviation of Slow Fading 10dB 8dB 6dB 6dB The slow fading margin can be obtained based on the cell edge coverage probability and standard deviation of slow fading. This spread of values approximate to the standard deviation of the signal strength at different test points from similar distances.Edge coverage probability) × Standard deviation of slow fading The Q function is expressed as follows: 61 .Figure 4-11 Impact of the slow fading margin on system reliability The difference found in the slow fading is reflected by the standard deviation of slow fading. Standard deviations requirement in Dense Urban area with highly integrated building layout and deeper indoor coverage requirement is even higher than typical urban environment. In plain areas. the standard deviation of slow fading is lower than that in suburban and urban areas. The standard deviation of slow fading shows the distribution of the radio signal strength at different test points at similar distances from the transmitter. The standard deviation of slow fading varies with the geological form. Table below lists the typical standard deviations of slow fading in different geological locations. The formula for calculating the edge coverage probability is as follows: Edge coverage probability = 1 . such as rural areas and open areas.Q( Slow fading margin Standard deviation of slow fading ) The slow fading margin can be obtained through the following formula: Slow fading margin = Q-1(1 . The value ranges from 5 dB to 12 dB.

b) The absence of soft handover gain between cells also means there will be NO macro diversity (soft handover) gain c) The slow rate of LTE power control (50Hz or 20ms) provides insignificant protection for fast fading condition.6.5. The figure below shows the point of divergence and the difference in path loss (dB) between the two assumptions vs distance (km) Figure 4-12 Propagation Difference: Planar vs Spherical Earth Curvature Assumption 4. at higher latitude part of the Earth surface. 80m high antenna will be required to ensure 40km coverage radius.The edge of coverage probability of a cell is based on area coverage probability. If the area coverage probability of the cell is PCov' = PCov’ the obtained edge coverage probability PEdge of the cell is the actual edge coverage probability of the cell. Suppose that the area coverage probability of a cell is PCov. the effect of earth curvature into radio propagation must also be considered. A 4/3 Earth radius multiplier is generally assumed for a distance larger than around 80km.6 Specific Factors in Link Budget Consideration 4. 4.3 Absence of Fast Fading and Soft Handover Margin It is also worth noting that in the system reliability part of LTE link budget consideration: a) Fast fading margin is absent in LTE as there is no WCDMA like fast power control gain. Use this probability to try the edge coverage probability PEdge for multiple times.1 Features Overview Below is a quick summary of specific features and their corresponding impact on the radio network link budget result if the features or functionalities are deployed 62 . 4. In fact. This is the distance where Planar Earth becomes spherical Earth distance from a radio propagation perspective.5. Hence. it is not necessary to include a fast fading margin in the link budget.2 Effect of Earth Curvature At larger propagation distances.

lower SINR will be required by the receivers at the eNodeB. Once the pattern and power level is determined. emulate the distortion occurring from the multi-path channels and.6. TTI bundling Gain is included as part of SINR in link budget estimation. 4.3 Interference Rejection Combining The concept of Interference Rejection Combining (IRC) is to regenerate the transmitted signal based on the estimated data from the previous receptions. In situation where TTI bundling collides with periodic CQI/PMI/RI reports. The code repetition rate will also be affected by the Redundancy Version chosen and it is currently based on Incremental Redundancy for LTE. The application of this feature is ideal for lower data rate applications such as VoIP and Packet data services requiring slower rate. TTI bundling will take precedent and the periodic reporting will be dropped accordingly.2 TTI Bundling By repeating the same uplink information. finally subtract all regenerated interfering signals from the uplink received signals to obtain more reliable estimation of original users’ data.4.6. At least 4 dB gain can be achieved through this data repetition. the victim cell can 63 . This feature utilizes the spatial separation and characteristics of inter-cell interference to determine the power of the interfering UE which belongs to another cell.

So in cases where there are only a small number of dominating interfering sources. Maximum ratio combining (MRC) do not make use of the spatial characteristics of the interference when calculating antenna weighting. simulation has shown a maximum SINR gain of 7dB can be achieved over traditional MMSE interference reduction method. Conversely. Figure 4-13 MMSE and IRC SINR Requirement vs FER condition 64 .then remove the interferer from the received signals. IRC can enhance network coverage and provide better QoS for cell edge users. IRC can provide more improvement than MRC especially when there are a reasonable number of receive antennae for IRC to execute the compensation. When Uplink IRC is used. It can reduce the interference impact of the neighboring users in the uplink. if there are a large number of equal power signals arriving at the receive antennae. IRC can increase the uplink users’ throughput significantly and hence improves the users’ experience. In comparison. IRC is implemented in the baseband processing module (WBBP) of NodeB. By outperforming Maximum Ratio Combining and MMSE receivers. the gain of IRC over MRC is not as significant. Therefore.

4.5 Remote Radio Unit and eNodeB Portfolio We offer a comprehensive range of eNodeB and Remote Radio Unit Portfolio for various applications. The introduction of RRU allow the reduction of cable loss by up to 3dB for both uplink and downlink. 4. However. UL Traffic. reliability of information transmission can also be “boosted” not by radio transmission power but by adjusted to a lower modulation level (MCS adjustment). since the radio power is shared equally by all Resources element.6. Radio planning engineers should pay particular attention to the following input parameters: 65 . the power allocation for each RE is fixed.6. By increasing the number of Resources element being used as Reference Signal. Power Boosting value = 0 if there is no extra resources used. the RS can be “boosted’ by 2x (3dB). as well as signaling channel. 3x (4. Default Power boosting = 1 (2x) for network planning Alternatively.7 Summary of Variables inside Link Budget Tools The link budget tool support the analysis for DL Traffic. single transmit branch to two transmit at 40W each.4 Reference Signal Power Boosting Gain Power boosting in LTE is mainly perform on the Reference signal.7dB) or 4x (6dB) accordingly. Possible Radio configurations on offer range from 20W per carrier. depending on the actual length of the cable run from top of base station rack to the antenna location. 4. Then the smallest radius is used as the final coverage radius based on the link balance principle.

A is always refers to the transmit function of the device DL/UL Cell Edge Rate (kbps): Setting in accordance to the actual customer requirements DL/UL Edge MCS: Total of 29 Coding selection that can be chosen separately for DL and UL. TMA used: Yes/No TMA Gain: 12dB/24dB Morphology: Dense Urban/Urban/Suburban/Rural/Highway Channel Model: EPA.4M. 1800. 10M. default is 2T2R) Design target area coverage probability. In a AxB configuration. 70% and 100% Propagation Model: Option include Cost231-Hata (Classic).5 meters high. As UL normally is the weakest link due to limited UE power. Cost231-Micro (Classic) and Cost231-Micro-Huawei.2dB for a Class 3 unit. ETU. 800. Typical value is either 43dBm (20W) or 46 dBm (40W). 20M MIMO Scheme: Separately settable for Downlink (1x2.Type of MIMO multi-antenna technology used (At this stage. Common values are 30%. DL/UL Target Load: Target customer loading should be provided here separately for Downlink and Uplink so the desired interference margin can be incorporated into the link budget. SPM. AWS. The terminal antenna is mounted at 1. Further information can be seen in the following sections. 1x4. please refer to detailed eNodeB configuration guide for final detail. However. 900. Below listed are some of the critical and “selectable” parameters from the Link Budget tool Duplex Mode: Option Frequency division duplex (FDD)/ Time division duplex (TDD). 2600) Bandwidth: 1. Okumura Hata (Classic). Please Note. referring to per TX path transmit power value. Cost231-Hata-Huawei. EVA. 15M. 2300. The minimum transmit power by this UE is -40dBm according to 3GPP TS 36. 5M. eNodeB cable loss: Value is dependent on cable configuration at customer site (0. High Speed Train (HST) Frequency (MHz): Frequency used in this system (700. UE Antenna Gain: Typical value is 0dB in the absence of any external antenna 66 .25 at the Edge as UE power is shared across only 8 RBs for best Maximum path loss results against other MCS. The Cost231-Hata model that is amended based on planning experience is generally used as the propagation model. Actual UE power can be reduced by the modulation used. (Operator dependent ranging from 90 to 95%) The antenna in a base station is mounted at a height of 30 meters. Okumura Hata-Huawei. 2x2 SFBC. 1x8). 2100. Further information is available in the Propagation Model section below eNodeB Total Transmit Power: Customer configuration specific. 4x2 SFBC+FSTD) and Uplink (1x2.101.5dB for RRU) vs 3dB (standard cable length) or more (extended length) for RFU based configuration UE Transmit Power: Typical value is 23dBm +/. We recommend UL MCS coding of QPSK 0. 50%. 850. 1500. 3M.

21 18 0. As a result. and can neither ensure the capacity nor coverage reliability of the actual network. the designer must discuss with the operator to determine the value of each input parameter in the link budget.19 0 0 0 6. depending on the different input parameters. Therefore.18 1.19 -2.5 0 32.29 Downlink 2×2 SFBC 1024 46 24 15.39 7 -128.96 20 11. 67 .67 -124.5 -132.26 18 0.63 0 0 0 70. LTE Link Budget Morphology Duplex Mode User Environment Channel Bandwidth (MHz) Channel Model MIMO Scheme Cell Edge Rate (kbps) Tx Max Total Tx Power (dBm) Allocated RB Subcarrier Power (dBm) Tx Antenna Gain (dBi) Tx Cable Loss (dB) Tx Body loss (dB) EIRP per Subcarrier (dBm) Rx SINR (dB) Rx Noise Figure (dB) Receiver Sensitivity (dBm) Rx Antenna Gain (dBi) Rx Cable Loss (dB) Rx Body loss (dB) Target Load Interference Margin (dB) Min Signal Reception Strength (dBm) Path Loss & Cell Radius Penetration Loss (dB) Std.6 Cost231-Hata 30 2600 0.71 -3.00% 3.7 95.89 20 11.48 125.00% 9. to design the link budget that reflects the requirement of a particular network.87 -148.5 0 50.34 The link budget is based on only theories. the link budget result varies greatly.52 2. The coverage target and requirements also vary with different network requirement and the respective assumptions.Below listed is an example for LTE link budget.00% 0.of Shadow Fading (dB) Area Coverage Probability Shadow Fading Margin (dB) Pathloss Propagation Model eNodeB/UE Antenna Height (m) Frequency (MHz) Cell Radius (km) Uplink Dense Urban FDD Indoor 20 ETU 3 1×2 256 23 4 6.48 128.7 95.00% 9.5 2600 0.

For a given coverage area. simple terrain. ideal site locations. the number of planned base stations will depend on the system simulation result. Hence. terrain type.Link budget also assumes a uniform landform. 68 . and subscriber distribution. The calculated coverage radius is used for reference in simulated site distribution. actual site location. System simulation covers detailed landform distribution. and even subscriber distribution. The detailed coverage planning must be completed through system simulation. the link budget result serves ONLY as the theoretical calculation result.

and transmit inter-modulation product. interference) to other systems. 5. Spurious interference includes the out of band power leakage of the interference source.1 Basic Concepts Spurious Interference Spurious interference refers to the additive interference generated by the interference source in the working frequency band of the interfered receiver.5 Interference and Guard Band Analysis 5.1 Overview In mobile communication network. interference is one of the key elements that affect the network quality. it may also overdrive the receiver to work in non-linear state or even worse. With the development of mobile communication technologies. Spurious interference is generated by a transmitter and usually includes the thermal noise generated and amplified by the power amplifier (PA). When a strong interference enters a receiver. This section describes the basic concepts and the method to determine the influence of interference to sensitivity. amplified background noise. Figure 5-1 Spurious interference Blocking Interference Receivers usually work in linear areas.1. The interference to the LTE system is in multiple forms. in saturation mode as the out of band suppression ratio of the receiver may 69 . Spurious interference can reduce the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the interfered receiver. Inter-modulation products can be generated during the multi-carrier operation and spurious signals can also be generated by frequency mixer. The signals transmitted by one system are useless signals (that is. it becomes a common phenomenon that multiple mobile networks with different frequencies and modulation characteristics coexist in the same area.

Blocking interference can reduce the receiver gains and increase the noise. the frequency 70 . the inter-modulation product is generated because of the non-linearity of the metals. multiple harmonic waves are generated on the received signal. blocking interference is generated by a strong interference signal out of the receive band that makes the receiver work in saturation state and then reduces the gains. When multiple signals with different frequencies transverse across conductors at the same time. the frequency of the inter-modulation product drops into the useful frequency band of the receiver and generates the inter-modulation interference. Generally. Figure 5-3 Inter-modulation interference Because of the non-linearity of the receiver and the limitation of out of band suppression. together with the transmitted signal of the transmitter may also generate some inter-modulation products because of the non-linearity of the transmitter.be limited. When a strong signal is reflected back from the transmitting end of a transmitter back into the transmitter. This type of interference is called blocking interference. When two strong interference signals are received at the same time. this signal. In addition. Unfortunately. the interference signal may mix with the local oscillator signal and then generate the interference in the intermediate frequency (IF). Figure 5-2 Blocking interference Inter-Modulation Interference When multiple strong signals with different frequencies enter a receiver at the same time. the inter-modulation product at the receiver is generated by the signals by the front end due to the non-linear circuit of the receiver.

If you want to eliminate the inter-modulation interference by installing a filter. Hence. it can be referred to as the ratio of the average power on the designated frequency point to the average power on the adjacent channel.combination such as 2f1-f2 and 2f2-f1 of the two strong interference signals may drop into the band of the receiver and then generates interference. ACS is the ratio of the receive filter attenuation on the assigned channel frequency to the receive filter attenuation on the adjacent channel(s). Alternatively. ACLR is the dB value of C (total transmit power of the designated frequency point) subtracting D (total in-band leakage power of the adjacent channel). The bandwidth is determined based on the system in the adjacent channel. ACLR represents the suppression capability of the transmit filter to the adjacent channel. As shown in the figure below. ACLR was also formerly called Adjacent Channel Power Ratio and ACLR is specified in the 3GPP standard. 71 . ACS refers to the capability to receive the power of the local in band channel when the interference signal from the adjacent frequency exists. Figure 5-4 ACS ACLR Adjacent Channel Leakage power Ratio (ACLR) is measure of transmitter performance and it is defined as the ratio of the transmitted power to the power measured after a receiver filter in the adjacent RF channel. The adjacent channel may be used by the same system or a different system. The capability to resist inter-modulation is a feature of the receiver. ACS Adjacent channel selectivity (ACS) is a protection index to determine the capability of a receive filter. ACS is the ratio of the receive filter loss on the designated channel to the loss on the adjacent channel. you need to install a receive filter in the interfered system.

