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Foundations in Media Literacy

Foundations in Media Literacy

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Published by Ian O'Byrne
Students in this course will consider the Internet and other communication technologies (ICTs) as they shape social and educational systems. This examination will be guided by critical foundational theories to include a focused study of traditional and new media, including social media that attempts to account for the feedback loops between institutions, audiences, and technology. The class will examine foundational research across various media to evaluate how media is as used in K-12 instruction, with an awareness of how these skills will play out in higher education, or in individual’s lives. They will also investigate how critical thinking and the Internet shape how we learn. The class will consider the distinct contours of media and information technologies and how these influence current students’ perceptions of theirs and others’ realities. Media literacy means not just accepting what is presented, but being an active user, a critical media evaluator, understanding content, systems, application and effect, to be a better informed decision maker.
Students in this course will consider the Internet and other communication technologies (ICTs) as they shape social and educational systems. This examination will be guided by critical foundational theories to include a focused study of traditional and new media, including social media that attempts to account for the feedback loops between institutions, audiences, and technology. The class will examine foundational research across various media to evaluate how media is as used in K-12 instruction, with an awareness of how these skills will play out in higher education, or in individual’s lives. They will also investigate how critical thinking and the Internet shape how we learn. The class will consider the distinct contours of media and information technologies and how these influence current students’ perceptions of theirs and others’ realities. Media literacy means not just accepting what is presented, but being an active user, a critical media evaluator, understanding content, systems, application and effect, to be a better informed decision maker.

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Faculty  Senate  Document  No.

4,  2007-­‐2008     UNH  Curriculum  Change  Form     APPROVAL  FOR:     Course  or  Program  Title  Foundations  in  Media  Literacy            Page  1         Course  or  Worksheet  Number  ED  710  –  3  credits   For  program,  state  whether  PhD,  MS,  MA,  Grad  Certificate,  BS,  BA,  AS,  Minor,  Concentration,  or  UG   Certificate.  Sixth  Year  Certificate  (6YC)   Administrative  Unit  Education   Proposing  Faculty  Member,  Name  Nancy  S.  Niemi  Tel  203-­‐932-­‐7466          Email  nniemi@newhaven.edu   Administrative  Unit  Vote  For  ……9……  Against  ……1……  Other  ………..  Date  12/7/10     Approved  by       Signature               Date   Administrative  Unit1     …………………………………….         …………………   College-­‐Level  Curriculum     Committee       …………………………………….         …………………   Dean         …………………………………….         …………………   University  UG,  or  G     Curriculum  Committee2  …………………………………….         …………………   Faculty  Senate3     …………………………………….         …………………   Provost        ……………………………………..         …………………     1  Prior  to  submitting  this  form  the  proposing  unit  should  discuss  these  changes  with  all  other  units  that   may  be  affected  by  the  changes.  The  earlier  this  is  done  in  the  process  the  better.  However,  all  members   of  the  faculty  will  be  advised  by  email  of  these  proposed  changes  when  they  are  put  on  the  University   UG  or  G  Curriculum  Committee  agenda.  The  proposing  faculty  member  shall  keep  a  list  of   departments/units  likely  to  be  affected  and  the  date  of  contact  and  the  response  of  each,  which   response  must  be  submitted  within  two  weeks.  All  negatively  affected  units  can  bring  their  concerns  to   the  attention  of  the  proposing  unit  and/or  any  of  the  approving  bodies.     2  The  UUCC/UGCC  and  Senate  may  request  B&F  review  for  changes  above  about  $5k.     3  In  the  case  that  the  senate  determines  that  changes  need  to  be  made  to  the  proposal,  the  proposal   will  be  referred  back  to  the  appropriate  University  Curriculum  Committee  for  consideration  of  the   suggested  changes.   This  form  is  for  UNH  approval  only.  For  other  approvals,  such  as  professional  accreditation,  applications   to  CT  DHE,  or  approvals  for  out  of  state  delivery,  seek  guidance  from  the  University  Accreditation   Officer.   An  administrative  unit  does  not  need  to  obtain  formal  approval  for  those  changes  to  catalog  copy  that   are  consistent  with  an  already  approved  course  or  program  description  and  that  leave  the  original  name   and  number  unchanged.     Catalogue  Description:     Students  in  this  course  will  consider  the  Internet  and  other  communication  technologies  (ICTs)  as  they   shape  social  and  educational  systems.  This  examination  will  be  guided  by  critical  foundational  theories   to  include  a  focused  study  of  traditional  and  new  media,  including  social  media  that  attempts  to  account   for  the  feedback  loops  between  institutions,  audiences,  and  technology.    The  class  will  examine   1    

