P. 1
Ex-gay Larry Houston - Identifying a Homosexual

Ex-gay Larry Houston - Identifying a Homosexual

|Views: 74|Likes:
Published by Ruben Miclea
Collection of articles by ex-gay Larry Houston identifying a homosexual
Collection of articles by ex-gay Larry Houston identifying a homosexual

More info:

Published by: Ruben Miclea on Feb 03, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/23/2015

pdf

text

original

Sections

Identifying a ʺHomosexualʺ 

Latest addition : Sunday 20 March 2011.  Chapter One Essentialism or Social Constructionism  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Two Biological Basis for Homosexuality  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Three ʺGay Brainsʺ and Gay Genesʺ  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Four: Types of Homosexualities  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Five: Types of Homosexualities / Age‑Structured  Sunday 20 March 2011 by Larry Houston  Chapter Six Types of Homosexualities/ Gay and Lesbian Homosexual Identity  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Seven: Stonewall and the American Psychiatric Association  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Eight ʺCircuit Partiesʺ and ʺGay Male Cloneʺ  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Nine Gay Male Homosexual and Sexual Behavior of Gay Male Homosexuals  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston  Chapter Ten Homosexual Identity Formation  Saturday 26 May 2007 by Larry Houston

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article85 

Chapter One Essentialism or Social Constructionism 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  Does a homosexual exist just as mankind is of the species, Homo Sapiens? Is a homosexual  orientation intimately intertwined with a person’s true identity as a human being? When  using the term homosexual, is one accurately defining a person’s self, his inner core, and  the  nature of  his  being? If  it is  true,  then  homosexuality  may be  implied as  natural, and  that it is essential to their human wholeness. There are those advocating for homosexuality  who hold such a view, that one is born a homosexual. But there are others advocating for  homosexuality  who  hold  a  conflicting  view,  that  homosexuality  only  has  the  meaning  which  is  given  to  it  by  the  society  and  culture  it  is  apart  of.  These  conflicting  views  are  usually  framed  by  the  parameters  of  the  words  “essentialism”  and  “social  constructionism. This discussion of the causes of homosexuality is usually a philosophical  tug of war with conflicting ideologies.  “Various  theories  of  homosexuality  are  derived  from  either  an  essentialist  approach  or  a  social  constructionist  approach.  Essentialism  claims  that  homosexuality  is  a  construct  that  is  both  ahistorical  and  acultural,  a  part  of  human  civilization  for  all  time;  whereas  constructionialsm  suggests  homosexuality  is  defined  more  by  temporal  periods  and  cultural  context.”  (Sullivan,  Homophobia,  History,  and  Homosexuality:  Trends  for  Sexual  Minorities,  p.3  in  Sexual  Minorities:  Discrimination,  Challenges,  and  Development  in  American,  Michael  K.  Sullivan, PhD, editor)  “Out of all the issues in the essentialist/social constructionist debate, whether or not same gender or  bisexual sexual orientation is a choice is probably the sole interest of many individuals and groups.  It is one of the most fiercely debated issues among scholars, scientists, and the lay public. It is also  debated by some members of gay, lesbian, and bisexual communities. Essentialists assume that no  sexual orientation, whether same‑gender, bisexual, or heterosexual, is a conscious choice (Gonsiorek  &  Weinrich,  1991;  Herdt,  1990)  Instead,  a  “fixed,  independent  biological  mechanism  steers  individual desire or behavior either toward men or toward women irrespective of circumstances and  experience” (De Cecco & Elia. 1993, p.11). In distinct contrast to this view is the claim that one’s  sexual  orientation  is  chosen  or  constructed.  This  is  one  of  the  most  basic  tenets  of  social  constructionism  (Golden,  1987;  Hart  &  Richardson,  1981;  Longino,  1988;  Vance,  1988;  Weeks,  1991; Weinberg & Willliams, 1974). Instead of sexual orientation, the phrase sexual preference is  often used by social constructionists to indicate that people take an active part in constructing their  sexuality  (Weinberg,  Williams,  &  Pryor,  1994)  or  make  a  conscious,  intentional  choice  of  sexual  partners (Baumrind, 1995).ʺ  Essentialists often hold to biomedical view of homosexuality, and use scientific studies to  find a cause for homosexuality. Later on a discussion will look at some of these scientific Larry Houston – www.banap.net  2 

studies that are used in an attempt for supporting a biomedical cause for homosexuality.  Within  this  essentialist  view  there  are  non‑relational  qualities  or  properties.  One  is  who  they are and that it is without any relationship to any other people or objects in the world.  Therefore in sexuality, particularly concerning homosexuality one is born a homosexual, it  is “nature” that is causative for homosexuality  “Essentialist approaches to research on sexual orientation‑whether they be evolutionary approaches  or approaches that rely on hormones, genetics, or brain factors‑rest  on assumptions that (a) there  are  underlying  true  essences  (homosexuality  and  heterosexuality),  (b)  there  is  discontinuity  between forms (homosexuality and heterosexuality are two distinct, separate categories, rather than  points  on  a  continuum),  and  (c)  there  is  constancy  of  these  true  essences  over  time  and  across  cultures (homosexuality and heterosexuality have the same form today in American culture as they  have  had  for  centuries  and  as  they  have  had  in  other  cultures  today).”  (Delamater  &  Shibley  Hyde. “Essentialism vs Social Constructionism in the Study of Human Sexuality.” p.16)  “Essentialism regarded homosexuality as a form of gender inversion that arose from such presocial  forces  as  genes,  hormones,  instincts,  or  specific  kinds  of  developmental  psychodynamics  (Richardson 1981). In other words, it viewed same‑sex desire and its perceived behavioral pattern of  gender  nonconformity  as  a  “manifestation  of  some”  biological  or  psychological  “inner  sense”  (Greenberg  1988,  485)  It  regarded  homosexuality  as  a  distinct  and  separate  form  of  being,  with  modes of expression that transcended time and place (Troiden 1988).” (Levine, Gay Macho: The  Life and Death of the Homosexual Clone, p. 233)  “The category of homosexuality carries a definition of the essential nature of the self. As individuals  are  inserted  into  this  discursive  framework  through  the  growing  authority  of  medicine,  science,  psychiatry,  and  law,  individuals  who  have  same‑sex  longings  are  defined  as  unique,  abnormal  human type: the homosexual.” (Seidman, Embattled Eros, p.147)  Yet we can find within this philosophical belief system there is a heterosexist essentialism  and a homosexist essentialism. Those individuals who adhere to heterosexist essentialism  assume  an  unmitigated  dimorphism  of  sexuality,  hetero/homo‑sexuality.  Seeing  the  complementary dualities of human existence, the heterosexist essentialist is implying that  homosexuality  is  an  immature  or  inferior  developmental  track.  The  individual  that  adheres  to  a  homosexual  essentialism  would  impose  a  gay  or  lesbian  identity  on  those  individuals  who  experience  same‑sex  attractions, and  encourage  the acceptance of a  gay  identity.  “Coming  out”,  is  a  concept  that  encourages  individuals  to  celebrate  their  homosexuality.  In  doing  so,  homosexual  essentialists  are  implying  that  a  person  was  always essentially homosexual in orientation but has only now become ready and willing  to acknowledge their true sexual nature and identity.  Those  who  hold  to  this  homosexist  essentialism  may  have  two  variants  to  support  their  views, an identitarian or behavioral essentialism.  “But essentialism as an intellectual program in lesbian and gay studies has two variants. The first  one  to develop  was essentialism  as  a  metaphysical  or universal  category  of  sexual  identity,  which 3  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

might  be  called  identitarian  essentialism.  The  second  variant  to  emerge  focused  on  the  biological  explanation  of  sexual  orientation  and  interpreted  it  as  a  naturalized  category  of  behavior;  this  is  behavorial essentialism.” Eschoffier, American Homo: Community and Perversity, p.130)  The  identitarian  essentialist  looks  back  into  history  and  sees  those  who  commit  homosexual  behavior as  being a  homosexual  or  gay. The  behavorial  essentialist  looks  to  homosexual  behavior  in  other  species  for  supporting  the  view  that  humans  are  born  homosexual.  This  idea of a “gay  identity”  is relatively  new, becoming  popularized only  since the late  1960’s and early 1970’s in the United States and Western Europe. So it may be viewed, as a  “type”  of  homosexuality  and  it  will  be  discussed  in  further  depth  later.  Unfortunately  authors  now  sometimes  use  a  homosexual  and  a  gay/lesbian  identity  interchangeably.  Also  there  is  some  possibility  of  confusion  when  authors  write  about  sexual  orientation  and  sexual  preference.  So  often  when  writing  about  homosexuality  there  is  a  confusing  use of terms, homosexuality/gay and lesbian identity, sexual orientation/sexual preference.  Also some authors want to speak of an erotic orientation instead of sexual orientation. An  essentialist and a social constructionist may have varying definitions for the same word or  idea.  Then  there  are those  who  hold  to  an  interactionist  view  of  homosexuality.  That  is  they  would  say  we  should  have  a  combination  of  essentialistism  and  social  constructionism ideas. Their defining of terms need to be understood in this context also.  “Interestingly, the term essentialism is generally used by those who are oppose to it and not those  who practice it.” (Delamater & Shibley Hyde. “Essentialism vs Social Constructionism in the  Study of Human Sexuality.” p.11)  “The crises have arisen in deciding what is essential to the homosexual category: Is it a particular  pattern  of  sexual  behavior?  Is  it  a  particular  sexual  identity?  Is  it  an  underlying  orientation?”  (Richardson,  “The  Dilemna of  Essentiality  in  Homosexual  Theory,”  p.89 in  Bisexual and  Homosexual  Identities:  Critical  Theoretical  Issues,  John  P.  De  Cecco,  editors  PhD  and  Michael G. Shively, MA)  “Individual erotic preferences are certainly not created solely by the social structural arrangements.  But  the integration  of  these  preferences  into  a  system  of  personal  values,  motives,  and  self‑image  very  much depends  on  historical conditions.  To define  the  traits  of  the  “homosexual  personality”  outside the concrete socionormative milieu is impossible.”  (Kon, “A Socicultural Approach” in  Theories  of  Human  Sexuality,  editors  James  H.  Geer  and  William  T.  O’Donohue,  P.279‑  280)  The essentialism view of homosexuality may be traced to the late nineteenth century and  to  Karl  Ulrichs  who  lived  in  what  is  present  day  Germany.  Ulrichs  was  a  homosexual  himself, and  was  the  first  person  to  theorize  about the  concept of a  homosexual  being a  “third sex”. He was advocating for legal and social rights for homosexuals.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

“Ulrich’s goal was to free people like himself from the legal, religious, and social condemnation of  homosexual  acts  as  unnatural.  For  this,  he  invented  a  new  terminology  that  would  refer  to  the  nature  of  the  individual,  and  not  to  the  acts  performed.”  (Kennedy, Karl  Heinrichs  Ulrichs  in  Rosario, Science and Homosexualities, p.30)  The  social  constructionist  view  may  be  traced  to  the  1970s,  being  advocating  for  by  homosexuals in England and the United States. This was the beginning of the era, which  has now been termed, “gay liberation”.  “The  constructionist  perspective  began  to  generate  theoretical  writing  beginning  in  the  1970s.  British  historical  sociologist  Jeffrey  Weeks,  influenced  by  the  earlier  work  of  Mary  McIntosh,  appropriated  and  reworked  the  sociological  theories  known  as  “symbolic  interactionism”  or  “labeling  theory”  to  underpin  his  account  of  emergence  of  a  homosexual  identity  in  Western  societies during the nineteen century. Other British writers associated with the Gay Left Collective  produced  work  from  within  this  same  field  of  influence.  U.S.  historians  Jonathan  Ned  Katz  and  John  D’Eimilio,  influenced  primarily  by  feminist  theory  and  the  work  of  Marxists  such  as  E.P.  Thompson, began to produce “social construction” theories of homosexuality by the early 1980s.”  (Duggan, “Making It Perfectly Clear,” p.116 in Sex Wars edited by Duggan & Hunter)  “The  constructionist  perspective  transformed  social  science  thinking  about  human  sexuality  (Gagnon  &  Simon,  1973).  It  challenged  us  to  see  the  conceptual  categories  through  which  individuals  interpret  eroticism  are  not,  as  previously  thought,  as  biologically  or  psychologically  determined  but  socially  constituted  (Simon  &  Gagnon,  1987).  Culture,  that  is,  provided  the  conceptual meanings through which people distinguished sexual feelings, identities, and practices.  It  thus  effectively  claimed  that  these  definitions  were  culturally  relative  (Plummer,  1975).ʺ  (Levine, Gay Macho: The Life and Death of the Homosexual Clone, p. 233)  The  philosophical  social  constructionist  view  of  sexuality  is  based  upon  behaviors  and  attitudes.  An  individual’s  sexual identity,  reaching  even  as  far as  the  preferred object  of  erotic  attraction,  is  socially  created,  bestowed,  and  maintained.  One  is  heterosexual  because their sexual attitudes and behaviors are toward members of the opposite sex. For  the homosexual, these sexual attitudes and behaviors would be for members of the same  sex.  Therefore,  social  constructionists  would suggest there  is  nothing  ʺrealʺ  about  sexual  orientation,  except  for  a  society’s  construction.  “According  to  this  view,  sexual  roles  and  behaviors  arise  out  of  a  culture’s  religious,  moral,  and  ethical beliefs,  its  legal  traditions, politics,  aesthetics, whatever scientific or traditional views biology and psychology it may have, even factors  like  geography  and  climate.  The  constructionist  view  holds  that  sexual  roles  vary  from  one  civilization  to  another  because  there  are  no innately  predetermined  scripts  for  human  sexuality.”  (Mondimore, A Natural History of Homosexuality, p. 19)  “Homosexuality  has  everywhere  existed,  but  it  is  only  in  some  cultures  that  it  has  become  structured into a sub‑culture. Homosexuality in the pre‑modern period was frequent, but only in  certain  closed  communities  was  it  ever  institutionalized  ‑  perhaps  in  some  monasteries  and  nunneries, as many of the medieval penitentials suggest; in some of the knightly orders (including Larry Houston – www.banap.net  5 

the Knights Templars), as the great medieval scandals hint; and in the courts of certain monarchs  (such as James I of England, William III). Other homosexual contacts, though recurrent, are likely  to have been casual, fleeting, and undefined.” (Weeks, Coming Out, p. 35)  “Conversely,  constructionism  interpreted  homosexuality  as  a  conceptual  category  that  varied  between  cultural  and  historical  settings  (Troiden  1988).  Definitions  of  same‑sex  eroticism  were  viewed  as  cultural  inventions  that  were specific  to  particular  societies  at  particular  times.  It  also  held that conceptualizations of homosexuality determined the forms same‑sex eroticism took within  a given society (Greenberg 1988). In other words, the social meaning of homosexuality shaped the  domain  of  emotions,  identity,  and  conduct  associated  with  sex  between  men.”  (Levine,  Gay  Macho: The Life and Death of the Homosexual Clone, p. 233‑234)  Thus, not surprisingly, they would reject the possibility of biomedical factors, i.e. nature,  being involved with sexual orientation. One cannot be born a homosexual. It is “nurture”  which  plays  the  role  in  creating  homosexuality.  A  social  constructionist  view  of  homosexuality  is  not  objective;  it  has  relationship  qualities  and  properties  that  are  culturally defined and dependent.  “Transcending all these issues of lifestyle was the potent question of the gay identity itself. The gay  identity is no more a product of nature than any other sexual identity. It has developed through a  complex history of definitions and self‑definition, and what recent histories of homosexuality have  clearly  revealed  is  that  there  is  no  necessary  connection  between  sexual  practices  and  sexual  identity.” (Weeks, Sexuality and Its Discontents Meanings, Myths and Modern Sexualities  p. 50)  “We  tend to think  now  that  the  word  ‘homosexual’  has  an  unvarying  meaning,  beyond  time  and  history. In fact it is itself a product of history, a cultural artifact designed to express  a particular  concept.” (Weeks, Coming Out, p. 3)  “In sum, homosexuality is not one but many things, many psychosocial forms, which can be viewed  as symbolic mediations between psychocultural and historical conditions and human potentials for  sexual  response  across  life  course.”  (Herdt,  “Cross‑Cultural  Issues  in  the  Development  of  Bisexuality and Homosexuality, p. 55)  Gilbert Herdt is an anthropologist, who self‑identifies as a gay male. He has written many  books  advocating  for  homosexuality  and  I  will  be  repeatedly  quoting  from  his  writings.  Herdt is best know for his work among the Sambia people of the eastern highlands of New  Guinea. He could be considered to hold to a social constructionism view of homosexuality.  The following quote taken from the introduction of his book, Same Sex, Different that was  published in 1997, is very interesting.  “Living among the Sambia and understanding their culture thus came to shape and influence my  own sexuality and the sense which I defined myself as being gay and in a partnership for life with  another  man  in  my  own  society.  Just  as  one  might  expect,  it  was  very  important  to  my  Sambia  friends not only that I was interested in their customs and could be trusted to keep the secrets of the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  6 

initiation rituals from the women and children, but also that I was curious and comfortable about  their homoerotic relations. I understood their feelings well enough. And I was sensitive enough to  inquire about issues of sexual attraction and excitement that another person in my position might  have found offensive or repulsive if he lacked the experience or curiosity to go on.  But  equally true,  as  the years  went  by,  the  Sambia could  not understand  my  own  sexuality,  and  even my closest friends, such as Weiyu and Moondi, would implore me to consider getting married  and having children. They even tried to arrange a marriage for me with a Sambia woman, and on  more than one occasion, because they felt “sorry” for me! More than once I can remember Moondi  asking about my relationship with my “friend” (partner) in the United States; and I would even use  the word gay to refer to this relationship, but Moondi was unable to understand what this meant to  me. I had reached the limits of cross‑cultural understanding even among the people closest to me in  the Sambia culture. Their society did not have a concept for homosexual or gay, and these notions,  when I translated them in the appropriate way, were alien and unmanageable.  Thus, it is remarkable for me to think that, even though living with the Sambia enabled me to accept  in a way perhaps strange to the United States concept of same‑sex relations as normal and natural,  the Sambia in their own way could only regard my own culture’s identity constructs of homosexual  and gay as strange. Herein lies a powerful lesson about cross‑cultural study of homosexuality‑and a  warning about the importance of being careful in the statements and assumptions we make about  another  people,  as  well  as  the  need  to  respect  their  own  customs  for  what  they  are‑and  are  not.”  (Herdt, Same Sex, Different Cultures, p. xiv‑xv)  Even  though  writing  this,  Herdt  and  many  others  continue  to  try  to  use  the  “Sambia  cultural  homosexuality”  as  a  type  of  age‑structured  homosexuality  to  support  the  post‑  modern western concept of homosexuality, a “gay identity.”  Those  advocating  for  a  homosexual  identity  have  not  resolved  this  philosophical  tug  of  war  of  conflicting  ideologies,  essentialism  versus  social  constructionism.  In  fact  the  strongest criticisms between these two views have been among homosexuals themselves.  There is a logical explanation for this philosophical ideological tug of war. Both sides ask  different questions, find different answers, and therefore this philosophical tug of war will  have no winner.  “Social  constructionism  does  not  offer  alternative  answers  to  questions  posed  by  essentialism:  it  raises a wholly different set of questions. Instead of searching for “truths” about homosexuals and  lesbians, it asks about the discursive practices, the narrative forms, within which homosexuals and  lesbians  are  produced  and  reproduced.  In  its  opposition  to,  and  deconstruction  of,  both  “homosexuals”  and  “science”  itself,  it  can  never  be  rendered  compatible  with  the  essentialist  project.”  (Kitzinge,  “Social  Constructionism:  Implications  for  Gay  and  Lesbian  Psychology,”  p.150  in  Lesbian,  Gay,  and  Bisexual  Identities  over  the  Lifespan:  Psychological Perspectives, D’Augelli & Patterson)  “The social constructionist/essentialist debate is ultimately irresolvable, because these two positions  are not commensurate. Social constructistism and essentialistism not only offer different answers, 7  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

but also ask different questions and rely on different approaches to finding the answers, (empiricism  versus  rhetoric).”  (Kitzinge,  “Social  Constructionism:  Implications  for  gay  Lesbian  Psychology,”  p.156  in.  Lesbian,  Gay,  and  Bisexual  Identities  over  the  Lifespan:  Psychological Perspectives, D’Augelli & Patterson)  Both  essentialism  and  social  construct  views  of  homosexuality  have  their  limitations.  Science or  medical theories  have never  been proven.  A discussion  will follow  looking at  some  of  these  scientific  studies.  Likewise  the  social  construct  view  has  serious  shortcomings.  “The  social‑constructionist  theory  of  homosexual  identity  has  its  own  weaknesses,  however.  According  to  some  evidence,  sexual  behavior  is  a  continuum  and  varies  over  the  life  cycle.  This  evidence  brings  into  doubt  the  fixedness  or  stability  of  people’s  sexual  identities.”  (Escoffier,  American Homo: Community and Perversity, p. 129)  “To escape the stranglehold that social constructionism has placed on the field of sexuality, we must  understand  the  strengths  and  weaknesses  of  the theory.  First,  the theory  is  a  strategy  for  critical  analysis; it is not a scientific theory. In fact, social constructionism makes a poor theory. The goal of  constructionists  is  to  point  out  how  information  and  concepts  within  social  discourse  support  various social groups and particular versions of social reality. They cannot say what reality should  be. Social  constructionism is a relativist philosophy that holds that social narratives about reality  have  value  to  the  people  invested  in  them;  beliefs  have  no  objective  value.  For  social  constructionists, social beliefs that “gay” people are demon‑possessed and should have holes drilled  into their heads in order to release the evil spirits that reside therein is as valid an explanation as  believing that there is a “gay” gene. The sociopolitical climate determines what beliefs are valued.  When these beliefs are identified, constructionism can be used to facilitate social change, if change is  desired.” (Kauth, True Nature A Theory of Sexual attraction, p.105)  Kauth  is  his  book  goes  on  to  write  about the  limits  of  social  construction.  His  first  limit  placed on a social construction view is as follows.  “Feminists, gay/lesbian theorists, social activists, and others who feel marginalized by society make  up  the  largest  group  of  adherents  to  social  constructionism.  For  these  followers,  social  constructionism represents a tool for social liberation.” (Kauth, True Nature A Theory of Sexual  Attraction, p.105)  He also writes that a social constructionist base their condemnation of essentialism on the  single‑factor biomedical theories of same sex eroticism. While at the same time they hold  to their own single‑factor social labeling theory of homosexuality. A third limit he says is  of a failure of any discussion of bisexuality. But at the same time promoting the idea that  the absence of sexual categories will result in diverse sexual relationships. Kauth’s fourth  limitation of a social construction is that it expresses a disembodied, purely social view of  human beings. In regards to sexuality they want to discuss the social impact, and not the  influence upon people as well as all animals the similar biological and instinctual forces to  survive  and  reproduce.  Delmater  and  Hyde  in  their  article,  “  Essentialism  vs  Social 8  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

Constructionism  in  the  Study  of  Human  Sexuality”  write  of  two  more  weaknesses.  In  social constructionism there is a tendency to assign a passive role to the individual. More  puzzling  is  the  limited  explanatory  and  predictive  power  of  constructionists  theories,  given their emphasis on variability.  “In brief, although social constructionists are very good at poking holes in conventional thinking,  the  theory  offers  little  in  the  way  of  a  useful  conceptualization  for  the  development  of  sexual  attraction.  The  theory  just  does  not  match  recorded  experience  and  observations  across  cultures,  and its predictions fall short.” (Kauth, True Nature A Theory of Sexual Attraction, p.108)  Perhaps  as  many  people  have  theorize,  including  Kauth,  an  interactionist  model  for  homosexuality  may  be  the  best  logical  and  practical  outcome  for  the  understanding  homosexuality.  “A common assumption of most theories is a multi‑dimensional developmental model with several  factors  (e.g., psychological,  biological,  and  sociological  )  interacting  with  in a  complex  manner  to  determine  homosexuality  (Marmor,  19965).”  (Martin,  Early  Sexual  Behavior  in  Adult  Homosexual and Heterosexual Males, p.396)  “The  literature  on  sexual  orientation  is  replete  with  theories  about  the  causes  of  homosexuality.  While it is beyond the scope of this article to discuss each of those theories, individually. It should be  noted  that  almost  all  of the  theories  of  homosexual  are  predicated  on  the  same  basic  assumption.  Most theories presume that homosexuality is caused by abnormalities in biological, psychological,  or social development leading to sexual inversion‑that is, having or desiring to have characteristics  of the opposite sex including sexual attraction to one’s own sex.” (Storms, “A Theory of Erotic  Orientation Development,” p.350)  “It  develops  in  some  individuals  as  a  result  of  influences  of  heredity,  prenatal  development,  childhood experiences, and cultural milieu in varying combinations. No one influence seems either  necessary  or  sufficient‑homosexual  orientation  is  a  possible  outcome  in  many  different  circumstances  because  the  human  mind  is  uniquely  evolved  to  be  rich  in  possibilities.”  (Mondimore, A Natural History of Homosexuality, p.249)  But  after  reading  and  trying  to  understand  what  these  and  many  other  authors  have  written, advocating for homosexuality I am even more confused about what I read in an  article  from  The  Journal  of  Sex  Research.  These  authors  are  writing  of  concerns  about  holding to an interactionist view of homosexuality.  “In  our  view,  the  basic  definitions  of  essentialism  and  social  constuctionism  may  well  prohibit  efforts  to  frame  conjoint  theories.  Essentialism  relies  on  a  notion  of  true  essences,  with  an  implication  (found  in  postivism)  that  we  can  know  these  true  essences  directly  and  objectively.  Social  constructionist  argue  the  opposite,  that  we  cannot  know  anything  about  true  essences  or  reality directly, but rather that humans always engage in socially constructing reality. There is no  happy  detente  between  these  approaches.  Similarly,  the  essentialist  emphasis  on  separate  and  distinct  categories  or  essences  is  at  odds  with  the  social  constructionist  view  of  the  startling Larry Houston – www.banap.net  9 

diversity  of  human  sexual  expression  across  time  and  culture,  and  even  within  the  individual.  Therefore,  although  one  may  frame  inteactionist  or  conjoint  theories  of  biological  and  cultural  influences,  it  seems  to  us  unlikely  that  there  can  be  a  true  conjoining  essentialist  and  social  constructionist  approaches.”  (Delamater  &  Shibley  Hyde.  “Essentialism  vs  Social  Constructionism in the Study of Human Sexuality.” p. 17)  What  are  we  then  left  to  believe  from  this  philosophical  discussion  of  conflicting  ideologies of the causes of homosexuality? Although what all these authors have written  may  contain  truth(s).  This  is  also  true,  our  physical  bodies  do  respond  to  many  stimuli,  including same‑sex sexual/erotic stimuli. Therefore we cannot leave out a moral aspect to  human  sexuality.  Sexual  promiscuity,  usually  with  anonymous  partners,  is  often  associated  with  homosexuality.  Nor  can  we  deny  there  are  negative  physical  consequences,  i.e.  sexually  transmitted  diseases  (STDs)  that  include  AIDS.  Even  those  advocating for homosexuality, must acknowledge these moral and medical consequences.  Bibliography  Baumrind,  Diana.  “Commentary  on  Sexual  Orientation:  Research  and  Social  Policy  Implications.”  Developmental  Psychology  1995,  Vol.31,  No.1,  130‑136.  Byne  MD,  PhD,  William & Bruce Parsons, MD, PhD. “Human Sexual Orientation The Biological Theories  Reappraised.” Archives of General Psychiatry. March 1993, Vol 50, 228‑239.  Connell, R. W. and G. W. Dowsett. Rethinking Sex Social Theory and Sexuality Research.  Melbourne University Press. Melbourne, 1992.  D’Augelli, Anthony R. & Charlotte J. Patterson. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identities over  the Lifespan. Oxford University Press. New York & Oxford, 1995.  De  Cecco,  John  P.  PhD,  and  David  Allen  Parker,  MA  editors.  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference. Harrington Park Press, New York, 1995.  Delamater, John D. & Janet Shibley Hyde. “Essentialism vs Social Constructionism in the  Study of Human Sexuality.” The Journal of Sex Research. 1998, Vol. 35, No. 1, 10‑18.  Diamant, Louis and Richard D. McAnulty, editors. The Psychology of Sexual Orientation,  Behavior, and Identity A Handbook. Greenwood Press. Westport, Connecticut, 1995.  Downing,  Christine.  Myths  and  Mysteries  of  Same‑Sex  Love.  Continuum  Publishing  Company. New York, 1989.  Drescher,  Jack.  M.D.  Psychoanalytic  Therapy  and  the  Gay  Man.  The  Analytic  Press.  Hillsdale, NJ, 1998.  Duggan, Lisa & Nan D. Hunter. Sex Wars Sexual Dissent and Political Culture. Routledge.  New York & London, 1995. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  10 