ACLR and ACS are usually considered together. and may even cause the dead zone. When near-far effect exists.Figure 5-5 ACLR ACIR It is difficult to separate ACLR and ACS because they coexist. The result of the consideration is Adjacent Channel Interference Ratio (ACIR) and ACIR is the ratio of the total power transmitted from a source (base station or UE) to the total interference power affecting a victim receiver. resulting from both transmitter and receiver imperfections. The formula is as follows: The interference in the adjacent channel affects both the system coverage and system capacity. therefore. interference from the adjacent channel greatly affects the system coverage. Figure 5-6 Near-far effect of the interference in the adjacent channel 72 .

which implies that downlink ACIR ≈ ACSUE. 73 . Therefore.2 Analysis of Background Noise Assume that the eNodeB receiver’s IF bandwidth is Bw (unit: MHz). where the terminal cannot access the network. The noise level directly affects the eNodeB receive sensitivity. which will dominate the downlink interference. the dead zone occurs. then the theoretical receive sensitivity of the eNodeB is as follows: So = No + (C/I) m. it is essentially the UE ACLR performance that is simulated. the limiting design factor is the UE transmitter. the eNodeB receive sensitivity decreases by 1 dB. that is.As shown in the preceding figure. Thus. and the eNodeB receive noise figure is Nf (unit: dB). In the uplink.1. Figure 5-7 Frequency offset relationship 5. when the noise level rises by 1 dB. The reason is that ACLRUE << ACSBS. 1 dB decrease in the receiver sensitivity of the system is regarded as the threshold of interference. A downlink simulation will thus essentially be a simulation of UE ACS performance. which implies that uplink ACIR ≈ ACLRUE. In the downlink. in an uplink simulation. where. OFFSET/BW/GB Figure below is the relationship of the Offset (frequency offset value). The reason is that ACSUE << ACLRBS. BW (channel bandwidth) and Guard Band. which will dominate the uplink interference. when the terminal in system A enters system B. the interference power of system B to system A is even greater than the useful power of system A. In the system. The equivalent noise level of the eNodeB receiver is as follows: No = –174 + 10 log (Bw) + Nf (Unit: dBm) If the demodulation carrier-to-interference ratio C/I (unit: dB) of the eNodeB receive system for a particular modulation scheme (MCS). the limiting design factor is the UE receiver. (C/I) m is the minimum demodulation C/I.

the total noise level increase is as follows: 10 log (2 w/1 w = 2) = 3 dB. the allowed interference level must be 16 dB lower than the original receive noise level of the system. When the interference level is equal to the original receive noise level of the system. the interference level is also 1 w.1 12 0.5 w.5 times of the original noise level (1/103/10 = 0. the allowed interference level is generally 6 dB lower than the original receive noise coefficient of the system. The total noise level of the system is 1 + 0. Assume that the external receive intra-frequency spurious interference has the feature of the quasi-white noise. Therefore. after the system is interfered.5 6 0.5 w. 74 . Table 5-1 lists the receive background noise rise level due to the presence of the external interference at level specified.3 Impact of Interference Interference is one of the key elements that affect network quality.76 1. call drop. the original receiver sensitivity of the system decreases by 1 dB. Therefore. When the original receive sensitivity of the system decreases by 0. the interference level is 0. The interference level is 3 dB lower than the original noise level of the system. Table 5-1 Increase of background noise due to the presence of interference levels Original system noise level / new interferer level (dB) Total noise level in system (compared with before) after new interferer is included (dB) Decrease of system receive sensitivity (dB) 20 0.04 16 0. Therefore.97 0. receiver’s IF bandwidth and noise coefficient are affected by the specific circuits and can never reach the theoretical value or optimum value from a pure analog circuitry perspective.76 0 3 3 In general.5). the influence of the interference to the system is that the interference adds to the original equivalent noise of the system and then raises the receive noise level of the system. the allowed interference level must be 10 dB lower than the original receive noise level of the system. handover. the receive sensitivity of the system decreases by 3 dB. that is. that is. In the broadband system.5 = 1.97 3 1.4 9 0.For LTE.1. 5.5 w/1 w = 1. The other values are calculated in the similar way: As shown in the preceding table. 0.1 dB. that is.4 0. sensitivity is calculated on per subcarrier rather than the entire channel allocation as in GSM.5 0.37 10 0.1 0. Assume that the original noise level of the system is 1 w: 1.log(1+10^(△P/10)) △P = new interferer level compared to the original level in dB. In actual component implementation level. after the system is interfered. The interference level is 0 dB lower than the original noise level of the system.76 dB.4 dB.5) = 1. 3. WCDMA or WiMAX because it is the basic bandwidth that needs to be demodulated by each UE.37 0. the new total interference increase from original due to extra interferer can be represented by: 10. The total noise level of the system is (1 + 1 = 2 w).04 0. when the original receive sensitivity of the system decreases by 0. 2. It deeply affects call quality. the total noise level increase is as follows: 10 log (1.

1 Interference between Different Carriers Besides normal neighbor cell interference. Table 5-2 lists the relationship between the decrease of sensitivity and the decrease of coverage radius (calculated based on the classic propagation model Okumura-Hata. absence of synchronization is one of the main sources of interference between TDD based systems belonging to different carriers.61% 48.91% 28.4 1 2 3 5 10 Decrease of Coverage Radius 3% 6. network coverage and capacity. How to reduce or eliminate interference is one of the key tasks in network planning and optimization.33% 23.congestion.17% 5. Table 5-2 Relationship between the decrease of sensitivity and the decrease of coverage Decrease of Sensitivity (dB) 0.03% 48. faulty transmitters and all the sideband interference scenarios listed in the previous section. The figure below provides a quick view of what will happen if there is asynchronous situation between different networks.2. Figure 5-8 Interference due to Synchronization Misalignment 75 .21% 73. which results in the decrease of coverage radius.21% Decrease of Coverage Area 6% 12. The decrease of sensitivity is the most direct influence of interference.14% 32. with the eNodeB antenna height of 30 m).2 Interference Between TDD Systems 5.33% 17.37% 12.

For FDD system. the delay in propagation can be resolved by using a smaller Cyclic Prefix of 6 (Extended CP) instead of 7 (Normal CP). Cyclic prefix lengths for the downlink and the uplink are shown in the figure below.4 km.Scenarios (a) and (c) described above clearly indicate inter-carrier interference.5. the receiver can remove the time domain interference between adjacent symbols caused by multi-path delay spread in the radio channel. The normal cyclic prefix of 144 x Ts protects against multi-path delay spread of up to 1. The CP is a copy of the end of a symbol inserted at the beginning. the inter-symbol interference can be completely eliminated if each OFDM symbol is cyclically extended into the guard period (by copying the end of the symbol to the start to create the cyclic prefix). Δf represents the 15 kHz or 7. By sampling the received signal at the optimum time. Implementation of time synchronization equipment such as IEEE 1588v2 as discussed in Chapter three will help to resolve most of the asynchronous systems problem. a longer guard band period can be selected between DwPTS and UpPTS as discussed in Chapter 3. difference in propagation delay will create time of arrival variation at the eNodeB and will result in intra-system interference as shown below Figure 5-9 Interference due to Propagation Difference To resolve this problem in LTE TDD system. Figure 5-10 Normal vs Extended Cyclic Prefix 76 . In the downlink case.5 kHz subcarrier spacing.2. 5. The longest cyclic prefix provides protection for delay spreads of up to 10 km.2 Interference within the Same Carrier Even within the same network. If this guard period is longer than the delay spread in the radio channel.

Based on our analysis. This section mainly describes the eNodeB->eNodeB interference and UE->UE interference. Analysis of UE->UE Interference When two systems are sharing the same site location. Analysis of eNodeB->eNodeB Interference The eNodeB->eNodeB interference can cause serious performance deterioration when the isolation between systems is not good. When total ACIR of radio equipment (eNodeB. As ACIR increases. Filter. Assuming the situation that eNodeB of the interfering system is in transmitting state and the eNodeB of the interfered system is in receiving state. a 5 MHz guard band should ensure the network coverage and capacity losses are limited. both ACS and ACLR are required to be at least 33dB for a Class 3 and Class 4 mobile at +/. the most serious interference is the eNodeB>eNodeB interference. UE->eNodeB. UE->UE interference does not seriously affect the network coverage and capacity. II. if interference exists within the entire network. and UE->UE. it is difficult to control the positions of the UEs through network planning.101. In addition. eNodeB->eNodeB. When two UEs of two systems are very close to each other. 77 . the downlink coverage and capacity losses occur as the interfered UE cannot perform in the best fashion. Combiners etc) is greater.3 Theoretical Analysis of Interference under Site Sharing This section provides a simulation analysis of the system performance deterioration caused by the following four types of interference: eNodeB->UE. that is.5MHz from centre frequency. Due to the “spill over” of transmitted signal into the receiving band. when eNodeBs are co-located. uplink coverage and capacity losses will occur.The interference scenarios can be classified into the following four types: eNodeB->UE. but only a small portion of the subscribers are affected and the influence is only temporary. The network coverage and capacity losses caused by the other three types of interference are smaller than 2% even if the guard band is not provided. eNodeB>eNodeB. As specified in 3GPP TS 36. the isolation between the UEs is in the worst scenario. From simulation result with no filtering. network coverage shrinkage and capacity reduction also decreases. the network coverage reduction and capacity losses are limited. interference is always there. During simulation. as listed in Table 5-3 Please note the TDD system can be either WiMAX or LTE TDD Table 5-3 TDD/TDD interference classification Interference Scenario (1) (2) (3) Interference Type eNodeB->UE eNodeB->eNodeB UE->UE UE->eNodeB Risk Normal Severe Severe Normal Victim Link DL UL DL UL 5. most installations can meet the interference requirement under a 5MHz guard band setting. UE->eNodeB. it is assumed that the time percentage of the interference occurrence is 100%.2. and UE->UE when two systems share the eNodeBs. Therefore. I. Hence. UE->UE interference comes about due to timing misalignment and one UE becomes the interfering system in transmitting state while another UE of the interfered system is in the receiving state.

Both uplink coverage and capacity loss will occur.4% 5. The network coverage and capacity losses caused by the other three types of interference are smaller than 2% even if the guard band is not provided.5 G No Interference from Other System 98.2% Downlink Coverage Loss 0. However. Hence.4 Theoretical Analysis of Interference: Non Colocated eNodeB This section provides a simulation analysis of the system performance deterioration caused by the following four types of interference: eNodeB->UE. Interference Simulation Analysis with Different ACIRs When the interfering eNodeB is close to the victim eNodeB. Figure below shows the simulation result of coverage change due to distance variations between the interfering eNodeB and interfered eNodeB. the network coverage loss and capacity reduction gradually decrease. and UE->UE when two systems are not co-located. as the eNodeBs’ separation and ACIR increase. when the eNodeBs are not co-located. the eNodeB->eNodeB interference can causes serious performance deterioration.6% With Interference from Other System 98. This is especially the case when the eNodeBs are from different systems and operating under different bandwidth. Figure 5-11 Influence of distance vs coverage due to eNodeB->eNodeB interference 78 . From simulation result with no filtering. the most serious interference is from eNodeB->eNodeB.2.Table 5-4 Impact of UE->UE interference to the network coverage – Monte Carlo Spread Downlink Coverage Probability Guard Band (MHz) 0 Frequency Band 2. UE->eNodeB. eNodeB->eNodeB. I. Assuming the offending eNodeB is in transmitting state and the victim eNodeB is in receiving state. Coupling loss between the eNodeBs is calculated based on the free space propagation model by taking into consideration of eNodeB antenna gains caused by the direction angle and tilt. our focus of analysis is the interference between eNodeBs.

a 5MHz guard band and separate antenna implementation is recommended.5.3 Guard Band Requirement: LTE-FDD vs GSM/UMTS Configuration is simpler for FDD based systems because both LTE FDD and its neighboring technologies are based on frequency duplex and offer sufficient frequency separation between transmit and receive signals.4 GuardBand Requirement: LTE FDD vs LTE TDD For two LTE TDD systems. Moreover. no guard band is required for co-location or non co-location if both systems are synchronized. With the introduction of SDR and SRAN product. Figure 5-12 Guard Band definition between LTE and GSM Figure 5-13 Co-Site GuardBand (MHz) between LTE Carrier of different Bandwidth &GSM 5. if 2 LTE TDD systems that co-exist but not synchronized. a 5MHz guard band is still required regardless of whether they are co-located or not. the requirement of guard band for LTE has been further reduced in a co-located eNodeB. 79 . if FDD LTE is to co-exist with LTE TDD. However.

Figure 5-14 Spectrum Refarming Expectation for LTE Deployment 5. With this approach.1 Summary Operators worldwide are looking forward to new LTE technologies deployment but not every one of them possess brand new spectrum required for LTE deployment. Current and the expected migration timeframe for different frequency band are shown below. recovery of GSM spectrum is an essential step as most 1800MHz networks are still entrenched with GSM technologies. many networks are expected to perform some level of refarming so new LTE technologies can be deployed there. there is an aggressive drive from Operators in the 1800MHz community to implement LTE due to the relative abundance of spectrum in that band. 80 . As a result. for Operators not in possession of new LTE spectrum.5 Spectrum Refarming for LTE 5. Tight Frequency Reuse (TFR) technology helps Operators refarm existing GSM spectrum for the deployment of LTE or UMTS networks.5.5.2 GSM Spectrum Refarming As shown in the figure above.5. An overview of capacity improvement and KPI achieved with one Operator is listed below.

LTE may have to co-exist with other technologies (e. 148Mbps downlink speed rate in trial test with 20MHz LTE bandwidth for LTE1800.Figure 5-15 Tight Frequency Reuse Results LTE1800 eNodeB supports the compact bandwidths by strict filer and RB punching. 10 MHz. • Compact bandwidth is completely transparent to UE and has no impact to R8/R9 UE. GSM) but at different locations. • Compact bandwidth need not to accord with standard bandwidth. Compact bandwidth produces higher throughput and better user experience.g. radio engineer can introduce a buffer zone concept as shown below to the customer.5.3 Introduction of Buffer Zone Due to financial and/or traffic requirement. In order to ensure minimal interference is between the EUTRAN and GSM BTS (or Node B of UMTS). Operators may opt to deploy LTE only in the core urban area but maintain their GSM system in the same spectrum at the fringe of the network. As a result. Compact bandwidths for 5 MHz. • Compact bandwidth configuration helps operators make full use of anomalous frequency bands and reduce the waste of frequency fragment. 5. 15 MHz and 20 MHz are supported. 81 .

6. 5.2 GSM-LTE Co-Location Examples Please note the following examples are just some of the possible frequencies combinations but the same concept can apply to other frequencies configurations I.1 Overview As mobile networks around the world evolve to offer more applications and services. GSM900/1800 system has to use separate antenna to LTE 2.6G and 900/1800 in the figures below also indicate the antennae are physically separable. there always needs to introduce new technologies.6 Radio Access Technologies Co-location Strategies 5. based on the current antenna availability. In fact. interRAT as well as possible frequency planning arrangement but buffer zone concept will remain a feasible option for LTE and GSM co-existence. traffic requirement. This section plans to provide some high level recommendation for radio engineers on co-location strategies and configurations.Figure 5-16 Buffer Zone for LTE and GSM Co-existence Deployment The final implementation will certainly be more complex due to coverage variations.6. Co-location of multiple technologies can save both deployment and operation cost and with SingleRAN solution can definitely help to reduce footprint and TCO. 5. Different Frequency and Different RFU Co-location The different ports used for 2. 82 .6G.

6G and GSM 900/1800MHz LTE 2.LTE 2.6G with GSM900 (DCS1800) macro BTS antenna solution Figure 5-18 Co-location Setup for LTE 2.6G and GSM1800 co-antenna solution: 83 .6G with GSM900 (DCS1800) macro BTS antenna solution Figure 5-17 Co-location Antenna Configuration for LTE 2.6G and GSM 900/1800MHz with RCU and TMA This antenna below for LTE2.

The following Configuration is not recommended due to the extra component requirement and addition insertion loss introduced. Figure 5-19 Co-Location Configuration Not Recommended for LTE 2.6G and GSM 84 .

g. Same Frequency and Same RFU Co-Location The example below shows possible configuration of eNodeB when both GSM and LTE are operating at 1800MHz and the two technologies are sharing the same RF output (e.This antenna below for LTE2. Single RAN configuration) Figure 5-20 Co-location Setup for LTE/GSM 1800MHz with RCU and without/with TMA 85 .6G: II.

Based on field measurement results. Physical Spacing Requirement Physical distance is the separation between the outer physical casing (not from the center of antenna) with both antennae being placed perfectly flat and parallel.6G with GSM900/DCS1800.This antenna below for LTE1800 and GSM1800 co-antenna solution: III. a horizontal separation of 0.5m or vertical separation of 0. OR Figure 5-21 Antenna Physical Configuration Recommendation under LTE/GSM Co-location 86 .2m between antennae can meet the isolation requirement for co-locating LTE at 2.

