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Affirmative Duties to Act - Restatement 3rd - Torts

Affirmative Duties to Act - Restatement 3rd - Torts

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Published by George W. Conk
Affirmative Duties - black letter - Restatment of Torts 3rd - American Law Institute (2010)
Affirmative Duties - black letter - Restatment of Torts 3rd - American Law Institute (2010)

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Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: George W. Conk on Jan 29, 2013
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01/08/2014

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RESTATEMENT 3D OF TORTS: LIABILITY FOR PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL HARM

© American Law Institute 2010 § 7 Duty (a) An actor ordinarily has a duty to exercise reasonable care when the actor's conduct creates a risk of physical harm. (b) In exceptional cases, when an articulated countervailing principle or policy warrants denying or limiting liability in a particular class of cases, a court may decide that the defendant has no duty or that the ordinary duty of reasonable care requires modification. § 37. No Duty Of Care With Respect To Risks Not Created By Actor An actor whose conduct has not created a risk of physical or emotional harm to another has no duty of care to the other unless a court determines that one of the affirmative duties provided in §§ 38–44 is applicable

§ 38. Affirmative Duty Based On Statutory Provisions Imposing Obligations To Protect Another When a statute requires an actor to act for the protection of another, the court may rely on the statute to decide that an affirmative duty exists and to determine the scope of the duty. § 39. Duty Based On Prior Conduct Creating A Risk Of Physical Harm When an actor's prior conduct, even though not tortious, creates a continuing risk of physical harm of a type characteristic of the conduct, the actor has a duty to exercise reasonable care to prevent or minimize the harm. § 40. Duty Based On Special Relationship With Another (a) An actor in a special relationship with another owes the other a duty of reasonable care with regard to risks that arise within the scope of the relationship. (b) Special relationships giving rise to the duty provided in Subsection (a) include: (1) a common carrier with its passengers, (2) an innkeeper with its guests, (3) a business or other possessor of land that holds its premises open to the public with those who are lawfully on the premises, (4) an employer with its employees who, while at work, are: (a) in imminent danger; or (b) injured or ill and thereby rendered helpless, (5) a school with its students,

(6) a landlord with its tenants, and (7) a custodian with those in its custody, if: (a) the custodian is required by law to take custody or voluntarily takes custody of the other; and (b) the custodian has a superior ability to protect the other. § 41. Duty To Third Parties Based On Special Relationship With Person Posing Risks (a) An actor in a special relationship with another owes a duty of reasonable care to third parties with regard to risks posed by the other that arise within the scope of the relationship. (b) Special relationships giving rise to the duty provided in Subsection (a) include: (1) a parent with dependent children, (2) a custodian with those in its custody, (3) an employer with employees when the employment facilitates the employee's causing harm to third parties, and (4) a mental-health professional with patients. § 42. Duty Based On Undertaking An actor who undertakes to render services to another and who knows or should know that the services will reduce the risk of physical harm to the other has a duty of reasonable care to the other in conducting the undertaking if: (a) the failure to exercise such care increases the risk of harm beyond that which existed without the undertaking, or (b) the person to whom the services are rendered or another relies on the actor's exercising reasonable care in the undertaking. § 43. Duty To Third Parties Based On Undertaking To Another An actor who undertakes to render services to another and who knows or should know that the services will reduce the risk of physical harm to which a third person is exposed has a duty of reasonable care to the third person in conducting the undertaking if: (a) the failure to exercise reasonable care increases the risk of harm beyond that which existed without the undertaking, (b) the actor has undertaken to perform a duty owed by the other to the third person, or (c) the person to whom the services are rendered, the third party, or another relies on the actor's exercising reasonable care in the undertaking. § 44. Duty To Another Based On Taking Charge Of The Other (a) An actor who, despite no duty to do so, takes charge of another who reasonably appears to be: (1) imperiled; and

(2) helpless or unable to protect himself or herself has a duty to exercise reasonable care while the other is within the actor's charge. (b) An actor who discontinues aid or protection is subject to a duty of reasonable care to refrain from putting the other in a worse position than existed before the actor took charge of the other and, if the other reasonably appears to be in imminent peril of serious physical harm at the time of termination, to exercise reasonable care with regard to the peril before terminating the rescue.

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