foundational  research  across  various  media  to  evaluate  how  media  is  as  used  in  K-­‐12  instruction,  with  an   awareness  of  how  these  skills  will  play  out  in  higher  education,  or  in  individual’s  lives.  They  will  also   investigate  how  critical  thinking  and  the  Internet  shape  how  we  learn.  The  class  will  consider  the  distinct   contours  of  media  and  information  technologies  and  how  these  influence  current  students’  perceptions   of  theirs  and  others’  realities.  Media  literacy  means  not  just  accepting  what  is  presented,  but  being  an   active  user,  a  critical  media  evaluator,  understanding  content,  systems,  application  and  effect,  to  be  a   better  informed  decision  maker.   Core  Objectives:     1.    Students  will  examine  the  evolving  nature  of  subject-­‐matter  knowledge  and  the  need  for  constantly   acquiring  new  ideas  and  understandings  within  one’s  discipline,  including  the  impact  of  technology   and  information  sources  on  the  nature  of  teaching,  communications  and  development  of  knowledge.     CTTC1:  1C,  1E;  ISTE  NETS-­‐T2:  3A,  3B   2.    Students  will  design  strategic  questions  and  opportunities  that  appropriately  challenge  students  and              actively  engage  them  in  exploring  the  content  through  strategies  such  as  discourse  and/or  inquiry-­‐                based  learning.     CTTC:  1C,  1D;  ISTE  NETS-­‐T:  2A,  2B   3.  Students  will  debate  and  critique  the  ethical  and  legal  issues  associated  with  bringing  new  media   technologies  and  participatory  culture  practices  into  the  classroom.     CTTC:  4A,  4B;  ISTE  NETS-­‐T:  4A,  4B   4.  Students  will  outline  some  of  the  ethical  challenges  which  youth  face  in  their  roles  as  media   producers  and  members  of  online  communities.     CTTC:  4C;  ISTE  NETS-­‐T:  4B,  4C   5.    Students  will  apply  their  theoretical  understandings  to  the  development  of  curricular  resources  for   use  in  school  or  after  school  programs.     CTTC:  2A,  2B,  2C;  ISTE  NETS-­‐T:  2C,  2D     Required  Text(s):     Potter,  W.J.  (2010).  Media  Literacy.  Sage  Publications,  5th  Edition.  New  York:  Sage  Communications.       Essential  Questions:   • What  does  it  mean  to  be  “literate”  and  how  has  this  changed  as  a  consequence  of  the   introduction  of  new  communications  technologies?   • What  social  skills  and  cultural  competencies  do  young  people  need  to  acquire  if  they  are  going   to  be  able  to  fully  participate  in  the  digital  future?   • What  are  the  ethical  choices  young  people  face  as  participants  in  online  communities  and   producers  of  media?                                                                                                                                  
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CCCT: Connecticut Teacher Technology Competencies 2001 ISTE NETS-T: International Society for Technology in Education, National Educational Technology Standards – Teachers 2008