The first example displayed the antenna separation required when the two technologies are sharing the same site so only antenna isolation separation is required. Antenna Feeder Solution Proposal • If same frequency and same RFU Co-Location. it is recommended to synchronize both WiMAX and LTE TDD to remove the guard band requirement.IV.four port antenna.5GHz) shown below are based on actual field measurement results and is in close (though not 100% similar) agreement with the theoretical data. • If different frequency and different RFU Co-Location. WiMAX & LTE TDD Synchronization Scenario Figure 5-22 Benefit of WiMAX and LTE TDD Synchronization 87 . 5. • If same frequency and different RFU Co-Location. there will be medium term need for the colocation of the two technologies. we recommend different feeder and co. it is also clear that a wider guard band between the 2 technologies will reduce the isolation requirement in antenna or site spacing. Different Frequency and Different RFU Co-location V.6.four port antenna.3 LTE TDD and WiMAX Systems Co-Location With the gradual migration of WiMAX network to LTE TDD worldwide. we recommend share feeder and two-port antenna. we recommend different feeder and co. The 2nd example shows the isolation requirement when the 2 technologies are located at different sites and a physical distance separation is required. Two implementation examples (at 2. In general. In both examples.

WiMAX & LTE-TDD Co-site and Un-Synchronized Figure 5-23 Antenna Isolation due to LTE TDD and WiMAX Co-location WiMAX & LTE-TDD: Non Co-Site + Un-Synchronized Figure 5-24 Physical Separation due to LTE TDD and WiMAX Co-existence but not co-located 88 .

As “average” experienced quality we can mention the “average” delay of all transmitted packets or the “average” packet throughput. As this metric represents a bound in performance. Since the required “average” experience varies across different services.6 LTE Access Network Capacity Planning 6. However. A high level summary for capacity planning process and input requirement is listed in the diagram below: 89 . The aim of LTE capacity dimensioning is to obtain the PS throughput supported in the network based on the bandwidth available and channel condition of each user. voice services have long been designed with a probability of error (non connection) ranging from 1% to 3% In the data centric world. For instance. the traffic mix chosen by the Operators will have a strong influence on the final maximum aggregate data rate that will be required and smart phone will further complicated the situation with their new user behavior pattern. with the increased availability of new services in wireless networks. user perceived quality or QoS is now also included in many capacity measures.1 Definition of Capacity A commonly accepted definition of capacity is the one provided by Shannon which states that capacity is the maximum achievable set of rates in multiple access channels with an arbitrarily small probability of error. in practice. the system capacity could be defined as the maximum aggregated data rate subject to the constraint that the average experienced quality of all flows in the system should be fulfilled according to a given target. the sum of the transmitted data rates (downlink) or aggregated data rate is used.

which has completely different behavior compared to feature phones. They frequently changes state between "idle" and "connected". network planning engineers can determine which customer service level can be met. is going to add a new level of challenges to planning engineers. Nevertheless. the increasing popular level of applications like twitter will hasten the evolution of customer behavior and 90 .Figure 6-1 Overview of EUTRAN Capacity Planning Process Examples of “Scenario Parameters” and “Equipment Parameters” are listed below. the arrival of smart phone. According to signaling statistics of operator S in Singapore. In addition. and the service heartbeat mechanism periodically communicates with the application server. one smart phone creates 14 times the signaling load of a feature phone. Figure 6-2 Examples of Parameters Related to Capacity Planning Most of these parameters are similar to those used for 2G/3G network dimensioning and by carefully considering the contribution of all these parameters. its fast dormancy feature forces the terminal to switch to an "idle" state every six to eight seconds in order to save battery power.

RT (Real Time) services are characterized by the short time response between the communicating parts and they generally required an acceptable GBR.traffic model in the next few years. NRT (Non-Real Time) services do not have tight requirements concerning packet delay although high packet delays are unacceptable. NRT normally is Non-GBR services. Figure 6-3 3GPP Service Level Requirement Definition From a EUTRAN design perspective.3 EUTRAN Capacity Limiting Factors In general. As an example of this kind of service we can mention Voice over IP (VoIP). information loss is not tolerable. it is essential that the network is dimensioned properly in the design stage to reduce the impact of services offer booking and short term surges in services due to unexpected events. there are two main classes of service type. In general. Average subscriber usage at busy hour has rapidly increased from the low 10kbps (since R99/1xRTT) to be in the mid to high 30kbps right now. Web browsing is an example of an NRT service. LTE has well defined classifications for Quality of Service. However. applications of this type must have error-correction or recovery mechanisms.e. On the other hand. the following are the major factors that will contribute towards the limitation of EUTRAN capacities: 91 . Therefore. when transmitting NRT services the major constraint is the information integrity. Hence.2 3GPP Services Classification Being a data centric technology. Although the dynamic nature of E-UTRAN capacity limiting factors listed below will affect the final user throughput and capacity. 6. how customer chooses the proportion and combination of these different services will be translated into bits per second requirement for the customer network. i. 6.. expected error rate and delay for each QoS class. with Guaranteed Bit rate vs with Non Guaranteed Bit rate. These services have strict requirements regarding packet delay and jitter. The table below shows the relative priority.

• Operating Frequency band • RF Coverage .3.1 Operating Frequency Band Choosing which frequency band to operate a LTE network is one of the most critical decision an Operator has to make 92 .RSRP • Impact of Interference on Capacity • Signal Interference Noise Ratio and Adaptive Coding • Radio (Transmitter) Power Availability • Spectrum Bandwidth Availability • Channel Card (LPPB) Processing Capacity • S1/X2 Capacity • Application of Special Antenna Technologies (MIMO/BF/Virtual MIMO) • Scheduling Mode • Actual Cell Site Placement in Relation to Traffic • UE Capability • User Traffic Mix and Call Modeling • Time Slot Allocation for Uplink and Downlink – TDD specific Figure 6-4 High Level Summary of Critical Capacity Affecting Factors 6.

3 Impact of Interference on Capacity Interference is always a main contributor to capacity degradation in 1G to 3G cellular network and LTE is no difference. Field trial results confirmed that although overall cell uplink throughput is stable. 800MHz is more likely to be used for rural applications due to the more extended coverage (e.3. 2. Coverage Gain with Low Frequency Figure 6-5 Difference in Propagation Loss due to Frequency Band With its shorter coverage range. Germany white spot wireless DSL project) 6.RSRP As in any other cellular technologies.6GHz is more likely to be used and is best suited for urban environment which also demand higher capacity within a smaller area. Although intercell interference will not be reflected by RSRP level. coverage is always a leading indicator of the likelihood of getting good service level. This in turn will decide the final capacity that can be offer for commercial services. either in the form of throughput or call quality and LTE is no difference in this regard. The frequency propagation and penetration characteristics will determine the number of sites that need to be built in order to cover the designated area chosen by the Operator.3. 6. field trial results confirmed the overall cell downlink throughput continues to degrade as the 93 . it is still a strong indicator of throughput level as long as the initial radio network was designed properly. Besides external interference. The figure below gives a high level view of the likely difference in coverage strength offered by the different major frequency band currently chosen for LTE deployment.2 RF coverage .when it comes to capacity planning.g. Reference Signal received power is a common measurement that can provide the coverage quality level. On the other hand. the per user throughput will decrease as the number of users in the cell increases due to resources sharing On the other hand. there is a strong relationship also between the number of users and overall cell capacity.

6. 94 .5 to section 6. EUTRAN planning engineers must also be aware of the limit due to hardware specific capacity. the most commonly used power in LTE eNodeB is 20W and 40W at this moment. MIMO and Beam Forming are critical features in determining the actual link budget required for the Operator’s network.3. Most users are expected to be using Class 3 mobile (23dBm +/. Downlink ICIC or efficient power control) as the most important factor in cell capacity protection.3. 6. the final values may vary between different eRan releases due to continuous improvement. Although product offers superior capacity. 6. Trial data below confirm the need of high SINR in order to achieve a high throughput in the downlink level and adaptive modulation technology is perfect to meet such requirement. This clearly identifies interference control (either through cell coverage control. However. the capacity of the S1 and X2 links will play a critical role to the overall throughput and capacity available to final users. As discussed in Chapter 4. these two features are also critical features from a capacity perspective as they can also improve the efficiency of frequency reuse and reduce the intra-frequency interference within the same cell as well as neighbor cells. Conversely.3.3. maximum number of active users and CPU loading.5 Radio (Transmitter) Power Availability The selection of radio power will have a significant impact on both the coverage and capacity of an LTE cell.6 Spectrum Bandwidth Availability Operators will need to determine how much spectrum bandwidth is available for the deployment of LTE services and there is a direct correlation between available spectrum and the cell capacity for both Uplink and downlink. 6. the availability of UE power will also determine the uplink coverage and throughput a user can achieved.3.number of users increase. Examples of such limit include maximum throughput.2dB) 6. The likelihood of cell edge users overcoming neighbor cells interference will also be highly dependent on the radio transmitter power installed and available at the cell site.7 Base Band Channel Card Processing Capacity Similar to other technologies. the per user throughput also decrease as the number of users in the cell increases due to resources sharing. The impact is especially obvious for users at the cell edge as the eNodeB is most likely need to change the coding allocating due to the radio power and quality received by the cell edge user.9 Application of Special Antenna Technologies (MIMO/BF/V MIMO) As already discussed in Chapter 4. 6. Please refer to the specific product dimensioning guide for detail.8 S1/X2 Capacity As the pipeline connecting eNodeBs to the packet network.7. At the same time.4 Signal Interference Noise Ratio and Adaptive Coding These two factors are extremely correlated and are both critical factors influencing the overall capacity of the cell and the network. Detailed dimensioning procedures and their impact will be discussed in the section 6.3.

Figure 6-6 Graphical View of 2x2 MIMO in Operation

In addition, We offer a separate antenna related technology in uplink, which is focusing on capacity improvement. This feature is called Uplink Virtual MIMO and it achieves uplink throughput by allocating same RB for different uplink users. Uplink Virtual MIMO can increase overall uplink spectral efficiency and hence increasing the overall uplink throughput. It is similar to a feature called CSM for WiMAX. The network will carefully select two users with the following characteristics: • Highly uncorrelated in the Uplink • Offer the best capacity improvement to the cell after combining • Highest Max PFair output when the 2 users are combined together These selection criteria will allow users with the most uplink data need and most uncorrelated to be chosen first. Since those two users are highly uncorrelated, they can be easily removed from each other’s overall signal.

Figure 6-7 Graphical view of Uplink Virtual MIMO

6.3.10 Scheduling Mode
Scheduler is one of the key RRM algorithms designed to maximize the radio resource usage and capacity availability while meeting the QoS (Quality of Service) requirements of different applications and users in both uplink and downlink. Because different operators may have different traffic mixes and strategies of utilizing their resources, the scheduler is flexible and configurable in order to meet various goals. The design goals of the scheduler include maximization and/or guarantee of the following: 1) Cell throughput 2) Cell edge user throughput 3) VoIP capacity 4) QoS satisfaction rate for various services. Scheduling algorithm enables the system to decide the resource allocation for each UE during each TTI. Scheduler
95

algorithm can bring the following benefits: 1) Flexible selection for the scheduling algorithm 2) Flexible configuration for QoS priority parameters 3) Strong QoS guarantee mechanism for different services 4) Optimal tradeoff among throughput, fairness, and the QoS We advanced scheduling algorithm includes Basic Scheduling, Enhanced Scheduling and VoIP Semi-persistent Scheduling.

6.3.11 Actual Cell Site Placement in Relation to Traffic
Similar to other cellular technologies, coverage provided by Macro vs Hotspot (micro/pico) cells and their vicinity to main user groups will have a significant impact on the final offered capacity. For example, limiting spectator traffic to a dedicated stadium only cell means most of its eNodeB power will be available to provide a better service rate instead of spending most of the energy travelling through air from external macro cell. The actual capacity degradation due to the amount of users and their distance from cell antenna is highly variable and will also depend on the actual traffic distribution at the time. A general rule is the further the users are from the cell antennae, the lesser the amount of capacity a cell can offer. Capacity will be degraded even more if more users are to be located towards the edge of cell coverage and it is possible to have a capacity degradation of up to 25% in some situation.

6.3.12 UE Capability
It is important to remember that the composition and penetration of various UE types will also have an impact on the final achievable cell throughput level. A high concentration of relatively low end UEs will result in low resources utilization efficiency, thereby bringing down the overall cell throughput. This will certainly be depending on when the network is launched, pricing model of Operators as well as UE vendors as well as the form factors of UE offered at the time. The figure below summarizes the capability of UEs by their category. E.g. only Cat-5 UE can support 64QAM on uplink initially and will affect user uplink throughput.

Figure 6-8 3GPP Release 8 UE Categories and Capabilities Requirement
96

6.3.13 User Traffic Mix and Call Modelling
As listed in previous section, LTE has 10 Quality of Service Classifications. The more freedom eNodeB has in user throughput allocation (represented by Best Effort only users), the more likely the cell will have a higher aggregate throughput as the scheduler can adjust the resources allocation more appropriately based on radio condition. On the other hand, the more Guarantee Bit Rate users are present in the cell, the more likely the cell will have a reduction in its average aggregate throughput.

6.3.14 Time Slot Allocation for Uplink and Downlink – TDD specific
The time division nature of LTE TDD will also require radio engineers to consider how time slots are shared between uplink and downlink based on both customer input as well as commercial users usage pattern between uplink and downlink in that country. This will have a direct impact on the EUTRAN capacity. There are 7 time sharing configuration between Uplink and Downlink in LTE TDD as defined by 3GPP. They are shown in the figure below and in summary, they are (DL : UL) - 1:3 or 2:2 or 3:1 or 2:1 or 7:2 or 8:1 or 3:5

Figure 6-9 Uplink-Downlink Time Sharing Configuration Schemes

Besides time sharing configuration, there is also a need to define how uplink and downlink pilots are configured based on the Guard band requirement. The guard band duration is also a direct result of propagation delay requirement due to the designated cell coverage radius. Inadequate guard band provisioning will result in direct interference between users within the same cell due to difference in signal delay arrival. 3GPP has defined 9 different guard period configuration schemes for Operator to choose. They are listed in the figure below.

97

3.15 Cyclical Prefix Allocation In order to accommodate extended propagation delay (e.g. a lower order cyclic prefix value of 6 can be used instead of the common value of 7. due to large cell radius coverage). This will result in the reduction of OFDM symbols that can be carried per time slot and therefore reducing the overall sector capacity.4 S1 Bandwidth Dimensioning Procedure The figure below denotes the location of the X2 and S1 link with respect to the other network components within the LTE network 98 .Figure 6-10 Uplink-Downlink Pilot Time Slot and Guard band Configuration Schemes 6. 6.

the X2 data will be combined with the S1 data and transport back to aggregators residing in the switching centre before being rerouted to their target eNodeB. it is most likely that there will not be any direct connection between eNodeBs. However in realistic network implementation.0 and 2. where GPRS tunneling protocol for user plane (GTPU) is adopted as the tunneling method. which uses SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol) developed by IETF for the purpose of transporting various signaling protocols over IP network.Figure 6-11 E-UTRAN Network View In general. the control plane. and the user plane. Main X2 dimensioning factors that need to be considered (in eRan2.1) include: • The frequency of handover between eNodeBs • The duration time of handover • The overlapping nature between eNodeBs • Hysteresis setting at cell level 99 . Instead.5 X2 Bandwidth Dimensioning Procedure X2 is the interface between eNodeBs and the bandwidth requirement is very complex. Figure 6-12 S1 Interface Composition 6. the traffic on S1 interface is divided into two different plane.

the amount of LTE traffic should be reduced as VoLTE terminal is unlikely to be commercially available till late 2011. excessive delay in S1 or X2 routing will definitely affect the service quality and user performance of higher layer applications. Various reasons to support this idea and they are: • IMS are most likely to be absent in many early LTE network so CSFB are likely to be required to carry voice traffic.6 Impact of Latency of X2 on Cell Throughput If infinite HARQ process is allowed (as a theoretical study). Similar to the S1 control plane throughput calculation. 6. Even in normal networks. 100 . Hence. the throughput of X2 is estimated to be 3% of the throughput on S1 in order to simplify the dimensioning process.7 Inter Radio Access Technology Handover Considerations The offloading and handover impact due to Inter-RAT must also be considered as part of the overall network capacity planning process. • SRVCC (Single Radio Voice Call Continuity) will come into service once IMS becomes a standard component in Operators’ network • On the other hand. the traffic level in LTE will also increase significantly but likely to be in a gradual fashion. once VoLTE becomes widely available.• Average service rate and packet size per handover • Signaling overhead in control plane of X2 interface The throughput on X2 is negligible compared to that on S1. Resolution of such problem is beyond the responsibility of access engineers. routing delay may be inherent in Operator’s non cellular core data network and this will create impact on throughput although it is not as severe as in infinite HAQR. 6. • LTE networks are unlikely to have contiguous coverage throughout the entire customer network especially outside certain urban area in most cases. meaning data users at the edge of network are likely to be “offloaded” to UMTS/GSM network • UE redirection from existing UMTS/GSM network back to LTE is unlikely to be available for most customer network upon initial launch due to new software requirement in UMTS/GSM network.