Dykes, Benjamin. “Problems in Defining Cross‑Cultural “ Kinds of Homosexuality” ‑ and  a Solution.” Journal of Homosexuality. 2001, Vol. 42 (2), 1‑18.  Eschoffier, Jeffrey. American Homo: Community and Perversity. University of California  Press. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London, 1998.  Friedman,  Richard  C.  M.D.,  and  Jennifer  I  Downey,  M.D.  “Homosexuality.”  The  New  England Journal of Medicine. Oct. 6, 1994, Vol. 331, No. 4, 923‑930.  Herdt, Gilbert. Same Sex, Different Cultures. WestviewPress. 1997.  Hunter, Ski, Coleen Shannon, Jo Knox, James I. Martin. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths  and Adults. Sage Publications. Thousand oaks, CA, 1998.  Jones, Stanton  L  &  Yarhouse,  Mark  A..  Homosexuality  The  Use  of  Scientific  Research  in  the Church’s Moral Debate. InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, 2000.  Kauth, Michael R. True Nature A Theory of Sexual Attraction. Kluwer Academic/Plenum  Publishers. New York, Boston, Dordrecht, London, Moscow, 2000.  Levine,  Martin  P.  Gay  Macho:  The Life and Death  of  the  Homosexual  Clone.  New  York  University Press. New York and London, 1998.  Manosevitz,  Martin.  “Early  Sexual  Behavior  in  Adult  Homosexual  and  Heterosexual  Males.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology 1970, Vol. 76, No. 3, 396‑402.  McIntosh, Mary. “The Homosexual Role.” Social Problems. 1968, 16, p.182‑192.  Mondimore,  Francis  Mark.  A  Natural  History  of  Homosexuality.  The  John  Hopkins  University Press. Baltimore and London, 1996.  Patterson,  Charolette  J.  “Sexual  Orientation  and  Human  Development:  An  Overview.”  Developmental Psychology 1995, Vol. 31, No.1, 3‑11.  Rosario,  Vernon  A..  editor.  Science  and  Homosexualities.  Routledge.  New  York  and  London, 1997.  Schmidt,  Thomas  E.  Straight  and  Narrow?  InterVarsity  Press.  Downers  Grove,  IL,  1995.  Seidman, Steven. Embattled Eros. Routledge. New York, 1992.  Storms , Michael D. “A Theory of Erotic Orientation Development.” Psychological Review.  1981, Vol. 88, No. 4, 340‑353.  Strommen,  Merton  P.  The  Church  and  Homosexuality  Searching  for  a  Middle  Ground.  Kirk House Publishers. Minneapolis, MN, 2001. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  11 

Sullivan,  Michael  K.  “Homophobia,  History,  and  Homosexuality:  Trends  for  Sexual  Minorities”, p.1‑13 in Sexual Minorities: Discrimination, Challenges, and Development in  American, Michael K. Sullivan, PhD, editor  Sullivan,  PhD.,  Michael  K.  Sexual  Minorities:  Discrimination,  Challenges,  and  Development in America. The Haworth Social Work Practice Press. New York, 2003.  Terry, Jennifer. An American Obsession Science, Medicine, and Homosexuality in Modern  Society. The University of Chicago Press. Chicago and London, 1999.  Weeks, Jeffrey. Coming Out Homosexual Politics in Britain, from the Nineteenth Century  to the Present. Quartet Books. London, Melbourne, & New York, 1977.  Weeks,  Jeffery.  Sexuality  and  Its  Discontents  Meanings,  Myths  and  Modern  Sexualities.  Routledge and Kegan Paul. London, 1988. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article75 

Chapter Two Biological Basis for Homosexuality 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  In this discussion of changing the traditional definition of marriage, that it is the union of  one  man  and  one  woman,  has  been  frame  in  the  parameters  as  a  “rights”  issue.  The  change that is being advocated for is the gender of one of the partners in marriage, with  the result being same‑sex marriage. But it is one particular group; homosexual advocates  who  are  trying  to  change  the  definition  of  marriage.  So  they  attempt  to  speak  of  this  change  as  homosexual  marriage.  In  doing  so  there  is  one  question  that  has  yet  to  be  answered.  Who  is  a  homosexual?  When  this  question  is  answered,  it  then  answers  the  question  within  the  discussion  of  changing  the  definition  of  marriage  as  it  pertains  to  being  a  “rights”  issue.  If  there  is  no  homosexual  as  a  distinct  class  of  individuals,  in  essence what is being advocated for is the legally sanctioning of homosexual behavior.  What follows are quotes to help answer the question. Who is a homosexual? Many of the  books and articles cited below are by those advocating for homosexuality. First are quotes  that address a biological basis for homosexuality. Then quotes are given in the parameter  of  “who  one  is  a  homosexual  or  what  one  does  homosexual  behavior.”  In  northern  America and Western Europe homosexuals have chosen the terms “gay and lesbian” and  there are  quotes to  help  understand this  concept  of  homosexuals as “gay and lesbian”. I  am  challenging  the  parameters  of  the  discussion  of  homosexuality  and  the  defining  of  terms within this discussion and I am doing so by using what homosexual advocates write  in their books and articles.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

12 

“Of  relevance  to  this  collection  of  papers  is  the  danger  of  having  the  search  for  scientific  facts  comprised  by  the  political  ideologies  of  the  investigators.  In  the  case  of  historical  there have  been  egregious  examples  of  anachronism  in  the  search  for  gay  men  and  lesbians  of  the  past  and  the  attribution of the gay identity to the biblical David and Naomi, to Julius Caesar and Alexander the  Great, to the temple priests of classical Greece, and to medieval witches. By taking on the conflated  notion of sexual identity, the biological research, in its search for physical markers that distinguish  heterosexuals from homosexuals, has unwittingly enlisted itself in the politics of sexual identity.”  (De  Cecco,  and  Parker,  editors.  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire:  The  Biology  of  Sexual  Preference, p. 24)  ∙ Biological Causation  “As  this  survey  indicates,  research  currently  cited  in  support  of  a  biological  model  of  human  sexuality  is  methodologically  deficient,  inclusive,  or  open  to  contradictory  theoretical  interpretations. In addition, much of such research concentrates on animal studies and therefore has  little relationship to human behavior which is generally affected by cultural values. Therefore, this  paper basic question is: How convincing is the biological evidence that details of human sexuality  are directly due to innate traits and processes? The answer is the evidence is far from persuasive.  We may conclude that the biological perspective on human sexuality has not yet made a substantial  contribution to the “balanced biosocial synthesis” that the Baldwins (1980) have recommended This  conclusion is not intended to imply that biology has nothing to do with human sexuality (since the  two, are of course, inextricably intertwined). It means simply this: The claim that biological factors  have  an  immediate,  direct  influence  on  such  things  as  sexual  identity,  behavior,  or  orientation  remains  unproven.  When  biology  seems  to  be  critical  in  such  matters,  an  intervening  cultural  factor is often more immediate.” (De Cecco and Shively, Bisexual and Homosexual Identities:  Critical Theoretical Issues p.150‑151)  “As  this  collection  of  papers  has  shown,  the  search  for  purely  biological  determines  of  sexual  preference  is  fraught  with  short‑comings. It  conflates  biological  sex  with gender  and gender  with  sexuality,  it  reduces  a  given  sexual  preference  to  specific  behaviors  and  further  reduces  those  behaviors to biological processes, and it accepts and reinforces society’s whimsical moral judgments,  categories,  and  proscriptions  regarding  sexuality.  It  is  no  wonder,  then,  that  in  spite  of  the  zeal  shown by researchers and the availability of sophisticated equipment and methodology over the past  decade, the search for biological markers of  sexual preference has failed to produce any conclusive  evidence.” (Parker and De Cecco, “Sexual Expression: A Global Perspective,” p. 427‑428 in  Sex, Cells, and Same‑Sex Desire, edited by De Cecco and Parker)  “Most  researchers,  however,  acknowledge  that  biology  does  not  completely  account  for  homosexuality  and  that  society and  environment  also  contribute  to  gay  and  lesbian  identities.  In  addition, because research on homosexuality does not occur in isolation, but rather in a cultural and  historical context, it is subject to manipulation by persons with moral and political agendas. Critics  have responded to this possible abuse of both science and subjects in two ways. They either conclude  that any scientific investigation is comprised by the scientist’s subjective bias, or they assert that in

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

13 

the  rigorous  scrutiny  of  scientific  methodologies  will  prevent  unreasonable  bias.”  (Murphy,  Readers Guide to Lesbian and Gay Studies, p.84‑85)  “It  remains  difficult,  on  scientific  grounds,  to  avoid  the  conclusion  that  the  uniquely  human  phenomenon  of  sexual  orientation  is  a  consequence  of  a  multifactorial  developmental  process  in  which biological factors play a part, but in which psychosocial factors remain crucially important. If  so,  the  moral  and political  issues  must  be  resolved  on  other  grounds.”  (Bancroft, “Homosexual  Orientation The Search for a biological basis,” p.439)  “The  argument for homosexual  immutability  betrays  a  misreading  of the  scientific  research  itself.  Nothing  in  any  of  these  studies  can  fully  support  the  idea  that  homosexuality  is  biologically  immutable; each study leaves open the possibility that homosexuality is the result of a combination  of  biological  and  environmental  factors,  and  several  suggest  that  homosexuality  may  be  tied  to  a  predisposition  in  temperament  that  could  manifest  itself  in  a  number  of  ways.  All  agree  that  biological,  social,  and  psychological  factors  interact  to  produce  and  change  the  signs  of  homosexuality.  Furthermore,  these  studies  cannot  comment  effectively  on  the  frequency  of  homosexuality in the general population.” (Terry, An American Obsession p.394)  “Biologic theories can account for the feelings that motivate behaviors; the behaviors themselves will  be strongly determined by the environmental factors‑in the case of sexual orientation such factors as  available  opportunities  and  social  and  legal  sanctions.”  (McConaghy,  “  Biologic  Theories  of  Sexual Orientation,” p.431)  ∙ “Who one is: a homosexual”  “We  tend to think  now  that  the  word  ‘homosexual’  has  an  unvarying  meaning,  beyond  time  and  history. In fact it is itself a product of history, a cultural artifact designed to express  a particular  concept.” (Weeks, Coming Out, p. 3)  “While  homosexual  behavior  can  be  found  in  all  societies,  though  with  very  different  cultural  meanings,  the  emergence  of  ‘the  homosexual’  as  a  cultural  construct  can  be  traced  to  the  late  seventeenth and early eighteenth century in urban centers of north‑west Europe (Trumnach 1989a,  1989b)  and  also  linked  with  the  rise  of  capitalism  (D’Emilio  1983).  Medical  and  psychiatric  discourses  provided  the  concept  and  labels  of  homosexuality  and  inversion  from  the  1860s,  .  .  .”  (Ballard, “Sexuality and  the State in  Time of  Epidemic,”  p. 108  in  Rethinking  Sex: Social  Theory and Sexuality Research editors R. W. Connell and G. W. Dowsett)  “For  well  over  a century homosexualists have  dreamed  that  the  invention  of the homosexual  as  a  person  would  ultimately  detoxicate  homosexual  behavior  and  win  a  place  of  equality  alongside  heterosexual  behavior.”  (De  Ceeo,  “Confusing  the  Actor  With  the  Act:  Muddled  Notions  About Homosexuality”, p. 411)  “Historians  underscore  an  important  distinction  between  homosexual  behavior  and  homosexual  identity.  The  former  is  said  to  be  universal,  whereas  the  later  is  viewed  as  historically  unique.  Indeed, some historians hold that a homosexual identity is a product of the social developments of Larry Houston – www.banap.net  14 

the late nineteenth‑century Europe and the United States. In any event, it seems fair to say that a  unique  construction  of  identity  crystallized  around  same‑sex  desire  between  1880  and  1920  in  America.  The  modern  western  concept  of  the  homosexual  is,  according  to  some  historians,  primarily  a  creation of late nineteenth‑century medical‑science discourses. In the context of elaborating systems  of  classification  and  descriptions  of  different  sexualities,  as  part  of  a  quest  to  uncover  the  truth  about human nature, the homosexual is said to have stepped forward as a distinct human type with  his/her  own  mental  and  physical  nature.”  (Seidman,  Embattled  Eros:  Sexual  Politics  and  Ethics in Contemporary America, p.146)  “Psychological theory, which should be employed to describe only individual mental, emotional, and  behavioral aspects of homosexuality, has been employed for building models of personal development  that purport to mark the steps in an individual’s progression toward a mature and egosyntonic gay  or lesbian identity. The embracing and disclosing of such an identity, however, is best understood  as a political phenomenon occurring in a historical period during which identity politics has become  a become  a consuming  occupation.”  (De  Cecco and  Parker, “The Biology of Homosexuality:  Sexual  Orientation  or  Sexual  Preference,”  p.  20  in  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire:  The  Biology of Sexual, Preference, editors De Cecco and Parker)  ∙ “Who one is: homosexual as gay and lesbian”  “Lesbian  and  gay  historians  have  asked  questions  about  the  origins  of  gay  liberation  and  lesbian  feminism, and have come up with some surprising answers. Rather than finding a silent, oppressed,  gay  minority  in  all  times  and  all  places, historians  have  discovered  that  gay  identity  is  a  recent,  Western, historical construction. Jeffrey Weeks, Jonathan Katz and Lillian Faderman, for example  have traced the emergence of lesbian and gay identity in the late nineteenth century. Similarly John  D’Emilio, Allan Berube and the Buffalo Oral History Project have described how this identity laid  the basis for organized political activity in the years following World War II.  The work of lesbian and gay historians has also demonstrated that human sexuality is not a natural,  timeless  “given”,  but  is  historically  shaped  and  politically  regulated.”  (Duggan  &  Hunter,  Sex  Wars, p.151‑152)  “The  idea  of  a  gay  and  lesbian  identity  sexual  identity  has  been  formulated  over  the  last  two  decades.  Historically  it  is  the  product  of  the  gay  and  lesbian  liberation  movement,  which,  itself,  grew out of the Black civil rights and women’s liberation movements of the fifties and sixties. Like  ethnic  identities,  sexual  identity  assigns  individuals  to  membership  in  a  group,  the  gay  lesbian  community. Although sexual identity has become a group identity, its historical antecedents can be  traced to the nineteen‑century notion that homosexual men and women, each a representative of a  newly  discovered  biological  specimen,  represented  a  “third  sex”.  Homosexuality,  which  had  been  conceived  primarily  as  an  act  was  thereby  transformed  into  an  actor.  (De  Cecco,  1990b).  Once  actors  had  been  created  it  was  possible  to  assign  them a  group  identity. Once  a  person became  a  member  of  a  group,  particularly  one  that  has  been  stigmatized  and  marginal,  identity  as  an  individual was easily subsumed under group identity.” (De Cecco and Parker, “The Biology of 15  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

Homosexuality: Sexual Orientation or Sexual Preference,” p. 22‑23 in Sex, Cells, and Same‑  Sex Desire: The Biology of Sexual, Preference, editors De Cecco and Parker)  “It isn’t at all obvious why a gay rights movement should ever have arisen in the United States in  the first place. And it’s profoundly puzzling why that movement should have become far and away  the  most  powerful  such  political  formation  in  the  world.  Same  gender  sexual  acts  have  been  commonplace throughout history and across cultures. Today, to speak with surety about a matter  for which there is absolutely no statistical evidence, more adolescent male butts are being penetrated  in the Arab world, Latin American, North Africa and Southeast Asia then in the west.  But the notion of a gay “identity” rarely accompanies such sexual acts, nor do political movements  arise to make demands in the name of that identity. It’s still almost entirely in the Western world  that the genders of one’s partner is considered a prime marker of personality and among Western  nations it is the United States ‑ a country otherwise considered a bastion of conservatism ‑ that the  strongest political movement has arisen centered around that identity.  We’ve only begun to analyze why, and to date can say little more then that certain significant pre‑  requisites  developed  in  this  country,  and  to  some  degree  everywhere  in  the  western  world,  that  weren’t present, or hadn’t achieved the necessary critical mass, elsewhere. Among such factors were  the  weakening  of  the  traditional  religious  link  between  sexuality  and  procreation  (one  which  had  made non‑procreative same gender desire an automatic candidate for denunciation as “unnatural”).  Secondly  the  rapid  urbanization  and  industrialization  of  the  United  States,  and  the  West  in  general, in the nineteen century weakened the material (and moral) authority of the nuclear family,  and  allowed  mavericks  to  escape  into  welcome  anonymity  of  city  life,  where  they  could  choose  a  previously  unacceptable  lifestyle  of  singleness  and  nonconformity  without  constantly  worrying  about parental or village busybodies pouncing on them.” (Duberman, Left Out, p. 414‑415)  ∙ “What one does: homosexuality/homosexual behavior”  “Our  concepts  and  categories  of  sexual  expression  are  based  on  the  genders  of  the  two  partners  involved:  heterosexuality  when  the  partners  are  of  the  opposite  sex,  and  homosexuality  when  the  partners  are  of  the  same  sex. In other  times  and among  other  peoples,  this  way  of thinking  about  people  simply  doesn’t  seem  to  apply‑anthropologists,  historians,  sociologists  have described  many  cultures in which same‑sex eroticism occupies a  very different place than it does in our own. . . .  Just  as  the  Greeks  and  Romans  had  no  words  for  our  sexual  categories,  the  Native  American  societies described by explorers, missionaries, and anthropologists from the seventeenth onward had  sexual categories for which we have no words.  Consequently, in the sections that follow‑ an exploration of attitudes and customs of ancient peoples  toward same‑sex eroticism‑ the modern concepts of “homosexuality” or sexual orientation” will be  conspicuous by their absence. Within these cultures, sexual contact between persons of the same sex  is  not  necessarily  seen  as  characteristic  of  a  particular  group  or  subset  of  persons,  there  is  no  category for “homosexuals.” On the contrary, in some cultures, same‑sex eroticism was an expected  part  of the  sexual  experience  of  every  member  of  society,  which  would  seem  to  argue  against  the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  16 

existence of “homosexuality” as a personal attribute at all.” (Mondimore, A Natural History of  Homosexuality, p.3‑4)  “A second assumption is that homosexuality is a unitary construct that is culturally transcendent.  However,  a  wealth  of  cross‑cultural  evidence  points  to  the  existence  of  numerous  patterns  of  homosexuality varying in origins, subjective states, and manifest behaviors. In fact, the pattern of  essentially  exclusive  male  homosexuality  familiar  to  us  has  been  exceedingly  rare  or  unknown  in  cultures  that  required  or  expected  all  males  to  engage  in  homosexual  activity.”  (Byrne  and  Parsons, “Human Sexual Orientation”, p.228)  “The  presently  dominant  myth  implies  that  ʺhomosexualityʺ  is  a  uniform  category,  that  the  history, the  experience,  the  self‑  understanding  of  those  whose  love  is  directed  to  members  of  the  same gender can be subsumed within the same definition, the same explanatory paradigm. Whereas  in actuality, as many recent studies have acknowledged, even as they still use the word, we would  do better to speak in the plural, to speak of “homosexualities.” (Downing, Myths and Mysteries  of Same‑Sex Love, p.6‑7)  “In sum, homosexuality is not one but many things, many psychosocial forms, which can be viewed  as symbolic mediations between psychocultural and historical conditions and human potentials for  sexual  response  across  life  course.”  (Herdt,  “Cross‑Cultural  Issues  in  the  Development  of  Bisexuality and Homosexuality, p.55)  My interest in the discussion of homosexuality is a personal one. Up until ten years ago I  believed  I  was  a  homosexual.  What  was  most  instrumental  in  my  overcoming  homosexuality was when I understand the idea that it was not “who one is a homosexual  but what one did homosexual behavior”. When I understood this and was able to separate  the  behavior  from  the  person,  it  empowered  me  to  accept  personal  responsibility  for  attitudes and acts. It also gave me hope to look forward to the day when my life would not  ruled and led by my feelings and emotions, which can change from moment to moment  and day to day, often influenced by external circumstances. I also have to accept the reality  that my body will respond to same‑sex sexual stimuli. But the question is not “can I” but  “should I” allow it to repeatedly do so. In essence seeking same‑sex intimacy with others  of  the  same‑sex  in  sexual  acts  is  an  illegitimate  way  of  meeting  the  legitimate  need  for  same‑sex intimacy. I am lobbying to maintain the status quo that marriage be defined as  the  union  between  one  man  and  one  woman.  In  doing  so  I  understand  to  change  the  gender  of  one  of  the  partners  will  only  lead  to  further  changes  as  in  the  number  of  partners, age of  partners  etc. I  am  not  lobbying  against  individuals  but how  individuals  wish  to  define  themselves  by  the  attitudes  and  acts  they  commit.  Because  I  along  with  thousands of others have changed how we once defined ourselves in similar ways. Also I  lobby  understanding  this  is  not  an  issues  of  “rights”  but  one  of  legally  sanctioning  homosexual behavior. With the end result being the continuation of the normalization and  legitimatization of homosexuality.  Bibliography Larry Houston – www.banap.net  17 

Bancroft, John. “Homosexual Orientation The search for a biological basis.” British Journal  Of Psychiatry. 1994, 164, 437‑440.  Byne  MD,  PhD,  William  &  Bruce  Parsons,  MD,  PhD.  “Human  Sexual  Orientation  The  Biological  Theories  Reappraised”.  Archives  of  General  Psychiatry.  Vol  50,  March  1993,  228‑239.  Connell, R. W. and G. W. Dowsett. Rethinking Sex Social Theory and Sexuality Research.  Melbourne University Press. Melbourne, 1992.  De  Cecco,  John  P.  “Confusing  the  Actor  With  the  Act:  Muddled  Notions  About  Homosexuality.” Archives of Sexual Behavior. 1990. Vol.19, No.4, 409‑412.  De  Cecco,  John  P.  PhD,  and  Michael  G.  Shively,  MA,  editors.  Bisexual  and  Homosexual  Identities: Critical Theoretical Issues. The Haworth Press. New York, 1984.  De  Cecco,  John  P.  PhD,  and  David  Allen  Parker,  MA  editors.  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference. Harrington Park Press, New York,  Downing,  Christine.  Myths  and  Mysteries  of  Same‑Sex  Love.  Continuum  Publishing  Company. New York, 1989.  Duberman, Martin. Left Out. South End Press. Cambridge, MA, 2002.  Duggan, Lisa & Nan D. Hunter. Sex Wars Sexual Dissent and Political Culture. Routledge.  New York & London, 1995.  Herdt, Gilbert. Same Sex, Different Cultures. WestviewPress. 1997.  McConaghy,  DSc,  MD,  Nathaniel. “Biologic Theories of Sexual  Orientation.”  Archives of  General Psychiatry May. 1994, Volume 51, 431‑431.  Mondimore,  Francis  Mark.  A  Natural  History  of  Homosexuality.  The  John  Hopkins  University Press. Baltimore and London, 1996.  Murphy,  Timothy  F.  Readers  Guide  to  Lesbian  and  Gay  Studies.  Fitzroy  Dearborn  Publishers. Chicago & London, 2000.  Seidman, Steven. Embattled Eros. Routledge. New York, 1992.  Terry, Jennifer. An American Obession Science, Medicine, and Homosexuality in Modern  Society. The University of Chicago Press. Chicago and London, 1999.  Weeks, Jeffrey. Coming Out Homosexual Politics in Britain, from the Nineteenth Century  to the Present. Quartet Books. London, Melbourne, & New York, 1977. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  18 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article76 

Chapter Three ʺGay Brainsʺ and Gay Genesʺ 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  Schmidt, Thomas E. Straight and Narrow? InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, IL, 1995.  Seidman, Steven. Embattled Eros. Routledge. New York, 1992.  Siker,  Jeffery  S.  editor.  Homosexuality  in  the  Church.  Westminster  John  Knox  Press.  Louisville, KY, 1994.  Stein, Edward. The Mismeasure of Desire. Oxford University Press. Oxford, 1999.  Strickland,  Bonnie  R.  “Research  on  Sexual  Orientation  and  Human  Development:  A  Commentary.” Developmental Psychology 1995, Vol.31, No.1, 137‑140.  Strommen,  Merton  P.  The  Church  and  Homosexuality  Searching  for  a  Middle  Ground.  Kirk House Publishers. Minneapolis, MN, 2001.  Terry, Jennifer. An American Obsession Science, Medicine, and Homosexuality in Modern  Society. The University of Chicago Press. Chicago and London, 1999.  Weeks,  Jeffery.  Sexuality  and  Its  Discontents  Meanings,  Myths  and  Modern  Sexualities.  Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1988.  West, Donald J and Richard Green, editors. Sociolegal Control of Homosexuality A Multi‑  Nation Comparison. Plenum Press. New York and London, 1997.  Chapter Three “Gay Brains and Gay Genes”  Those advocating for homosexuality often misused the small number of studies that have  been  conducted  which  have  shown  a  possible  biological  basis  for  homosexuality.  This  misuse  actually  began  with  the  researchers  themselves.  The  misuse  is  often  with  the  intention of achieving a political objective. After having their research results published in  the highly respected journal, Science, both LeVay and Hamer went on to write books. The  use  and  misuse  of  this  research  for  a  biological  basis  for  homosexuality  has  come  with  mixed  results.  In  finding  a  “homosexual  person”  it  is  hoped  that  the  treatment  of  such  individuals  by  others  will  be  more  favorable,  and  even  gaining  specific  legal  rights  for  homosexuals.  Yet  there  is  also  the  risk  for  greater  unfavorable  treatment,  with  possible  attempts for the prevention of becoming a homosexual. The search for a biological basis to  homosexuality first began in Germany during the 1860s. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  19 