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  COURSE  ASSESSMENTS  (specific  instructions  will  be  distributed  separately):       1.  Attendance  &  in-­‐class  discussions  (10%)   Active  participation,  in  this  course,  is  defined  as:    contributing  relevant  information  to  class  discussion,   demonstrating  an  understanding  and  engagement  with  reading  assignments  and/or  concepts  discussed   in  class,  applying  reading  and  other  course  materials  to  discussions,  and  being  intellectually  present  and   open  throughout  each  class.     2.  Online  Discussions  &  Discussion  Director  (DD)  (15%)   Throughout  the  course  you  will  be  expected  to  contribute  in  online  discussions,  along  with  the  in-­‐class   discussions  during  our  face-­‐to-­‐face  meetings.  Each  week  the  discussions  will  focus  on  a  selected  reading   for  the  week  and  will  ask  you  to  have  read  and  then  respond  to  the  selection.  You  will  respond  online  a   minimum  of  one  time  before  our  weekly  class  meeting  and  one  time  after  our  class  meeting.  During   class,  we  will  save  time  to  discuss  face-­‐to-­‐face  the  selection  or  discussions  that  have  arisen  from   the  literature.  The  online  discussions  will  be  led  each  week  by  one  of  your  peers.  You  are  expected   to  involve  yourself  in  the  discussion.  You  may  respond  as  often  as  you  like,  but  the  minimum  you  may   respond  is  once  before  and  once  after  class.  The  rubric  that  will  be  used  to  assess  your  involvement  in   online  discussions  will  be  based  on  a  three-­‐point  scale.  The  rubric  will  assess  whether  or  not  you  involve   yourself  in  the  discussion,  attention  to  the  literature,  and  depth  of  the  discussion.  The  rubric  can  be   found  on  the  Google  Doc  containing  the  class  rubrics.  Discussions,  both  in-­‐class  and  online  are  a  valuable   and  necessary  piece  of  the  profession.  Practice  in  these  environments  will  prepare  you  for  the  situations   that  will  present  themselves  throughout  your  future     Each  week  all  members  of  the  class  will  be  expected  to  contribute  to  discussions  in  the  virtual  classroom   on  Google+.  One  week  a  semester,  you  will  act  as  a  Discussion  Director  (DD)  for  that  week’s  literature.   You  will  be  required  to  have  read  the  week’s  literature  and  write  two  prompts  that  address  what  you   believe  the  pertinent  issues  of  the  literature  are.  You  will  post  these  prompts  to  the  online  discussion   board  the  day  after  our  face-­‐to-­‐face  class  session.  As  individuals  read  the  literature  and  respond  to  your   prompts,  it  is  your  responsibility  to  lead  a  discussion  of  what  you  believe  to  be  the  essential  parts  of  that   week’s  readings.  In  the  face-­‐to-­‐face  class,  you  will  present  a  quick  synopsis  (5  minutes)  of  the  week’s   readings  and  what  points  came  up  in  the  discussion.  In  class,  we  will  then  have  time  to  discuss  how  the   literature  affects  the  greater  elements  of  the  course  and  the  effect  on  instruction.  The  rubric  can   be  found  on  the  Google  Doc  containing  the  class  rubrics.  In  discussion  environments,  at  times  you  will   need  to  lead  a  group  (of  peers  or  students)  in  discussion.  This  provides  an  opportunity  to  practice  the   skills  and  dispositions  needed.     3.  Online  Collaborative  Writing  Responses  (15%)   This  assignment  will  call  for  you  to  write  collaboratively  with  you  students  in  class  using  ICTs  such  as   Wikipedia,  Blogger,  and  Google  Docs.  You  will  work  on  four  collaborative  writing  responses  with  your   peers  during  the  semester.  These  writing  sessions  will  be  conducted  in  place  of  the  online  discussions   and  DD  responsibilities  for  the  week.  The  rubrics  used  to  assess  this  assignment  are  available  on  the   Google  Doc  containing  class  rubrics.     4.  Defining  Media  Literacy  (20%)   You  are  to  identify  a  concept  of  media  literacy  and  produce  a  “viral  video”  to  place  online  sharing  the   findings  of  your  research  to  the  general  educator.  This  video  should  be  of  high  quality,  and  still   3    