• Although LTE capable terminal is required to rescan for LTE network after 6 minutes. Different Inter-RAT handover algorithms are listed below: Figure 6-13 Different PLMN Idle Handover Figure 6-14 Different PLMN Dedicated Mode Handover 101 . this rescanning could be hindered by any active connections to UMTS/GSM during this period. The final delay period could also depend on individual UE manufacturer’s rescanning algorithm.

Figure 6-15 Co PLMN Idle Mode Handover Figure 6-16 Co PLMN Dedicated Mode Handover 102 .

13. Mandatory. User Profile setting. Set the Clutter Classes parameter (standard square deviation of shadow fading). It is not aimed at replacing the U-Net user manual but is intended to give an overview of U-Net operation. Mandatory. 2. 9. Environment setting. Mandatory. Mandatory. Mandatory. Set the Transmitter table. 11. directly copy and paste the site parameters. Planning information for LTE TDD is not yet available and will be added later on once the planning tool is approved by the responsible RNP experts. For existing sites. 12. The antenna of the eNodeB is mandatory and that of the terminal is optional. 8. Set the User Equipment. Optional. Mandatory. Monte Carlo simulation setting. Mandatory. Mandatory. default parameters are automatically set but need adjustment. Import site parameters. 7. 6. 103 . Set the parameters of the eNodeB equipment. Mandatory. Set network parameters. Terminal setting. Set the eNodeB Equipment. Optional. Set the Frequency Band. 4. Set prediction parameters. select one from two. Set the parameter of the traffic model. select one from two. Mandatory. 3. 10. Service setting. Set the parameters of propagation models (including the propagation models for different geographic types). 5. Monte Carlo simulation setting. Mandatory. This chapter includes ten sections to give an overview of what U-Net V3R6 can offer from a LTE FDD radio planning perspective as of end of 2010.7 U-Net Simulation and Operation 7. Set the Predictions global parameter. 7. Set the Feeder Equipment.2 Simulation Process Below is a quick summary of the most of steps that need to be taken in a simulation process Simulation Process 1. meanings of common parameters. For new sites. Mandatory. Set the Transmitter global parameter. Import the antennae of the eNodeB and terminal. Import maps—set the coordinate system. and relations between parameters in software. Create a simulation project. Optional.1 Introduction This chapter describes the basic information of the U-Net in terms of use method.

7.3 Creating Project
1. Run the U-Net. 2. Click on the toolbar or choose File>New. The Project Templates dialog box is displayed.

3. Select LTE and then click OK. The LTE U-Net project is created. 4. Click on the toolbar or choose File>Save. The Save As dialog box is displayed.

5. Select the storage directory and name of the project from the Save Project File dialog box and save the file, as shown below.

7.4 Geographical Information
7.4.1 Quick Import Function
User can make use of the Quick import function of U-Net under Maps by Right mouse click on Map

104

Maps related information can then be imported individually via highlighting each of the following

A lot of project related detail and also set in this menu

7.4.2 Defining Coordinate Systems
Projection of WGS 84 means setting to WGS 84 projection. U-Net actually separates the North and South systems separately and easily changeable via: Path: [Explorer / Geo / Map /Coordinate]

105

Display of Coordinate Systems can be changed after importing either Clutter or Height information into the project. It can be changed by calling up the “Map Setting” function in the following way

7.4.3 Properties of Clutter Class
Path: [Explorer / Geo / Clutter /Parameter Management]

106

Unit: dB. Description Height Indicates the average height of the clutter. C/ I standard deviation Penetration Loss 7. If the indoor coverage is considered when estimating. If it is not C/I prediction. Functional when the SPM model is used and not functional when the Cost-Hata model is used. Indicates the clutter class. The value is consistent with that of the Estimation tool. Indicates the height that above the DTM map if the DTM map is imported. The standard deviation is used to calculate prediction items. transmitter and UE in the U-Net. The standard deviation is used to calculate the shadow fading margin. Indicates the indoor loss of each clutter class. the standard deviation of Model is used. Value range: 4-10 dB.2 Network Settings I. The indoor loss is used when buildings exist. Unit: m. Setting Frequencies Path: [Explorer / Transceiver / Frequency Band] 107 . Statistics that indicates height of the clutter above the ground. Model.5.Parameter Code Name Indicates the code of the clutter class. The figure below gives a high level view of the relationships between various parameters in U-Net 7. with a common value of 8-20 dB.5 Equipment Parameter 7.1 Overview This chapter describes the setting and related properties of equipment like the eNodeB.5. indoor penetration loss should be considered.

The channels between the first channel and last channel that cannot be used. 108 . Indicates the start frequency. Channel bandwidth. Indicates the FDD uplink start frequency. Related to the frequency width and channel bandwidth. Indicates the start frequency in the time division duplex (TDD) mode and the downlink start frequency in the frequency division duplex (FDD) mode. number normally starting from 0 (or any positive number). Indicates the bandwidth of each sector. The first channel that can be used. The last channel that can be used.Field Name Channel Width (MHz) Start channel Last channel Excluded channels Frequency (DL) (MHz) Frequency (UL) (MHz) Description Indicates the frequencies and has no impact on the calculation.

Setting Detail LTE Cell Configuration A detail cell configuration layout will appear and numerous LTE specific parameters will appear. II.Field Adjacent Channel Signal to Interference Ratio Duplexing Method Description The default value is 30. TDD (Time Division Duplex) or FDD (Frequency Division Duplex) mode. The value range is from 0 to 231 Indicates the duplex mode. 109 .

Setting MCS Parameter Path: [Explorer / Data / Transmitters Parameters/ Services/LTE/PUSCH MCS or PDSCH MCS] Users can then set the value for each of the Uplink and Downlink MCS threshold separately. Setting Reception Equipment Parameters Path: [Explorer / Data / Terminal / LTE / Reception Equipment] 110 .III. please doublecheck the default value in U-Net as it may differ from the actual requirement. IV. However.

By clicking Cell reception equipment or Default UE reception equipment and then followed by clicking on MCS threshold. users can also view the MCS value format used in U-Net. V. Make sure all fields are displayed as well. Setting MIMO Configuration Path: [Explorer / Data / Transmitters] Set the number of Tx/Rx antennae per eNodeB transceiver here. Path: [Explorer / Data / Traffic Parameters/Services/LTE/MIMO] Also set the number of Tx/Rx antennae per transceiver here for different services type 111 .Users can then match the required MCS table accordingly to Uplink and Downlink table defined above through the selection tab shown below.

Description Indicates whether space division multiplexing is supported. Indicates the number of Tx antenna. Path: [Explorer / Data / Traffic Parameters/Terminals/LTE/MIMO] Set the number of Tx/Rx antennae per transceiver here for different terminal type Then enable Space Multiplexing by checking the box under LTE Terminal folder.Field Name Tx_Antennas Rx_Antennas SM_Supported SM_Gain (dB) Indicates the name of MIMO. All MIMO parameters must be set correctly in order to allow simulation to be performed correctly especially for MCS function. Under U-NetV3R6 only downlink spatial multiplexing is enabled. Indicates the number of Rx antenna. 112 . Indicates SM gain. This will allow simulation to switch between SFBC and MCW where appropriate.

4 Site. 7. DBS 3900. Indicate the transmission losses. Please refer to Chapter 4 for feeder loss at particular frequency. Indicates the thermal noise parameter. Indicates the thermal noise of the equipment. e. Indicate the reception gain.3 Equipment Setting TMA Equipment Path: [Explorer / Data / Transmitters / Equipment / TMA Equipment] Field Name Noise Figure Gain (UL) Loss (DL) Indicates the name of TMA equipment. both the transceivers and terminals must have between 2 to 4 antennae in their configuration. 7.5. The Default Noise Figure of U-Net is 2. Unit: dB. it is better to include connector loss under jumper or miscellaneous loss as U-Net calculates cable loss by cable length. Unlike Atoll.Path: [Explorer / Data / Transmitters/Cell] To enable AMS (Automatic MIMO Switching). Unit: dB. Description Setting Feeder Equipment Path: [Explorer / Data / Transmitters / Equipment / Feeder Equipment] Field Name dB/100m Indicates the feeder name. Description Setting BTS Equipment Path: [Explorer / Data / Transmitters / Equipment / Site Equipment] Field Name Noise Figure Description Indicates the Site Equipment Name.3 dB. Cell and Transmitter Listing External Tables can be imported through the following tab 113 .5.g. Unit: dB.

The results should appear as below after importing file with correct format. Cell and Transceiver tables can be imported in similar fashion. Similarly. 114 .

7.6 Propagation Model Selection U-Net has already built in a number of propagation models so users can just select them without any extra adjustment. the actual label will appear in an excel like table after the selection has taken place. They can be recalled using the following steps: By checking the corresponding box. Extra fields can also be added according to the user’s requirement 7.5 Viewing “Hidden” Parameters Many parameters are not shown in the default U-Net display.5.5. 115 . Examples are shown in the diagram below and detail information on these models can be found in Chapter 4.

Drive test/CW data can be imported and then used for calibration which is performed in the following steps 116 . diffraction method as well as effective height definition.User adjusted propagation model can also be created by modifying the individual K parameters.

this model can be assigned to each cell in the network accordingly within the Cell table Path: [Explorer / Network/ Transmitters / Cell /] 117 .After choosing/creating an appropriate model for network design.

7.5.7 Clutter Related Modelling
User can configure individual clutter related modeling if Okumura Hata or Cost Hata were chosen with the following tab Path: [Explorer / Data/ Propagation Models / Clutter related Hata /]

Upon completion make sure the right selection is chosen under LTECell/Propagation Model

This will allow each clutter type to be assigned to an appropriate morphology type (Dense Urban/Urban/Suburban/ Rural) and saving the time needed for radio planner to assign different model for different cell.

7.5.8 Impact of Parameter Setting on Prediction and Simulation
The table below summarizes the impact on prediction and simulation results by each of the critical parameters listed for U-Net V3R6 GA version (V300R006SCP300)
118

Notes: Target Load/Target Iot for simulation, Actual Iot/Actual Load for coverage prediction

7.6 Engineering Parameter
7.6.1 Power Setting
There are 4 main power related parameters that need to be adjusted and they are under Path: [Explorer / Network/ Transceiver / Cell /]

119

I. Max Power The maximum power from the eNodeB by summing all the transmit paths. If eNodeB is a 2x20W configuration, the Max power is 46dBm. An eNodeB of 2x40W will be 49dBm II. RS Power This is the power allocated to the Reference signal and will be dependent on the bandwidth as well as the number of RE (15kHz) channel allocation. For example, if there is 2x20W at a 20MHz spectrum while Power Boosting (PB) = 1, then the RS power RSRE Power = 43dBm (20w) – Log10 1200 (100 RB) + 3 (PB = 1) = 15.2dBm Since different RE will be used for RS at different antennae, U-Net is avoiding any uncertainty in UE RSRP measurement methods by providing only a single path RS power. It is likely the actual RSRP measured in the field be higher due to the implementation of downlink MIMO. III. PB Power Boosting with a range of [0, 1, 2, 3], this value is defaulted to be 1 and represent the number of extra RE used for the addition of Reference signal transmission.

IV. Other Channel to RS Power value of other channels such as PCFICH, PHICH, PDCCH, PBCH, SCH can all be offset against the Reference signal power.
120

Normally. Actual Load (UL/DL) The number of RB allowed to be used for Prediction of traffic in cell (out of all available RB). Typical value is 2-4dB which corresponds to the uplink interference margin in link budget. III.2 Load Setting System loading will have a determining factor on throughput in an LTE network. Radio planner can then choose to “commit” the resulting values or not as the Actual Load and Actual IoT. Neighbor load Impact estimation due to interference from Neighbor cell can be set under Properties function of a particular 121 . U-Net will gather Target load (UL/DL) and Target IoT (UL) from the configuration information. Normally. During Simulation. a value of 1 (100%) is given.7. Actual IoT (UL) Increase in uplink interference level used in Prediction.6. Path: [Explorer / Network/ Transceiver / Cell /] I. Target Load (UL/DL) The number of RB allowed to be used for Simulation of traffic in cell (out of all available RB). Target IoT (UL) Increase in uplink interference level created by Simulation traffic. IV. Typical value is 2-4dB which corresponds to the uplink interference margin in link budget. U-Net allows user to simulate the network with loading in both forward and reverse directions. a value of 1 (100%) is given II. V.

7. “Actual Load” value of the neighboring sector will be chosen by U-Net in neighbor load calculation.Prediction. Normally. Path: [Explorer / Operation/ Prediction]. If Neighbor load is not selected.6.3 Frequency Planning Path: [Explorer / Operation/ LTE Frequency Planning /] Activate the frequency planning function through the following Tab The available Polygon or traffic area will appear for selection 122 . Neighbor load value will be of 50 – 75%.

user can select N Channel index (N = 3 under 1x3) and frequency planning function will allocate different Channel to different cell. With multiple frequency reuse (U-Net only support 1x3 currently). all cells will be labeled as using Channel 0 only. Under Single frequency reuse (1x1). ensure the band and channel index shown below are selected I. 123 .Before running the allocation. Channel Index Path: [Explorer / Network/ Transceiver / Cell /Normal Parameter] Value of Channel Index will determine the frequency reuse pattern.

A graphically representation of style for downlink is shown below. it shows which 1/3 part of the frequency has been chosen by Automatic frequency plan for the downlink and uplink of a particular sector. Basically. ICIC Switch Path: [Explorer / Network/ Transceiver / Cell /Advanced Parameter] ICIC function for Uplink and Downlink can be enabled separately for simulation. Edge Frequency Style The style corresponds to the frequency pattern chosen and only applicable to (1x1).In U-Net. the frequencies will be allocated according to the table below. 124 . II. An example output is shown based on 1x3 selection where Channel 0 -2 are chosen. then select the Channel index that can be used for frequency planning before “running” the allocation. III. the first step is to select the frequency Reuse pattern. Upon completion.

4 Scheduling Parameters U-Net allows users to configure scheduling functions for LTE network simulation. Schedule Policy Planning engineers can select between Proportional Fairness. All these scheduling parameters reside in the LTE-Cell path Path: [Explorer / Network/ Transceiver / Cell /Advanced Parameter] I.Various settings in Edge frequency Style. Frequency Selectivity Schedule Enabling Uplink and Downlink FSS function separately in simulation.6. II. PF is the default and recommended policy. ICIC switch and Channel index will not affect the prediction results as these are mainly used for traffic simulation. Round Robin or Max C/I for scheduling policy. 125 . 7.

10). Default value is 10. 126 .5 Antenna Property Path: [Explorer / Data / Antenna] Most common antennae categories are already included as part of U-Net standard tools without any need of new input. 7.g. Max Schedule User Controls how many users can be scheduled within a single TTI (1ms) for uplink and downlink separately.6.III.g. However. 30) exceed the max schedule users (e. U-Net scheduler can simulation multiple TTI condition if the number of data transferring users (e. user may also need to configure special antennae due to customer’s requirement by incorporating data into the 4 tables under Antenna – New option.