“For  well  over  a century homosexualists have  dreamed  that  the  invention  of the homosexual  as  a  person  would  ultimately  detoxicate  homosexual  behavior  and  win  it  a  place  of  equality  alongside  heterosexual  behavior.”  (De  Ceeo,“Confusing  the  Actor  With  the  Act:  Muddled  Notions  About Homosexuality”, p. 411)  “The  biological  claims of gay  brains  and genes, while power‑charged  interventions  in  the  current  cultural  and  political  debates  of  difference,  are  by  no  means  historically  innovatory,  as  social  historians  of  sexuality  have  long  recognized  (Weeks  1981).  The  claims  instead  resurrect  the  essentialist  thesis  advanced  by  politically  engaged  gay  men  and  argued  intermittently  since  the  mid‑nineteenth  century  to  secure  political  and  culture  space  for  homosexuality.  In  a  context  of  widespread  political  moves  within  the  U.S.  to  deny  homosexuals  their  constitutional  rights,  this  oppositional discourse, with its twin location in the neurosciences and in molecular genetics, seeks  to ground the claim for civil rights in the body.” (Rose, “Gay Brains, Gay Genes and Feminist  Science  Theory”  in  Weeks,  and  Holland  editors.  Sexual  Cultures  Communities,  Values,  and Intimacy, p.54)  “As  this  collection  of  papers  has  shown,  the  search  for  purely  biological  determines  of  sexual  preference  is  fraught  with  short‑comings. It  conflates  biological  sex  with gender  and gender  with  sexuality,  it  reduces  a  given  sexual  preference  to  specific  behaviors  and  further  reduces  those  behaviors to biological processes, and it accepts and reinforces society’s whimsical moral judgments,  categories,  and  proscriptions  regarding  sexuality.  It  is  no  wonder,  then,  that  in  spite  of  the  zeal  shown by researchers and the availability of sophisticated equipment and methodology over the past  decade, the search for biological markers of  sexual preference has failed to produce any conclusive  evidence.” (Parker and De Cecco, “Sexual Expression: A Global Perspective,” p. 427‑428 in  Sex, Cells, and Same‑Sex Desire, edited by De Cecco and Parker)  As noted before the “biological basis” for homosexuality may be historically traced to the  19th  century  in  Germany  when  “homosexuals”  themselves  begin  advocating  for  legal  rights. Up until this time homosexuality was as seen what one did, and it was a sin and a  crime. Now it would also begin to have a medical and scientific connotation, there could  now  be  a  “homosexual  person”.  Yet  in  over  130  years  there  has  not  been  found  one  “homosexual  person.”  Today  many  of  those who  practice  homosexuality  self‑identify as  homosexuals and have created and organized based these sexual acts.  “The  modern  western  concept  of  the  homosexual  is,  according  to  some  historians,  primarily  a  creation of late nineteenth‑century medical‑science discourses. In the context of elaborating systems  of  classification  and  descriptions  of  different  sexualities,  as  part  of  a  quest  to  uncover  the  truth  about human nature, the homosexual is said to have stepped forward as a distinct human type with  his/her own mental and physical nature.” (Seidman. Embattled Eros, p.146)  “The  second  and  related  assumption  of  these  research  reports  was  that  homosexuality,  as  a  biological  given,  existed  as  the  antithesis  of  heterosexuality.  Over  the  past  two  decades,  however,  gay and lesbian scholarship has documented the fact that the notion that individuals exist as two  distinct  species,  one  exclusively heterosexual,  the  other  exclusively homosexual,  is  of  fairly  recent Larry Houston – www.banap.net  20 

origin,  born  in  the  eighteenth  and  nineteenth  centuries  and  institutionalized  in  19th  century  medicine (Foucault, 1976; Weeks 1991; Trumbach, 1991). In several historical periods and in many  cultures,  past  and  present,  no  such  antithesis  has  existed.  Almost  anyone  who  engaged  in  homosexual practice was believed to be capable also of heterosexual practice. Nor was it thought that  homosexual practice, especially in youth, in any way precluded adult heterosexuality (e.g., Dover,  1978;  Herdt,  1981;  Blackwood,  1985).”  (De  Cecco  and  Parker,  “The  Biology  of  Homosexuality: Sexual  Orientation or  Sexual  Preference?”  p. 11 in Sex,  Cells, and Same‑  Sex Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference edited by John P. De Cecco, PhD and David  Allen Parker, MA.)  Modern  medicine  and  science  has  only  added  to  the  confusion.  The  discussion  of  homosexuality  continues  to  be  comprised  of  a  seemingly  endless  philosophical  battle  between  conflicting  ideologies  of  “essentialism”  and  “social  constructionism”.  The  best  possible summary of this philosophical battle of ideologies may be stated in the following  statements.  “Who  one  is,  a  homosexual,”  or  “What  one  does,  homosexuality.”  The  strongest evidence and support is for homosexuality, what one does. Those advocating for  homosexuality  have  created  these  conflicting  ideologies  of  “essentialism”  and  “social  constructionism”.  “The category of homosexuality carries a definition of the essential nature itself. As individuals are  inserted  into  this  discursive  framework  through  the  growing  authority  of  medicine,  science,  psychiatry,  and  law,  individuals  who  have  same‑sex  longings  are  defines  as  unique,  abnormal  human type: the homosexual.” (Seidman. Embattled Eros, 147)  In the early 1990s a small number of scientific studies reporting to find a ‘biological basis’  for a ‘homosexual person’ were published. The use of and response to these reports were a  surprise to many people. The ‘essentialism’ side temporally began to hold sway over those  who  hold  to  “social  constructionism”.  The  strongest  criticism  to  these  published  studies  are  among  others  who  also  advocate  for  homosexuality,  but  do  so  from  a  “social  constructionism” perspective.  “To no small extent, the amplification of the twin ‘gay brains’ and ‘gay genes’ these has produced  not simply by media misrepresenting science ‑ as science commonly claims ‑ but directly through  the language and activities of the scientists themselves. This process has worked its way through a  mixture of press releases, titles and public comment. . . But most of all, neither LeVay nor Hammer  reflect on the category ‘homosexual’: for both it is fixed as, say, brown eyes. LeVay in particular has  a very simple‑minded view of sexuality. Thus he reflects in passing that heterosexual copulation is  ‘so  simple,  one  hardly  needs  brain  to  do  it’  (LeVay,  1993,  p.47).  Thus  it  is  not  the  media  which  biologises  the  category  but  the  gay  scientist  themselves.”  (Rose,  “Gay  Brains,  Gay  Genes  and  Feminist Science  Theory”  in  Weeks, and  Holland  editors. Sexual  Cultures  Communities,  Values, and Intimacy, p.62‑63)  “The  argument  for homosexual  immutability  betrays  a  misreading  of  the  scientific  research  itself.  Nothing  in  any  of  these  studies  can  fully  support  the  idea  that  homosexuality  is  biologically Larry Houston – www.banap.net  21 

immutable; each study leaves open the possibility that homosexuality is the result of a combination  of  biological  and  environmental  factors,  and  several  suggest  that  homosexuality  may  be  tied  to  a  predisposition  in  temperament  that  could  manifest  itself  in  a  number  of  ways.  All  agree  that  biological,  social,  and  psychological  factors  interact  to  produce  and  change  the  signs  of  homosexuality.  Furthermore,  these  studies  cannot  comment  effectively  on  the  frequency  of  homosexuality in the general population.” (Terry, An American Obsession p.394)  “In  studies  like  these,  a  type  of  circulating  reasoning  often  follows  the  delineation  of  the  subject  population:  scientific  research  on  homosexuality  does  not  begin  with  random  populations,  but  rather  with  groups  of  people  who  are  defined  as  homosexual  to  begin  with  (by  themselves,  by  scientist,  or  by  both);  then,  researchers  search  for  a  biological  (or  social)  marker  common  to  the  group (whether it be a gene a portion of the brain, or an overwhelming mother); finally, if such a  marker is found, homosexuality is redefined by the presence of the marker itself. In a curious way,  than, each  study  can  be  said to  reinvent  its  own object.”  (Kenen, “Who  Counts  When  You’re  Counting  Homosexuals?  Hormones  and  Homosexuality  in  Mid‑Twentieth‑Century  America,” p. 197 in Science and Homosexualities edited by Vernon A. Rosario)  “Science cannot yet produce unequivocal answers to many of the questions that exercise politicians  or excite moral debate. Research points to a manifestations of homosexuality being the outcome of  ongoing  interplay  between  a  multiplicity  of  factors,  some  genetic,  some  environmental,  the  latter  including  the  environment  of  the  developing  fetus  as  well  as  upbringing,  family  situation,  social  and  legal  climate,  and  culturally  permitted  outlets.  It  appears  likely  that  the  direction  of  sexual  impulses in some individuals is largely a matter of innate, biological disposition, whereas in others  the kind of sexual experiences to which they are exposed is more influential. There appears to be in  many  contrasting  societies  a  hard  core  of  homosexuals  whose  behavior  is  not  altered  by  even  the  most draconian sanctions. The causes may well be different for homosexuals whose general behavior  conforms to what is expected of their sex than those who do not comply with gender expectations in  either  social  behavior  or  heterosexual  performance.”  (West,  “Supposed  Origins  of  Homosexuality  and  Implications  for  Social  Control,”  p.  312  in.  Sociolegal  Control  of  Homosexuality A Multi‑Nation Comparison, editors West, and Green)  “In  summary,  with  the  exception  of  the  few  clear  biological  anomalies  that  result  in  cross‑gender  structural anomalies, it is impossible to disentangle the biological and psychological contributions  to  the  behavioral  differences  that  constitute  sexual  orientation.  As  Breedlove  (1994)  affirmed,  biology  and  psychology  are  simply  disciplines  that  offer  different  means  of  describing  the  same  phenomena.” (Baumrind, Diana. “Commentary on Sexual Orientation: Research and Social  Policy Implications,” p.132)  “Biologic theories can account for the feelings that motivate behaviors; the behaviors themselves will  be strongly determined by the environmental factors‑in the case of sexual orientation such factors as  available  opportunities  and  social  and  legal  sanctions.”  (McConaghy,  “  Biologic  Theories  of  Sexual Orientation,” p.431)

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

22 

“Certainly,  as biological  organisms, any  and  all  of  our  behaviors  must  have  biological  correlates,  but that does not mean that those correlates determine our behavior. In fact one of the maxims of  scientific research is, “correlation is not causation.” We are more then biological organisms; we are  creatures  shaped  by  experience,  emotion,  time,  and  circumstance,  and  in  turn,  we  re‑shape  ourselves for our needs and our goals. Sexuality can be reduced to neither a purely biological state  nor  a  purely  psychosocial  one.  Any  plausible  explanation  of  sexual  expression  would  have  to  include  all  its  components.”  (Parker  and  De  Cecco,  “Sexual  Expression:  A  Global  Perspective,” p. 428 in Sex, Cells, and Same‑Sex Desire, edited by De Cecco and Parker)  “It  remains  difficult,  on  scientific  grounds,  to  avoid  the  conclusion  that  the  uniquely  human  phenomenon  of  sexual  orientation  is  a  consequence  of  a  multifactorial  developmental  process  in  which biological factors play a part, but in which psychological factors remain crucially important.  If so, the moral and political issues must be resolved on other grounds.” (Bancroft, “Homosexual  Orientation The search for a biological basis,” p.439)  In the literature that discusses a biological basis for homosexuality usually there are three  broad categories for those biological causes of homosexuality, hormonal, within the brain,  and  genes.  They  are  then  broken  down  into  subcategories  with  many  more  details  then  what  is  really  needed.  In  the  hormonal  category  they  are  divided  into  prenatal,  before  birth, and postnatal, after birt. The hormones are usually those that deal with gender, i.e.  they  effect  masculinity  and  feminity,  or  hormones  that  interact  with  sexual  functioning.  The hormones are testosterone, estrogen, and LH (luteinizing hormone). In the brain the  area studied is the hypothalamus, and there are four regions of the anterior hypothalamus  which is discussed (INAH 1, 2, 3, 4). When doing gene studies they are divided into two  categories, indirect where twins and families are studied; and direct, where specific genes  themselves are studied.  “There are three major types of biological models of same‑gender orientation (Byne and Stein 1997).  Formative  experience  models  assume  biology  shapes  the  organizing  and  interpretation  of  life  experiences,  including  sexual  desire.  Direct  effects  models  hold  that  factors  like  genetic  predisposition or prenatal hormones produce brain circuits determinative of sexual orientation. And  indirect  models  suggest  that  biological  factors  like  temperament,  not  directly  related to  sexuality,  indirectly  shapes  sexual  orientation.  Direct effect  models  involving  behavioral genetics,  hormonal  influences, and regional brain studies have gained particular prominence in the last decade.  Whatever their intrinsic merits, searches for a biological bases for homosexuality have been plagued  by the difficulty of finding reliable and valid means to identify clear groups differentiated by sexual  orientation.” (Cohler and Galatzer‑Levy, The Course of Gay and Lesbian Lives: Social and  Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 53)  A  more  detailed  look  at  studies  by  LeVay,  a  ‘gay  brain’,  and  Hammer,  a  ‘gay  gene’  follows. These individuals and their studies were the ones that seem to generate the most  excitement  in  the  popular  press.  Upon  their  release  in  the  journal,  Science,  they  subsequently  became  the  headlines  in  the  popular  media  with  the  resulting  politicizing Larry Houston – www.banap.net  23 

and  propagandizing  quickly  following.  Who  are  these  scientists,  and  what  are  their  qualifications, will tell us much about their intent in publishing their studies. What is often  not  discussed  is  the  “loss  of  scientific  objectivity”  with  the  use  of  these  studies  for  a  possible  biological  basis  for  homosexuality  in  attempting  to  gain  popular  support  and  even political gain for homosexuality.  The two scientists LeVay and Hamer, who conducted these studies of a “gay brian” and a  “gay gene” self identify asa homosexuals. These two studies have never been replicated,  and  subsequent  studies  have  shown  results  that  contradict  the  original  studies.  The  popular  media  has  given  much  more  press  to  the  original  “gay  brain”  and  “gay  gene”  studies,  but all of the  studies  have  been  reported in  scientific  literature.  Both  LeVay and  Hamer conducted their studies in areas that they normally did not study. They were both  acknowledged  scientists  in  their  fields,  and  their  research  was  conducted  at  well  renowned  facilities,  which  helped  to  lend  credit  ability  to  their  studies. Both  LeVay  and  Hamer  went  on  to  write  books  after  publishing  their  research  findings  advocating  biological  causations  for  homosexuality.  With  this  all  said  and  done,  though  LeVay and  Hamer  were  passionate  researchers,  their  research  was  less  then  impartial.  LeVay  conducted his “gay brain” research and study after his male lover died from complications  of AIDS. Hammer after seeing many of his friends dying from Kaposi’s sarcoma decided  to  look  into  a  possible  genetic  predisposition  for  gay  men  to  get  this  rare  and  now  predominantly AIDS‑related cancer.  “The  origins  and  determinants  of  sexual  orientation,  both  heterosexual  and  homosexual,  pose  unanswered questions of genuine scientific interest. But the scientific enquiry they have engendered  reveals  a  long  history  of  distortion  by  moral  and  political  considerations.  This  is  an  area,  par  excellence,  where  scientific  objectivity  has  little  chance  of  survival.”  (Bankcroft,  “Homosexual  Orientation The search for a biological basis.” p.437)  “Under the sort of scientific‑technical approach favored by a Hamer or LeVay, information that does  not  fit  existing  theories  and  preferred  modes  of  research  in  effects  falls  into  limbo;  it  is  made  to  disappear, as though it had never existed.” (Clausen, Beyond Gay or Straight, p.127)  “In studies like these, a type of circulating reasoning often follows the delinearation of the subject  population:  scientific  research  on  homosexuality  does  not  begin  with  random  populations,  but  rather  with  groups  of  people  who  are  defined  as  homosexual  to  begin  with  (by  themselves,  by  scientist,  or  by  both);  then,  researchers  search  for  a  biological  (or  social)  marker  common  to  the  group (whether it be a gene a portion of the brain, or an overwhelming mother); finally, if such a  marker is found, homosexuality is redefined by the presence of the marker itself. In a curious way,  than each study can be said to reinvent its own object.” (Kenen, Hormones and Homosexuality  in  Mid‑Twentieth‑Century  America,  Rosario,  Vernon  A.  editor.  Science  and  Homosexualities, p.197)  “To be specific, it is necessary to investigate the biological research to determine exactly what it has  to  say  about  homosexuality.  The  studies  of  LeVay  and  Hamer,  for  example,  which  are  often Larry Houston – www.banap.net  24 

associated  with  the  biological  argument,  were  limited  in  cope  and  never  have  been  satisfactorily  replicated  (Crewdson 1995). In  addition, both  studies  used  only  male  subjects;  therefore,  the data  only  support  the  biological  argument  as  applied  to  male  homosexuals.  Finally  both  LeVay’s  and  Hamer’s studies draw on a wide variety of scientific studies that contain varying theories of male  homosexuality,  many  of  which  conceptualize  male  homosexuality  as  pathology.”  (Brookey,  Reinventing the Male Homosexual: The Rhetoric and Power of the Gay Gene, p. 7)  ∙ LeVay’s “Gay Brainʺ  Science, one  of the  leading  journals in  the scientific  field  published in 1991 an  article  by  Simon  LeVay,  “A  Difference  in  Hypothalamic  Structure  Between  Heterosexual  and  Homosexual Men.” This is the article and study that became the basis for the “gay brain”  headlines. But  it  was  not  without  controversy  for both  the  journal and its author. LeVay  was  a  neurobiologist  who  performed  his  research  at  the  Salk  Institute  for  Biological  Studies in CA. His previous research had been on a distinctly different region of the brain  known as the visual cortex. LeVay himself said on a The Phil Donahue show, (“Genetically  Gay:  Born  Gay  or  Become  Gay,  January  3,  1992)  that  his  study  was  not  entirely  a  dispassionate  scientific  endeavor.  He  conducted  his  research  and  study  after  his  male  lover  died from  complications  of  AIDS. In a sense  LeVay was  personally outing  himself  with the publication of his research and study.  “LeVay has said that the motive for his research was to honor the nature of his relationship with  his lover, Richard Hersey, who died of AIDS.” (Murphy, Gay Science The Ethics of Sexual  Orientation Research, p.25)  “The  claims  were  immediately  contentious  both  within  and  without  science.  Despite  LeVay’s  evident cultural capital which would make him more publishable than an outsider, it is questionable  whether Science would have published an article of similar methological vulnerabilty had it focused  on  anything  less  charged  than  homosexuality.  The  sample  was  small,  and  AIDS  commonly  produces  severe  neurological  consequences.  There  were  no  ‘normal’  controls,  and  he  sought  to  measure a brain region whose boundaries are notoriously difficult to define. His findings have not  been replicated.” (Rose, “Gay Brains, Gay Genes and Feminist Science Theory”in Weeks and  Holland editors. Sexual Cultures Communities, Values, and Intimacy. p.59)  “LeVay’s  study  was  initially  rejected  by  the  in‑house  reviewers  at  Science  (LeVay,  personal  communication).  Although  Science  rarely  allows  resubmission  of  manuscripts,  an  exception  was  made in this case. Because Science refuses to comment on this exceptional treatment, one can only  speculate as to why their initial decision had been to reject the manuscript even before  sending it  out for peer review. Perhaps the reason for this is that paper did not meet the minimal standards to  which even animal research in this area is held. This paper had a single author who did all of the  tissue processing as well as all of the anatomical measurements and statistical tests. Even in animal  work, the standard has been that all measurements are made not only blindly but also by more than  one investigator. Certainly, the editors at Science should have been more cautious and required that  a co‑investigator repeat and verify LeVay’s measurements prior to publication of a study that was Larry Houston – www.banap.net  25 

sure to be of great interest to the general public as well as to the scientific community. While LeVay  has stated that there was no suitable co‑investigator in his laboratory at the time he conducted this  study (quoted in Marshall, 1992), there is no lack of qualified anatomists who would have been (and  still  would  be)  more  than  willing  to  check  his  measurements.”  (Byne,  “Science  and  Belief:  Psychobiological  Research  on  Sexual  Orientation,”  p.334  in  Sex,  Cells  and  Same‑Sex  Desire, editors John P. De Cecco PhD and Michael G. Shively, MA)  LeVay’s research was the study of the brain tissue from 41 subjects that was obtained from  routine  autopsies  of  those  who  died  at  7  metropolitan  hospitals  in  New  York  and  California. 19 of the subjects were homosexual men who died of complications from AIDS  (1 was a bisexual). There was an additional 16 male subjects which were presumed to be  heterosexual,  of  these,  6  died  from  AIDS  and  10  from  other  causes.  The  final  6  subjects  were  women  presumed  to  be  heterosexual,  of  these 1  died  from  AIDS and 5  from  other  causes.  What  LeVay  did  was  to  measure  the  size  of  the  INAH3  portion  of  the  hypothalamus. His research and results were published in the Science article.  “The discovery that a nucleus differs in size between heterosexual and homosexual men illustrates  that  sexual  orientation  in humans is  amenable  to  study  at  the  biological  level,  and  this discovery  opens the door to the studies of neurotransmitters or recptors that might be involved in regulating  this  aspect  of  personality.  Further  interpretation  of  the  results  of  this  study  must  be  considered  speculative.  In  particular,  the  results  do  not  allow  one  to  decide  if  the  size  of  INAH  3  in  an  individual is the cause or consequence of the individual sexual’s orientation, or if the size of INAH  3 and sexual orientation covary under the influence of some third, unidentified variable.” (LeVay,  “A  Difference  in  Hypothalamic  Structure  Between Heterosexual and  Homosexual  Men,”  p. 1036)  “It had  also  been  determined  that human hypothalamus  was  sexually dimorphic,  which is to  say,  certain clusters of cells in the gland were dependably larger in men than in women. Hypothesizing  that  perhaps  the  cells  were  dimorphic  for  sexual  orientation  rather  than  sex, LeVay  found  in  his  forty‑one  brains  that  clusters  of  INAH3  cells  in  the  hypothalamus  glands  of  men  who  had  apparently  been  gay  were  consistently  smaller  than  those  men  who  had  apparently  been  heterosexual.  The  brains  of  the  women,  all  who  were  (almost  groundlessly)  presumed  to  be  heterosexual,  had  similarly  smaller  INAH  clusters.  LeVay  ultimately  decided  that  the  size  of  the  INAH3 clusters were determined by sexual object choice, and not by sex itself. So, brains that were  attracted to women were had large INAH3 concentrations, brains that were attracted to men had  smaller ones.” (Archer, The End of Gay and the death of heterosexuality, p.132)  This study by LeVay was heralded by those advocating for homosexuality as proof for the  biological basis and innateness of homosexuality. Those who oppose homosexuality have  raised questions concerning LeVay’s study. But of most interest is the response to LeVay’s  study  by  those  advocating  for  homosexuality.  Numerous  articles  and  books  have  been  written of LeVay’s study of a “gay brain”.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

26 

“The study, as LeVay himself admits, has several problems: a small sample group, great variation in  an  individual  nucleus  size,  and  possibly  skewed  results  because  all  of  the  gay  men  had  AIDS  (although LeVay found “no significant difference in the volume of INAH3 between the heterosexual  men who died of AIDS and those who died of other causes”). As of this writing, Levay’s findings  have yet to be replicated by other researchers.” (Burr, “Homosexuality and Biology” in Silker,  Homosexuality in the Church, p.124)  “The  reader  is  entitled  to  be  skeptical  if  not  confused  by  these  findings.  There  is  either  lack  of  consistency or of replication. There are methodological problems. Numbers are inevitably small, and  most studies homosexual subjects have died of AIDS; the possibility that such structural changes  could  be  the  consequence  of  disease,  such  as  AIDS,  remains.  But  even  if  these  findings  are  substantiated, and specific areas of the hypothalamus or elsewhere are found to be linked to sexual  orientation, it is difficult to imagine what the nature of such link would be. It is certainly unlikely  that  there  is  any  direct  relationship  between  structure  of  a  specific  area  of  the  brain  and  sexual  orientation per se.” (Bancroft, “Homosexual Orientation The search for a biological basis.”  p.438)  “A second problem is that to date, there have been no replications of LeVay’s finding; Byne (1994)  reports  that  Manfred  Gahr  at  the  Max  Planck  Institute  has  tried  unsuccessfully  to  replicate  LeVay’s  findings.  Moreover,  the  interstitial  nuclei  in  the  anterior  hypothalamus  vary  in  size,  in  part  in  relation  to  seasonal  factors,  suggesting  that  these  structures  are  not  so  immutable  as  LeVay’s research appears to assume. More than three dozen studies have failed to confirm LeVay’s  (1991)  claim  that  the  corpus  callosum  is  larger  in  male  homosexuals  than in  heterosexual  men.”  (Cohler  and  Galatzer‑Levy,  The  Course  of  Gay  and  Lesbian  Lives:  Social  and  Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 82)  There  have  been  other  various  studies  that  conflict  each  other,  and  LeVay’s  specific  research  has  not  been  replicated.  Common  criticisms  of  LeVay’s  research  are  with  methodological shortcomings. First is the small sample size, there were only 41 samples of  brain  tissues.  There  are  many  questions  about  the  role  of  AIDS,  which  LeVay  himself  acknowledges. But the one area of his study that has resulted in the most criticism is how  LeVay determined the sexual orientation of the subjects. This determination was after the  fact,  without  any  input  by  the  subjects  themselves.  They  had  died.  In  most  studies  and  research  determination of  sexual  orientation  or  homosexuality  is  by  self‑proclamation of  the participants themselves.  “Second, questions have been raised about the fashion in which LeVay determined the orientation of  the  persons  whose  brains  he  was  dissecting  after  death.  Nineteen  of  the  men  were  assigned  the  designation  homosexual  based  on  it  being  noted  in  the  medical  charts  by  their  doctors;  the  remaining 16 men were presumed to be heterosexual on the basis that their sexual orientation was  not  mentioned  in  their  charts. This  leads  us  to  suspect  LeVay did  not  know for  sure  whether  the  brains of nearly half of the people he was studying were from homosexual or heterosexual persons.  Further more, all of the homosexual men and 6 of the presumed 16 heterosexual men died of AIDS.”