represent  scholarly  research.  Your  video  will  be  uploaded  to  the  6YC  IT-­‐DML  Wiki  and  6YC  IT-­‐DML   YouTube  Channel.       5.  New  Media  Challenge  (20%)   For  this  assignment  you  will  use  media  literacy  currently  available  online,  along  with  your  growing  skills   in  the  use  and  development  of  online  assessments  to  build  a  new  media  challenge.  This  challenge  will   ultimately  be  uploaded  to  the  6YC  IT-­‐DML  Wiki  for  the  purposes  of  being  fully  available  online  to   educators.  You  should  approach  this  using  a  Critical  Literacy  perspective  and  include  the  appropriate   theoretical  perspectives  you  also  chose  to  guide  your  work.  You  may  work  collaboratively  on  this   project,  but  the  resultant  project  should  represent  your  collaborative  efforts.     6.  New  Media  Learners  (20%)   The  final  project  for  this  class  calls  for  you  to  complete  a  scholarly  paper/project  of  your  own  design   (with  guidance  from  the  instructor)  in  which  you  make  a  contribution  to  the  research  base  on  new   media  literacies  and  their  place  in  the  classroom.  You  must  use  your  experience  as  a  classroom  teacher,   your  experiences  in  this  Program,  as  well  as  your  growing  experience  working  with  media  literacies  to   develop  an  informative  paper/project  that  details  an  aspect  of  media  literacy,  and  its  pedagogical   affordances.  This  paper/project  will  be  uploaded  to  the  IT-­‐DLE  Wiki.     GRADING  SCALE:     Education  Department  Grading  Scale,  effective  fall  2010   Number   grade   Letter   grade   equivalent   A    A-­‐      B+   B    B-­‐      C+   C    C-­‐   F   GPA         4.0   3.7   3.5   3.0   2.5   2.0   1.5   1.0   0.0         According  to  the  UNH  Graduate  Grading  Scale,  an  A  grade   represents  superior  work,  a  B  grade  represents  above   average  work,  and  a  B-­‐  represents  average  work.  Students   whose  work  falls  at  the  C+  level  or  below  this  grade  are   required  to  repeat  the  course,  as  per  University  Graduate   School  Policy.    In  the  Internship  program,  students  will  be   required  to  pay  for  the  repeated  course.    Incompletes  will   only  be  considered  for  students  who  experience  serious   extenuating  circumstances.    Please  see  the  instructor   immediately  if  such  a  situation  occurs.  The  assignment  of  an  

95-­‐100   90-­‐94   87-­‐89   84-­‐86   80-­‐83   77-­‐79   74-­‐76   70-­‐73   Below  70  