Unit: dBi. giving all angles and corresponding fading values. Indicates the antenna angle. Name Manufacturer Gain Pattern Electrical Tilt I. However. Indicates the mechanical tilt of the antenna. Max Frequency and Min Frequency. Value range: 0 –359 Indicates the attenuation value of the current transmission angle. all these values are for labeling purposes only and don’t affect prediction results 127 .Parameter Description Indicates the antenna name. Unit: dB. The naming rule of the U-Net antenna consists of the following four parts: • Half power angle • Antenna gain • Electrical tilt • Application frequency Indicates the antenna manufacturer Indicate the antenna gain. Horizontal Pattern Parameter Figure area Angle Description Indicates the horizontal or vertical beam figure of the antenna. (dB) Other Properties The U-Net defines three parameters for antenna data: Beamwidth. This parameter is not used in calculation. Antenna gain of this angle is represented by: Antenna Gain(θ) = Standard Gain – Attenuation(θ) The antenna angle is from 0° to 359°. Att.

6 Properties of a Single Transmitter Path: [Explorer/Network/Transmitters/Any transmitter/Properties] I. Indicates the maximum supported frequency. 7. Indicates the minimum supported frequency. General 128 .6.Parameter Beamwidth Max Frequency Min Frequency Description Indicates the antenna vertical beamwidth.

Indicates the feeder type and will recall feeder table. Indicates the miscellaneous transmit loss and the miscellaneous receive loss.Equipment Allow user to fill in total loss or add individual component such as TMA separately Indicates the tower-mounted amplifier. The U-Net software does not establish a loss model for each piece of equipment. Indicates the power allocation to the transmit equipment. Indicates the name of the site to which the current transmitter belongs. II. Default value = 1 Indicates the transmit feeder length and the receive feeder length. Click this button to set the properties of the selected site.Parameter Name Site Description Indicates the name of the current transmitter. Antenna Configuration Parameter Dx. such as combiner loss and power splitter loss. Dy Equipment TMA Feeder Power Ratio Feeder Length Description Indicate the offsets of coordinates X and Y of the current transmitter relative to the site location. You can define additional losses. User can simulate a remote transmitter by setting this parameter. The feeder loss is equal to the feeder loss per unit length multiplied by the total feeder length. Miscellaneous Losses 129 .

7. A transmitter not yet activated does not participate in any calculation. LTE Cell Most of the critical parameters inside LTE cell table have been mentioned before and the content is shown here again. Low Speed and Highway Click this button to view and modify the properties of the Advanced Parameters. Main Antenna Selectable between High Speed. Neighborlist or Propagation Models related to this transceiver.7 Properties of a eNodeB Template Path: [ I. High Speed Frequency Band Indicates the Frequency Band used. the current transmitter is activated.III.6. If Activate is selected. General Define the radius of hexagongrid if it is used for new site design /Template Management/Properties] 130 . Parameter Active Description Indicates whether the current transmitter is activated.

II. 131 . LTE Cell Properties Parameter Main Antenna Model 1st Sector Azimuth Indicates the transmitter antenna. The U-Net software evenly allocates the azimuth of the transmitter according to the azimuth of the first sector and the number of sectors of the eNodeB. Description Indicates the azimuth of the first sector for a N sector site.

1 Overview This chapter describes how to set the properties of LTE Parameters folder.7. 132 . please see in the section below. 7. For details on the setting of the user type in User Profiles. and the methods for creating traffic maps. please see in the section below.7 LTE Traffic Model Parameters 7. Indicates the mobility type corresponding to the user type.7.2 Environments Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/Environment/Any environment type/ Properties] I. General Parameter Name User Mobility Density Indicates the name of the environment type. the types of traffic maps. Description Indicates the user type. Indicates the user density in subscribers/km2.7. For details on the setting of the mobility type in User Profiles.

7.3 Properties of Clutter Class. Indicates the proportion of indoor users corresponding to the clutter class.II. Description Indicates the user distribution weight corresponding to the clutter class.3 User Profiles Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/User Profiles/Any User Profiles type/ Properties] 133 .7. For indoor users.4. Please refer to 7. indoor loss is added during the simulation. The indoor loss per clutter class is user settable in the clutter properties. Clutter Weight Field Clutter class Weight %Indoor Indicates the clutter class.

Description Indicates the service used by the current user. Please refer details on the setting of Service to Services section Indicates the terminal of the current service. Please refer to Terminal section for setting detail Indicates the number of calls per hour. Indicates the uplink user volume. Indicates the type of equipment used by the current terminal.Parameter Name Service Terminal Calls/hour Duration UL Volume (Kbytes) DL Volume (Kbytes) Indicates the name of the user profile. Indicates the duration of a call in seconds. Indicates the downlink user volume. 7.7.4 Terminals Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/Terminals Profiles/Any Terminal type/ Properties] Parameter Name Reception Equipment Description Indicates the name of the current terminal type. Defined under Path: [Explorer/ Data/Traffic Parameters/ Terminals Profiles/Any Terminal type/ Properties] 134 .

Parameter Description Indicates the minimum transmit power allowed for the current terminal. Indicates the antenna technology used by the terminal.5 Mobility Types Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/Mobility/Any Mobility type/ Properties] Parameter Name Average Speed Indicates the name of the mobility type. the U-Net software calculates the transmit power of the terminal required to meet the current network QoS requirements. the terminal transmits signals using this minimum transmit power. Indicates the number of transmit antennas and the number of receive antennas at the terminal side. Indicates the terminal rate. Antenna Indicates the model of the terminal antenna. the terminal is denied by the U-Net and limit the transmit power to Tx Max. the U-Net software calculates the transmit power of the terminal required to meet the current network QoS requirements. During the simulation. If the transmit power of the terminal is greater than this value. this parameter should be left blank. Indicates the maximum transmit power allowed for the current terminal. Indicates the noise figure of the terminal. During the simulation. Description 135 . Indicates the receive loss of the terminal. In general. Indicates the antenna gain of the terminal. Min Power Max Power Losses Noise Figure Model Gain Spatial Multiplex Support MIMO 7.7. If the required transmit power of the terminal is lower than this value.

Indicates the GBR service. Indicates the fixed uplink/downlink overhead.6 Services Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/Services/LTE/Any Services type/ Properties] Parameter Name Type GBR Priority Indicates the service name. Downlink: downlink activation factor. low-priority services are denied first when the cell resources reach the upper limit. This parameter is used to calculate the application layer throughput. Value is 0 to 232. 6. This parameter is required for only the CS services. During the simulation. Uplink: fixed uplink overhead. Indicates the block error rate. Uplink: uplink activation factor. Indicates the body loss. Indicates the uplink/downlink activation factor. 5. Value range is from 0 to 1. Indicates the priority of the current service. Indicates the uplink/downlink transmission rate. Downlink: fixed downlink overhead. which can be set to Voice or Data.7. Value range is from 0 to 1.01 to 1. Value range is 0 to 100.9. which is the length added to an encapsulated packet during the transmission at the MAC or RLC layer. Uplink transmission rate.2. Value range is 0. You can select the GBR service only after selecting Data.2. 5.95.4.75. Indicates the uplink or downlink maximum throughput per service Indicates the uplink or downlink minimum throughput of the service.15. and 12. 7. Value is 0 to 232. 7. Indicates the average throughput requested by the service (using in creating a traffic map based on environment only). The unit is kbit/s. Downlink transmission rate. Value range is 0.01 to 1. which is usually 3 dB for voice services and not considered for data services.7.7. The values are 4. 1 represents the lowest priority. 136 Activity Factor AMR Rate Max Throughput Min Throughput Average Throughput Transmission Efficiency IBER Offset Body loss . 10. Indicates the rate of the CS services. Description Indicates the service type.

7.7. Indicates the traffic map based on user profiles. The Environment type will have the user type and their density distributed according to clutter weighting defined under Environment. Creating a Traffic Map Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/Traffic Map/New Map] Simply select the Map type and hit “Create Map” II. I.7 Traffic Map The U-Net software provides a total of three types of traffic maps. Map based on Environments (Raster) Select the Environment type (DU/U/SU/RU) as discussed in previous section for a particular Polygon chosen to create Environment traffic map. Indicates the traffic map based on the coverage. 137 . Path: [Explorer/Data/Traffic Parameters/Traffic Map] Parameter Map based on Environments (Raster) Map based on User Profiles (vectors) Map based on Transceiver Coverage Description Indicates the traffic map based on environments.

III. Map based on User Profiles (Vectors) Adding Traffic Information 138 .

Indicates the mobility type.Parameter User profile Mobility Density Indicates the user profile. Path for Predictions are: [Explorer/Operation/Predictions/] Setting the Properties of a Traffic Map Path: [Explorer/Geo/Traffic/Map based on Transmitters and Services & Map based on Transmitters and Services (#Users)/ Properties] 139 . Map based on Transceiver Coverage Creating a Traffic Map The transceiver selected will be based on the Prediction Group chosen. IV. A prediction group will only be created after a prediction has been carried out. Indicates the traffic density of the vector area in subscribers/km2. So only transceiver that had prediction information attached will be part of any prediction group. Description Indicates the traffic density in subscribers/km2 Selecting Area (Polygon) Parameter Name Density Description Indicates the name of the area/polyon to which the vector area belongs.

If the total ratio is not equal to 100%. Indicate the distribution weight and indoor distribution ratio of the service or user for different clutter classes. the U-Net software automatically recalculates the ratios. The input here is the number of users for each service type 140 .Parameter Terminals (%) Mobility (%) Weight % Indoor Description Indicate the distribution ratios of terminals and mobility of the service or user.

which is set in the properties of a single transmitter in the Transmitters folder. Indicates the number of downlink users corresponding to the FTP service.8.1 Predictions Path: [Explorer/Operations/Predictions/Properties] User can then select the type of prediction required.Parameter Prediction Group Tx_ID LTEFTP (UL) LTEFTP (DL) LTE (UL) VideoConferencing LTE (DL) VideoConferencing LTEVoIP (UL) LTEVoIP (DL) LTE (UL) WebBrowsing LTE (DL) WebBrowsing Selects a coverage prediction group Description Indicates the transmitter name.8 Prediction and Simulation 7. Indicates the number of uplink users corresponding to the FTP service. 141 . Indicates the number of uplink users corresponding to the video conferencing service Indicates the number of downlink users corresponding to the video conferencing service Indicates the number of uplink users corresponding to the VoIP service Indicates the number of downlink users corresponding to the VoIP service Indicates the number of uplink users corresponding to the Web browsing service Indicates the number of downlink users corresponding to the Web browsing service 7.

I. General information 142 .

Indicates the handover threshold of intra-frequency cells. the default precision (50m) is used for the prediction. the probability that the receive signal strength is stronger than the specified threshold at the edge of a cell Indicates whether penetration loss is considered in the calculation Indicates whether frequency offset is considered in the calculation. Otherwise. In general. This parameter is valid during the prediction of the counters Handover Area and Overlapping Zones Indicates the handover threshold of inter-frequency cells. Intra-Frequency Handover (dB) Inter-Frequency Handover (dB) Polygon Neighbour load With Shadow Cell Edge Coverage Probability Indoor Coverage RS Shifting II. Please refer to Load Setting section Indicates whether shadow fading is considered in the calculation Indicates the probability of cell edge coverage. Loading of Neighbour cells. the precision specified for the prediction is used. If cell PCIs are not planned. it indicates that the interference is calculated according to values of cell PCIs after the modulo operation is performed. Advanced Frequency Name Channel Index 143 Indicates the name of a frequency band Indicates the ARFCN corresponding to a frequency band . the prediction precision is the same as the map precision. If the precision is not specified for a prediction. This parameter is valid during the prediction of the counters Handover Area and Overlapping Zones. Indicates the area calculated in coverage prediction. only the interference on the RS is taken into consideration. ie. If RS Shifting is selected during the prediction of the counter DL RS SINR.Resolution Indicates the resolution of the prediction map.

Condition Parameter Parameter on the left of the inequality Parameter in the middle of the inequality Parameter on the right of the inequality Service Terminal Mobility Interferer Reception Threshold (dBm) Description Indicates the lower limit of the predicted value. Indicates the method used for the current prediction. Indicates a service type Indicates a terminal type Indicates a mobility type Indicates the interference threshold IV. Viewing Prediction Results User can review the results both statistically or in table format 144 . No calculation is performed if the value of the parameter in the middle of the equality is lower than this value.III. No calculation is performed if the value of the parameter in the middle of the equality is higher than this value. Indicates the upper limit of the predicted value.

2 Simulation Path: [Explorer/Operation/Simulations/] 145 .In either Cumulative Distribution Function or Probability Distribution Function format Or in Table format for other results such as MAC throughput 7.8.

I. 146 . Parameter Global Scaling Factor Select Traffic Maps Select Calculate Area Description Indicates the scaling factor of user number. Indicates a calculation area to be selected. Setting Monte Carlo method is used by U-Net for traffic distribution. Traffic Map needs to be created prior to running simulations. Number of users = Size x User density x Scaling factor of user number Indicates a traffic map to be selected. Planner can adjust the “Source Traffic” table as below. Once it is ready.

Indicates whether hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) gain is considered. configuration of “Advance Parameters” Table is also required Parameter Description Indicates the number of transmission time intervals (TTIs) within a snapshot.Finally. Indicates the downlink load convergence threshold. which is used for checking whether a network is converged. Indicates the uplink throughput convergence threshold. U-Net adopts the semi-dynamic simulation to obtain the instantaneous network information as per TTI within a snapshot. therefore increases the precision of simulation results but requires longer calculation period. Indicates whether TTI Bundling is considered. which is used for checking whether a network is converged. Indicates the shadow fading factor on the base station side. Indicates whether interference rejection combining (IRC) is considered. Indicates the uplink IoT convergence threshold. which is used for checking whether a network is converged. Number of TTI Site Corr UL IOT Convergence Threshold UL Load Convergence Threshold (%) DL Load Convergence Threshold (%) UL Throughput Convergence Threshold (%) DL Throughput Convergence Threshold (%) TTI Bundling VMIMO IRC HARQ Fix User Position 147 . Indicates the uplink load convergence threshold. which is use for checking whether a network is converged. which is used for checking whether a network is converged. A larger TTI count allow better reflection of scheduling. Indicates whether the virtual multiple-input and multiple-output (VMIMO) is considered. Indicates whether the location of user is fixed. Indicates the downlink throughput convergence threshold.

148 .

Individual users’ simulation results can also be seen by pointing the mouse on top of the user locations within the Simulation 149 .

Simulation Results Various results can be obtained from the simulation results. 150 . and throughput results.II. Planners can then see the average value as well as the distributions of these results graphically. IoT. including cell loading.

9.1 Profile Purpose of this window is to display the terrain profile in relation to signal loss. you can view the profile of the path from a point on the map to this transmitter. User enter the required value and Margin needed will be displayed 7.9 Point Analysis Tool This section describes how to use the point analysis window and explains the relevant parameters. After you specify the transmitter. Parameter Transmitter Path Loss/DL RSRP Cell Edge Coverage Probability Description Indicates the transmitter.2 Reception Parameter Display area Description Indicates the names and signal strength of all the cells available for the terminal at the Cursor location 151 .7.9. Path: Click or on tool bar “Window – Point Analysis Tool” 7. Choose to display either the path loss or the DL RSRP at the Cursor.

whose simulation results are used to simulate the current analysis environment. Indicate the type of the terminal.9.the received signal strength and Clutter class 7.7. and the permitted access carrier of the terminal represented by .9. 7. the class of clutter in the position where the terminal is located as well as list of cells from which signals can be received.4 Result This page displays the coordinates and altitude of the current cursor location. moving speed. service.3 Signal Analysis Parameter Simulation group Terminal or Mobility or Service Description Indicates a simulation or a group of simulations. 152 .10 RF Cell Planning Optimization U-net also offer radio network planners an network planning optimization tool.

Path: [Explorer/Operation/LTE Cell Planning/] Optimization selection steps I. Value range is from 0 to 100. Table value – General Tab Parameter Name Analysis Area Simulation Area Max Iteration Count Resolution RSRP Target Ratio Indicates the RF auto-planning area Indicates the simulation area of RF auto-planning (this area must contain the analysis area.Value range is from 0 to 10.768. Indicates the precision in calculation.) Indicates the maximum number of iterations. The greater the number of iterations is.000 Indicates the percentage of the downlink RSRP that reaches the specified threshold in the selected calculation area. Description Indicates the name of an RF planning group 153 . the more accurate the planning result is but longer time the calculation takes. Value range is from 0 to 32.