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

27 

(Jones  &  Yarhouse,  Homosexuality  The  Use of Scientific  Research in the Church’s  Moral  Debate, p. 70)  LeVay himself has also noted that one subject who was listed as bisexual on his medical  charts was lumped in with the homosexual subjects.  “Medical records were his only source of information as to the sexuality of his subjects. While the  charts  of  those  who  died  from  other  causes  than  AIDS  failed  to  specify  sexual  orientation,  he  assumed that,  based  on  statistical  probability,  not  more  than  one  or  two  were  likely  to  have  been  gay,  and  so  felt  justified  in  using  them  to  represent  the  “heterosexual”  male  and  female  brain.”  (Clausen, Beyond Gay or Straight: Understanding Sexual Orientation, p. 106‑107)  “Vance and others have been struck by the contrast between the care with which LeVay measured  his brain samples and the sloppiness of his assumptions concerning his subjects’ sexuality. He had  no  idea  how  hospital  workers  arrived  at  the  conclusion  that  the  AIDS  patients  for  whom  they  recorded a sexual orientation were indeed gay. Given what is known of human sexual diversity, it  seems  safe  to  assume  that  LeVay’s  simple  labels  covered  a  wide  range  of  specific  desires  and  behaviors. Those subjects who did not die of AIDS were simply assumed, in the absence of evidence  to the contrary, to be heterosexual‑ a peculiarly heterosexist assumption for a gay male researcher to  make.” (Clausen, Beyond Gay or Straight: Understanding Sexual Orientation, p. 109)  “Problems  he didn’t pay much  attention to  include  the presumption  of  sexual  identity  in  corpses  that were doing no talking for themselves. If an AIDS patient had denied any homosexual activity  to doctors before his death, his brain was labeled heterosexual. The presumption of heterosexuality  among  the  women,  as  well,  as  among  the  men  who  died  of  cause  other  than  AIDS,  was  based  primarily, according to a note, on that misinterpreted Kinsey 10 percent. Chances were, LeVay said,  these people were straight.” (Archer, The End of Gay and the death of heterosexuality, p.133)  There  is  also  a  large  and  common  critical  basis  of  many  scientific  studies  looking  for  ‘biological  causes’  this  is  taking  animal  research  and  applying  it  towards  humans.  As  noted  before  same‑sex  physical  activity  and  behavior  is  seen  in  animals,  but  not  a  ‘homosexual animal’. Research has been done trying to understand the ‘mechanics’ of this  same‑sex erotic activity, what are the ‘biological underpinnings.’ There are many studies  using sheep and rats. Some of these studies in rats have located in the rat’s brain a location  that regulates sexual physical behavior, the SDN‑POA. So this area is thought to be similar  to the portion of the human hypothalamus, INAH3. But first, different studies have found  different portions of the hypothalamus to regulate sexual behavior. Remember there are 4  parts  to  the  anterior  hypothalamus.  LeVay  studied  the  INAH3  section  of  the  hypothalamus.  Others  have  criticized  LeVay  for  trying  to  connect  the  rat’s  brain,  (SDN‑  POA)  and  the  part  it  plays  in  sexual  activity  to  the  human’s  INAH3  portion  of  the  hypothalamus. Kauth’s criticism in his book is particularly pointed and direct.  “Conceptually, LeVay’s finding could present a problem. LeVay asserted that the INAH3 functions  much like the SDN‑POA does in rats; the SDN‑POA regulates sexual behavior but is not known to  control  sexual  desire.  The  ability  to  perform  certain  sexual  behaviors  is  not  equivalent  to  sexual 28  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

desire. LeVay confuses sexual orientation and sexual behavior. As motivated human behavior, erotic  feelings  are  more  complex  than  reflexively  thrusting  a  penis  into  an  opening  or  presenting  one’s  backside  to  be  penetrated.  Yet,  by  comparing  the  human  INAH3  to  the  rat’s  SDN‑POA,  LeVay  emphasizes  the  importance  of  sexual  behavior  over  sexual  feelings  and  implies  that  mechanical  behavior  is the  sine  qua  non  of human  sexuality.  In  actuality, the  mechanics  of  sexual  behavior ‑  mounting,  thrusting,  rubbing,  fondling,  kissing,  licking,  and  sucking  ‑differ  little  across  individuals  of  various  erotic  interests.  Only  the  sex  of  the  desired  partner  varies.  Therefore,  it  is  unlikely that the human INAH3 is functionally similar to the rat SDN‑POA. LeVay’s premise is  faulty, and his conclusions are suspect. His findings could easily reflect the different environmental  experiences  of  his  subjects  rather  than  reveal  anything  about  sexual  orientation.  No  meaningful  conclusions  can  be  drawn  from  LeVay’s  study.”  (Kauth,  True  Nature  A  Theory  of  Sexual  Attraction, p.126‑127)  “When it is all said and done, the work of LeVay is more suggestive than anything else. It certainly  does not show that there is a hard and fast correlation between INAH3 size and sexual orientation.”  (Murphy, Gay Science The Ethics of Sexual Orientation Research, p.30)  “Not that there weren’t reservations and problems. As LeVay himself pointed out at the end of his  Science  report, AIDS could have played a role in varying the sizes  of INAH3. INAH3 could also  determined by one’s sexual behavior rather than being the cause of it. Or there could be some third  factor that triangulates with sexual behavior and INAH3 clusters, mitigating the cause‑and‑effect  between the two.” (Archer, The End of Gay and the death of heterosexuality, p.132‑133)  What  critical and objective  conclusion  can  be  gained  from a  close  look at  LeVay’s  study  published  in  the  journal  Science?  Both  the  journal,  and  LeVay  came  under  intense  scrutiny.  Science  was  faulted  for  not  following  their  own  procedures  and  policies  for  publication of articles. LeVay acknowledges it was not an impartial study by an impartial  researcher. The results themselves are open to methodological concerns, small sample size,  determination  of  the  sexual  orientation  of  subjects  from  which  the  brain  tissue  samples  were taken, and drawing conclusions from parallel animal research. Finally no follow up  research has replicated his original results.  ∙ Hammer’s “Gay Brain”  The publication of Hamer’s study that has been used to herald the finding of a ‘gay gene’  has had similar consequences of acclaim and criticism.  “He published a paper with this findings, which proved to be so media‑friendly that he wrote a book  about the whole thing, in which he said several times that as far as he knew there was no such thing  as a gay gene, and that, even if there was, he hadn’t found one.” (Archer, The End of Gay and  the death of heterosexuality, p.136)  “While in the paper published in Science Hammer and his colleagues claim only to have found an  association between markers in the Xq28 region and a behavioral outcome (homosexuality), in more  popular  writings  (Hammer  and  Copeland  1994,  1998;  LeVay  and  Hammer  1994)  they  blur  the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  29 

distinction between association and causation in a way that more strongly suggests a genetic basis  for  homosexual  behavior  (Allen  1997).”  (Cohler and  Galatzer‑Levy,  The  Course  of  Gay  and  Lesbian Lives: Social and Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 68)  “Back in the early part of this decade, after he got fed up with so many of his friends dying from  Kaposi’s sarcoma, he decided to look into a possible genetic predisposition for gay men to get this  anomalous and now predominantly AIDS‑related cancer. He didn’t find any, but in the course of  studying  the  gay‑man  DNA  he’d  collected,  he  noticed  a  greater  than  average  coincidence  of  a  certain genetic marker along a certain part of the long arm of the X chromosome. After a little more  casting about, he came up with some results that showed the marker, Xq28, seemed to played some  role in the sexual orientation of somewhere between 5 and 30 percent of gay men.” (Archer, The  End of Gay and the death of heterosexuality, p.136)  “This was not, as the media chose called it, a ‘gay gene’, but persuasive evidence of a genetic factor  or  factors,  which  in  this  section  of  the  gay  community  at  least,  are  sex  liked.  As  previously,  the  genotype  remains  obscure.  It  could  be  of  indirect  relevance  (e.g.  relating  to  some  behavioral  or  gender role ‘phenotype’ which interacts with other influences on sexual development). It is unlikely  to be a gene which determines sexual orientation per se.” (Bancroft, “Homosexual Orientation  The search for a biological basis.” p.439)  “This study does not identify a “gene for homosexuality,” as many ill‑informed reports have had it.  In  fact,  the  chromosomal  region  in  question  is  large  enough  to  contain  several  hundred  genes.  Moreover, the genetic action at work is not decisive by itself because there were seven pairs of gay  brothers in the study who did not share the same genetic commonality at this region.” (Murphy,  Gay Science The Ethics of Sexual Orientation Research, p.32‑34)  “In both report and book, Hamer made it clear that he did not figure he’d found a gay gene. He’d  found a conspicuous concurrence of a specific genetic marker among self‑declared homosexuals. The  findings  were  statistically  significant,  but  the  relationship  of the  genetic  marker  to  the  behaviour  was as yet undetermined” (Archer, The End of Gay and the death of heterosexuality, p.135)  Hamer’s  study  was  set  up  in  a  way  that  it  almost  guaranteed  success,  in  that  he  would  find  what  he  was  looking  for.  The  study  was  of  40  brother  pairs  of  homosexuals  from  families  in  which  the  pattern  of  occurrence  of  homosexuality  suggested  inheritance  through the mother. In the comparison of the x‑chromosomes of the homosexual brothers,  64% of the brother pairs shared an identical section of DNA, a different “marker” for each  pair.  Hamer and his colleagues also had their research published in an by Science in 1993, “A  Linkage Between DNA Markers on the X Chromosome and Male Sexual Orientation” by  Dean  H.  Hamer,  Stella  Hu,  Victoria  L  Magnuson,  Nan  Hu,  &  Angela  M.  L.  Pattatucci.  Hamer  and  others  on  this  research  team  are  self‑avowed  homosexuals.  In  addition  to  widespread  popular  media  coverage  similar  to  LeVay’s  study,  there  were  investigations  by  U.S.  governmental  agencies  of  Hamer’s  research.  The  initial  investigation  was  concerning possible fraud, the selective use of data, where pairs of brothers whose genetic 30  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

makeup contradicted the finding were not included in the findings. This investigation was  conducted  by the  National Institutes  of  Health, and  was  followed  by an  investigation  of  the Federal Office of Research Integrity. A co‑worker within Hamer’s group of researchers  made the claim and it was first reported in 1995 article in the Chicago Tribune newspaper.  In December of 1996 the second investigation was closed and no charges were filed against  the researchers.  Hamer’s  criticism  came  from  both  sides  of  the  issue,  those  for  and  those  against  homosexuality.  It  was  common  criticism  of  methodology  by  many  people,  but  as  with  LeVay for those advocating for homosexuality it was direct and pointed. Sample size and  how  subjects  were  included in  the  study  was  noted. In  this  study  it  included  only those  where  transmission  of  the  trait  was  from  the  mother’s  side.  In  spite  of  it  being  called  a  “gay  gene”  the  actual  study  was  looking  for  genetic  markers  and  not  for  the  genes  themselves. Most interesting is that initially the research was not to look for a “gay gene”.  The  study  was  to  determine  if  homosexuals  were  genetically  predisposed  to  alcoholism  and  the  AIDS‑related  skin  cancer,  Kaposi’s  sarcoma.  This  study  has  also  not  been  replicated. Another study by Canadian researchers has found different results. “Failure to  use  controls  limits  the  conclusions  in  the  research  reported  by  Hammer  and  his  colleagues.”  (Cohler  and  Galatzer‑Levy,  The  Course  of  Gay  and  Lesbian  Lives:  Social  and  Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 66)  “Taken  as  a  whole,  Hamer’s  study  faces  various  methodological problems,  its  results  are  open  to  various interpretations (several which are more plausible then the existence of a gay gene), and it  has not been replicated. Hamer’s study, which has been taken by many to be the centerpiece of the  emerging research program, actually exemplifies many of its problems.” (Stein, The Mismeasure  of Desire, p. 221)  “Hamer and associates did not identify genes that cause same sex erotic attraction. They identified  common  markers  for  male  same‑sex  eroticism  among  related  individuals  with  the  same  trait.  To  enhance  their  chances  of  finding  positive  results,  Hamer  and  associates  limited  expression  of  the  trait  to  maternal  transmission.  Therefore,  genes  “for”  the  trait  would  be  specific  to  the  X  chromosome. Consequently, “gay” men with “gay” fathers‑who might transmit the trait on the Y  chromosome‑were excluded from the study.” (Kauth, True Nature, p. 138‑139)  “Hammer and Copeland note that the “gay” gene has not been isolated and that “Xq28 plays some  role in about 5 to 30% of gay men. The broad range of these estimates is proof that much more work  remains to be done” (1994,146).” (Cohler and Galatzer‑Levy, The Course of Gay and Lesbian  Lives: Social and Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 67)  “Genetic  linkage  studies  are  particularly  complicated,  technical,  and  vulnerable  to  confusion  and  misinterpretation because such tiny bits of material are said to influence such major traits as sexual  attraction. Consequently, disagreements among scientists about these analysis are many.” (Kauth,  True Nature, p. 140)

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

31 

“Hamer  identified  five  genetic  markers  for  maternally  transmitted  same‑sex  eroticism  in  males.  Even  so,  this  type  of  work  is  in  its  infancy,  and  Hammer’s  findings  need  to  be  confirmed  by  independent researchers. The five markers encompass hundreds of genes.”  (Kauth, True Nature,  p. 216)  “Hamer’s  effort  to  generalize  from  genes  to  behavior  would  be  immensely  complicated  by  a  confrontation with the actual complexities of human psychology, social organization, and cultural  forms.  Starting  from  a  presupposition  that  sexuality  is  an  either‑or  matter  and  that  gay  and  straight are essential, timeless orientations‑his decision to exclude bisexuals from the study was, he  says,  intentional‑Hamer  sets  up  his  research  in  such  a  way  to  bypass  any  information  to  the  contrary  and  then  comes  up  with  evidence  for  a  gene  that  in  turn  seems  to  confirm  his  initial  categories.” (Clausen, Beyond Gay or Straight, p.126‑127)  “Rice  et  al.  (1999)  report  failure to  replicate  Hammer’s  work.  This  research  group  was  unable  to  find  a link  between  male  homosexuality and  Xq28, and  maintains  that gay  brothers  are  no more  likely  than  straight  brothers  to  share  the  Xq28  genetic  marker.  Further,  this  group  found  little  evidence  supporting  Hammer’s  claim  of  maternal  transmission.  Wickelgren  (1999)  reviews  findings reported at the 1998 meetings of the American Psychiatric Association which also failed to  replicate  the  findings  of  Hammer  and  concludes  that  there  is  very  little  evidence  supporting  the  hypothesis that Xq28 is a genetic marker linked to homosexuality.” (Cohler and Galatzer‑Levy,  The Course of Gay and Lesbian Lives: Social and Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 67)  “The  evidence  for  a  genetic  component  for  homosexuality  is  hardly  overwhelming.  Numerous  studies that purport to prove the existence of a genetic aspect to homosexuality are either anecdotal  or  seriously  flawed.  Homosexuality  is  often  poorly  defined  and  researchers  use  a  variety  of  behavioral  measures.  The  sample  sizes  are  too  small  and  recruitment  of  subjects  is  biased.”  (McGuire, “Is Homosexuality Genetic? A Critical Review and Some Suggestions.” p. 140‑  141 in Sex, Cells, and Same‑Sex Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference editors John P. De  Cecco, PhD and David Allen Parker, MA)  “To be specific, it is necessary to investigate the biological research to determine exactly what it has  to  say  about  homosexuality.  The  studies  of  LeVay  and  Hamer,  for  example,  which  are  often  associated  with  the  biological  argument,  were  limited  in  cope  and  never  have  been  satisfactorily  replicated  (Crewdson 1995). In  addition, both  studies  used  only  male  subjects;  therefore,  the data  only  support  the  biological  argument  as  applied  to  male  homosexuals.  Finally  both  LeVay’s  and  Hamer’s studies draw on a wide variety of scientific studies that contain varying theories of male  homosexuality,  many  of  which  conceptualize  male  homosexuality  as  pathology.”  (Brookey,  Reinventing the Male Homosexual: The Rhetoric and Power of the Gay Gene, p. 7)  “The  argument  for homosexual  immutability  betrays  a  misreading  of  the  scientific  research  itself.  Nothing  in  any  of  these  studies  can  fully  support  the  idea  that  homosexuality  is  biologically  immutable, each study leaves open the possibility that homosexuality is the result of a combination  of  biological  and  environmental  factors,  and  several  suggest  that  homosexuality  may  be  tied  to  a  predisposition  in  temperament  that  could  manifest  itself  in  a  number  of  ways.  All  agree  that Larry Houston – www.banap.net  32 

biological,  social,  and  psychological  factors  interact  to  produce  and  change  the  signs  of  homosexuality.  Furthermore,  these  studies  cannot  comment  effectively  on  the  frequency  of  homosexuality in the general population.” (Terry, An American Obsession p.394)  “As  this  survey  indicates,  research  currently  cited  in  support  of  a  biological  model  of  human  sexuality  is  methodologically  deficient,  inclusive,  or  open  to  contradictory  theoretical  interpretations. In addition, much of such research concentrates on animal studies and therefore has  little relationship to human behavior which is generally affected by cultural values. Therefore, this  paper  basic  question  is:  How  convincing  is  the  biological  evidence  that  the  details  of  human  sexuality  are  directly  due  to  innate  traits  and  processes?  The  answer  is  the  evidence  is  far  from  persuasive. We may conclude that the biological perspective on human sexuality has not yet made a  substantial  contribution  to  the  “balanced  biosocial  synthesis”  that  the  Baldwins  (1980)  have  recommended.  This conclusion is not intended to imply that biology has nothing to do with human sexuality (since  the  two,  are  of  course,  inextricably  intertwined).  It  means  simply  this:  The  claim  that  biological  factors  have  an  immediate,  direct  influence  on  such  things  as  sexual  identity,  behavior,  or  orientation remains  unproven.  When  biology  seems  to  be  critical  in  such  matters,  an  intervening  cultural factor is often more immediate.” (Hoult, “Human Sexuality in Biological Perspective:  Theoretical  and  Methodological  Considerations,”  p.150‑151  in  De  Cecco  and  Shively,  Bisexual and  Homosexual Identities:  Critical  Theoretical Issues  editors John  P.  De  Cecco  and Michael G. Shively)  “Although we have sought to provide a balanced understanding of the issues involved in study and  treatment,  review  of  extant  findings  has  led  to  several  conclusions  which  inform  the  book.  In  the  first  place,  while  genetic  influences  might  play  some  role  in  determining  sexual  orientation,  evidence reported to date does not permit such a conclusion. Neither do extant studies of biological  factors such as hormonal changes in prenatal life among men later identifying as gay support the  hypothesis that such factors have an important role in explaining same‑gender sexual orientation.  Findings from developmental studies suggest that sexual orientation is much more fluid across the  course of life than has often been recognized.” (Cohler and Galatzer‑Levy. The Course of Gay  and Lesbian Lives: Social and Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p.9)  What  is  important  is  to  understand  what  is  now  commonly  spoken  of  as  “sexual  orientation.” Whether it is heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual. And most important of  all  is  the  biological  role  that  may  play  in  one  being  a  heterosexual,  homosexual,  or  a  bisexual.  Sexual Orientation  “There are no sexual instincts in man. Human sexual behavior, as we have seen, varies widely from  individual  to  individual  and  from  culture  to  culture,  and  human  sexual  behavior  is  entirely  dependent  upon  learning  and  conditioning.  The  tastes,  preferences,  goals,  and  motives  that  determine  the  individual’s  pattern  of  sexual  behavior  are  acquired  in  the  context  of  his  unique Larry Houston – www.banap.net  33 

experiences and are in no sense innate or inherited. Only if this fact is thoroughly integrated and  absorbed  is  it  possible  to  discuss  human  sexual  phenomena  from  a  scientific  standpoint.”  (Churchill,  Homosexual  Behavior  Among  Males:  A  Cross‑Cultural  and  Cross‑Species  Investigation, p. 101)  “Like other aspects of human behavior, sexual orientation is the outcome of a complex interplay of  different factors, some of them physical, some of them hereditary, but most of them environmental.  Environmental  influences  include  general  cultural  habits  and  expectations,  as  well  as  particular  characteristics  of  the  individual’s  family  upbringing  and  person  circumstances.  No  single,  predominant  cause  for  all  cases  of  homosexual  orientation  is  ever  likely  to  be  found.”  (West,  Homosexuality Re‑Examined, p.320)  “Although  there  is  no  reliable  evidence  that  sexual  orientation  is  genetically  inherited,  neither  is  there  evidence  for  the  conclusion  by  Hoult  (1984)  that  it  is  the  result  of  social‑learning.  The  available evidence forces one to consider that neither nature or nurture provides the sole answer to  the cause of sexual orientation, either heterosexual or homosexual. One may consider that genetic  material (nature) is acted upon during a critical period by environmental influences (nurture) or,  in a more general sense, that neither influence can act without the other. Human beings are born  with  the  potential  for  sexual  behavior.”  (Haynes,“A  Critique  of  the  Possibility  of  Genetic  Inheritance and Homosexual Orientation,” p. 108‑109 in Sex, Cells, and Same‑Sex Desire:  The Biology of Sexual Preference editors John P. De Cecco, PhD and David Allen Parker,  MA)  “All available scientific evidence points to the conclusion that sexual orientation, be it heterosexual,  ambisexual, or homosexual, is a result of the interaction of genotype and environment. People are  born  with  the  innate  ability  to  perform  sexually,  but  the  focus  of  that  performance  is  no  more  immutable  than  language  skills.  Further,  there  is  evidently  great  plasticity  in  orientation,  as  one  moves  from  one  point  on  the  sexual  continuum  to  another,  for  differing  lengths  of  time,  and  at  different periods of one’s life. The constraints placed by social order on particular orientations have  no  basis  in  biology.  Thus  homosexuals  should  seek  their  liberation  through  political  and  social  efforts rather than biological research.” (Haynes, PhD James D. “A Critique of the Possibility  of  Genetic  Inheritance  and  Homosexual  Orientation,”  p. 111  in  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference editors John P. De Cecco, PhD and David Allen  Parker, MA.)  “Social theory and the study of the lives of gay and straight men and women converge to show that  the  experience of  sexual desire  is  not  fixed  but varies  across  the  course  of  life.  Sexual  orientation  should not be viewed from an essentialists perspective that regards sexual desire as predetermined  by either innate or developmental factors; sexual desire is fluid and changing in its significance for  society  and  persons  over  historical  time  and  in  lived  experience  within  lifetimes.  Little  is  known  about factors leading to either heterosexuality or homosexuality. The meaning of same‑gender desire  is founded in social and historical circumstances, which change over time and across generations or  cohorts. Social contexts and personal life circumstances alike influence the presently told life story

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

34 

narrated and collaboratively re‑constructed in psychoanalysis.” (Cohler and Galatzer‑Levy, The  Course of Gay and Lesbian Lives: Social and Psychoanalytic Perspectives, p. 421)  Bibliography  Archer, Bert. The End of Gay (and the death of heterosexuality). Thunder’s Mouth Press.  New York, 2002.  Bailey,  J.  Michael.  PhD.  &  Richard  C  Pillard,  MD.  “A  Genetic  Study  of  Male  Sexual  Orientation.” Archives of General Psychiatry. December 1991. Vol. 48, 1089‑1096.  Bancroft, John. “Homosexual Orientation The search for a biological basis.” British Journal  Of Psychiatry. 1994, 164, 437‑440.  Baumrind,  Diana.  “Commentary  on  Sexual  Orientation:  Research  and  Social  Policy  Implications.” Developmental Psychology 1995, Vol.31, No.1, 130‑136.  Brookey, Robert Alan. Reinventing the Male Homosexual: The Rhetoric and Power of the  Gay Gene. Indiana University Press. Bloomington & Indianapolis, 2002.  Burr, Chandler. “Homosexuality and Biology” p. 116‑134. in Silker, Jeffery. Homosexuality  and the Church. Westminster John Knox Press. Louisville, KY, 1994.  Byne,  William  MD,  PhD,  and  Bruce Parsons,  MD,  PhD.  “Human Sexual  Orientation The  Biological Theories Reappraised.” Archives of General Psychiatry March 1993. Vol.50, 228‑  239.  Byne,  William  MD,  PhD.  “Science  and  Belief:  Psychobiological  Research  on  Sexual  Orientation.”  in  De  Cecco, John  P.  PhD, and David Allen  Parker,  MA  editors. Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire:  The  Biology  of  Sexual  Preference.  Haworth  Press.  New  York,  London, & Norwood Australia, 1995.  Churchill,  M.D.,  Wainwright.  Homosexual  Behavior  Among  Males:  A  Cross‑Species  Investigation. Hawthorn Books, Inc. Publishers. New York, 1867.  Clausen,  Jan.  Beyond  Gay  or  Straight:  Understanding  Sexual  Orientation.  Chelsa  House  Publishers. Philadelphia, 1997.  Cohler, Bertraim J., Robert M. Galatzer‑Levy. The Course of Gay and Lesbian Lives: Social  and  Psychoanalytic  Perspectives.  The  University of  Chicago  Press.  Chicago and  London,  2000.  De  Cecco,  John  P.  PhD,  and  Michael  G.  Shively,  MA,  editors.  Bisexual  and  Homosexual  Identities: Critical Theoretical Issues. The Haworth Press. New York, 1984.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

35 

De  Cecco,  John  P.  PhD,  and  David  Allen  Parker,  MA  editors.  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference. Haworth Press. New York, London, & Norwood  Australia, 1995.  Ellis, Lee and Linda Ebertz. Sexual Orientation Toward Biological Understanding. Praeger.  Westport, Connecticut and London, 1997.  Ehrhardt,  Anke  A.  &  Heino  F.  L.  Meyer‑Bahlburg.  Effects  of  Prenatal  Sex  Hormones  on  Gender‑Related Behavior. Science. March 20, 1981. Vol. 211, No. 4488, 1312‑1318.  Friedman,  Richard  C.  M.D.,  and  Jennifer  I  Downey,  M.D.  “Homosexuality.”  The  New  England Journal of Medicine Oct. 6, 1994, Vol. 331, No. 4, 923‑930.  Gudel, Joseph P. “Homosexuality: Fact and Fiction”. Christian Research Journal Summer  1992, page 30. (See also CRI Journal web site, article, crj0107a)  Hammer, Dean H., Stella Hu, Victoria L Magnuson, Nan Hu, & Angela M. L. Pattatucci.  “A Linkage Between DNA Markers on the X Chromosome and Male Sexual Orientation.”  Science. July 16, 1993, Vol. 261, No.5119, 321‑327.  Jones, Stanton  L.  & Yarhouse,  Mark  A.  Homosexuality  The  Use  of  Scientific  Research  in  the Church’s Moral Debate. InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, 2000.  King, Michael & Elizabeth McDonald. “Homosexuals who are Twins.” The British Journal  of Psychiatry. March 1992, Vol. 160, 407 ‑ 409.  Kauth, Michael R. True Nature A Theory of Sexual Attraction. Kluwer Academic/Plenum  Publishers, New York, 2000.  LeVay,  Simon.  “A  Difference  in  Hypothalamic  Structure  Between  Heterosexual  and  Homosexual Men.” Science. August 30, 1991, Vol. 253, No. 5023, 1034‑1037.  LeVay, Simon. Queer Science. The MIT Press. Cambridge, MA & London, 1996.  McConaghy,  DSc,  MD,  Nathaniel. “Biologic Theories of Sexual  Orientation”.  Archives of  General Psychiatry. Volume 51, May 1994, p. 431‑431.  McKnight,  Jim.  Straight  Science?  Homosexuality,  Evolution  and  Adaptation.  Routledge.  London and New York, 1997.  Murphy,  Timothy  F.  Gay  Science  The  Ethics  of  Sexual  Orientation  Research.  Columbia  University Press. New York, 1997.  Money, John. “Sin, Sickness, or Status?” American Psychologist April 1987, Vol.42, No.4,  384‑399. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  36 

Rose, Hilary. “Gay Brains, Gay Genes and Feminist Science” in Weeks, Jeffery. Sexuality  and Its Discontents Meanings, Myths and Modern Sexualities. Routledge and Kegan Paul,  London, 1988. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article94 

Chapter Four: Types of Homosexualities 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  Same  sex  physical  sexual  activity,  ‘homosexuality,’  can  be  historically  documented;  this  activity in and of it is not disputed. This same sex physical sexual activity, ‘homosexuality,’  has been tolerated; but the meaning given to it has been culturally specific according the  individual society in which it takes place. The norm in all cultures and societies is opposite  sex physical sexual activity, ‘heterosexuality,’ marriage and procreation. The idea of a ‘gay  identity,’ (two adults  in a  homosexual relationship)  is a  modern  western  cultural type of  homosexuality. A ‘gay identity’ also must be viewed in the social political context in which  gives it its name and form.  Furthermore it was not until near the end of the twentieth century that a ‘gay liberation’  movement has  emerged and  made homosexuality a  controversial  issue.  Most  commonly  seen  is  that  reluctantly  societies  tolerated  some  adult  male  same‑sex  relations  with  even  more  acceptance  of  adult  female  same‑sex  relations.  While  they  more  generously  approved  sexual  relations  between  men  and  boys  with  some  qualifications:  the  practice  was understood more or less as a rite of passage which must end for the man in his late  twenties and for the boy in early teens. In all instances of ‘homosexuality’ continuing on  today, ‘homosexuality’ is based on behaviors and same‑sex physical sexual activity, today  the  emphasis  is  based  on  self‑identification  as  being  a  ‘homosexual.’  This  ‘homosexual’  today  is  a  pattern  of  essentially  exclusive  adult  same‑sex  relationships,  that  historically  and culturally specific to post‑modern western societies.  “Equally diverse are the forms of its acceptance. In one group of societies homosexual contacts are  tacitly  allowed  or  tolerated  for  a  definite  category  of  people,  for  example,  adolescent  boys  or  bachelors,  or  for  a  definite  situation,  as  something  temporary,  unavoidable,  or  unimportant.  In  other societies such contracts are prescribed as a necessary element of some sacred rites, for example,  in initiation rites. In the third case homosexual relationships constitute an aspect of a more or less  prolonged  social  process,  like  socialization  of  adolescents.  In  the  fourth  case  homosexuality  is  symbolized  as  a  permanent  life‑style  with  a  corresponding  social  role/identity.  Individual  sexual  motivation is dependent on these cultural variations.” (Kon, “A Socicultural Approach,” p.278‑  279  in Theories  of  Human  Sexuality,  editors  James  H.  Geer  and  William  T.  O’Donohue.  Plenum Press. New York and London, 1987.)