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incomplete  grade  is  completely  at  the  discretion  of  the  instructor.  The  incomplete  grade  will  not  be   given  to  simply  allow  the  student  to  raise  a  grade.   Attendance:  On-­‐time  attendance  is  required  for  all  face-­‐to-­‐face  class  sessions.  For  video  webinars,  you   must  be  on  time,  and  present  for  the  entire  meeting.  In  the  case  of  discussion  forums  you  must  be   “involved”  in  the  discussion  at  the  beginning,  follow  the  discussion  throughout  the  weekly  cycle,  and   contribute  at  the  end  of  the  weekly  cycle.  Rubrics  are  available  and  will  be  used  to  determine  activity   and  participation  during  the  discussions.  You  cannot  make  up  discussions  and  analyses  for  which  you   were  not  present.  More  than  one  missed  class  will  result  in  a  lower  course  grade.    Missing  more  than   three  classes  will  result  in  a  failing  grade  for  the  course.    If  you  have  serious  extenuating  circumstances,   see  the  instructor  immediately.   Assignments:  Assignments  are  due  at  the  beginning  of  the  class.  Late  assignments  will  be  accepted  at  a   reduced  grade,  at  the  discretion  of  the  instructor.    If  you  are  unable  to  meet  a  deadline,  please  contact   instructor  prior  to  class.   Student  Code  of  Conduct:    Students  are  expected  to  uphold  the  rules  outlined  in  the  UNH  Student  Code   of  Conduct  http://newton.newhaven.edu/students/booklet.pdf.  Students  who  attempt  to  cheat  or  turn   in  another  person's  work  as  their  own  will  receive  a  zero  on  that  assignment  or  test  and  may  result  in  a   failing  grade  in  the  course.  University  policy  will  be  followed.   Student  Disability  Statement:  Students  with  documented  disabilities  are  encouraged  to  share,  in   confidence,  information  about  needed  specific  course  accommodations.  Students  with  documented   disabilities  are  also  encouraged  to  make  individual  appointments  with  the  Director  of  Disability  Services   &  Resources,  Ms.  Linda  Copney-­‐Okeke,  who  can  be  reached  by  phone  203.932.7331  or  by  email:   lcopney-­‐okeke@newhaven.edu    so  that  you  can  be  informed  of  the  full  range  of  student  services   available  at  the  University.   ADDITIONAL  RESOURCES:     Bennett,  W.  L.  (2009).  "Changing  Citizenship  in  the  Digital  Age"  in  W.  Lance  Bennett  (Ed.),  Civic  Life     Online:    Learning  How  Digital  Media  Can  Engage  Youth.  Cambridge,  MA:  MIT  Press.   Bruns,  A.  (2008).  "Educating  Produsers,  Produsing  Education,"  Blogs,  Wikipedia,  Second  Life,  and     Beyond:  From  Production  to  Produsage  (New  York:  Peter  Lang,  2008),  pp.337-­‐356.   Buckingham,  D.  and  Domaille,  K.  (2003)  ‘Where  have  we  been  and  where  are  we  going?  Results  of  the       UNESCO  Global  Survey  of  Media  Education’,  pp.  41-­‐52  in  Von  Feilitzen,  C.  and  Carlsson,  U.  (eds.)       Promote  or  protect  UNESCO  Children,Youth  and  Media  Yearbook  Goteborg,  Sweden:  Nordicom       Boyd,  D.  (2009).  "Why  Youth  Social  Network  Sites:  The  Role  of  Networked  Publics  in  Teenage  Social       Life,"  in  David  Buckingham  (Ed.)  Youth,  Identity  and  Digital  Media.  Cambridge:  MIT  Press.    

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Flanagin,  A.,  &  Metzger,  M.  (2008).  "Digital  Media  and  Youth:  Unparalleled  Opportunity  and     Unprecedented  Responsibility,"In  Andrew  J.  Flanagin  and  Miriam  J.  Metzger  (eds.),  Digital     Media,  Youth,  and  Credibility  (Cambridge:  MIT  Press/MacArthur  Foundation,  2008),  pp.  5-­‐28.     Hayes,  E.  (2008).  "Girls,  Gaming,  and  Trajectories  of  IT  Expertise,"  in  Yasmin  B.  Kafai,  Carrie  Heeter,  Jill     Denner,  and  Jennifer  Y.  Sun  (Eds.)  Beyond  Barbie  &  Mortal  Kombat:  New  Perspectives  on  Gender     and  Gaming.  Cambridge,  MA:  MIT  Press.     Jenkins,  H.  (2008).  "What  Wikipedia  Can  Teach  Us  About  the  New  Media  Literacies,"  Journal  of  Media     Literacy.     Kafai,  Y.  (2008).  "Gender  Play  in  a  Tween  Gaming  Club,"  in  Yasmin  B.  Kafai,  Carrie  Heeter,  Jill  Denner,     and  Jennifer  Y.  Sun  (Eds.),  Beyond  Barbie  &  Mortal  Kombat:  New  Perspectives  on  Gender  and     Gaming.  Cambridge,  MA:  MIT  Press.   McLuhan,  M.  (1997).  Understanding  media:  The  extensions  of  man.  Cambridge,  MA:  MIT  Press.        (Original  work  published  1964).       Mraz,  M.,  Heron,  A.  &  Wood,  K.  (January  2003).  “Media  Literacy,  Popular  Culture,  and  the    Transfer  of  Higher  Order  Thinking  Abilities.”  Middle  School  Journal,  p.  51-­‐56.     COURSE  CALENDAR:   Week     Week  One     Topics/Assignments   What  is  Media  Literacy?   Google+:  Log  on  to  Google+.  In  the  appropriate  section  on   the  discussion  board  within  Google+,  introduce  yourself.   Share  some  information  about  yourself,  where  you  will  be   teaching,  and  a  significant  experience  you  have  had  with   reading/writing  instruction  and/or  assessment.  Finish  for   homework.  Edit  class  rubrics.   Five  Key  Core  Concepts  and  Questions   Google+:  First  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.   The  Medium  of  Choice:  Television   Google+:  Second  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.   Readings   Potter,  Ch.  1      