Value range is from -90 to 90. Indicates the maximum adjustment range of the reference signal. Value range is from 0 to 32. Indicates the minimum adjustment range of the downtilt angle. The value range is from -180 to 0.1 Overview of Planning Area The clutter information and planning target area of City X are presented as below. Value range is from 0 to 360. Value range is from -32. Indicates the step length at which the azimuth is adjusted.11 U-Net Planning Case U-Net is widely applied in global LTE planning projects by RNP engineers. Indicates the maximum/minimum transmit power of the reference signal. Indicates the maximum adjustment range of the azimuth. Value range is from 0 to 360. The planning area is about 30 square km and shown as the red broken line polygon. Indicates the maximum/minimum downtilt angle. RS SINR Fitness Weight + RSRP Fitness Weight = 1 Indicates the weight of the RS SINR performance counter of a cell.768 Indicates the minimum adjustment range of the reference signal.Parameter RSRP FitnessWeight RS SINR Fitness Weight RS SINR Target Ratio Calculate Now Description Indicates the weight of the RSRP performance counter of a cell. Value range is from 0 to 1. RS SINR Fitness Weight + RSRP Fitness Weight = 1 Indicates the percentage of the downlink RS SINR that reaches the specified threshold in the selected calculation area. that is.768. Indicates the step length at which the downtilt angle is adjusted. Here is one case presented as reference. Value range is from -32. Indicates whether to perform the RF auto-planning immediately II. Value range is from 0 to 90. Indicates the minimum adjustment range of the azimuth.768. Value range is from 0 to 32. the more accurate the planning result is. Indicates the step length at which the reference signal is adjusted.768 to 32. In U-Net. an individual represents the configuration combination of the RF parameters related to all the cells in a calculation area. 7.768 to 0. Value range is from -360 to 0. Control Parameter Parameter Description Indicates the size of a population. but the longer time the calculation takes. Indicates the maximum adjustment range of the downtilt angle. Urban and Suburban. Value range is from 10 to 40. Individuals of Population Size are calculated in each iteration and the greater the number of individuals. the total number of individuals in a population. Population Size Antenna Tilt Max or Min Value Antenna Tilt Max Range Antenna Tilt Min Range Tilt Step Size Reference Power Max or Min (dBm) Maximum Range Minimum Range Power Step Size Antenna Azimuth Max Range Antenna Azimuth Min Range Antenna Azimuth Step Size 7. Value range is from 0 to 1. Main morphologies include Dense Urban.11. 154 .The value range is from 0 to 180.

0 0.0 2.10 155 .3 0.2 3.01 0.) 0 0.31 0 0 0 0.05 1.6 47.8 11.Clutter Name unclassified sea inland_water wetland barren grass/agriculture rangeland woodland forest village suburban dense_suburban urban dense_urban core_urban building_blocks industrial airport open_in_urban open Area (sq.6 7.0 1.9 0.8 0.0 2.7 9.0 0.0 7.11.83 0.17 0 0 3.61 0.0 0.4 0.km.7 0.35 Percentage (%) 0. All the sector azimuths and antenna downtilts presented in the figure below are automatically tuned by the RF Cell Planning Optimization Function mentioned in Section 7.0 0.0 12.42 0.2 Site Distribution 30 site locations have been selected for this planning case.0 0.01 0.52 2.71 0 2.94 3.2 14.

3 Parameter Configuration and General Assumption According to the network design requirements and agreements with Operator.5 23 0 1.5 0 0 7 COST231-Hata (Huawei) PDCCH: 3 symbols PUCCH: 9 RBs 156 .6 20 2T2R 1T2R 2x20 2. These common assumptions have been applied in global LTE projects Parameter Used DL Spectrum Used UL Spectrum Frequency (GHz) Bandwidth (MHz) eNB Antenna Configuration UE Antenna Configuration eNB Tx Power (W) eNB Noise Figure (dB) eNB Antenna Height (m) eNB Cable Loss (dB) eNB Jumper Loss (dB) UE Tx Power (dBm) UE Antenna Gain (dBi) UE Antenna Height (m) UE Cable Loss (dB) Body Loss (dB) UE Noise Figure (dB) Propagation Model Used Control channel overheads Value 2630-2650 MHz 2510-2530 MHz 2.11. Necessary assumptions are made based on wireless network planning experiences. the planning parameters are configured in U-Net.7.5 According to Engineering Information 0 0.

Name unclassified sea inland_water wetland barren grass/agriculture rangeland woodland forest village suburban dense_suburban urban dense_urban core_urban building_blocks industrial airport open_in_urban open Penetration Loss (dB) 0 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12 14 16 18 20 20 20 14 14 6 6 Model Standard Deviation (dB) 7 7 7 7 4 4 4 4 4 7 7 9 9 11 11 11 7 7 4 4 7. Downlink RSRP 157 .11. I. both Operator and Huawei can forecast the LTE network coverage condition and evaluate the network design.4 Network Coverage Predictions By coverage prediction.

II. Uplink RSRP III. PDSCH SINR 158 .

IV. PUSCH SINR V. Downlink MAC Peak Throughput 159 .

both Operator and Huawei can forecast the LTE system capacity condition and evaluate the network design. The traffic map is created based on cell coverage and designed as following settings. I. PDSCH SINR and PUSCH SINR levels are higher than -5dB. DL and UL RSRP levels are higher than -115dBm.5 Network Capacity Simulation By Monte Carlo simulation. 7. DL and UL MAC Peak Throughput levels are higher than 5Mbps. Terminal MIMO Terminal LTE Mobile Terminal LTE % 100 0 Mobility 30 km/h 50 km/h 60 km/h 90 km/h Fixed Pedestrian % 0 0 0 0 80 20 160 .VI. Uplink MAC Peak Throughput The above coverage prediction plots show that in 95% of the planning area.11. Traffic Map Setting FTP service is considered in the Monte Carlo simulation. The network design leads to a good coverage situation.

Part of the simulation result is presented in the table below. 161 . Simulation Result Users are created randomly in the Monte Carlo Simulation. One of five Snapshots is presented in figure below.Clutter Class unclassified sea inland_water wetland barren grass/agriculture rangeland woodland forest village suburban dense_suburban urban dense_urban core_urban building_blocks industrial airport open_in_urban open Weight 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 % Indoor 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 II.

35 17.70 34. It shows that over 95% cells can reach over 15Mbps DL throughput and 10Mbps UL throughput in the target area.372.750.86 33.937.009.48 26.69 15.17 41.98 0.12 41.92 0.28 5.852.90 0.829.96 0.96 0.39 22.50 14.07 41.229.25 6.689.53 6.57 9.Site 403 403 403 405 405 405 4050 4050 4050 4051 4051 4051 4052 4052 4052 Transceiver 4031 4032 4033 4051 4052 4053 40501 40502 40503 40511 40512 40513 40521 40522 40523 Tx Power (dBm) 41.92 0.963.97 0.64 30.85 0.397.495.96 0.97 0.89 0.92 20.21 41.98 0.98 0. Cell capacity of this simulation case is good enough.15 41.103.14 41.72 6.083.00 1.94 0.99 0.93 30.454.15 41.994.54 14.644.29 8.93 0.597.35 7.91 0.13 41.17 20.570.91 23.540.012.93 Load (UL) 0.20 41.811.60 5.16 41.36 31.85 27.98 0.38 24.97 0.13 41.39 20.63 27.55 29.93 1.99 Load (DL) 0.87 1. The cell throughput statistics results (both downlink and uplink) are presented in the figures below.08 5.99 0.32 24.99 0.94 0.95 0.605.832.01 23.09 26.452.18 30.81 8.67 22. 162 .73 29.76 MAC Throughput (DL) (kbps) 30.793.95 28.95 6.611.00 MAC Throughput (UL) (kbps) 22.09 28.90 0.90 20.14 IoT(UL) (dB) 5.51 5.54 8.406.96 Cell throughput is the benchmark to evaluate the system capacity.731.103.00 0.20 41.958.67 5.11 41.10 41.

8. Mobility. preliminary acceptance and final acceptance. and Integrity. which are. The KPI architecture is shown in the following figure. and Subscriber perceived quality. Retainability. KPI Architecture The above KPI classification fully considers the customer experience and focuses on the Quality of Experience. providing a wide range of network KPIs to reflect network factors that are relative to the service quality. Mobility. Latency. using industry standards as reference to define network counters and KPIs.8 LTE Network Key Performance Indicators 8. LTE KPI Acceptance Procedure 163 . LTE KPIs are mainly classified into 5 classes.1 KPI Measurement Methodology The KPIs are formulated to measure the network performance in terms of Accessibility. are recommended as shown below. Integrity. Retainability.2 KPI Acceptance Procedure LTE network KPI acceptance procedure for the two phases. Accessibility.

Handover Success Rate.. planning and optimization capabilities. the final acceptance of the whole network performance on the basis of statistics will be implemented. KPIs will be derived from the drive test analysis and stationary measurements. statistics will not eligible statistical result without enough samples. Statistics KPIs are not proposed and measured at this stage as the traffic is insufficient. for Network KPIs.g. mainly determined by product performance. if possible. the Service KPIs’ test is suggested to be performed by Stationary Test (ST) in the area with good RF conditions and close to the cell in order to eliminate the affect of poor RF or non-equipment factor and the test is proposed to be implemented under the condition of one serving cell. However.3 Service KPIs and Network KPIs The Field Test KPIs into two categories: Service KPIs and Network KPIs. (2) Drive Test Route Selection For cluster optimization. shopping centers. should be performed on the Drive Test (DT) routes in rollout clusters. major roads. the KPI values of statistics probably might not be same with those in drive test due to different calculations and considerations. no necessary for repeating the measurement in all clusters Based on the above reasons. 8. We recommend that only one cluster (named pilot cluster) is selected for the evaluation and acceptance for the Service KPIs. Call Drop Rate. Cluster means a group of sites (Normally 20-40 sites) which are geographically neighbor and all the eNodeBs of this test cluster should be integrated and on air. (1) Cluster Optimization Performing optimization/acceptance per Cluster is recommended. In general the test routes shall be planned according to the following criteria: (a) All sectors of each site in the cluster should be covered by the drive route. 8. tourist attractions and railway stations. but the actual sites number of per cluster should be flexible to allow a faster rollout and acceptance. neighboring relations.4 Cluster and Test Route The following contents present recommendation for Cluster Optimization and the selection of Drive Test Route for this project.During the phase of preliminary acceptance before commercial launch. e. configuration and parameter setting. Whereas. and this analysis and measurement are on the basis of cluster which constitutes a group of sites (20-40 sites). which is determined by the radio network environment. Service KPIs are the KPIs that are not subject to be effected by cluster tuning and optimization activities. After on-going optimization while the traffic keeps increasing after commercial launch. (b) Routes shall pass through Key business centers. throughput. 164 . etc. the planning of the test route shall consider the handover performance. such as Call setup success rate. etc. coverage. along with surrounding neighbor cells. ping delay.

The main purpose of Preliminary Acceptance is to verify whether the optimized cluster achieves the coverage and performance requirements or not. KPI Classes Accessibility Retainability Throughput Delay/Latency Mobility Indicator E-RAB Establishment Success Rate Call Drop Rate DL Single User Throughput UL Single User Throughput Round Trip Time (Ping 32Bytes) Handover Success Rate (Intra-system) Proposed KPIs for Preliminary Acceptance Test Method Drive test Drive test Stationary Stationary Stationary Drive test 8. Stats. Optional) The following table lists the proposed KPIs for Final Acceptance. the following KPIs are suggested for Preliminary Acceptance and Final Acceptance separately. Proposed KPIs for Preliminary Acceptance The following table lists the proposed KPIs for Preliminary Acceptance. statistics collection method could be introduced under the condition that a minimum amount of traffic per site at the Busy Hour is reached (the sufficient data are available). (1) Preliminary Acceptance For Preliminary Acceptance (before the commercial launch).8. Based on worldwide experiences of LTE commercial networks. so the Field Test (Drive Test and Stationary Test) KPIs are recommended for this phase. (2) Final Acceptance (Stability Acceptance.5 Proposed Key Performance Indicators There are two types of methods for KPIs’ measurement: Field Test and Statistic Collection. Stats. low traffic (even empty) is not able to produce sufficient traffic data to evaluate the correlative Statistics KPIs. KPI Classes Accessibility Retainability Mobility Indicators RRC Connection Establishment Success Rate ERAB Establishment Success Rate Call Drop Rate Handover Success Rate (Intra-system) Proposed KPIs for Final Acceptance Test Method Stats. Different measurement methods and KPI categories shall be taken into consideration so as to match the following two acceptance phases. 165 . Stats.6 Proposed KPIs for Final Acceptance (Stability Acceptance. Optional) For Final Acceptance (after the commercial launch).

However.g. 10MHz. it is generally true downtown area would require higher bandwidth (15MHz or 20MHz) due to higher traffic requirement while rural and/or suburban area may only require smaller bandwidth (10MHz).2. different band. Spectrum only available within 100km from City centre) • Will the entire network be running on the same frequency spectrum (e. The final frequency band granted will have a significant impact on site count and hence overall project cost due to the propagation and pathloss characteristics of different frequency bands. The purpose of the checklist is to ensure all the major aspects are considered either from our intelligence or with customer input. 15MHz or 20MHz bandwidth. limitations and considerations required for the planning of a LTE network. City is 2.9 Network Planning Checklist 9.6G but countryside is 800) Too often proposals are based on wrong assumptions on spectrum and the available bandwidth that will be used for new network deployment which results in a significant cost and work implications.2 Checklist Items Consideration Radio planning engineers are highly recommended to review the following checklist items in full and confirm the detail of all these items BEFORE committing to any network site count to begin to perform any network simulation 9.1 Understanding Customer Spectrum Bandwidth Availability The purpose of detail planning is to determine a solid radio network design for possible deployment so radio engineer should not be using detail planning as a mean to determine or compare the network capacity offering between 5MHz.g. 9. The same five questions/issues raised in “Understanding Customer Spectrum Bandwidth Availability” also need to be 166 . radio planning engineers should have a good understanding on the technological background.2 Actual Frequency Band Allocation for LTE Similar to spectrum bandwidth availability.1 Introduction By now. swapping customer current spectrum to another band) • Any spectrum licenses restrictions (e.g.2. This chapter will go through the required information step by step from a practical implementation perspective to highlight the approach needed for both radio engineers in deciding on the strategy required for LTE network planning. will customer buy more spectrum in same band.g. With all these information on hand. Further issues need clarifications include • Spectrum availability and timeframe e. the final network plan created will sure be more customer relevant and less rework will be required. radio planners need to know which band is to be given for their network. • Will customer need to perform migration or refarming of 2G/3G technologies first before spectrum is available for LTE • Any government plan for Spectrum recovery (e. 9.