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

37 

“Homosexual  acts  are  probably  universal  in  humans  but  institutionalized  forms  of  homosexual  activity are not; and these depend to a great extent, upon specific historical problems and outlooks of  a culture.” (Herdt, Same Sex, Different Cultures p.55)  “Homosexuality as we know it ‑that is, long‑term relationships of mutual consent between adults‑  simply  did  not  exist  before  the  nineteen  century,  when  it  was  invented  by  scientists  to  create  a  pathological condition out of a rarely practiced behavior (previously known primarily as “sodomy”)  The construction of the condition made it possible for increasing numbers of people to identify with  it,  and  eventually  to react  against  its  pathological  status.”  (Schmidt, Straight and  Narrow?  p.  142‑143)  “Although  same‑sex  attractions  and  sexual  behavior  have  undoubtedly  occurred  throughout  history, lesbian, gay, and bisexual identities are relatively new (D’Emilio, 1983). The contemporary  notion  of  identity  is  itself  historically  created  (Baummeister,  1986).  The  concept  of  a  specifically  homosexual  identity  seems  to  have  emerged  at  the  end  of  the  nineteen‑century.  Indeed,  only  in  relatively  recent  years  have  large  numbers  of  individuals  identified  themselves  openly  as  gay  or  lesbian  or  bisexual.  Gay,  lesbian,  and  bisexual  public  identities,  then,  are  a  phenomenon  of  our  current historical era (D’Emilio, 1983; Faderman, 1991).” (Patterson, “Sexual Orientation and  Human Development: An Overview,” p. 3)  “Historical  and  anthropological  research  has  shown  that  homosexual  persons  (i.e.  people  who  occupy a social position or role as homosexuals) do not exist in many societies, whereas homosexual  behavior occurs in virtually society. Therefore, we must distinguish between homosexual behavior  and  homosexual  identity.  One  term  refers  to  one’s  sexual  activity  per  se  (whether  casual  or  regular);  the  other  word  defines  homosexuality  as  a  social  role,  with  its  emotional  and  sexual  components.  Such  distinction  is  consciously  rooted  in  historical  and  cross‑cultural  comparisons  between  homosexuality  in  advanced  societies  and  homosexuality  in  other  cultures  or  eras.”  (Escoffier, American Homo: Community and Perversity, p. 37)  “Lesbian and gay historians also discovered that homosexual activity frequently took place in some  societies without the presence of people defined as “homosexuals,” and that intense homosocial or  erotic  relationships  existed  between  people  who  did  not  otherwise  appear  to  be  homosexuals.”  (Escoffier, American Homo: Community and Perversity, p. 110)  “The cross‑cultural data on homosexuality (and almost all it concerns males alone) is also scarce, of  dubious quality and sometimes difficult to interpret. There are, of  course, the famous instances of  widespread male homosexual practices, but the data are often less than the fame. Classical Greece  and some Arab societies are cases of this sort, and one is forced to consider the possibility that these  examples  have  as  much  to  do  with  cultural  stereotyping  as  with  a  genuine  cultural  pattern.”  (Davenport  “Sexual  in  Cross‑Cultural  Perspective  in  Beach,  Human  Sexuality  in  Four  Perspectives, p.153)  “When  contemporary  homosexuals  invoke  history  and  anthropology  in  defense  of  homosexuality  and in opposition to exclusive and universal heterosexuality, their argument is empirically shaky.  Actually, history and anthropology provide no evidence for the tolerance of exclusive homosexuality 38  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

for  any  general  population.  There  is  no  society  that  approves  of  exclusive  homosexuality  for  the  general population, male or female. Some  societies permit a small number of men (less commonly  women) to engage in nothing but homosexual liaisons, often in conjunction with other roles, such  as shamans, magicians, or sorcerers.” (Goode, Deviant Behavior, p.193)  Therefore in the past, homosexuality has not posed the same issues as today.  “Homosexuality may be the key to understanding the whole of human sexuality. No subject cuts in  so  many  directions  into  psychology,  sociology,  history,  and  morality.  The  incidence,  as  well  as  visibility,  of  homosexuality  has  certainly  increased  in  the  Western  world  in  the  past  twenty‑five  years.  But  discussion  of  it  rapidly  became  over  politicized  after  the  Stonewall  rebellion  of  1969,  which  began  the  gay  liberation  movement.  Viewpoints  polarized:  people  were  labeled  pro‑gay  or  anti‑gay,  with  little  room  in  between.  For  the  past  decade,  the  situation  has  been  out  of  control:  responsible scholarship is impossible when rational discourse is being policed by storm troopers, in  this case gay activists, who have the absolutism of all fanatics in claiming sole access to the truth.”  (Paglia, Vamps and Tramps, p. 67)  “Consequently in sections that follow ‑ an exploration of attitudes and customs of ancient peoples  toward same‑sex eroticism the modern concepts of “homosexuality” or “sexual orientation” will be  conspicuous by their absence. Within these cultures, sexual contact between persons of the same sex  is  not  necessarily  seen  as  characteristic  of  a  particular  group  or  subset  of  persons;  there  is  no  category or “homosexuals”. On the contrary, in some cultures, same‑sex eroticism was an expected  part  of the  sexual  experience  of  every  member  of  society,  which  would  seem  to  argue  against  the  existence of “homosexuality” as a personal attribute at all.” (Mondimore, A Natural History of  Homosexuality p. 4)  “Descriptions of the Greeks, the berdaches, and the Sambia should make us a little unsure about our  categories  homosexual  and  heterosexual‑at  least,  they  should  make  us  think  more  carefully  about  what we mean by these words. But if we are now a little confused about categories, perhaps we can  agree on a few simple facts about human sexuality: (1) same‑sex eroticism has existed for thousands  of  years  in  vastly  different  times  and  cultures;  (2)  in  some  cultures,  same‑sex  eroticism  was  accepted as a normal aspect of human sexuality, practiced by nearly all individuals some time of the  time; and (3) in nearly every culture that has been examined in any detail, a few individuals seem to  experience  a  compelling  and  abiding  sexual  orientation  toward  their  own  sex.”  (Monimore,  A  Natural History of Homosexuality, p. 20)  “The universal claims of the gay myth have seduced otherwise careful scholars to reinterpret history  and anthropology in the same way, applying our peculiar explanation of homosexual behaviors to  other cultures and other times. Works on “Homosexuality in Greece,” for example, have attempted  to explain the homosexual habits  of  the  Greeks  in terms  of  sexual  orientation,  an  explanation  the  Greeks themselves would have found eccentric and probably offensive (along with our concepts of  “sexuality” – another concept of quite modern origins).  Similar  descriptions  of  the  berdaches  found  among  American  Indian  societies  as  “a  common  institutionalized  form  of  homosexuality”  are  also  a  mistake.  There  is  no  indication  that  sexual 39  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

orientation had anything to do with choosing the life of a berdache. North American Indians had a  tolerance  for  gender  ambiguity  that  provided  for  more  than  one  gender  role  without  reference  to  sexual orientation.  The  sexual  practices  of  other  societies  are  frequently  similar  in  appearance  but  express  quite  different beliefs and social priorities. As anthropologists have told us, no human behaviors are more  flexible, more malleable, or more expressive of the social structure of society than sexual behaviors,  and  it  does  no  good  to  impose  the  sexual  meanings  of  one  society  on  others.”  (DuBay,  Gay  Identity The Self Under Ban, p.6)  Today as we discuss the topic of homosexuality, we see a wide variety of expressions of it  in the lives of people. So now the term ‘homosexualities’ is often applied in the literature  on  this  topic.  When  talking  about  types  of  ‘homosexualities’  we  must  remember  we  are  taking a  ʺverbʺ and  using it as a ʺnounʺ; using  two  different  parts of  speech  to label the  same idea. I want to frame the discussion this way, “who one is, a homosexual” and “what  one  does,  homosexuality.”  Also  as  we  discuss  types  of  ‘homosexualities’  today  we  are  doing so from a framework of our ʺpostmodern generationʺ and ʺwestern culturalʺ lenses.  There  have  become two  sides in this  discussion,  with a moral  line  dividing them: a  pro‑  gay side, (those who support a homosexual identity, including individuals who accept this  identity), and those who oppose this ‘homosexual or gay identity’. So often objectivity has  become the ʺbaby thrown out with the bath waterʺ. Common sense has been replaced by  blind  passion.  This  objectivity  has  also  been  lost  in  the  scientific  community.  Before  accepting  the  outcome  of  a  scientific  project,  we  must  determine,  whether  the  scientists  have  a  particular  political/societal  agenda.  Is  the  scientist  himself  accepting  a  ʺgay  identityʺ? This present discussion, types of ‘homosexualities is coming from a sociological  framework,  looking  for  a  scientific  causation  may  be found  within  my  discussion  about  scientific studies.  ∙ Facultative and Obligative Homosexuality  Various  authors  use  several  terms  in  speaking  about  types  of  “homosexualities”.  Sometimes  you  will  see  the  terms  facultative  and  obligative  used  describing  homosexuality. The later, obligative, is considered exclusive homosexuality, a condition in  which a person can only bond or pair with a person of the same sex. There is no option for  bisexual or heterosexual bonding. Facultative homosexuality is a technical term for sexual  orientation and sexual activity with persons of the same sex. This term does not exclude  sexual relations with members of the opposite sex; it also may be referred to as bisexuality.  The  same‑sex  physical  activity  may  be  engaged  in  only  for  sexual  release,  power,  or  control,  or  in  situations  where  there  are  no  members  of  the  opposite  sex,  such  as  in  a  prison. ∙ Compulsive, symptomatic, and episodic homosexuality  One  author  uses  three  broad  categories,  compulsive,  symptomatic,  and  episodic  homosexuality.  (See  John  F  Harvey,  The  Truth  About  Homosexuality)  This  last  one,  episodic,  is  a  catchall  term  and  is  also  called  “situational  or  variational”.  Here  an Larry Houston – www.banap.net  40 

individual  participates  in  same‑sex  physical  acts  (homosexual  activity),  but  they  would  normally be heterosexual in their orientation. Homosexual activity takes place in times or  places where heterosexual activity is not possible, where people are separated by their sex,  for example prisons, schools etc. Also this homosexual activity may be seen in children or  adolescents  who  do  so  out  of  curiosity  or  in  learning  about  sex.  Older  individuals  may  engage  in  homosexual activity  for  money,  in  search  of  a  new  thrill,  from  indifference  to  sexual morals, or even in rebellion to cultural norms.  When  speaking  about  symptomatic  homosexuality,  one  is  acting  homosexually  as  a  symptom  of  a  more  general  personality  problem.  The  stronger  impetus  to  homosexual  activity  is  to  resolve  a  “personality/relational”  conflict”  which  has  become  sexualized.  Three  possible  areas,  though  there  may  be  others,  can  be  summarized.  There  may  be  problems of unsatisfied dependency needs, such as for love and affirmation. It may be in  the area of control issues, seen in unresolved power or dominance needs. So often this is  involved with sexual abuse as a child, which possibly leads them to abuse others later on.  Boys who are abused by other older males, often feel because this has happened to them,  he  must  be  a  homosexual  himself.  This  self  labeling  may  result  in  these  individuals  continuing  on  with  a  false  line  of  thinking,  giving  into  homosexual  physical  acts  and  accepting the homosexual identity and behavior.  Compulsive  or  obligatory  homosexuality  has  its  origins  with  childhood  developmental  relational  conflicts  with their  parents and peers.  This  category is associated  with  what is  being called sexual orientation. The child may prefer and exhibit non‑gender conforming  behavior,  which  results  in  labeling  and  identifying  with  homosexuality.  Other  typical  patterns are a passive, absent, or rejecting same sex parent. For males it is a strong mother,  “overshadowing”  the  father.  For  females  it  is  often  seen  as  a  result  of  sexual  abuse.  For  both sexes it may be a result of early exposure to sex, which is not age appropriate. At a  very  early  age  the  individual  child  “sees  and  feels”  himself  as  being  different  and  not  accepted.  As a  result of “relational/emotional”  needs become  sexualized during  puberty.  Whatever  the  impetus  that  results  into  acquiring  compulsive  homosexuality,  its  underlying cause is not of being born a homosexual.  ∙ Institutional homosexualities  More  often  by  many authors  homosexuality  is  discussed  within  the  framework  of  three  types  of  institutional  ‘homosexualities’  gender‑reversed,  role‑specialized,  and  age‑  structured  to  prove  a  fourth  commonly  identified  “homosexuality”  the  ʺgay  identityʺ.  Many of these authors are advocates for homosexuality.  “To facilitate the presentation of the cross‑cultural cases, I use a model that takes into account five  widely  agreed  on  forms  of  same‑gender  relations  around  the  world.  These  forms  are  (1)  age‑  structured relations as the basis for homoerotic relationships between older and younger males, (2)  gender‑transformed  homoerotic  roles  that  allow  a  person  to  take  the  sex/gender  role  of  the  other  gender, (3) social roles that permit or require the expression of same‑gender relations as a particular Larry Houston – www.banap.net  41 

niche in society, (4) western homosexuality as a nineteenth‑century form of sexual identity, and (5)  late‑twentieth‑century  western  egalitarian  relationships  between  persons  of  the  same  gender  who  are self‑consciously identified as gay or lesbian for all of their lives.” (Herdt, Gilbert. Same Sex,  Different Cultures: Gays and Lesbians Across Cultures, p.22‑23)  1. Gender‑reversed homosexuality  One institutional example is the berdache, among Native American groups. The role of the  berdache, is in a religious context. This person is spoken of as being “two spirited.” This is  referred  to  as  transgenderal  or  gender‑reversed  homosexuality.  Here  typically  a  male  plays out the role of a female. The anatomical sex of these individuals are not question, it  is  the  mechanism  of  selection  of  an  individual  that  is  not  known.  One  controversial  thought  is  that  an  individual  may  be  selected  because  of  a  genetic  predisposition  to  the  role, for example they have feminine physical traits and characteristics. This is not unlike  the  labeling  of  those  in  western  culture  as  ʺgay  or  queerʺ  given  by  peers  today  to  individuals based on their  physical appearance  and  mannerisms.  They  ʺlook and fitʺ  the  role.  In  these  societies  heterosexual  marriage  and  parenthood  are  the  normative.  The  berache  is  accepted,  but  is  not  the  normative.  The  gender  reversal  of  this  norm  therein  implies discontinuity  from  childhood  to adult sexual  development. Berache  could  marry  and have children.  “Another institutionalized from of homosexuality existed in many American Indian societies. Girls  and boys in these societies could refuse initiation into their adult gender roles and instead adopt the  social  role  of  the  other  gender.  For  example,  men  who  dressed  and  acted  in  accordance  with  the  adult female  role  were  known  as  “two‑spirited”  or  berdache  (originally  the  French  term  for these  Indians). The  berdache  often  married  Indian  men.  The partners  in  these  marriages  did  not define  themselves as “homosexuals,” nor did their societies recognize them as such, but their marital sex  life consisted of homosexual sexual relations.” (Escoffier, Jeffrey. American Homo Community  and Perversity, p.37)  “A third characteristic of a berache is that she or he was allowed to choose a marital partner of the  same sex. This is not necessarily prescribed: female berdaches are known to have married men, and  male ones have married women in both cases without losing their berdache status. So the element  which detemined the identityof the berdache was not the choice of sexual partner but rather her or  his occupation.”  (Wiering, “An Anthropological Critique of Constructionis: Berdaches and  Butches,” p. 224‑225 in Homosexuality, Which Homosexuality? by Dennis Altman)  2. Role‑specialized homosexuality  A second type,  role‑specialized homosexuality  is  less  commonly  discussed,  but  may  still  be documented. Here something must be added and adapted for homosexuality to occur.  It is recognized only for people who occupy a certain status role. An institutional example  for  this  type  is  the  Chuckee  shaman.  Again  as  with  the  berdache,  we  have  a  religious  context. The Chuckee shaman has a religious vision quest that leads to the feeling that he  should cross‑dress and engage in homosexual activity. Most of this type of homosexuality, 42  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

role‑specialized, is seen among females, with there being a further division among woman  in  class‑stratified  and  nonclass  societies.  Another  striking  similarity  as  seen  in  gender‑  reversed  homosexuality  discussed  before,  we  find  this  type  also  to  be  a  discontinuity.  Heterosexuality  is  the  normative  sexuality,  resulting  in  marriage  and  parenthood.  There  must be the allowance for enduring homoerotic bonding that may occur, but if it does, it is  rare and infrequent. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article95 

Chapter Five: Types of Homosexualities / Age‑Structured 
Sunday 20 March 2011.  3. Age Structured Homosexuality  The  third  type  of  homosexuality  is  transgenerational  or  age‑structured,  usually  between  men  and  boys.  This  is  the  type  of  homosexuality  that  finds  most  disapproval  in  our  western  culture  today.  Yet  this  type  of  homosexuality  is  still  sited  today  to  allow  for  approval  of  homosexuality in  general.  Most often  mentioned  is the  Greek  pederasty and  militarized societies, i.e. New Guinea. Characteristic of this type of homosexuality is that it  is  seen  as  a  regular  and  normal  part  of  development.  In  militarized  societies  it  is  the  context  for  installing  of  the  values  of  courage,  prowess,  aggressiveness,  and  masculine  value by older men into younger boys. This type of homosexuality is strongly correlated  with ritual mechanisms, such as initiation ceremonies. Boys are raised by their mothers to  a  certain  age  is  reached,  and  then  the  boy  goes  through  a  cultural  ritual  and  begins  segregated living with other males. In general there is a greater segregation of the sexes;  less emphasis is placed on a family structure. Again most notably we are referring to tribal  agrarian societies. We can find that the homosexual activity is practiced by older males on  younger males who are in the late childhood through early adulthood age. As the males  grow  older  the  roles  are  reversed,  from  being  passive  recipients,  to  being  the  active  partners  in  the  homosexuality  activity.  Even  after  marriage  the  male  was  able  to  participate in this homosexual activity. It was only after fatherhood that he was no longer  able  to  participate  in  homosexual  activity.  “With  fatherhood,  however,  all  same‑gender  activity is expected to cease.” (Turner, Miller, and Moses, Editors. AIDS Sexual Behavior  and Intravenous Drug Use, p.161) The most common type of homosexual activity is oral  sex,  the  idea  being  that  semen  must  be  transferred  from  older  males  to  younger  males.  Gilbert  Herdt,  a  gay  anthropologist,  has  written  extensively  about  this  type  of  homosexuality.  “The Sambia people (Herdt 1981) of the eastern highlands of New Guinea are among those whose  traditional folk wisdom provided a rationale for the policy of prepubertal homosexuality. According  to  this  wisdom,  a  prepubertal  boy  must  leave  the  society  of  his  mother  and  sisters  and  enter  the  secret society of men in order to achieve the fierce manhood of a head hunter. Whereas in infancy he Larry Houston – www.banap.net  43 

must have been fed woman’s milk in order to grow, in the secret society of men he must be fed men’s  milk‑  that  is,  the  semen  of  mature  youths  and  unmarried  men‑  in  order  to  become  pubertal  and  grow mature himself. It is the duty of the young bachelors to feed him their semen. They are obliged  to practice institutionalized pedophilia. For them to give their semen to another who could already  ejaculate his own is forbidden, for it robs a prepubetal boy of a substance he requires to become an  adult. When a bachelor reaches the marrying age, his family negotiates the procurement of a wife  and arranges the marriage. He then embarks on the heterosexual phase of his career. He could not,  however, have become a complete man on the basis of heterosexual experience alone. Full manhood  necessitates  a  prior  phase  of  exclusively  homosexual  experience.  Thus  homosexuality  is  universalized  and  is  a  defining  characteristic  of  head‑hunting,  macho  manhood.”  (Money,  “Sin,  Sickness, or Status?,” p. 384‑385)  “Since homosexual behavior in Melanesian societies is routine and obligatory as part of the social  organization  of  these  societies,  it  is  not  perceived  as  deviant  or  abnormal  behavior.  Clearly,  we  cannot  label  this  behavior  according  to  our norms  or  view these  men  as  “homosexuals”  –  a  term  that derives from our Western culture (see Herdt, 1984; Stroller, 1980.)” (Heyl, “Homosexuality:  A  Social  Phenomenon,”  p.  323  in  Human  Sexuality:  The  Societal  and  Interpersonal  Context. Kathleen McKinney and Susan Sprecher.)  Age‑structured  homosexuality occurs  in  many  places and times in  history, although  it  is  not universal. Of the three types of homosexuality discussed it could be argued that it is  the most frequent form of institutionalized same‑sex erotic contact around the world. This  type of homosexually occurs among the norm of heterosexuality for the adult male that is  married and has children. A much more detailed look at Greek pederasty will now follow.  By  many “homosexual apologists” there is much  made of  Greek  pederasty.  Yet if  we let  the facts speak for themselves, perhaps we may see Greek pederasty more as the Greeks  viewed it. It is quite interesting that the many recent books written about Greek sexuality  by  those  advocating  for  homosexuality  have  tended  to  romanticize  it.  In  the  following  discussion I have also included those who have not done so. The difference may be seen in  their titles and the quotes I use.  “Many  of  us,  too, may  imagine  that  world as  one  where  our  dreams  of  a  truly  healthy  and  fully  affirmed homosexuality were realized. Yet while it is true that the Greeks believed that sexual desire  for members of one’s own sex was something that almost everyone would feel at some time, and also  true  there  were  culturally  sanctioned  ways  of  living  that  desire,  those  accepted  ways  are  not  necessarily  congruent  with  our  contemporary  fantasies  about  how  same‑sex  love  might  most  fulfillingly  be  lived.  Indeed,  some  scholars  believe  that  the  ancient  Greek  presuppositions  surrounding  the  accepted  forms  of  male  love  of  males  are  so  radically  different  from  the  modern  concept of homosexuality as to make their perspectives irrelevant to our lives.” (Downing, Myths  and Mysteries of Same‑Sex Love, p.133)

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

44 

“However,  ancient  Greek  idealization  of  the  athletic  male  form  were  always  grounded in  a  larger  context  of  both  aesthetics  and  religion.  And,  it  must  be  remembered,  Athenian  boy‑lovers  always  married and never stopped honoring female divinities.” (Paglia, Vamps and Tramps, p.69)  “For the ancients, many historians agree, sexuality was not a separate realm of experience, the core  of  private  life;  instead  it  was  directly  linked  to  social  power  and  status.  People  were  judged  by  public  behavior,  for  which  there were  clear  roles;  marriage,  for  instance,  was  a  duty  that bore  no  necessary relationship to erotic satisfaction. Socially powerful males (citizens) enjoyed sexual access  to almost all other members of the society (including, in Greece, enslaved males, younger free males,  foreigners, and women of all classes).” (Clausen, Beyond Gay or Straight, p. 51)  “They were tied together in a pact equally compelling for both. It was the obligation of the erastes  always to  be  an  outstanding  and  impeccable  example to  the  boy.  He should  not  commit  any deed  that  would  shame  the  boy.  His total  responsibility  to  the  boy  made  him dependent  on  the  boy  in  ways far beyond the purely erotic. He was judged by the development and conduct of the boy. Even  in  regards  to  the  bodily  aspect  of  the  relationship  the  boy  could  assert  himself  against his  tutor.”  (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol and Its History in the Male World, p. 88)  “The cross‑cultural data on homosexuality (and almost all it concerns males alone) is also scarce, of  dubious quality and sometimes difficult to interpret. There are, of  course, the famous instances of  widespread male homosexual practices, but the data are often less than the fame. Classical Greece  and some Arab societies are cases of this sort, and one is forced to consider the possibility that these  examples  have  as  much  to  do  with  cultural  stereotyping  as  with  a  genuine  cultural  pattern.”  (Davenport  “Sexual  in  Cross‑Cultural  Perspective,  p.153  in  Human  Sexuality  in  Four  Perspectives, Editor Frank A. Beach.)  Because of fundamental differences between the sexual mores of ancient Greece and those  of  our  society,  to  make  comparisons  between  cultures  is  difficult.  We  must  try  to  avoid  interpreting the Greek experience through our post modern, western linguistic categories,  even  though  the  sexual  mores  of  our  society  and  culture  have  their  roots  in  both  Roman/Greek and Judea/Christian sexuality.  “First,  most  of  the  writing  on  ancient  sexuality  these  days  grinds  the  evidence  in  the  mill  of  an  “advocacy agenda” supported by some fashionable theory that says more about the crisis of Western  rationalism  than  it  does  about  ancient  Greece.  Thus  we  are  told  that  the  Greeks  saw  nothing  inherently wrong with sodomy between males as long as certain “protocols” of age, social status,  and position were honored, an interpretation maintained despite the abundance of evidence, detailed  below  in  Chapter  4,  that  the  Greeks‑including  pederastic  apologists  like  Plato‑were  horrified  and  disgusted by the idea of male being analling penetrated by another male and called such behavior  “against nature.” One purpose here is to get back to what the Greeks actually say without burying  it in polysyllabic sludge.” (Thornton, Eros The Myth of Ancient Greek Sexuality, p. xiii)  “The Greeks associated sexual desire closely with other human appetites – the desire for food, drink,  and sleep – and saw all these appetites as entailing the same moral problem, the problem of avoiding  excess.” (Downing, Myths and Mysteries of Same‑Sex Love, p.134) 45  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