  Week  Two  

Potter,  Ch.  2   Bruns  (2008)  

  Week  Three  

Potter,  Ch.  3   Bennett  (2008)  

6    

  Week  Four  

Radio  and  the  Sounds  of  Media   Google+:  Third  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.   Assignment:  Bring  in  work  next  class  on  Defining  Media   Literacy  assignment.  A  workshop  will  be  provided  to  allow   for  feedback  and  suggested  revisions.  

Potter,  Ch.  3   Flanagin  &  Metzger   (2008)  

  Week  Five  

Films  and  Film  Appreciation     Assignment:  Bring  in  work  on  Defining  Media  Literacy   assignment.  A  workshop  will  be  provided  to  allow  for   feedback  and  suggested  revisions.   Google+:  Fourth  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.  

Potter,  Ch.  4   Hayes  (2008)  

  Week  Six  

The  Photograph  –  Images  and  Visuals   Assignments:  Defining  Media  Literacy  assignment  due   Google+:  Fifth  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.  

Potter,  Ch.  5   Kafai  (2008)  

  Week  Seven    

Advertising  –  Part  1   Reminder:  New  Media  Challenge  assignment  due  next   week.   Google+:  Sixth  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.  

Potter,  Ch.  6   Mraz,  Heron,  &  Wood   (2003)  

  Week  Eight  

Advertising  –  Part  2   Google+:  Seventh  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.   Assignment:  New  Media  Challenge  assignment  should  be   completed  and  uploaded  to  6YC  IT-­‐DML  Wiki  by  the  end  of   class.  

Potter,  Ch.  7   Jenkins  (2008)  

  Week  Nine    

Stereotypes  and  Identity   Google+:  Eighth  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.  

Potter,  Ch.  8   McLuhan  (1997)  

7    

  Week  Ten      

Media  Ownership   Assignment:  Bring  in  materials  for  your  New  Media   Learners  Assignment  to  class.  You  will  have  a  workshop  in   class.   Google+:  Ninth  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.   Politics  and  the  Media  Structure  

Potter,  Ch.  9    

  Week  Eleven    

Potter,  Ch.  10  

Assignment:  Bring  in  materials  for  your  New  Media     Learners  Assignment  to  this  class.  You  will  have  a  workshop   in  class.   Google+:  Tenth  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.  

  Week  Twelve      

The  New  Media  and  its  Implications   Assignment:  Bring  in  materials  for  your  New  Media   Learners  assignment  to  this  class.  You  will  have  a  workshop   in  class.  This  is  due  next  week.   Google+:  Eleventh  DD  posting.  Read  &  respond  to  the   supplemental  readings.   Final  Project  and  Presentation   Reminder:  Assignment:  New  Media  Learners  assignment   due  this  week.  All  materials,  plans  and  written  pieces  need   to  be  uploaded  to  Google+  by  the  end  of  the  semester.  For   class  you  will  need  to  have  a  presentation  prepared   outlining  the  research  and  argument  you  make  in  your   research  review  and  present  to  the  class  using  any  tools   needed.  

Potter,  Ch.  11   Buckingham  &   Domaille  (2003)  

  Week  Thirteen      

     

   

8    

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