9. RRU. Not necessary LTE specific but will be required by 2G/3G e. coupler or splitter addition) to enable co-siting with existing technology (CDMA/GSM/UMTS) • Changes in Hardware (e. Currently. TMA) which will lead to path loss changes. radio planning engineers need to have a good understanding of where customer traffic will be in order to allocate an appropriate distribution of base stations. As a result. different customers will have different focus on traffic requirement. no detail network design activities should begin. answers to these questions are highly variable and every network will be different due to their current capacity status. Therefore. This is mainly because the final site count is more likely to be determined by coverage requirement and the capacity offered by the network is the product of site count x capacity per site. In case where LTE is to be introduced after spectrum refarming. high subscriber density area are most likely made up of users with low mobility so the emphasis on site placement for dense urban is more critical and it is important to be closer to users in high traffic area. high subscriber density and high usage is expected for dense urban and city area. In general. In summary. Guard band spectrum availability? • Additional passive equipment/path loss introduced due to possible equipment swap out (e. the following items will need to be considered carefully prior to detail network design: • Any co-location with Existing Technology (2G/3G)? • Guard Band in place already? If not. jumper cable.g. This allocation can be affected by such factors as indoor 167 . it is recommended until a clear vision is obtained from customer for all 3 questions listed above. the final capacity offer by the network will be different due to the coverage requirement. In developed markets.e.clarified here if it has not be done so before any detail planning activities are to begin. users are likely to be of lower usage and of higher speed so maximizing coverage through site antenna height or higher terrain is more important.g. growth forecast. • Extra workload requirement due to refarming which may have human resources impact (e. per cell capacity is bandwidth not frequency band dependent). require GSM planning). On the other hand. marketing strategies and even management preferences to showcase their technological leadership or not.g.2. introducing TFR to improve GSM efficiency first.2. in rural and highway condition.3 Frequency Band Refarming Requirement for LTE Some of the most popular questions from customer these days are • How they can perform refarming? • When is the best time? • How much spectrum do they need? For radio planners. It is also worth noting here although the bits/Hz value will not change with different frequency band (i.4 Location of Customer Coverage Requirement It is critical to have the proposed LTE site locations correspond to where it can best serve the designated traffic area and traffic type. antennae change. hence it is normal to have more site count being allocated to dense urban/urban environment. there is also a big push in Europe for white spot (rural) wireless DSL coverage in Europe DD spectrum based on LTE.g. 9.

small transmit power or even less MIMO complexity as long as coverage is fine.penetration margin and slow fading margin in the link budget. 9. it is not appropriate to locate an InterRAT border in location where the existing 3G or 2G network is of poor coverage. In LTE. In general. traffic likely to be high speed but low volume so smaller capacity provisioning is acceptable. If customer focus is just in covering dense urban area. • It is also not recommended to place any InterRAT border along interRNC/BSC or inter PLMN border area. Another important factor is when the database was made available and when was the latest update made. it will be inappropriate to design a radio network with solid coverage everywhere (suburban/rural alike) where customer do not appreciate the value or return on their investment. this means either smaller bandwidth. Google earth (which is normally 3 168 .7 Terrain and Clutter Database Availability and Accuracy It may not appear to be important but the resolution and accuracy of terrain and clutter information will have a BIG influence on the reliability of the final network design. In both situations. 100m and beyond depending on the price paid as well as the location of the clutter. This is particularly important before designing any network that requires commitment on KPIs later.2.2.2. it is also important to ensure the clutter data is not shifted from the real structural location. Hence.6 Evaluate Existing Network Condition for InterRAT Radio planning engineers need to understand the existing customer’s network configuration as well as its footprint. understanding the current status of the underlying network from both a coverage and performance perspective is critical in finalizing the LTE network design and capacity planning. Clutter resolution comes as 10m. 9. 25m. 50m. it is NOT a good practice to rely on the external eNodeBs to provide coverage inside the tunnel. It is very worthwhile to valid the clutter information against other sources of information e. it is reasonable to request traffic loading and performance information from the customer regarding the existing network both within and on the edge of the proposed LTE network 9.g. there will be a need for InterRAT handover either due to coverage hole within the LTE network or on the fringe of the LTE network to area beyond its coverage. One major problem for this type of coverage is the feasibility of installation due to for example space and air conditioning restrictions inside tunnel or location restrictions along major highway so Radio planner also need to ensure the appropriate type of eNodeB is chosen. • Try to locate LTE InterRAT border in area where customer network is offering good throughput to reduce the level of future customer complaint.5 Highway and Tunnel Coverage Requirement Most Operators will require good coverage along major highway and major tunnels due to the strategic visibility of services. For instance. For example. • Similarly. • It is unwise to place an InterRAT border in a heavily congested area. In any Greenfield LTE deployment. In order to make these InterRAT boundary decision intelligently. Besides data resolution. downtown area will require higher resolution while rural town can accept data of a lower resolution nature.

By assigning appropriate data user model inside U-net. the edge throughput requirement is also a result of special government legislation on Operator e. major pedestrian walkways.8 Scheduler Selection Radio design engineer can choose between different data transmission schedulers in the OSS database depending on the likely radio performance of the network. Government legislation to improve rural/ 169 . On the other hand.2. Canada and Australia. there is always a need of indoor microcell and customer is normally quite willingness to pay for the extra coverage. 9.g. big shopping mall. Other important questions to be considered before finalizing the network plan are • How much spare capacity the network has to tackle the growth and change in subscriber’s usage without adding extra equipment? • How well data hot spots (e. popular sport stadium. final site count will also be affected as it would be unwise to assume high data traffic usage uniformly across the entire network. Sometimes.2. white spot coverage in European countries like Germany as well as rural coverage in US. Depending on the network morphologies weighting. The final requirement of site count will thereby be directly impacted. Normally.g. customer may have difficulties in accessing certain buildings or shopping malls so these areas may need to be covered by outdoor eNodeBs which will increase the penetration requirement.10 Cell Edge Throughput Requirement The final requirement of Uplink and Downlink throughput requirement at cell edge has to come from customer and is directly related to their pricing as well as branding. There is now a much bigger data requirement especially in short and bursting traffic. some networks are seeing single smart-phone user consuming up to 14 times network resources normally consumed by traditional non smart phone user.2. 9.11 Call Model and SmartPhone Penetration Growth Considerations The arrival of Smartphone has introduced a whole new trend in data applications and hence resource usage condition. As a result. 9. at important indoor locations such as lobbies of major hotels. PF scheduling is preferred but Max C/I scheduling will give the best throughput for a network with solid coverage. major stadium and other high profile locations) are covered? Do they have dedicated cell coverage? • How much penetration margin is provided for indoor coverage? Indoor user will be a major factor for interference generation to other users due to the higher power requirement. subway stations and airports. • Any major driver for surprise usage increase in the near future? (e.2. different usage behavior should be simulated accordingly. Nevertheless. It is likely high data usage traffic be concentrated around dense urban and urban area while Rural and Highway area will consist of lower than average data user.g.to 6 months late) to ensure critical structures have been included. 9.9 Indoor Coverage Requirement Customer coverage expectation will have a direct impact on link budget considerations for both indoor penetration requirement and standard deviation.

700/800MHz digital dividend spectrum could be subjected to interference signals coming from big television broadcasting towers. installation of new antennae in certain locations may not be possible due to local authority restriction. In addition. Hence. While use of separate and/or new antenna may incur additional project cost. Please refer to previous discussion in Chapter 5 for guard band. 9. home DSL replacement package. However.6G may also be subjected to interference either from standard microwave.suburban usage. certain network requirements may demand new antennae altogether due to different network coverage requirement. Finally.2.2. tunnels and sporting stadium. for example: inside shared antenna system in major shopping malls. this may come at the expense of limitation in tilting flexibility. On the other hand. Conversely. no additional loss will be incurred. Frequency band of the new LTE network will also be a critical factor in antenna selection. 170 . New multiband antennae now offered by Huawei Agisson can provide independent electrical tilt for different band which may be useful for some situations. If SingleRAN solution is already in place and new LTE network is built on frequency band covered by existing antennae. shutting down of existing data network and migrating users to new LTE networks) 9. radio engineers need to ensure project team or customer can provide appropriate installation feasibility for such locations. However. Due the close vicinity to traditional microwave frequencies. addition loss (e. In general.g. Existing radio networks are also likely to have additional downtilt for coverage control purposes so independent tilt for Greenfield LTE network may help to reduce the final site count required. antenna selection would be a critical factor in the new LTE radio network design. splitters and jumper cables) needs to be included in the prediction design to ensure all the extra combining loss are included due to equipment co-siting. These two factors could lead to extra guard band and worst case full retune requirement for protection purposes. standard isolation would be required if equipment from different vendors are to be combined. indoor DAS (distributed antenna system) may contribute to interference problem particularly on the uplink due to PIM related inter-modulation. Hence.3G to 2. satellite transmission or MMDS/LMDS networks. Wideband repeaters operating in the same or even adjacent band to the LTE networks may generate unwelcomed interference.12 Base Station Antenna and Other Co-siting Equipment Selection New LTE network is likely to be overlaying with customer’s existing radio networks.13 Interference Protection and Isolation Requirement Similar to any radio network. engineers should not rely on tunnel coverage to be provided by radio signals coming from the base station located outside the tunnel premises. filtering as well as vertical/horizontal separation information. combiners. if the LTE network is to be overlay on other vendor’s network within the same frequency band. over drive of input RF power as well as impedance mismatch between components. radio planners need to evaluate the benefit of having this tilting and orientation flexibility carefully on a site by site basis. LTE networks at 2.

At certain cell site sectors. the main difference being that in beam forming one typically considers a physical antenna beam being constructed towards the UE. site drawing) 9. Radio engineers also need to understand the current configuration of customer sites so the realistic cable and/or combiner loss are reflected in their coverage design.15 Network and Spectrum Evolution Consideration Different Operators may have different network evolution considerations. radio engineers need to remember the addition of new antennae may incur extra CAPEX and OPEX cost on the operator due to extra mounting pole requirement so prior customer discussion is recommended. a cable length of 30m is assumed but this definitely needs to be reviewed during the design stage on a site by site basis based on customer information (e. 9.2.2. For instance. the total path loss will also be different so radio engineers need to discuss with customer in detail on their plan and preference to ensure the discussion results are reflected in the detail network design plan. filter bandwidth.17 Cyclic Prefix Planning 171 . beam forming is very similar to the diversity transmission. ideally. it is important the benefit of applying such products is reflected in our design proposal and link budget estimation.2.5dB) vs Macro RFU (3dB). there is a 2. As a major application for LTE TDD.14 Radio Related Equipment Selection With the introduction of new Remote radio head technology. All these considerations will affect the selection of network components involved (e. beams will be at least a few wavelength apart but the arrival of higher transmit/receive order antenna may well change this situation in the future. However.g. Careful planning of location update border and coverage control remains two of the most important techniques in resolving this problem. most FDD based Operators will likely to be focusing on existing spectrum (850/900/1800MHz) refarming while WiMAX Operators will have major concern on co-existence between WiMAX and LTE TDD.2. 9.5dB reduction in cable loss in using DBS RRU (0. 9. RRU power and guard band/spectrum requirement). Normally. beam forming requires closely spaced antennae and this is unlike the MIMO diversity schemes which require at least a few wavelength antenna spacing. For instance. Depending on the chosen direction. radio engineers should choose a spectrum that is relatively clean in both the uplink and downlink for new LTE systems deployment.g. So for best result. interference increase due to traffic loading is always an important consideration especially when subscriber number increases. due to installation limitation. antenna orientation and tilt may need to be adjusted to avoid interference from external sources and existing customer network configuration may give hints in this direction. Finally. However.16 MIMO and Beam Forming Implementation The number of antenna deployed per cell will have an immediate impact on the coverage and capacity offered by diversity based technology like LTE. Although external interference sometimes could be unavoidable due to various reasons.

North America and Australia/New Zealand. a higher power boosting 172 . Hence. Requirement of extended cell can also be determined via customer discussion and current network coverage review to minimize provisioning of guard band in LTE TDD network.18 Understanding of Current Transmission Backhaul Network Capability Radio planners should regularly report and remind core and transmission network designers about the LTE access network transmission capacity requirement based on customer edge throughput and traffic requirement. the perception of customer coverage is likely to be dictated by the “coverage” shown by UEs (e. Radio engineers are recommended to determine the traffic ratio between downlink and uplink from the customer’s current network to assist in the selection of appropriate slot assignment ratio. there are seven Downlink vs Uplink assignment ration as well as nine Uplink/Downlink Pilot Time Slot vs Guard Band configuration available for radio planner’s selection.2. using a more pedestrian oriented channel model will most likely result in an under-estimation of equipment requirement.19 UE Distribution and Channel Model : Pedestrian vs High Mobility The impact of user distribution (pedestrian oriented vs high mobility focus) needs to be reflected in the channel model chosen for link budget estimation. If the target network is a dense metropolis like Hong Kong. appropriate proportioning between mobile and pedestrian users can also be configured in U-Net Simulations using the correct channel mode under each of the Environment entries. An appropriate buffer needs to be provisioned by the transmission planners as there will be extra loading due to S1/X2 interfaces as described in Chapter 6. Shanghai or Singapore. radio engineers should observe the local condition and make appropriate adjustment in their radio plan.g. Although the expansion of backhaul capacity will normally occur in conjunction with LTE access network rollout. number of signal bars).20 TDD Specific Uplink and Downlink Configuration Due to the spectrum sharing and time division nature of TDD. Result of backhaul congestion will be slower user throughput. 9. 9. 9. This is because power control works much more efficiently in low mobility environment and its gain diminishes as the speed of mobility increases. Hence. On the other hand. it is still essential to ensure no commitment of radio access throughput beyond backhaul latency. 9.2. Transmission expansion based on microwave could be lengthy from a time perspective due to various technical and spectrum regulations so radio planners should report their requirement as soon as possible. possible drop call and QoS/QoE degradation. at initial LTE network launch when loading is low.2. capability and capacity is made. using the wrong incorrect (higher mobility) channel models will have a higher demand on capacity and throughput estimation. On the other hand.Radio engineer should also discuss with customer to ensure any sites needing extended coverage are addressed by using the Long CP configuration as discussed in Chapter 3 and 6. The different combination will have an impact on both the coverage and capacity availability especially when there is an extended range requirement.21 Power Boosting Configuration Similar to most wireless systems.2. for more mobility oriented cities in Western Europe.

173 . there will be a need to scale back power boosting as • Power Boosting consumes extra RE that could have been used for traffic • The higher the MIMO order. However.factor will help to improve coverage perception and reduce cell site count as RSRP is always a major requirement from customer. once network traffic grows steadily. the more RE will be consumed • More new sites are likely to be added to enhance coverage as well as capacity so Power boosting will indeed have a negative impact on coverage control in this situation.

triple-band antennas. The beam can be as wide as 180 degrees. 10. 10. or as narrow as 60 degrees. Electrical energy is fed to the antenna via a transmission line.1 Overview Antenna is a device which converts an electric wave guided by a conductor into a free-space.2.2. the parabolic dish. wide-band antennas. 10.10 Appendix: RF Antenna Systems 10.1 Frequency Antennas can be classified as single-band antennas (narrow-band antennas). the horn. the patch antenna. and vice versa. They have the highest gain and therefore used for long distance coverage.2 Antenna Classification There are dozens of antenna types and variations of each.2 Directivity Antennas can be omnidirectional. A matching device is usually required to ease the abrupt transition between the guided and the free wave. and many others. a conductor which passes electrical energy from one point to another. Sectorial antennas radiate primarily in a specific area. the helicoidal.3 Main Specifications of Antenna The technical specifications of antenna include: • Work band • Gain • Polarization mod • Beam width • Preset down tilt • Down tilt mode • Adjustable range of down tilt • Front-to-rear ratio • Side lobe suppression ratio • Zero point filling • Echo loss 174 . the biquad. Directional or directive antennas are antennas in which the beamwidth is much narrower than in sector antennas. Types of directive antennas are the Yagi. The most popular types of omnidirectional antennas are the dipole and the ground plane. etc 10. dual-band antennas. unguided electromagnetic wave. The type of antenna selected for use depends on the propagation characteristics required. Omni-directional antennas radiate roughly the same pattern all around the antenna in a complete 360° pattern. sector or directive. The wave guided by the line is radiated into space by the antenna.