“The Greek sexual ethic emphasized not what one did but how one did it; it involved not an index of  particular  forbidden  acts  but  an  inculcation  to  act  with  moderation.”  (Downing,  Myths  and  Mysteries of Same‑Sex Love, p.135)  “In Greece the sexual relationship was assumed to be a power relationship, where one participant is  dominate and the other inferior. On one side stands the free adult male; on the other, women, slaves,  and  boys.  Sexual  roles  are  isomorphic  with  social  roles;  indeed,  sexual  behavior  is  seen  as  a  reflection  of  social  relationship  not  as  itself  the  dominant  theme.  Thus  it  is  important  for  us  to  remember  that  for  the  Greeks  it  was  one’s  role, not  one’s  gender,  that  was salient.  Sexual  objects  come in two different kinds – not male and female but active and passive.” (Downing, Myths and  Mysteries of Same‑Sex Love, p.135‑136)  “In  its  basic  characteristics,  the  Roman  sex/gender  system  was  hardly  unusual.  Its  conceptual  blueprint  of  sexual  relations,  like  that  of  classical  Athens,  corresponded  to  social  patterns  of  dominance  and  submission,  reproducing  power  differentials  between  partners  in  configuring  gender roles and assigning by criteria not always coterminous with biological sex. Intercourse was  constructed  solely  as  bodily  penetration  of  an  inferior,  a  scenario  that  automatically  reduced  the  penetrated  individual‑woman,  boy,  or  even  adult  male‑  to  a  feminized  state.”  (Skinner,  Introduction, p.3 in Roman Sexualities editors Judith P. Hallett and Marilyn B. Skinner)  In doing so they had a double standard, in that they tolerated most sexual activity, as long  as  it  did  not  threaten  the  survival  of  the  family.  For  the  Greeks  sexual  activity  has  a  directional  quality,  sex  was  something  one  did  to  someone  else.  It  also  had  anatomic  imperative,  which  dictated that  it  was  the  man, or  more  precisely  the  penis that  did the  doing. So for the Greeks it may be seen that the social acceptability of a sexual act was not  determined by the gender of the partners but rather by the balance of the power between  them.  The  acceptability  of  a  particular  sexual  pairing  depended  on  the  age  and  social  standing of the partner. Also sexual acts were viewed from the prospective of domination  and submission. This may be constantly seen across cultures and history. Examples of this  may  include the  practice  of  humiliating  conquered  enemies  ‑ both  males and females by  raping them. To be penetrated unwilling is shameful and degrading.  “The second feature is more applicable to classical Greece culture. Male homosexual activity was, to  some extent, seen as normal, but only if it was kept within certain clearly defined social parameters.  Relationships  between  equals  in  age  were  frown  upon.  In  classical  Athens,  homosexual  relationships ideally had some features of an initiation rite, between a young, beardless boy and an  older  mentor.  However,  even  such  relationships  were  hedged  round  with  etiquette  regarding  the  process  of  courtship  and  the  giving  and  receiving  of  gifts  and  other  signals,  while  a  ‘deep‑rooted  anxiety’  about  pederasty  was  expressed  in  classical  Athenian  law.  Aristotle  argues  that  any  enjoyment of what he saw as the subordinate, defeated role of the passive partner in a homoerotic  relationship was unnatural; on Athenian vase‑paintings, the passive partner is never showed with  an erection. The Athenian figure of the kinaidos, the man who actually enjoys the passive role, is  presented as a ‘scare‑figure’, both socially and sexually deviant.” (Porter & Teich editors, Sexual  Knowledge, Sexual Science: The History of the Attitudes to Sexuality, p. ) Larry Houston – www.banap.net  46 

“The  ancient  world,  both  Greek  and  Roman,  did  not  base  its  classification  on  gender,  but  on  a  completely  different  axis,  that  of  active  versus  passive.  This  has  one  immediate  and  important  consequence, which we must face in the beginning. Simply put, there was no such emic,  cultural  abstraction as “homosexuality” in the ancient world. The fact that a man had sex with other men  did not determine his sexual category. Equally, it must be emphasized, there was no such concept as  “heterosexuality”. The application of these terms to the ancient world is anachronistic and can lead  to  serious  misunderstandings.  By  the  fifth  time  one  has  made  the  qualification,  “The  passive  homosexual was not rejected for his homosexuality but for his passivity,” it ought to become clear  that we are talking not about “homosexuality” but about passivity.  It  is  very  difficult  for  us  to  ignore  our  own  prejudices  and  realize  that  what  may  be  literally  a  matter of life and death in our culture would have been a matter of indifference or bewilderment to  the  Romans  (see  below).  But  anthropological  data  shows  that  active versus  passive  as  a  basis  for  determining sexual categories is paralleled in a wide variety of societies. Outside our own system of  cultural types, “homosexual” applies meaningfully only to acts, not to people; it is an adjective, not  a noun. Even then we must add the warning that the adjective may serve to gather together acts of  significance only to our culture. We all recognize that different societies have totally different lines  from ours that divide sacred and secular, edible and inedible, kin and nonkin. We are willingly to  believe that the Romans inhabited a different physical world, a different spiritual world, a different  psychological  world.  We  must  be  willing  to  accept  the  fact  that  they  inhabited  a  different  sexual  world as well.” (Parker, The Teratogenic Grid, p.47‑48 in Roman Sexualities editors Judith  P. Hallett and Marilyn B. Skinner)  In  actuality  there  is  very  little  surviving  historical  evidences  and  records  of  how  the  Greeks viewed sexuality. But what we know is that the norm for an adult Greek male was  predominantly heterosexual and his sexual responsibilities were primarily for his wife. As  seen in other cultures, there was a “homosexual period” in the life of a Greek man. Their  society expected a male to pass through predominately homosexual stages of life on their  way  to  full  masculinity.  The  end,  this  “full  masculinity”  for  the  Greek  male  was  heterosexuality, marriage, and fatherhood. Greek homosexuality was not a stable pattern  in  life,  but  only  a  phenomenon  of  puberty,  that  might  later  be  integrated  into  adult  heterosexual  life.  Thus  though  homosexual  drives  may  have  remained  into  adulthood,  they need not be denied, nor was shame attached to them. The Greek culture allowed for  their physical expression provided the proper social etiquette was observed.  When  studying  the  “art”  of  ancient  Greece,  there  is  almost  no  written  record  of  the  circumstances standing what the artist attempts to portray. Are they attempting to portray  sex  acts?  We  are  viewing  these  artifacts  hundreds  of  years  later  and  from  a  radically  different world viewpoint. From the little surviving historical evidence there is even less if  any,  showing  same  sex  adults  as  “couples”.  The  majority  of  surviving  evidence  and  records  from  ancient  Greece  is  related  to  man‑youth  homosexuality  or  the  precisely  defined passive homosexual, kinaidos.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

47 

“Vase  paintings  are  very  clear  about  the  correct  sexual  position,  showing  male  citizen  lovers  as  standing up facing one another, not penetrating any orifice but with the erastes rubbing his penis  inside  the  boy’s  thigh  (interfemoral  intercourse).”  (Bishop  and  Osthelder,  Sexualia  From  Prehistory to Cyberspace, p.208‑209) A review of the surviving historical written records  from  the  three  greatest  philosophers,  Socrates,  Plato,  and  Aristotle  will  show  that  they  regarded  homosexual  conduct  as  intrinsically  immoral.  They  rejected  the  “idea  of  a  modern gay identity”. Also there are written records of legal provisions regulating various  forms of homoerotic behavior. These legal provisions may be may be grouped into three  categories. The first group has been mentioned before, legal provisions surrounding male  prostitution.  The  male  lost the right to address  the  Assembly  and  to participate  in other  areas of civil life if he engaged in homosexual intercourse for gain. These legal provisions  against male prostitution also applied to pederasty.  “This was especially so if the youth allowed himself to be penetrated, an act considered unworthy of  a man and a free citizen, and one which could threaten his citizenship.” (Bishop and Osthelder,  Sexualia From Prehistory to Cyberspace, p.208)  A second group of legal provisions regulating homoerotic behavior were laws relating to  education and courtship. The growth of pederasty had also resulted in a “proper way” for  wooing the boy, so as to protect the integrity of both parties. This also was to provide for  the protection of the boy’s family. This group of legal provisions set out a series of detailed  prohibitions designed, among other things, to protect schoolboys from the erotic attention  of  older  males.  The  final  group  was  a  more  general  set  of  legal  provisions.  They  were  general  provisions  concerning  sexual  assault,  and  fell  under  the  Law  of  hubris  (insult,  outrage, or abuse). Thus they were applicable to both males and females.  “Scholars usually do not refer to hubris in connection with pederasty because they believe hubris to  require violent insult and outrage. They have not paid sufficient attention, however, to the way in  which  the  law  of  hubris  may  have  provided  for  the  principle  criminal  penalties  for  rape.  But  although rape is often characterized as hubris, so is seduction. Euphiletus, foe example, refers to the  hubris which the lover of his wife has committed against him (Lysias 1.4, 17, 25) and an oration of  Demosthenes involves a prosecution for hubris (hubreos graphe) brought by a son on account of the  seduction of his mother.  Such contexts perfectly match Aristotle’s definition of hubris as any behaviors which dishonors and  shames the victim for the pleasure or gratification of the offender (Rhetoric 1387b). Indeed, it is in  this connection that Aeschines introduced the law of hubris into the catalogue of statutes which he  enumerated  as  regulating  paederasty  in  Athens  in  the  fourth  century  B.C.  In  fact,  when  he  first  refers to the law of hubris he characterizes it as the statute which includes all such conduct in one  summary prohibition: “If anyone conmmits hubris against a child or man or woman or anyone free  or slave . . .” (Aeschines 1, 15). Accordingly, Athenian sources qualify both rape and seduction of  women and children as acts of hubris, for both violate the sexual integrity and honor of the family.”  (Cohen, Law, Sexuality, and Society The Enforcement of Morals in Classical Athens, p.178‑  179) Larry Houston – www.banap.net  48 

So what can we know about how the Greeks viewed homosexuality and pederasty.  “I hope that sufficient documentary evidence has been given to show that paiderasty was cultivated  by  heterosexually  normal  men  in  ancient  Greece,  where  it  did  not  presuppose  an  inversely  homosexual type of personality. It was not considered a transgression, to be tolerated, nor was it felt  to betoken to any laxity in moral standards; it was a natural part of the life‑style of the best of men,  reflected in the stories of the gods and heroes of the people.” (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol and  Its History in the Male World, p. 32)  “Homosexuality,  then,  to  the  Greeks  is  a  historical  innovation,  a  result  of  the  depraved  human  imagination  and  vulnerability  to  pleasure.”  (Thornton,  Eros  The  Myth  of  Ancient  Greek  Sexuality, p. 102)  “The  people  of  the  ancient  world  were  not  only unfamiliar  with  the  concept  of  “homosexuality,”  they  would  have  been  equally  puzzled  by  the  concept  of  “sexuality.”  Indeed,  we  can  legitimately  question whether either of these terms has any clinical validity at all. The Greeks were aware that  some  people  enjoyed  tender  relations  with  members  of  their  own  sex  and  others  did not. Period.”  (DuBay, Gay Identity The Self Under Ban, p.154)  “The situation was totally different in the case of grown equals, however. Whereas the Dorian boy  would  attain  manhood  through  his  submission,  the  grown  man  who  submitted  to  another  man  would  lose  his  manliness  and  become  effeminate,  exposed  to  shame  and  scorn.”  (Vanggard,  Phallos A Symbol and Its History in the Male World, p. 89)  “All three  of  the greatest  Greek  philosophers,  Socrates,  Plato,  and  Aristotle,  regarded homosexual  conduct  intrinsically  immoral.  All  three  rejected  the  linchpin  of  modern  “gay”  ideology  and  lifestyle.  At the heart of the Platonic‑Aristotelian and later ancient philosophical rejections of all homosexual  conduct, and thus of the modern “gay” ideology, are three fundamental theses: (1) The commitment  of  a  man  and  a  woman  to  each  other  in  the  sexual  union  of  marriage  is  intrinsically  good  and  reasonable, and is incompatible with sexual relations outside of marriage. (2) Homosexual acts are  radically and peculiarly non‑martial, and for that reason intrinsically unreasonable and unnatural.  (3)  Furthermore,  according  to  Plato,  if  not  Aristolte, homosexual  acts have  a  special  similarity  to  solitary masturbation, and both types of radically non‑martial act are manifestly unworthy of the  human being and immoral.” (Finnis, “Law, Morality, and “Sexual Orientation, p.33)  Pederasty developed from a rite of passage to an educational institution. This institution  was for the noblemen from the privilege class of leading Greek city‑states to pass onto the  adolescents of the same social class the manly virtues they would need to take their place  in Greek society. Consequently there may be less “sex” between the male adult and youth,  then homosexual advocates may wish to portray. What sexual contact took place between  males of the same social groups was very much concerned with the status and was played  out  according  to  rules  that  neither  party  was  degraded  or  open  to  accusations  of  licentiousness. The little sexual contact that may have taken place was to be sexual release Larry Houston – www.banap.net  49 

and  pleasure  for  the  adult  male  and  not  for  the  youth.  It  was  not  oral  or  anal  sexual  activity. Most often it is thought to occur by the adult rubbing his penis between the thighs  of the youth to obtain organism, while both are standing up and facing each other. What  this  accomplished was  to  allow  the  older active  partner  to achieve  orgasm,  avoiding  for  the young man the “shame of penetration”. For the young man, whatever his affections for  the  older  man,  he  was  not  to  feel  or  express  sexual  desire  towards  the  older  man.  The  Greek  norm  was  always  heterosexuality  and  marriage.  Greek  pederasty  was  primarily  restricted  to  the  “privileged  noble  classes”  of  some  Greek  city‑states.  Both  members  the  adult and youth were from the same “social class”. The relationship for the youth ended  when he himself became an adult. Greece placed a strong emphasis on military and sport  abilities, i.e. the Olympics.  “So  these  love  relationships  were  not  private  erotic  enterprises.  They  took place  openly  before  the  eyes  of  the  public,  were  regarded  as  of  great  importance  by  the  state,  and  were  supervised  by  its  responsible authorities.” (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol and Its History in the Male World, p.  39)  “Such  pederasty  was  supposed  to  transmit  manly  virtues  of  mind  and  body  from  nobleman  to  young  lover  (Vangaard,  1972).”  (Karlen,  “Homosexuality  in  History,”  p.79  in  Homosexual  Behavior: A Modern Reappraisal, editor Judd Marmor)  “Paiderasty served the highest goal – education (paideia). Eros was the medium of paideia, uniting  tutor  and  pupil.  The  boy  submitted  and  let  himself  be  taken  in  the  possession  of  the  man.”  (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol and Its History in the Male World, p. 87  “Ancient Greece is often cited as an example of a civilization in which homosexuality was accepted  as normal, even encouraged. This is not quite true. All males were expected to make love to women,  to marry, and to sire a family, whether or they a male lover or not. Moreover, love and sex between  adult  males  was  thought  to  be  a  bit  ridiculous.  The  norm  was  for  an  adult  male  to  have  a  relationship that lasted several years with and adolescent boy. When the boy reached maturity, he,  then, was also expected to take a young lover.” (Goode, Deviant Behavior, p.193‑194)  “For  instance,  in  ancient  Greece,  homosexual  relationships  between  older  men  and  younger  men  were  commonly  accepted  as  pedagogic.  Within  the  context  of  an  erotic  relation,  the  older  man  taught the younger one military, intellectual, and political skills. The older men, however, were also  often husbands and fathers. Neither sexual relationship excluded the other. Thus, although ancient  Greek  society  recognized  male  homosexual  activity,  the  men  in  these  relationships  rarely  defined  themselves  as  primarily  “homosexual.”  (Escoffier,  American  Homo:  Community  and  Perversity, p. 37)  “To  facilitate  the  understanding  of  the  Hellenic  love  of  boys,  it  will  be  as  well  to  say  something  about  the  Greek  idea  of  beauty.  The  most  fundamental  difference  between  ancient  and  modern  culture is that the ancient is throughout male and that the woman only comes into the scheme of the  Greek man as a mother of his children and as manager of household manners. Antiquity treated the  man, and the man only, as the focus of all intelligent life. This explains why the bringing up and 50  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

development of girls was neglected in a way we can hardly understand; but the boys, on the other  hand,  were  supposed  to  continue  their  education  much  later  then  is  usual  with  us.  The  most  peculiar  custom, according  to our  ideas,  was that every  man  attracted  to  him  some  boy  or youth  and, in the intimacy of daily life, acted as his counselor, guardian, and friend, and prompted him in  all manly virtues.” (Licht, Sexual Life in Ancient Greece, p.418)  “For  instance,  in  ancient  Greece,  homosexual  relationships  between  older  men  and  younger  men  were  commonly  accepted  as  pedagogic.  Within  the  context  of  an  erotic  relation,  the  older  man  taught  the  younger  one  military,  intellectual,  and  political  skills.  The  older  men,  however,  were  often husbands and fathers. Neither sexual relationship excluded the other. Thus, although ancient  Greece society recognized male homosexual activity as valid form of sexuality, the men involved in  these  relationships  rarely  defined  themselves  as  primarily  “homosexual.”  (Escoffier,  Jeffrey.  American Homo Community and Perversity, p.37)  Throughout  history  the  majority  of  societies  were  essentially  masculine,  although  there  were  exceptions.  So  we  must  be  careful  not  to  add  a  strong  sexual  emphasis  to  Greek  pederasty.  “Among the Dorians it was the best men who cultivated paiderasty as something worthy of praise,  as an obligation the state.” (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol and Its History in the Male World,  p. 52)  “The  truth  is  that  pederasty  is  a  vice  encouraged  by  abnormal  social  conditions,  such  as  life  in  military camps or purely masculine communities. Society was essentially masculine in the classical  period of Greek civilisation, even outside of Sparta. Homosexuality in fact develops wherever men  and  women  live  separate  lives  and  differences  in  education  and  refinement  between  the  sexes  militate against normal sexual attraction. The more uncompromising such separation and diversity  become, more widespread homosexuality will be.” (Flaceleitere, Love in Ancient Greece, p.215‑  216)  “What then  is  one  to  conclude  about  a  culture  whose  laws  expressed a deep  rooted  anxiety  about  pederasty while not altogether forbidding it. A culture in which attitudes and values range from the  differing  modes  of  approbation  represented  in  Plato’s  Symposium  to  the  stark  realism  of  Aristophanes  and  the  judgement  of  Aristotle,  that  in  a  man,  the  capacity  to  feel  pleasure  in  a  passive  sexual  role  is  a  diseased  or  morbid  state,  acquired  by  habit,  and  comparable  to  biting  fingernails or habitually eating earth or ashes. A culture is not a homogeneous unity; there was no  one  “Athenian  attitude”  towards  homoeroticism.  The  widely  differing  attitudes  and  conflicting  norms and practices which have been discussed above represent the disagreements, contradictions,  and  anxieties  which  make  up  the  patterned  chaos  of  a  complex  culture.  They  should  not  be  rationalized  away.  To  make  them  over  into  a  nearly  coherent  and  internally  consistent  system  would  only  serve  to  diminish  our  understanding  of  the  “many‑hued”  nature  of  Athenian  homosexuality.”  (Cohen,  Law,  Sexuality,  and  Society  The  Enforcement  of  Morals  in  Classical Athens, p. 201‑202).

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

51 

“Basic to the understanding of the nature, meaning, and importance of paiderasty is the following:  Firstly, the age difference between the erastes and his eromenos was always considerable. The eraste  was a grown man, the eromenos still an immature boy or youth.” (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol  and Its History in the Male World, p.43) “Secondly, as has been demonstrated, an ethical basis  was essential for the Dorian relationship.” (Vanggard, Phallos A Symbol and Its History in the  Male  World,  p. 43) “Thirdly, the  homosexuality  of  the paidersty  relationship had  nothing  to do  with effeminacy. On the contrary, among the Dorians the obvious aim of education was manliness  in its most pronounced forms. Refinement in the manner of dressing and in regards to food, house,  furniture or other circumstances of daily life was looked upon with contempt. Contemporary as well  as  later  sources  agree  in  stressing  that  it  was  among  the  warlike  Dorians  in  particular  that  paidersty  flourished.”  (Vanggard,  Phallos  A  Symbol and Its  History  in the  Male  World,  p.  44) “Fourthly, Dorian paiderasty was something entirely different from homosexuality in the usual  sense in which we use the term, as inversion (see definition on page 17). We have repeatedly pointed  out that ordinary men regularly cultivated paiderasty and active heterosexuality at the same time.  Men who stuck exclusively to boys and did not marry were punished, scorned, and ridiculed by the  Spartan  authorities,  and  treated  disrespectfully  by  the  young  men.”  (Vanggard,  Phallos  A  Symbol and Its History in the Male World, p. 44)  Again here, with pederasty as an example of age‑structured homosexuality, along with the  other  two  types  of  homosexualities,  gender  reversed  and  role‑specialized  discussed,  heterosexuality  in  adulthood  with  marriage  and  parenthood  is  seen  as  being  the  norm.  Thus the nature of same‑sex erotic contact is sequential, not linear; in time it evolves into a  different mode of sexual experience for the individual. Also it is in the context that sexual  maturity  is  broken  by  the  discontinuity  of  adolescent  homosexuality.  Heterosexuality  is  the end result, with homosexuality being a transitional phase state. Finally it is important  to  notice  that  one  sexuality,  homosexuality  is  replaced  by  another  sexuality,  heterosexuality. What is learned and accepted must be unlearned and rejected. In all three  of  these  types  of  homosexualities  there  is  no  concept  of  the  “modern  western  gay  identity”.  That  is  a  homosexual  identity,  a  person  who  is  habitually  and  exclusively  sexually bonded to a same sex‑partner through the life span. As with the other two types  of  homosexualities  we  must  acknowledge  the  existence  of  the  possibility  of  adulthood  homoerotic attractions. But they are by far not the norm. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article64 

Chapter  Six  Types  of  Homosexualities/  Gay  and  Lesbian  Homosexual  Identity 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  4. Gay and Lesbian Homosexuality Identity

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

52 

Homosexuality today expressed in a gay and lesbian identity may possibly be viewed as  another type of homosexuality. Just as the others are historically and culturally specific so  is  the  modern gay and  lesbian.  Being a gay and lesbian is  not a  unitary  construct  that is  culturally  transcendent  across  all  societies  today.  A  gay  and  lesbian  is  a  social  political  identity  limited  to  modern  western  cultures,  although  this  gay  and  lesbian  identity  is  gradually being expressed and adopted in other parts of the world.  “The search for a theory of gay identity originated among gay Left intellectuals. Starting from an  “ethnic  model”  of history  that  at  first  assumed  an  already  existing  identity  or social  group,  they  eventually discovered that homosexuals were historically constructed subjects.” (Escoffier, Jeffrey.  American Homo Community and Perversity, p.62)  “We should employ cross‑cultural and historical evidence not only to chart changing attitudes but  to  challenge  the  very  concept  of  a  single  trans‑historical  notion  of  homosexuality.  In  different  cultures  (and  at  different  historical  moments  or  conjunctures  within  the  same  culture)  very  different  meanings  are  given  to  same‑sex  activity  both  by  society  at  large  and  by  the  individual  participants.  The  physical  acts  might  be  similar,  but  the  social  construction  of  meanings  around  them are profoundly different. The social integration of forms of pedagogic homosexual relations in  ancient  Greece  have  no  continuity  with  contemporary  notions  of  homosexual  identity.  To  put  it  another way, the various possibilities of what Hocquenghem calls homosexual desire, or what more  neutrally  might  be  termed  homosexual  behaviors,  which  seem  from  historical  evidence  to  be  a  permanent  and  ineradicable  aspect  of  human  sexual  possibilities,  are  variously  constructed  in  different  cultures  as  an  aspect  of  wider  gender  and  sexual  regulation.  If  this  is  the  case,  it  is  pointless discussing questions such as, what are  the origins of homosexual oppression, or what is  the nature of the homosexual taboo, as if there was a single, causative factor. The crucial question  must be: what are the conditions for the emergence of this particular form of  regulation of sexual  behavior in this particular society?” (Weeks, Against Nature, p. 15‑16)  “Transcending all these issues of lifestyle was the potent question of the gay identity itself. The gay  identity is no more a product of nature than any other sexual identity. It has developed through a  complex history of definitions and self‑definition, and what recent histories of homosexuality have  clearly  revealed  is  that  there  is  no  necessary  connection  between  sexual  practices  and  sexual  identity.” (Weeks, Sexuality and Its Discontents Meanings, Myths and Modern Sexualities,  p. 50)  “The  idea  of  a  gay  and  lesbian  identity  sexual  identity  has  been  formulated  over  the  last  two  decades.  Historically  it  is  the  product  of  the  gay  and  lesbian  liberation  movement,  which,  itself,  grew out of the Black civil rights and women’s liberation movements of the fifties and sixties. Like  ethnic  identities,  sexual  identity  assigns  individuals  to  membership  in  a  group,  the  gay  lesbian  community. Although sexual identity has become a group identity, its historical antecedents can be  traced  to  the  nineteen‑century  notion  that  homosexual  men  and  women,  each  representative  of  a  newly  discovered  biological  specimen,  represented  a  “third  sex”.  Homosexuality,  which  had  been  conceived  primarily  as  an  act  was  thereby  transformed  into  an  actor.  (De  Cecco,  1990b).  Once  actors  had  been  created  it  was  possible  to  assign  them a  group  identity. Once  a  person became  a Larry Houston – www.banap.net  53 

member  of  a  group,  particularly  one  that  has  been  stigmatized  and  marginal,  identity  as  an  individual was easily subsumed under group identity.” (De Cecco and Parker, “The Biology of  Homosexuality: Sexual Orientation or Sexual Preference,” p. 22‑23 in Sex, Cells, and Same‑  Sex Desire: The Biology of Sexual, Preference, editors De Cecco and Parker)  “The  configuring  of  the  meaning  of  homosexuality  by  its  advocates  into  a  lifestyle  alternative  or  minority  status,  and  the  movement  of  lesbians  and  gay  men  into  the  social  center  parallels  the  transformation  of  the  social  role  of  the  African‑Americans  and  women  during  the  same  period.”  (Seidman, Embattled Eros, p.148‑149)  “On the one hand, lesbians and gay men have made themselves an effective force in the USA over  the past several decades largely by giving themselves what the civil rights movement had: a public  collective identity. Gay and lesbian social movements have built a quasi‑ethnicity, complete with its  own political and culture institutions, festivals, neighborhoods, even its own flag. Underlying that  ethnicity is typically the notion that what gays and lesbians share ‑ the anchor of minority rights  claim – is the same fixed, natural essence, a self with same‑sex desires. The shared oppression, these  movements have forcefully claimed, is denial of the freedoms and opportunities to actualize this self.  In this ethiniclessentialist politic, clear categories of collective identity are necessary for successful  resistance and political gain.” (Gamson, “Must Identity Movements Self‑Destruct?”, p.516)  “Lesbian  and  gay  historians  have  asked  questions  about  the  origins  of  gay  liberation  and  lesbian  feminism, and have come up with some surprising answers. Rather than finding a silent, oppressed,  gay  minority  in  all  times  and  all  places, historians  have  discovered  that  gay  identity  is  a  recent,  Western, historical construction. Jeffrey Weeks, Jonathan Katz and Lillian Faderman, for example  have traced the emergence of lesbian and gay identity in the late nineteenth century. Similarly John  D’Emilio, Allan Berube and the Buffalo Oral History Project have described how this identity laid  the basis for organized political activity in the years following World War II.  The work of lesbian and gay historians has also demonstrated that human sexuality is not a natural,  timeless “given”, but is historically shaped and politically regulated.” (Duggan, “History’s Gay  Ghetto: The Contradictions of Growth in Lesbian and Gay History,” p.151‑152 in Sex Wars  edited by Duggan & Hunter, Sex Wars)  “It isn’t at all obvious why a gay rights movement should ever have arisen in the United States in  the first place. And it’s profoundly puzzling why that movement should have become far and away  the  most  powerful  such  political  formation  in  the  world.  Same  gender  sexual  acts  have  been  commonplace throughout history and across cultures. Today, to speak with surety about a matter  for which there is absolutely no statistical evidence, more adolescent male butts are being penetrated  in the Arab world, Latin American, North Africa and Southeast Asia then in the west.  But the notion of a gay “identity” rarely accompanies such sexual acts, nor do political movements  arise to make demands in the name of that identity. It’s still almost entirely in the Western world  that the genders of one’s partner is considered a prime marker of personality and among Western  nations it is the United States ‑ a country otherwise considered a bastion of conservatism ‑ that the  strongest political movement has arisen centered around that identity. 54  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