175 .2 Antenna Gain The antenna is a passive device.• Power capacity • Impedance • Third order intermodulation The mechanical specifications of antenna include: • Dimensions • Weight • Number Input ports • Port connector type (e.g. There are usually two units for antenna gain: dBi and dBd. The relationship between the two units is as the following equation: 0 dBd = 2. The d in dBd means dipole. It can neither strengthen the signal nor transmit signal by itself.1 Work Band It is the work band of LTE system. AWS and TDD Band 33-37.15 dBi • dBi: the capability of concentrating power by actual directional antenna (including omnidirectional) compared with the isotropic antenna. N or DIN) • Wind load 10.3. 900MHz) • 1710-2170MHz (FDD 1800MHz. The i in dBi means isotropic. It concentrates the power to a direction by changing the combination of oscillators and changing the feeder mode. Huawei Agisson is offering antenna product of the following frequency band: • 806-960MHz (FDD 850MHz.6G) • 824-960/1710-2180MHz (Dual Band) • 2300-2700/2300-2700MHz (for 4T4R MIMO) The only major band not covered by Huawei Agisson is 700MHz band used mainly for US LTE networks. Band 39) • 2300-2700MHz (TDD Band 38/40 and FDD 2. Gain is a key index for antenna. • dBd: the capability of concentrating power by actual directional antenna (including omnidirectional) compared with half-wave dipole antenna.3. 10. 2100MHz. standing for the capability of concentrating the power to a direction.

The lobe with the highest power is the main lobe. 10. The antenna pattern is a cubic figure. There are also omnidirectional antenna pattern and directional antenna pattern. The second side lobes are those with the third highest power….3. usually represented by two patterns which are vertical to each other in a main plane. In mobile communication. This is the surface pattern. the power pattern is the most common. There are other special directional antennas. horizontal and vertical beamwidth. Figure 6-2 shows the horizontal and vertical patterns of directional antenna. The directionality of antenna lies in the ranking of oscillators and the variety of feeder phase. 176 .Figure 10-1 Relation between dBi and dBd The antenna gain is relevant to the number of oscillator units. • If the pattern is represented by radiation field strength. it is called phase pattern. The lobes of various shapes and zero points form. such as heart-shaped antenna and 8-shaped antenna. The lobes near the main lobe with the second highest power are the first side lobes. • If the pattern is represented by power density.3 Antenna Pattern The pattern is the electromagnetic field of antenna radiation distributed by coordinate along fixed distance. As a result. The directional antenna produces a rear lobe. the power in some directions is strengthened while the power in some directions is weakened. • If the pattern is represented by phase. it is called power pattern. similar to the interferometric effect of optics in principium. The surface pattern includes vertical pattern and horizontal pattern. it is called field strength pattern.

for an omnidirectional antenna. • Ga: the antenna gain in the unit of dBi. It strengthens the power of a direction while reducing the power of other directions. 90°. • θ: the horizontal beamwidth in the unit of dBi. 60°. 10. When the antenna gain is fixed. the horizontal beamwidth is 360°. 7°.5 Relation between Beamwidth and Gain The antenna concentrates power. including horizontal beamwidth and vertical beamwidth. and 16°. if you have known the antenna gain and horizontal. The common horizontal beamwidth of eNodeB antennas includes 360°. 10°. For example. The common vertical beamwidth of eNodeB antennas includes 6. with their relation as below: Wherein. You can usually reduce the horizontal beamwidth to strengthen the power of a direction. According to the previous formula.4 Beamwidth The beamwidth is also called the half power beamwidth.Figure 10-2 Horizontal and vertical patterns of directional antenna 10.5°. and 33°.3. the horizontal beamwidth is in inverse proportion to the vertical beamwidth. 13°.3. • β: the vertical beamwidth in the unit of dBi. you can calculate the vertical beamwidth. 65°. so the vertical beamwidth is calculated as below: Due to the deficiency of design and manufacturing process. the gain is 11 dBi. The horizontal beamwidth and vertical beamwidth is the beamwidth between two points where the power is lower 50% (3 dB) than the maximum radiation power. the actual vertical beamwidth of omnidirectional antenna is 177 .

the antenna length will double. vertical beamwidth. the better the antenna is designed. for shaped-beam antenna. when the antenna gain is low. The larger the number of oscillators. The front-to-rear ratio of common antennas is between 18 dB and 45 dB. For an omnidirectional antenna. the antenna gain depends on the number of oscillators. Therefore. and horizontal beamwidth According to the figure above.7 Upper Side Lobe Suppression In a cellular network. the vertical beamwidth and horizontal beamwidth are usually small. 10. the difference between the level of side lobe and the maximum beam in the range of rear 180°±30°. to improve the efficiency of frequency reuse and reduce the intra-frequency interference with neighbor cells. The less difference between the two beamwidth. 10.3. When the antenna gain is high.3. Figure 10-3 Relation among antenna gain. the higher the gain is and the larger the aperture of antenna (the effective receiving area) is. the antenna gain is usually within 11 dBi. if the antenna gain increases by 3 dB. you need lower the upper side lobe that radiates neighbor cells and improve 178 . a positive value.usually smaller than the calculated result. the vertical beamwidth and horizontal beamwidth are usually large.6 Front-to-rear Ratio It is the ratio of signal radiation strength of main lobe to that of rear lobe. In addition.

the D/U ratio (the ratio of strength of useful signal to that of interference signal). The elliptical polarization wave and circular polarization wave have polarization direction.3. the polarization wave is elliptical polarization wave. The level of the first upper side lobe compared with main lobe shall be smaller than –18 dB. the polarization wave is circular polarization wave.10 VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) In mobile communication systems. If unspecified. The adjustable electrical down tilt is adjustable. the spatial direction of electric field vector usually serves as the polarization direction of electromagnetic wave. The spatial direction of electric field vector is the direction of maximum radiation by antenna. the VSWR of antenna is 1. • If the endpoint trace of electric field vector forms an ellipse. The dual polarization antenna reduces the impact from multi-path attenuation and improves the quality of signals received by the eNodeB by using polarization diversity. and adjustable electrical down tilt (RET antenna) as below: • Mechanical down tilt: you adjust the mechanical down tilt by lowering the support. This is invalid to the antennas of macro cell eNodeB. The elliptical polarization usually applies for satellite communication. • If the endpoint trace of electric field vector forms a circle. the down tilt cannot be adjusted. 10. • Electrical down tilt: you adjust the electrical down tilt by adjusting the phase of oscillators.9 Down Tilt The down tilt of antenna is an important means that you can enhance the signal level of serving cell and reduce the interference with other cells.8 Polarization Mode The polarization is a radiation feature for indicating the vector special direction of field strength of electromagnetic wave.5:1 at most. The polarization modes of antennas include the polarization and dual polarization. After the preset electrical down tilt is sold out of the factory. The dual polarization antenna in LTE networks usually use ±45° cross polarization mode. The electromagnetic wave of different bands caters for different polarization modes for propagation. 10. The spatial direction of electric field vector is not always fixed. 10. The common down tilt modes include mechanical down tilt. With the ground as a reference.3. The mobile communication systems usually choose vertical polarization while the broadcasting systems usually choose horizontal polarization. the polarization of which the direction of electric field vector is parallel to ground is the horizontal polarization wave and polarization of which the direction of electric field vector is vertical to ground is the horizontal polarization wave.3. preset electrical down tilt. The electromagnetic wave of which the spatial direction of electric filed vector keeps fixed any time is the linear polarization wave. Assume that: • ZA: input impedance of antenna • Z0: nominal characteristic impedance 179 . You can adjust the mechanical down tilt and electrical down tilt simultaneously. and they are all linear polarization.

13 Input Port of Antenna To improve the reliability of passive intermodulation and RF connection. and phase shift. When the input impedance of antenna is not equal to characteristic impedance. balancing. Before the antenna is used. feeders. the input port of antenna is 7/16 DIN-Female. The ratio of the maximum adjacent voltage of standing wave to the minimum adjacent voltage of standing wave is the voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR).98 dB. 10. The passive parts are usually considered linear but they may have non-linearity to some degree under high power due to the following factors: • The contact between different metals • The contact between the same metal with rough surface 180 .12 Power Capacity It is the average power capacity. As a result.3. If the power of a carrier is 20 W and a port of the antenna can support four carriers at most. and filters work under high power of multi-carrier. the RL is 13. 10. the power amplifier may be burnt and the communication system will work abnormally. therefore. the reflected and incident waves form standing wave after overlapping on the feeder. antennas. such as dual polarization antenna and dual band dual polarization antenna. 10.14 Passive Intermodulation (PIM) The passive intermodulation is caused by non-linearity of the part when the passive parts like connectors.5:1. such as matching. the power capacity per port shall exceed 150 W (in a 65°C ambient temperature).3. so it can bear a limited power. there shall be a protective cap over the port to avoid generating oxide or absorbing impurity. 10. the isolation must exceed 30 dB when the Rx port is the TX port. the communication distance will be shortened and the reflected power will return the transmitter.So the reflection coefficient is calculated as below: You can also represent the matching character of port with echo loss as below: If the VSWR is 1. the maximum input power of antenna is 80 W.3. The antenna comprises of coupling parts. If the VSWR is over large.3.11 Port Isolation For multi-port antennas.

3. installation.3. In suburban and rural areas. salt mist-proof.3. 10.16 Wind Load The antennas are usually installed on high buildings or towers.3. and antennas as below: • Passive intermodulation index of connects: ≤ –150 dBc • Passive intermodulation index of cable: ≤ –170 dBc • Passive intermodulation index of antenna: ≤ –150 dBc 10. and especially the intermodulation products in the receiver band have severe impact on the receiving performance of system. cable. the antenna is required to have a size as small as possible and a weight as light as possible when all the electrical specifications are met. As a result. In the littoral areas.19 Three-proof Capability The antenna of eNodeB must capable of damp-proof. In urban areas. The antenna can usually resist strong wind. 10. there are strict requirements on the intermodulation feature of passive parts like connectors. it can also be installed bottom up and meet the three-proof capacity. there is no such restriction. In some windy areas. The operators have more and more strict requirements on the dimensions. so you shall choose the antennas with small surface area.3. 10. 10. weight. transport. 10. hidden. the wind is strong with high speed.18 Lightning Protection A direct DC connection of each RF input ports of antenna to the ground is required. so the antennas are required to work normally under a wind speed of 36 m/s and to keep complete under a wind speed of 55 m/s. the antennas are damaged due to unstable tower and pole.17 Work Temperature and Humidity The antenna of eNodeB shall work in a temperature of –40°C to +65°C and a humidity of 0 to 100%. For an omnidirectional antenna.• Loose connection • Rusty or water filled connection • Magnetic objects The intermodulation product interferes with communication systems. and leaf mold-proof. The camouflaged antenna aims to keep consistent with the environment and to avoid being noticed so that the mobile communication project 181 . and according with technical requirements. the antenna of eNodeB shall be light.20 Camouflaged Antenna Scheme for Sites A camouflaged antenna is beautiful.15 Dimensions and Weight of Antenna To facilitate storage. so you must focus on both the technical and non-technical specifications upon antenna selection. and outlook of antenna. and beautiful. and safety.3. small.

proceeds smoothly. The customized camouflaged antennas are various in shapes. The camouflaged antenna applies for urban site construction and coverage solutions for top grade residence area. There are no fixed modes and methods for antenna camouflage. The antenna camouflage aims to hidden it in the environment. as shown in figure below. Figure 10-4 Outlook of customized camouflaged antennas Figure 10-5 The bottom chart of antenna 182 . and these antennas usually include the three-side electrical tilting directional antenna.3. The antenna camouflage includes the following types: • Customized camouflage • Outlook camouflage • Camouflage in special environment 10. You can choose proper beautification modes according to the environment for actual installation. The following paragraphs focus on some antenna camouflage schemes.21 Customized Camouflage Some vendors provide special antennas (such as cluster antenna). The antenna camouflage changes to flexible forms in different scenarios. The application of this camouflage is narrow. because the customized antenna is expensive.

and indoor areas. Especially in a community. according to the special installation position of antenna. you can use the flat panel antenna. community. such as part. In communities or on streets.22 Outlook Camouflage For outlook camouflage. as the advertising board and road sign shown in figure below. In addition. Paint the antenna with an ambient color so that the residents take it as ornament of environment.3.23 Antenna Camouflage in Special Environment Residents are sensitive to antennas in some special scenarios. You can camouflage antennas with the previous methods.10. as shown in figure below Figure 10-6 Painting camouflage 10.3. you need design a scheme that the installed antenna accords with the environment and residents can seldom identify the antenna. Figure 10-7 Flat panel antennas camouflaged by advertising board and road sign 183 . you can use the following methods. the residents reject installing antennas on the roof.

Smith. Yokohama.11 References 3GPP Specification TS 36. IEEE 802.3c-01/29r1.300: E-UTRA and E-UTRAN: Overall description.S.323: E-UTRA: Packet Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP) specification 3GPP Specification TS 36. 2011 3GPP TSG RAN TSGR#3(99) 231 Technical Specification Group Meeting #3.141: E-UTRA: Base Station (BS) conformance testing 3GPP Specification TS 36. Hari. “Channel Models for Fixed Wireless Applications”. D. K.306: E-UTRA: User Equipment (UE) radio access capabilities 3GPP Specification TS 36.410: E-UTRAN: S1 layer 1 general aspects and principles 3GPP Specification TS 36. Stage 2 3GPP Specification TS 36.420: E-UTRAN: X2 general aspects and principles V.213: E-UTRA: Physical layer procedures 3GPP Specification TS 36. GSM/3G and LTE Market update: Global mobile Supplier Association.101: E-UTRA: User Equipment (UE) radio transmission and reception 3GPP Specification TS 36.211: E-UTRA: Physical channels and modulation 3GPP Specification TS 36. Baum et al.214: E-UTRA: Physical layer. March. 2001 FCC: methods for predicting interference from response station transmitters and to response station hubs and for supplying data on response station systems. Erceg.V.401: E-UTRAN: Architecture description 3GPP Specification TS 36.S. General description 3GPP Specification TS 36. 23 Feb.304: E-UTRA: User Equipment (UE) procedures in idle mode 3GPP Specification TS 36. M. Measurements 3GPP Specification TS 36.133: E-UTRA: Requirements for support of radio resource management 3GPP Specification TS 36.322: E-UTRA: Radio Link Control (RLC) protocol specification 3GPP Specification TS 36.212: E-UTRA: Multiplexing and channel coding 3GPP Specification TS 36.201: E-UTRA: Long Term Evolution (LTE) physical layer.S. 21-23 April 1999 Huawei Interference Analysis and Co-existence Training Huawei LTE Technology Overview and Introduction Training Huawei LTE InterRAT Handover Management Training Huawei TFR Solution and Performance Training Huawei Genex U-Net Operation Manual 184 .104: E-UTRA: Base Station (BS) radio transmission and reception 3GPP Specification TS 36.331: E-UTRA: Radio Resource Control (RRC).321: E-UTRA: Medium Acces Control (MAC) protocol specification 3GPP Specification TS 36. Protocol specification 3GPP Specification TS 36.16.

Hu Kangyan. new technology. Wang Mingmin. Zhong Fanliang. Gao Zhengwei.huawei.. Therefore. Hao Guangming. Jin Keyou.: M3-121210199-20110718-C-1. Zhang Fan.Consultant: Wang Tao Editors-in-chief: Liu Jinghai. Other trademarks.R. Huawei may change the information at any time without notice. Cheng Tangbai. Liu Yadong. Chen Qi. There are a number of factors that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed or implied in the predictive statements. LTD. China Tel: +86-755-28780808 Version No. Xu Haihong. Dong Fei. and are trademarks or registered trademarks of Huawei Technologies Co. Zhou Dongfei. Ma Guotian. Xie Guozhu. He Gang. Huawei Industrial Base Bantian Longgang Shenzhen 518129. General Disclaimer The information in this document may contain predictive statements including. HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CO. Xiang Rui Auditors: Lin Guangpu. Ltd. product. statements regarding the future financial and operating results. service and company names mentioned are the property of their respective owners. Zhao Xinlei. P. Dong Fei. Zhou Zhibing.. Tan Zhu Copyright © Huawei Technologies Co. Fang Minghai. All rights reserved. Yang Bo Editors: Lin Guangpu..0 www. HUAWEI. Fang Minxi. Li Guoyue. Zhao Yinghe. 2011. without limitation. Liu Yingwei. Ltd. Trademark Notice . such information is provided for reference purpose only and constitutes neither an offer nor an acceptance.com . future product portfolio. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written consent of Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.. Ying Weimin. etc.