We’ve only begun to analyze why, and to date can say little more then that certain significant pre‑  requisites  developed  in  this  country,  and  to  some  degree  everywhere  in  the  western  world,  that  weren’t present, or hadn’t achieved the necessary critical mass, elsewhere. Among such factors were  the  weakening  of  the  traditional  religious  link  between  sexuality  and  procreation  (one  which  had  made non‑procreative same gender desire an automatic candidate for denunciation as “unnatural”).  Secondly  the  rapid  urbanization  and  industrialization  of  the  United  States,  and  the  West  in  general, in the nineteen century weakened the material (and moral) authority of the nuclear family,  and  allowed  mavericks  to  escape  into  welcome  anonymity  of  city  life,  where  they  could  choose  a  previously  unacceptable  lifestyle  of  singleness  and  nonconformity  without  constantly  worrying  about parental or village busybodies pouncing on them.” (Duberman, Left Out, p. 414 ‑ 415.)  “I have argued that lesbian and gay identity and communities are historically created, the result of  a  process  of  capitalist  development  that  has  spanned  many  generations.  A  corollary  of  this  argument is that we are not a fixed social minority composed for all time of a certain percentage of  the population. There are more of us than one hundred years ago, more of us than forty years ago.  And  there  may very  well  be  more  gay men  and  lesbians  in  the  future.  Claims  made  by gays  and  nongays that sexual orientation is fixed at an early age, that large numbers of visible gay men and  lesbians  in  society,  the  media,  and  schools  will  have  no  influence  on  the  sexual  identities  of  the  young, are wrong. Capitalism has created the material conditions for homosexual desire to express  itself as a central component of some individuals’ lives; now, our political movements are changing  consciousness, creating the ideological conditions that make it easier for people to make that  choice.”  (D’Emilio,  “Capitalism  and  Gay  Identity,  p.  473‑474  in  The  Lesbian  and  Gay  Studies Reader by Henry Abelove, Michele Aine Barale and David M. Halperin)  There  is  a  wealth  of  cross‑cultural  evidence  that  point  to  the  existence  of  numerous  patterns of homosexuality varying in origins, subjective states and manifest behaviors. But  the  paramenters  of  the  discussion  are  still  best  framed  as  Who  one  is,  a  homosexual  or  What one does, homosexuality. The support for the latter is the strongest.  “Descriptions of the Greeks, the berdaches, and the Sambia should make us a little unsure about our  categories homosexual and heterosexual ‑least, they should make us think more carefully about what  we mean by these words. But if we are a little confused about categories, perhaps we can agree on a  few simple facts about human sexuality: (1) same‑sex eroticism has existed for thousands of years in  vastly  different  times  cultures;  (2)  in  some  cultures,  same‑sex  eroticism  was  accepted  as  normal  aspect of human sexuality, practiced by nearly all individuals some of the time; and (3) in nearly  every  culture  that  has  been  examined  in  any  detail,  a  few  individuals  seem  to  experience  a  compelling  and  abiding  sexual  orientation  toward  their  own  sex.”  (Mondimore,  A  Natural  History of Homosexuality, p.20)  The  reality  is  that  this  “gay  identity”,  a  pattern  of  essentially  exclusive  male  homosexuality familiar to us which has been exceedingly rare or unknown in cultures that  required  or  expected  all  males  to  engage  in  homosexual  activity.  So  I  would  argue  this  “gay  identity”  should  be  seen  not  as  a  type  of  homosexuality,  but  rather  as  a  social  movement, a political cause, a new form of gender identity, and a life‑style. Therefore the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  55 

psychosocial  conditions  of  being  gay  today  must  be  understood  in  their  own  place  and  historical time.  “Psychological theory, which should be employed to describe only individual mental, emotional, and  behavioral aspects of homosexuality, has been employed for building models of personal development  that purport to mark the steps in an individual’s progression toward a mature and egosyntonic gay  or lesbian identity. The embracing and disclosing of such an identity, however, is best understood  as a political phenomenon occurring in a historical period during which identity politics has become  a become a consuming occupation.” (De Cecco, Sex, Cells, and Same‑Sex Desire: The Biology  of Sexual, Preference p.21)  Being “gay” cannot be seen as monolithlic and invariant identity label culturally valid for  ancient  and  medieval  societies.  As  has  been  repeatedly  stated,  historical  culturally  the  pattern  was  for  heterosexuality,  marriage,  and  procreation.  Although  there  have  been  cases, which are exceptions to the norm, instances of adult same sex behavior, are almost  always tolerated, but looked down upon with disapproval.  “Certainly the gay movement is specialized somewhat to class and urban social formations, and it  must be seen from the perspective of the decontextualization of sex. Only by disengaging sexuality  from the traditions of family, reproduction, and parenthood was the evolution of the gay movement  a  social  and  historical  likeihood.  (Herdt,  1987b).”(Herdt,  “Developmental  Discontuntinuties  and  Sexual  Orientation  Across  Cultures,”  p.  224  in  Homosexuality/Heterosexuality  Concepts of Sexual Orientation edited by McWhirter, Sanders, and Reinisch)  “It is the myth of gay identity, the belief that homosexuals are a different kind of people.  Gay identity is one of the great working myths of our age. Even though it is based on the ideas of  gender and sex that have more to do with folklore than science, it occupies a central position in the  beliefs and principles that govern our behaviors. It is a significant element of our social organization  of gender and sexuality. The myth holds us all in thrall, not just those who have adopted the gay  role.  We begin with the premise that there exists an evident distinction between (1) homosexual feelings,  (2)  homosexual  behavior,  and  (3)  the  homosexual  role.  The  argument  presented  here  is  that  homosexual feelings play a minor part in becoming gay, which is chiefly is the result of adopting the  homosexual role.  Being  gay  is  always  a  matter  of  self‑definition.  No  matter  what  your  sexual  proclivities  or  experience,  you  are  not  gay  until  you  decide  you  are.”(DuBay,  Gay  Identity  The  Self  Under  Ban, p.1‑2)  “The gay myth is responsible for the creation of the gay community, which is an assemblage, not of  people who share the same sexual orientation (they don’t), but of those who have adopted the gay  role.  Underlying  the  many  facets  of  gay  life  is  an  overriding  concern  with  the  gay  role.  The  conversation  and  behavior  of  gay‑identified  individual  reveals  that  what distinguishes  them  from Larry Houston – www.banap.net  56 

others is not their sexual identity but their identity, their consciousness of being a people set apart.  And  what  sets  them  apart  is  their  joint  commitment  to  a  role  created  by  a  society  solely  for  the  purposes  of  controlling  and  isolating  behaviors.”  (DuBay,  Gay  Identity  The  Self  Under  Ban,  p.2‑3)  “Gay people there are, and some are indeed different, but it is not their sexuality that makes them  different. Their real differences, as significant as they may be, are now submerged in the emphasis of  the gay myth on sexual difference. If anything, it is their sexuality that they have most in common  with all humans. We can end this introduction with one more appeal added to countless others, an  appeal  almost  totally  ignored  by  the  academic  and  medical  establishments:  Gayness,  unlike  the  medical term “homosexuality,” has nothing to do with sex or sexual orientation. It concerns a wide  range  of  divergent  behaviors  that  set  some  people  apart  from  others  in  their  appearance,  gender  behavior, emotional sensibilities, intellectual powers, and their perspective of the world.” (DuBay,  Gay Identity The Self Under Ban, p.12)  Even  today  in  our  ʺmodern  western  cultureʺ,  being  and  acting  gay  is  a  developmental  discontinuity  in  our  society.  Heterosexuality  still  continues  to  be  the  norm.  A  ʺgay  identityʺ began evolving within large population centers in the late nineteenth century. In  the  United  States  there  was  rapid  growth  as  the  result  of  the  coming  together  of  large  groups of men to fight in World War Two. These men from rural and small town America  began knowing ʺothers just like themselvesʺ. It has been more recent, since the 1960s that  there has been the emergence of the individuals who do not marry, but accept the idea of  being  single  and  gay.  Before  this  time  most  individuals  would  be  married  and  their  homosexuality  was  expressed  in  sexual acts  with  members of the same sex.  Perhaps  the  largest milestone in the emergence of a modern ʺgay identityʺ took place on June 12, 1969,  in New York City at a gay bar called Stonewall Inn. This was an act of resistance, a riot by  drag  queens  mourning  the  death  of  Judy  Garland.  It  was  a  group  of  effeminate  men,  wearing  women’s  clothes  resisting  police  authority,  during  a  raid  on  the  gay  bar.  This  event is often linked with the beginning of the gay liberation movement.  “After the 1969 Stonewall riots, a homosexual emancipation movement emerged. This movement,  called “gay liberation,” resulted from a clash of two cultures and two generations‑the homosexual  subculture of the 1950 and 1960s and  the New Left counterculture of 1960s youth. Ideologically,  the  camp  sensibility  of  the  1950s  and  early  1960s  had  served  as  a  strategy  of  containment;  it  ha  balanced  its  scorn  for  the  principle  of  consistency  with  a  bitter  consciousness  of  oppression  in  a  framework  that  offered  no  vision  of  historical  change.  The  gay  liberationists,  who  had  rarely  had  much  appreciation  for  traditional  gay  life,  proposed  a  radical  cultural  revolution.  Instead  of  protecting the right to privacy, gay liberation radicals insisted on coming out‑ the public disclosure  of  one’s  homosexuality‑  which  then  became  the  centerpiece  of  gay  political  strategy.”  (Escoffier,  American Homo Community and Perversity, p.58)  “Stonewall  was  an  act  of  resistance  to  police  authority  by  multiracial  drag  queens  mourning  the  death of Judy Garland, long divinized by gays. Therefore Stonewall had a cultural meaning beyond

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

57 

the  political:  it  was  a  pagan  insurrection  by  the  reborn  transvestite  priests  of  Cybele.”  (Paglia,  Vamps and Tramps, p. 67)  A  second  important  event  allowing  for  the  idea  of  a  “gay  identity”  was  the  removal  of  homosexuality  as  a  psychiatric  disorder.  In  1973  the  American  Psychiatric  Association  removed homosexuality from its Diagnostic and Statistical Manuel of Mental Disorders.  “It  was  the  militant  organization  of homosexuals,  not  any  scientific  breakthrough,  that  led  to the  removal  of  homosexuality  from  the  list  of  diseases  of  the  American  Psychiatric  Association  in  1974.” (Weeks, Sexuality, p.85)  “The decision of the American Psychiatric Association to delete homosexuality from its published  list  of  sexual  disorders  in  1973  was  scarcely  a  cool,  scientific  decision.  It  was  a  response  to  a  political campaign fueled by the belief that its original inclusion as a disorder was a reflection of an  oppressive politico‑medical definition of homosexuality as a problem.” (Weeks, Jeffery. Sexuality  and Its Discontents Meanings, Myths and Modern Sexualities, p. 213)  Why was it decided at this specific point in time that homosexuality was not pathological  after  being  listed  as  one  for  23  years?  For  certain  it  was  not  a  decision  based  upon  new  scientific evidence, for there was very little to support homosexuality. It was as a result of  a  three‑year  social/political  campaign  by  gay  activists,  pro‑gay  psychiatrists  and  gay  psychiatrists,  not  as  a  result  of  valid  scientific  studies.  Rather  the  activities  were  public  disturbances, rallies, protests, and social/political pressure from others outside of the APA  upon the APA. There also was a sincere belief held by liberal‑minded and compassionate  psychiatrists that listing homosexuality as a psychiatric disorder supported and reinforced  prejudice  against  homosexuals.  Removal  of  the  term  from  the  diagnostic  manual  was  viewed as a humane, progressive act. A third influencing factor was an acceptance of new  criteria  to  define  psychiatric  conditions.  Only  those  disorders  that  caused  a  patient  to  suffer  or  that  resulted  in  adjustment  problems  were  thought  to  be  appropriate  for  inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Adding to the push for removal was an  acknowledgment  of  the  extraordinary  resistance  of  homosexuality  to  psychiatric  intervention, for overcoming homosexuality. Some passions and prejudices were involved  with  this  decision  as  well.  In  actuality  this  action  was  taken  with  such  unconventional  speed that normal channels for consideration of the issues were circumvented. This was a  time period of great social upheaval and change, civil rights for blacks, the Vietnam war,  and  of  course,  the  “sexual  revolution”.  Though  the  Board  of  Trustees  voted  13  to  0,  a  referendum  sent  to  25,000  APA  members  only  25  %  responded,  and  of  these  only  58%  favored  removing  homosexuality  from  the  list  of  disorders.  Follow  up  surveys  of  the  members of the APA continued to show that many members consider homosexuality to be  pathological and a disorder. Also APA members report that the problems of homosexuals  had more to do with their inner conflicts then with stigmatization by society at large. It is  not what is now termed “homophobia. Ronald Bayer in his book, Homosexuality and the  American  Psychiatry:  The  Politics  of  Diagnosis  covers  in  depth  the  removal  of

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

58 

homosexuality  by  the  APA  from  the  Diagnostic  and  Statistical  Manuel  of  Mental  Disorders.  This action taken in the APA had dramatic consequences on psychosexual life according to  Charles  Socarides in a article published  in The Journal of  Psychohistory, “Sexual  Politics  and  Scientific  Logic:  The Issue of  Homosexuality.”  He  described a  movement  within the  American  Psychiatric Association  in  which through  social/political activism resulted in a  two‑phase  radicalization  of  a  main  pillar  of  psychosocial  life.  The  first  phase  was  the  erosion of heterosexuality as the single acceptable sexual pattern in our culture. This was  followed  by  the  second  phase  being  the  raising  of  homosexuality  to  the  level  of  an  alternative  life.  As  a  result  homosexuality  became  an  acceptable  psychosocial  institution  alongside heterosexuality as the prevailing norm of behavior.  “In  essence,  this  movement  within  the  American  Psychiatric  Association  has  accomplished  what  every  other  society,  with  rare  exceptions,  would  have  trembled  to  tamper  with,  a  revision  of  the  basic code and concept of life and biology: that men and women normally mate with the opposite sex  and  not  with  each  other.”  (Socarides,  “Sexual  Politics  and  Scientific  Logic:  The  Issue  of  Homosexuality,” p. 321)  More recent events have shown interesting perspectives. There has been the formation of  NARTH,  National  Association  for  Research  and  Therapy  of  Homosexuality  in  1992  that  was in response to the growing threat of scientific censorship. In May of 2001 Dr. Robert L  Spitzer  reported  a  study  that  homosexuality  may  sometimes  be  changeable.  Dr  Spitzer  was  the  psychiatrist  who  headed  the  APA  committee  that  led  to  the  1973  removal  of  homosexuality  from  the  APA’s  list  of  disorders.  These  events  coincide  with  a  growing  influential movement of people who have overcome homosexuality, and are usually self‑  identify as ex‑gay.  “Another aspect of the development of sexual orientation and identity which would seem to require  investigation  is  the  reduction  of  the  percentage  of  men  and  women  engaging  in  homosexual  behavior with age. A significant percentage of the medical students and male twins investigated by  McConaghy  and  colleagues  (1987,  1994)  reported  that  they  were  not  currently  aware  of  homosexual feelings they experienced in adolescence indicating homosexual feelings diminished or  disappear  with  age  in  a  proportion  of  the  population.”  (McConaghy,  “Unresolved  Issues  in  Scientific Sexology,” p. 300)  There are individuals who overcome homosexuality and they do so in multiple ways. But  what  is  of  great  interest  are  those  individuals who  choose  to  continue  to  self‑identify as  gay or lesbian but have as their objects of sexual activity members of the opposite sex. The  following are examples of such people who have made public declarations. JoAnn Loulan  was  a  prominent  lesbian  activist  in  the  seventies  and  eighties  who  met  and  fell  in  love  with a man in the late nineties, and even appeared on a 20/20 television episode in 1998.  Jan  Clausen  also  a  lesbian  activist  writes  in  two  of  her  books  Beyond  Gay  or  Straight,  Apples  and  Oranges  of  a  sexual  relationship  with  a  man.  This  latter  book  is Larry Houston – www.banap.net  59 

autobiographical. She began a long‑term monogamous relationship with a man in 1987. In  England Russell T. Davies wrote Queer as Folk and also wrote for British TV the show Bob  and Rose airing in September 2001. This second show is about a gay man who falls in love  with a woman and has a sexual relationship with her. This series was based on a friend of  Davies’, Thomas, who was well known in the Manchester, England gay scene. Bert Archer  who  identifies  as  a  gay  male  in  his  book,  The  End  of  Gay  (and  the  Death  of  Heterosexuality), writes of his sexual relationship with a woman. He also gives examples  of other gay men who have similar experiences.  Of most interest is the actual result of this latest attempt beginning in the late 1960s and  early 1970s  to define  homosexuality as a “one  size fits all”  type of  homosexuality, a  gay  and lesbian identity. What was at first an attempt to see two sexual identities, heterosexual  and homosexual has been a birth of multiple sexual identities. It is a fracturing of a “one  single sexual identity”, homosexual into multiple sexual identities and heterosexuality.  “What  these  examples  illustrate  is  that  homosexual  and  heterosexual  are  socially  constructed  categories. There are no objective definitions of these words; there is no “Golden Dictionary in the  Sky” that contains the real definitions. These are words, categories we made up.” (Muehlenhard,  “Categories and Sexualities,” p. 102‑103)  “Although the radicalised movement of self‑affirming lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgendered  people  and  others  proclaimed  the  desire  to  ‘end  the  homosexual’  and  indeed  the  heterosexual  (Altman  1071/1993)  ‑  that  is  to  get  rid of  redundant and  oppressive  categorisations  ‑  the  reality  was  different.  Since  the  early  1970s,  there  has  been  considerable  growth  of  distinctive  sexual  communities,  and  of  what  have  been  called  quasi‑ethnic  lesbian  and  gay  identities,  and  the  proliferation of other distinctive sexual identities from bisexual to sado‑masochistic, and many other  subdivisions  (Epstein  1990).  Difference  has  apparently  triumphed  over  convergence,  identity  or  similarity.  The  rise  of  queer  politics  from  the  late  1980s  can  be  seen  as  both  a  product  of  and  a  challenge to these developments, rejecting narrow identity politics in favor of a more transgressive  erotic warfare. (Warner 1993; Seidman 1997) ‑ while at the same time, ironically, creating a new,  post‑identity  identity  of  ‘queer’.”  (Weeks,  Heaphy  and  Donovan,  Same  Sex  Intimacies  Families of Choice and Other Life Experiments, p.14)  “Yet  perhaps  the  most  enabling  breakthrough  in  the  study  of  premodern  sexualities  over  the  last  decade  has  been  precisely  the  rejection  of  easy  equations  between  sexual  practice  and  individual  identity. In the wake of Foucault’s famous dictum‑“The sodomite had been a temporary aberration;  the homosexual was now a species” (1990, 43)‑scholars have recently brought to light a vast array  of  homoerotic  discourses  in  the  premodern  West  that  were  neither  filtered  nor  constrained  by  modern  sexual  identity  categories.  In  the  words  of  David  Halperin,  “Before  the  scientific  construction of ‘sexuality’ as a supposedly positive, distinct, and constitutive features of individual  human  beings  .  .  .  Certain  kinds  of  sexual  acts  could  be  individually  evaluated  and  categorized”  (1990, 26). While gay and lesbian history in the 1970s and early 1980s aimed primarily at either  identifying,  the  last  decade  has  seen  the  focus  shift  to  erotic  acts,  pleasures,  and  desires,  to  homoeroticism  itself  as  a  pervasive  and  diverse  cultural  phenomenon  rather  than  the  closeted Larry Houston – www.banap.net  60 

practice  of  a  homosexual  minority  (see  Hunt,  1994).”  (Fradenburg  and  Lavezzo  editors.  Premodern Sexualities, p.243‑244)  “On the one hand, lesbians and gay men have made themselves an effective force in the  USA  over  the  past  several  decades  largely  by  giving  themselves  what  the  civil  rights  movement had: a public collective identity. Gay and lesbian social movements have built a  quasi‑ethnicity,  complete  with  its  own  political  and  culture  institutions,  festivals,  neighborhoods,  even  its  own  flag.  Underlying  that  ethnicity  is  typically  the  notion  that  what gays and lesbians share ‑ the anchor of minority status and minority rights claim – is  the same fixed, natural essence, a self with same‑sex desires. The shared oppression, these  movements  have  forcefully  claimed,  is  denial  of  the  freedoms  and  opportunities  to  actualize  this  self.  In  this  ethiniclessentialist  politic,  clear  categories  of  collective  identity  are  necessary  for  successful  resistance  and  political  gain.”  (Gamson,  “Must  Identity  Movements Self‑Destruct?” p. 516 in Sexualities: Critical Concepts in Sociology Volume II  editor Ken Plummer)  “That  Way. That  Sort.  The  whole  modern gay  movement,  form  the  mid‑  to late‑Mattachine‑style  homophilia to Gay is Good, to Queer Nation and OutRage! to Ellen, Queer as Folk and beyond, has  been a  struggle  first  to  define,  than  to  justify  and/or  celebrate  and/or  revel  in, than  to  normalize  what was still thought of by many as being That Way. And there have been wild successes, genuine  victories resulting in real progress being made in very short spans of time in thinking and acting on  sexuality and human relationships. But there’s a forgotten, ignored, or perhaps never acknowledged  baby in the bathwater the Movement’s been sumping: the possibility of a sexual attraction that is  neither  or  exclusively  based  on anatomy  nor  especially  relevant  to your  sense  of  self.  It’s  an  idea  that  the  lesbian  communities  have  been  dealing  with  for  some  time,  something  about  which  they  have a lot to teach the rest of us.” (Archer, The End of Gay and the death of heterosexuality,  p.17‑18)  “Such was the heady agenda of gay liberation. By the mid‑1970s, however, it was evident that the  agenda – encouraging people to come out and be proud of being gay – was not working. Reports of  casualties – gay related suicides and beatings, illnesses and death from alcohol and drug use – were  not declining. The mortality rate of gay people dying from hepatitis was staggering: 5,000 a year  according to some accounts. New infectious diseases were appearing, including devastating internal  parasites that added to the already alarming incidences of other sexually transmitted diseases.  Worse, gay people did not seem to be coalescing into the productive lifestyle envisioned by the early  leaders  of  the  movement.  Where  was  Whitman’s  vision  of  a  land  where  men,  women,  children  would join in a continuous celebration of life and the body electric? What we saw instead was an  escalating  spread  of  promiscuity,  prostitution,  and  pornography.  Our  liberated  community  was  rapidly becoming an exploited community. Gay society founded itself with less and less to be proud  of. The march of gay rights seemed to slow down, and with the arrival of AIDS, was stopped dead in  its  tracks.”  (DuBay,  Gay  Identity  The  Self  Under  Ban,  p.131) “In  short,  the  gay  lifestyle  ‑  if  such a chaos can, after all, legitimately be called a lifestyle ‑ it just doesn’t work: it doesn’t serve the  two  functions  for  which  all  social  framework  evolve:  to  constrain  people’s  natural  impulses  to Larry Houston – www.banap.net  61 

behave  badly  and  to  meet  their  natural  needs.  While  it’s  impossible  to  provide  an  exhaustive  analytic list of all the root causes and aggravants of this failure, we can asseverate at least some of  the  major  causes. Many  have  been  dissected,  above,  as  elements  of  the  Ten  Misbehaviors;  it  only  remains  to  discuss  the  failure  of  the  gay  community  to  provide  a  viable  alternative  to  the  heterosexual family.” (Kirk and Madsen, After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear  and Hatred of the Gay’s in the 90s, p.363)  Bibliography  Archer, Bert. The End of Gay (and the death of heterosexuality). Thunder’s Mouth Press.  New York, 2002.  Bayer,  Ronald.  Homosexuality  and  the  American  Psychiatry:  The  Politics  of  Diagnosis.  Basic Books. New York, 1981.  Beach,  Frank  A.  editor.  Human  Sexuality  in  Four  Perspectives.  The  John  Hopkins  University Press. Baltimore and London, 1977.  Bishop,  Clifford  and  Osthelder,  Xenia.  Sexualia  From  Prehistory  to  Cyberspace.  Konemann Verlagsgescellschaft mbH. Cologne, Germany, 2001.  Clausen,  Jan.  Beyond  Gay  or  Straight:  Understanding  Sexual  Orientation.  Chelsa  House  Publishers. Philadelphia, 1997.  Cohen, David. Law, Sexuality, and Society The Enforcement of Morals in Classical Athens.  Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, England, 1991.  Covino,  John.  Editor.  Same  Sex  Debating  the  Ethics,  Science  and  Culture  of  Homosexuality. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Lanham, Maryland, 1997.  D’Emilio,  John.  “Capitalism  and  Gay  Identity,  467‑476,  in  The  Lesbian  and  Gay  Studies  Reader  editors  Henry  Abelove,  Michele  Aine  Barale  and  David  M.  Halperin.  Routledge.  New York and London, 1993.  Diamant, Louis and Richard D. McAnulty, editors. The Psychology of Sexual Orientation,  Behavior, and Identity A Handbook. Greenwood Press. Westport, Connecticut, 1995.  Dickeman,  Phd,  Mildred.  “Reproductive  Strategies  and  Gender  Construction:  An  Evolutionary  View  of  Homosexualities.”  in.  If  You  Seduce  a  Straight  Person,  Can  You  Make The Gay? John P. De Cecco PhD and John P. Elia, PhD (cand.) editors. The Haworth  Press, Inc. New York, 1993.  DuBay,  William  H.  Gay  Identity  The  Self  Under  Ban.  McFarland  &  Company,  Inc.  Publishers. Jefferson, NC and London, 1987.  Duberman, Martin. Left Out. South End Press. Cambridge, MA, 2002. 62  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

Duggan, Lisa & Nan D. Hunter. Sex Wars Sexual Dissent and Political Culture. Routledge.  New York & London, 1995.  Downing,  Christine.  Myths  and  Mysteries  of  Same‑Sex  Love.  Continuum  Publishing  Company. New York, 1989.  Escoffier,  Jeffery.  American  Homo:  Community  and  Perversity.  University  of  California  Press. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London, 1998.  Finnis, John. “Law, Morality, and Sexual Orientation.” p. 31‑43 in Same Sex: Debating the  Ethics, Science, and Culture of Homosexuality. John Covino, Editor. Rowman & Littlefield  Publishers. Lanham, Maryland, 1997.  Flaceleliere,  Robert.  Love  in  Ancient  Greece.  Greenwood  Press,  Publishers.  Westport,  Connecticut, 1973.  Fone, Byrne. Homophobia A History. Metropolitan Books. New York, 2000.  Fradenburg,  Louise,  and  Carla  Lavezzo  editors.  Premodern  Sexualities.  Routledge.  New  York and London, 1996.  Gamson,  Joshua.  “Must  Identity  Movements  Self‑Destruct?”  p.515‑537  in  Sexualites:  Critical  Concepts  in  Sociology  Volume  II.  Edited  by  Ken  Plummer.  Routledge.  London  and New York, 2002.  Garrison,  Daniel  H.  Sexual  Culture  in  Ancient  Greece.  University  of  Oklahoma  Press.  Norman, OK, 2000.  Goode, Erich. Deviant Behavior Second Edition. Prentice‑Hall, Inc. Englewood Cliffs, New  Jersey, 1984.  Hallet,  Judith  p.  and  Marilyn  B.  Skinner.  Roman  Sexualities.  Princeton  University  Press.  Princeton, NJ, 1997  Halperin,  David  M,  John  J  Winkler,  and  Froma  I  Zeitlin,  Editors.  Before  Sexuality  The  Construction of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek World. Princeton University Press.  Princeton, NJ, 1990.  Harvey O.S.F.S., John F. The Truth About Homosexuality The Cry of the Faithful. Ignatius  Press. San Francisco, 1996.  Henderson, Jeffery.  The  Maculate  Muse.  Yale  University  Press.  New  Haven, 1975  Herdt,  Gilbert. Same Sex, Different Cultures. WestviewPress. 1997.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

63 

Heyl,  Barbara  Sherman.  “Homosexuality:  A  Social  Phenomenon.”  321‑349  in  Human  Sexuality:  The  Societal  and  Interpersonal  Context.  Kathleen  McKinney  and  Susan  Sprecher. Ablex Publishing Corporation. Norwood, New Jersey, 1989.  Jones, Stanton  L.  & Yarhouse,  Mark  A.  Homosexuality  The  Use  of  Scientific  Research  in  the Church’s Moral Debate. InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, 2000.  Kaplan,  Morris  B.  Sexual  Justice  Democratic  Citizenship  and  the  Politics  of  Desire.  Routledge. New York and London, 1997.  Kon,  Igor  S.  “A  Socicultural  Approach,  p.  257‑286”  in  Theories  of  Human  Sexuality,  editors James H. Geer and William T. O’Donohue. Plenum Press. New York and London,  1987.  Licht,  Hans.  Sexual  Life  in  Ancient  Greece.  Constable  and  Company  Limited.  London,  1994.  Larmour, David H.J., Paul Allen Miller, and Charles Platter. Rethinking Sexuality Foucault  and Classical Antiquity. Princeton University Press. Princeton, New Jersey, 1998.  LeVay,  Simon  and  Elisabeth  Nonas.  City  of  Friends:  A  Portrait  of  the  Gay  and  Lesbian  Community inAmerica. The MIT Press. Cambridge, MA and London,1995.  Marmor, Judd editor. Sexual Inversion. Basic Books, Inc. New York, 1965.  Marmor,  Judd  editor.  Homosexual  Behavior  A  Modern  Reappraisal.  Basic  Books.  New  York, 1980.  McConaghy D.Sc.,  M.D.,  Nathaniel. “Unresolved Issues in  Scientific  Sexology.”  Archives  of Sexual Behavior. 199, Vol. 28, No. 4, 285‑318.  McLure, Laura K. editor. Sexuality and Gender in The Classic World. Blackwell Publishers  Ltd. Oxford WK, 2002.  McWhirter, David P.M.D., Stephanie A. Sanders Ph.D., and June Machover Reinisch, Ph.D.  Homosexuality/Heterosexuality Concepts of Sexual Orientation. Oxford University Press.  New York and London, 1990.  Mondimore,  Francis  Mark.  A  Natural  History  of  Homosexuality.  The  John  Hopkins  University Press. Baltimore, 1996.  Money, John. “Sin, Sickness, or Status?” American Psychologist April 1987, Vol.42, No.4,  384‑399.  Muehlenhard, Charlene L. “Categories and Sexuality.” Journal of Sex Research. May 2000,  Vol. 37, No. 2, 101‑107. 64  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

Nussabaum,  Martha  C.  and  Juha  Sihvola.  The  Sleep  of  Reason  Erotic  Experience  and  Sexual Ethics in Ancient Greece and Rome. The University of Chicago Press. Chicago and  London, 2002.  Paigila, Camille. Vamps & Tramps. Vintage Books. New York, 1994.  Patterson,  Charolette  J.  “Sexual  Orientation  and  Human  Development:  An  Overview.”  Developmental Psychology 1995, Vol. 31, No.1, 3‑11.  Percy  III,  William  Armstrong.  Pederasty  and  Pedagogy  in  Archaic  Greece.  University  of  Illinois Press. Urbana and Chicago, 1996.  Schmidt, Thomas E. Straight and Narrow? InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, IL, 1995.  Seidman, Steven. Embattled Eros. Routledge. New York, 1992.  Siker,  Jeffery  S.  editor.  Homosexuality  in  the  Church.  Westminster  John  Knox  Press.  Louisville, KY, 1994.  Socarides, Charles W. “Sexual Politics and Scientific Logic: The Issue of Homosexuality”.  The Journal of Psychohistory. 19 (3), Winter 1992.  Strommen,  Merton  P.  The  Church  and  Homosexuality  Searching  for  a  Middle  Ground.  Kirk House Publishers. Minneapolis, MN, 2001.  Thorton,  Bruse  S.  Eros:  The  Myth  of  Ancient  Greek  Sexuality.  Westview  Press.  Boulder,  CO, 1997.  Weeks, Jeffrey.  Against  Nature:  Essays on  History,  Sexuality, and Identity.  Paul and  Co.  Concord, MA, 1991.  Weeks,  Jeffery,  Brian  Heaphy  and  Catherine  Donovan.  Same  Sex  Intimacies  Families  of  Choice and Other Life Experiments. Routledge. London and New York, 2001.  Weeks, Jeffrey. Sexuality Second Edition. Routledge. London and New York, 2003.  Wieringa,  Sakia.  “An  Anthropological  Critique  of  Constructionism:  Berdaches  and  Butches.” 215‑238, in Homosexuality, Which Homosexuality? International Conference on  Gay  and  Lesbian  Studies,  Dennis  Altman  and  et  al.  GMP  Publishers,  London  and  Uitgeverij An Dekker/Schorer, Amsterdam. 1989. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article70 

Chapter Seven: Stonewall and the American Psychiatric Association
Larry Houston – www.banap.net  65 

Saturday 26 May 2007.  Stonewall  “In  short,  the  political  and  cultural  environment  had  undergone  a  liberalizing  shift  which  had  created  the  opportunity  for  the  emergence  of  a  mass  homosexual  movement.”  (Engel,  The  Unfinished  Revolution:  Social  Movement  Theory  and  the  Gay  and  Lesbian  Movement,  p.38)  “Ironically,  when  the  uprising  finally  occurred,  many  people  failed  to  recognize  its  significance.  Looking back, however, there is no denying that what began, as a skirmish at a Greenwhich Village  bar became the harbinger for a new movement of human rights. Detailed accounts of Stonewall have  taken on the quality of myth, as more people remember being there than could have possibly have fit  in the tiny grimy bar. It is generally accepted that a diverse group of bar patrons, led by the drag  queens  who were Stonewall  regulars, spontaneously began to fight back during a police raid. The  resistance  turned  into  a  riot,  which  lasted  for  several  days.”  (Kranz  &  Cusick,  Gay  Rights:  Revised Edition, p. 35)  “The  years  leading  up  to  Stonewall  saw  a  breach  in  the  assimilationist  attitudes  of  the  docile  homophiles  of  the previous generation  in  favour of  more  revolutionary  ones  of  people  who  craved  more purely sexual freedom.” (Archer, The End Gay, p.91)  “But in the 1960s and 1970s, the gay movement broke decisively with the assimilationist rhetoric of  the  1950s  by  publicly  affirming,  celebrating,  and  even  cultivating  homosexual  difference.”  (Chauncey, Why Marriage? The History Shaping Today’s Debate Over Gay Equality, p.29)  An  event  that  took  place  on  June  12,  1969,  in  New  York  City  at  a  gay  bar  called,  the  Stonewall Inn, had great social and cultural historical significance in the development of  the  concept  of  the  “modern  homosexual”  who  soon  adopted  what  is  known  as  a  “gay”  identity. This was an act of resistance, a riot by drag queens mourning the death of Judy  Garland.  It  was  a  group  of  effeminate  men,  wearing  women’s  clothes  resisting  police  authority, during a raid on the gay bar. What started out as a typical raid by the police, a  shake  down  for  bribery  from  a  gay  bar  turned  out  much  differently.  This  event  is  often  linked with the beginning of the “gay liberation movement.” It should be noted that it was  a  fringe  group  of  homosexuals,  and  not  representative  individuals  of  the  homosexual  community at large who displayed this physical resistance.  “Stonewall  was  an  act  of  resistance  to  police  authority  by  multiracial  drag  queens  mourning  the  death of Judy Garland, long divinized by gays. Therefore Stonewall had a cultural meaning beyond  the  political:  it  was  a  pagan  insurrection  by  the  reborn  transvestite  priests  of  Cybele.”  (Paglia,  Vamps and Tramps, p. 67)  “In the 1970s gay liberation was the name of a major theoretical challenge to assimilation as well as  minoritization.  Early  activists  and  writers  argued  that  gay  liberation  could  transform  all  sexual  and  gender  relations;  they  argued  against  marriage  and  monogamy  and  against  existing  family Larry Houston – www.banap.net  66 

structures  (Altman  1981;  Jay  and  Young  1972).”  (Phelan,  Sexual  Strangers:  Gays,  Lesbians,  and Dilemmas of Citizenship, p. 108‑109)  “Gay  liberation  had  somehow  evolved  into  the  right  to have  a  good  time‑the  right  to  enjoy  bars,  discos,  drugs,  and frequent  impersonal  sex.”  (Clendinen and  Nagourney,  Out for  Good:  The  Struggle to Build a Gay Rights Movement in America, p.445)  ∙ American Psychiatric Association  Another  historically  significant  event  in  the  development  of  the  concept  of  the  “modern  homosexual”  occurred  in  the  early  1970s.  This  was  the  decision  in  1973  by  the  APA,  American  Psychiatric  Association,  to  remove  homosexuality  from  the  lists  of  sexual  disorders  in  the  Diagnostic  and Statistical  Manual.  Homosexual  advocates  acknowledge  the hijacking of science for political gain.  “Of course, to mount this counterattack, gays and lesbians must challenge authority of scientists,  and  that  is  exactly  what  gay  rights  activists  did  when  they  campaigned  to  have  homosexuality  removed from the APA’s list of mental disorders. In fact, those activists argued that homosexuality  is not a disease but a lifestyle choice. Although that argument was successful in the early 1970s, the  political climate has changed in such a way that gay rights advocates no longer want homosexuality  to  be  thought  of  as  an  immutable  characteristic,  and  the  gay  gene  discourse  helps  them  in  this  effort.” (Brookey, Reinventing the Male Homosexual: The Rhetoric and Power of the Gay  Gene, p. 43)  “In 1973, by a vote of 5,854 to 3,810, the diagnostic category of homosexuality was eliminated from  the  Diagnostic  and  Statistical  Manual  of  Mental  Disorders  (DSM)  of  the  American  Psychiatric  Association (Bayer 1981).” (Donohue and Caselles, “Homophobia: Conceptual, Definitional,  and Value Issues,” p. 66 Wright, and Cummings. Destructive Trends in Mental Health The  Well‑Intentioned Path to Harm, editors Wright, and Cummings)  “The decision of the American Psychiatric Association to delete homosexuality from its published  list  of  sexual  disorders  in  1973  was  scarcely  a  cool,  scientific  decision.  It  was  a  response  to  a  political campaign fueled by the belief that its original inclusion as a disorder was a reflection of an  oppressive politico‑medical definition of homosexuality as a problem.” (Weeks, Jeffery. Sexuality  and Its Discontents Meanings, Myths and Modern Sexualities, p. 213)  “Perhaps the greatest policy success of the early 1970s was the American Psychiatric Association’s  1973‑74 decision to remove homosexuality from its “official Diagnostic and Statistical Manual list  of mental disorders.” This decision did not come about because a group of doctors suddenly changed  their  views;  it  followed  an  aggressive  and  sustained  campaign  by  lesbian  and  gay  activists.”  (Rimmerman,  From  Identity  to  Politics:  The  Lesbian  and  Gay  Movements  in  the  United  States, p. 85‑86)  “Writing about the 1973 decision and the dispute that surrounded it, Bayer (1981) contended that  these  changes  were  produced  by  political  rather  than  scientific  factors.  Bayer  argued  that  the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  67 

revision represented the APA’s surrender to political and social pressures, not new data or scientific  theories regarding on human sexuality.” (Donohue and Caselles, “Homophobia: Conceptual,  Definitional,  and  Value  Issues,”  p.  66  Wright,  and  Cummings.  Destructive  Trends  in  Mental Health The Well‑Intentioned Path to Harm, editors Wright, and Cummings)  “The APA’s very process of  a medical judgment arrived at by parliamentary method set off more  arguments  than  it  settled.  Many  members  felt  that  the  trustees,  in  acting  contrary  to  diagnostic  knowledge,  had  responded  to  intense  propagandistic  pressures  from  militant  homophile  organizations.  “Politically  we  said  homosexuality  is  not  a  disorder,”  one  psychiatrist  admitted,  “but privately most of us felt it is.” (Kronemeyer, Overcoming Homosexuality, p.5)  The removing of homosexuality as a sexual disorder was as a result of a three year long  social/political campaign by gay activists, pro‑gay psychiatrists and gay psychiatrists, not  as a result of valid scientific studies. Rather the activities were public disturbances, rallies,  protests,  and  social/political  pressure  from  within  by  gay  psychiatrists  and  by  others  outside of the APA upon the APA. The action of removing homosexuality was taken with  such  unconventional  speed  that  normal  channels  for  consideration  of  the  issues  were  circumvented. This action taken in the APA had dramatic consequences on psychosexual  life according to Charles Socarides in a article published in The Journal of Psychohistory,  “Sexual  Politics  and  Scientific  Logic:  The  Issue  of  Homosexuality.”  Socarides  writes  the  removal of homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual was a false step with  the following results.  “This amounted to a full approval of homosexuality and an encouragement to aberrancy by those  who  should  have  known  better,  both  in  the  scientific  sense  and  in  the  sense  of  the  social  consequences of such removal.” (Socarides, Charles W. “Sexual Politics and Scientific Logic:  The Issue of Homosexuality,” p.320‑321)  In this article he described a movement within the American Psychiatric Association that  through social/political activism resulted in a two‑phase radicalization of a main pillar of  psychosocial  life.  The  first  phase  was  the  erosion  of  heterosexuality  as  the  single  acceptable sexual pattern in our culture. This was followed by the second phase the raising  of homosexuality to the level of an alternative lifestyle. As a result homosexuality became  an  acceptable  psychosocial  institution  alongside  heterosexuality  as  a  prevailing  norm  of  sexual behavior.  “In  essence,  this  movement  within  the  American  Psychiatric  Association  has  accomplished  what  every  other  society,  with  rare  exceptions,  would  have  trembled  to  tamper  with,  a  revision  of  the  basic code and concept of life and biology: that men and women normally mate with the opposite sex  and  not  with  each  other.”  (Socarides,  Charles  W.  “Sexual  Politics  and  Scientific  Logic:  The  Issue of Homosexuality,” p.321)  The hijacking of science in the APA by those advocating homosexuality has now taken a  very interesting twist. Thirty years later after this decision by the APA, Robert L. Spitzer,  M.D.  who  was  instrumental  in  the  removal  of  homosexuality  in  1973  from  the  lists  of 68  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

sexual disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual is once again facing the anger of  others.  The  first  time  was  by  those  who  opposed  the  normalization  of  homosexuality.  Now after publishing the results of a study showing that some people may change their  sexual  orientation  from  homosexual  to  heterosexual,  it  is  those  advocating  for  homosexuality. Dr. Spitzer’s study and peer commentaries have just been published in the  October 2003 issue of the “Archives of Sexual Behavior.”  “An additional personal parallel‑the anger that has been directed towards me for doing this study  reminds me of a similar reaction to me during my involvement in the removal of the diagnosis of  homosexuality  from  DSM‑II  in  1973.”  (Spitzer,  “Reply:  Study  Results  Should  Not  be  Dismissed and Justify Further Research on the Efficacy of Sexual Reorientation Therapy”,  p. 472)  Bibliography  Archer, Bert. The End of Gay (and the death of heterosexuality). Thunder’s Mouth Press.  New York, 2002.  Bayer,  Ronald.  Homosexuality  and  the  American  Psychiatry:  The  Politics  of  Diagnosis.  Basic Books. New York, 1981.  Brookey, Robert Alan. Reinventing the Male Homosexual: The Rhetoric and Power of the  Gay Gene. Indiana University Press. Bloomington & Indianapolis, 2002.  Chauncey,  George.  Why  Marriage?  The  History  Shaping  Today’s  Debate  Over  Gay  Equality. Basic Books/Perseus Books Group. New York, 2004.  Clendinen,  Dudley  and  Adam  Nagourne.  Out  for  Good:  The  Struggle  to  Build  a  Gay  Rights Movement in America. Simon and Schuster. New York, 1990.  Engel, Stephen M. The Unfinished Revolution: Social Movement Theory and the Gay and  Lesbian Movement. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK, 2001.  Konemeyer, Robert. Overcoming Homosexuality. Macmillan. New York, 1980.  Kranz, Rachel and Tim Cusick. Gay Right: Revised Edition. Facts on File, Inc. New York,  2005.  Paigila, Camille. Vamps & Tramps. Vintage Books. New York, 1994. Phelan, Shane. Sexual  Strangers:  Gays,  Lesbians,  and  Dilemmas  of  Citizenship.  Temple  University  Press.  Philadelphia, 2001.  Rimmerman, Craig A. From Identity to Politics: The Lesbian and Gay Movements in the  United States. Temple University Press. Philadelphia, 2002.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

69 

Socarides, Charles W. “Sexual Politics and Scientific Logic: The Issue of Homosexuality.”  The Journal of Psychohistory Winter 1992, 19 (3), 307‑329.  Spitzer,  M.D.,  Robert  L.  “Reply:  Study  Results  Should  Not  be  Dismissed  and  Justify  Further  Research  on  the  Efficacy  of  Sexual  Reorientation  Therapy.”  Archives  of  Sexual  Behavior October 2003, Vol. 32, No. 5, 469‑472.  Weeks,  Jeffery.  Sexuality  and  Its  Discontents  Meanings,  Myths  and  Modern  Sexualities.  Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1988.  Wright,  Rogers  H. and  Nicolas  A.  Cummings.  Destructive  Trends  in  Mental  Health:  The  Well‑Intentioned Path to Harm. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. New York and Hove,  2005. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article68 

Chapter Eight “Circuit Parties” and the “Gay Male Clone” 
Circuit Parties  Circuit partiesʺ are unique to the homosexual community, but are similar to other parties  called “raves” and  can  be traced back to the  popularity of disco  music in the 1970s. The  popularity of these “circuit parties” has grown tremendously over the past 10 years. There  is no uniform definition of a “circuit party”, because these parties continue to evolve.  “However,  a  circuit party  tends  to  be  a  multi‑event  weekend  that occurs  each year  at  around the  same time and in the same town or city and centers on one or more large, late‑night dance events  that  often  have  a  theme  (for  example,  a  color  such  as  red,  black  or  white).”  (Mansergh,  Colfax,  Marks, Rader, Guzman, & Buchbinder, “The Circuit Party Men’s Health Survey: Findings  And Implications for Gay and Bisexual Men.” p.953)  “Circuit Parties are weekend‑long, erotically‑charged, drug‑fueled gay dance events held in resort  towns  across  the  country.  There’s  at  least  one  party  every  month  somewhere  in  the  U.S.‑New  York’s  “Black  Party,” South Beach’s  “White  Party,”  Montreal’s  “Black  and Blue  Party,”  and  so  on‑  and  people  travel  far  and  wide  to  take  part.”  (Ghaziani,  “The  Circuit  Part’s  Faustian  Bargin,” p.21)  Because  these  “circuit  parties”  are  unique  to  the  homosexual  community,  it  is  from  the  media  of  this  community  itself  that  most  of  the  information  about  these  parties  comes  from.  Although  there  has  been  a  study  published  in  the  American  Journal  of  Public  Health, which is quoted from above. I have also found an article form USATODAY.com,  “Worries crash ‘circuit parties’, 06/20/2002. The information that is coming from all sources Larry Houston – www.banap.net  70 

is strikingly similar. That is the high prevalence of drug use and sexual activity, including  unprotected anal sex.  “The  circuit‑with  its  jet  set “A‑List”  of  well‑heeled  and  muscular  gay  men‑ had  actually  been  in  existence in the pre‑AIDS time, albeit it was small and very exclusive. It consisted in the late 1970s  into the early 1980s mostly of a about thousand men who flew back and forth between New York  and Los Angeles, going from the famous parties at the Flamingo and the Saint in New York to the  ones  at  the  Probe  in  L.A.  But  in  the  1990s  the  circuit  grew  to  consist  of  parties  all  around  the  country,  indeed  around  the  world‑from  Miami  to  Montreal,  Vancouver  to  Sydney‑with  tens  of  thousands  of  men  who  regularly  attend  events.  In  the  early  1990s  there  were  only  a  handful  of  events; by 1996, according to Alan Brown in Out and About, a gay travel newsletter, there were  over 50 parties a year, roughly one per week. Typically these are weekend‑long events, more a series  of all‑night (and daytime) parties stretching over a few days, often taking place in resort hotels, each  punctuated by almost universal drug use among attendees.” (Signorile, Life Outside, p.64‑65)  “Every  party  has  a  similar  format,  with  loud  music  and  dancing  at  its  core,  spiced  with  live  entertainment  from  popular  singers  and  scantily‑clad  male  dancers.  Circuit  parties  began  in  the  mid‑1980’s as part of an effort to raise gay men’s awareness of AIDS as well as to  raise funds to  combat the disease and help its victims. To this day, many circuit parties HIV/AIDS charity events,  benefiting  a  variety  of  nonprofit  organizations.”  (Ghaziani,  “The  Circuit  Part’s  Faustian  Bargin,” p.21)  According  to  health  officials,  Palm  Springs,  CA  has  developed  one  of  the  highest  per  capita rates of syphilis in the nation, driven mostly by gay and bisexual men. Palm Springs  is where the White Party is held annually in April. The 2003 party raised concerned among  public  health  officials  and  some  gay  leaders  that  the  event  would  feed  the  spread  of  syphilis.  Some  charities  ‑  along  with  public  health  officials  and  many  gay  rights  leaders  ‑  are  increasingly  uncomfortable  with  what  has  become  the  dark  side  of  circuit  parties:  widespread drug use and random, unprotected sex that some charities say is just the type  of  behavior  they  discourage.  (“Worries  crash  ‘circuit  parties’.”  www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2002/06/20/circuit‑parties‑usat.htm  “Our  findings  confirm  anecdotal  reports  of  a  high  prevalence  of  drug  use  during  circuit  party  weekends  and  at  specific  party  events.”  (Mansergh,  Colfax,  Marks,  Rader,  Guzman,  &  Buchbinder, “The Circuit Party Men’s Health Survey: Findings And Implications for Gay  and Bisexual Men,” p.956)  “Sexual  activity,  including  unprotected  anal  sex,  was  relatively  common  during  circuit  party  weekends.”  (Mansergh,  Colfax, Marks,  Rader, Guzman,  & Buchbinder, “The  Circuit  Party  Men’s Health Survey: Findings And Implications for Gay and Bisexual Men,” p.956)  “Consider  the  potential  impact  of  circuit  party  weekends  on  HIV  infection  rates  and  rates  of  infection  with  other  sexually  transmitted  diseases,  based  on  sexual  mixing  opportunities  and Larry Houston – www.banap.net  71 

patterns both within and beyond the 3‑day periods. Our data pertain to a single party weekend for  each participant. If we multiply the prevalence of sexual risk behavior by the median of 3 parties per  year revealed in this sample, and if we consider the large number of men who attend circuit parties,  as  well  as  the  growing popularity  of  such parties,  then  the  likelihood  of  transmission of  HIV  and  other sexually transmitted diseases among party attendees and secondary partners becomes a real  public  health  concern.”  (Mansergh,  Colfax,  Marks,  Rader,  Guzman,  &  Buchbinder,  “The  Circuit  Party  Men’s  Health  Survey:  Findings  And  Implications  for  Gay  and  Bisexual  Men,” p.957)  “This seems harmless enough, but there is also a flipside. While the evidence to date is inconclusive,  circuit parties may ironically be a potential site for HIV infection. The irony is that circuit parties  began as vehicles for HIV awareness and fundraising.” (Ghaziani, “The Circuit Part’s Faustian  Bargin,” p.22)  “It  is  well  known,  both  anecdotally  and  through research,  that drug  use  is  wide  spread  at  circuit  parties.  Studies  indicate  that  club  drugs  are  consumed  by  about  95  percent  of  party  attendees  (Mansergh,  2001).  Indeed  drug  use  is  incorporated  into  the  setting  as  an  intergal  part  of  circuit  culture.” (Ghaziani, “The Circuit Part’s Faustian Bargin,” p.22)  “Research  revels  an  abundance  of  sexual  activity  during  party  weekends.”  (Ghaziani,  “The  Circuit Part’s Faustian Bargin,” p.22)  But one national gay organzation in September of 2004 appears not to be concerned with  this  dark  side  of  circuit  parties.  The  NGLTF  (National  Gay  and  Lesbian  Task  Force)  has  purchased  the  rights  and  assets  to  the  Winter  Party  held  in  Maimi,  FL.  A  Washington  Blade  online  article  (Friday,  September  09,  2004)  quotes  the  executive  director  of  the  NGLTF, who sees no problem with being a sponsor of a ʺcircuit partyʺ. He goes on to call  it a dance event.  “Foreman said he sees no problem with the Task Force becoming associated with a circuit party.”  “We’re  very  proud  to  have  acquired  the  Winter  Party,”  Foreman  said.  “Having  a  dance  event  where  people  come  together  and  have  a  good  time  is  a  good  thing.”  (“Task  Force  to  take  over  Winter Party”, Washington Blade online, Friday, September 03, 2004) ∙ Gay Male Clones  Throughout history the male homosexual was often based on non‑gender conformity, that  is the effeminate male. Although this still continues today, a rejection of this stereotyping  is seen in the “gay male clone”. There are two books written by homosexuals themselves  that defines this “gay male clone”. Michelango Signorileis is the author of the book, Life  Outside. Signorileis writes about gay men, masculinity, the “gay male clone”, and “circuit  parties”. Martin Levine was a sociologist, and university professor. The book, Gay Macho,  is an edited version of Levine’s doctoral dissertation. He died from complications of AIDS  at the age of 42. The ʺgay male cloneʺ was not a representative homosexual, but only one  of  many  groups  among  the  “modern  homosexual”  gays,  lesbians,  queers,  and  homosexual. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  72 

“Clones symbolize modern homosexuality. When the dust of gay liberation had settled, the doors to  the  closet  were  opened,  and  out  popped  the  clone.  Taking  a  cue  from  movement  ideology,  clones  modeled themselves upon traditional masculinity and the self‑fulfillment ethic. (Yankelovitch 1981)  Aping blue‑collar workers, they butched it up and acted like macho men. Accepting me‑generation  values, they searched for self‑fulfillment in anonymous sex, recreational drugs, and hard partying.  Much  to  activists’  chagrin,  liberation  turned  the  “Boys  in  the  Band”  into  doped‑up,  sexed‑out,  Marlboro men.  The  clone  was,  in  many  ways,  the  manliest  of  men.  He  had  a  gym‑defined  body;  after  hours  of  rigorous  body  building, his physique  rippled  with  bulging  muscles, looking more  like  competitive  body builders than hairdressers  or florists. He wore blue‑collar garb‑flannel shirts over muscle T‑  shirts,  Levi 501s  over  work  boots,  bomber  jackets  over  hooded  sweatshirts.  He  kept his hair  short  and had a thick moustache or closely cropped beard. There was nothing New Age or hippie about  this  reformed  gay  liberationist.  And  the  clone  lived  the  fast  life.  He  “partied  hard,”  taking  recreational drugs, dancing in discos till dawn, having hot sex with strangers.  Throughout  the  seventies  and  early  eighties,clones  set  the  tone  in  the  homosexual  community  (Altman 1982, 103; Holleran 1982). Glorified in the gay media, promoted in gay advertising, clones  defined  gay  chic,  and  the  clone  life  style  became  culturally  dominant.  Until  AIDS.  As  the  new  disease  ravaged  the  gay  male  community  in  the  early  1980s,  scientist  discovered  that  the  clone  lifestyle was “toxic”: specific sexual behaviors, even promiscuity, might be one of the ways that the  HIV virus spread in the gay male population. Drugs, late nights, and poor nutrition weakened the  immunity system (Fettner and Check 1984)” (Levine, Gay Macho, p.7‑8)  “The  clone  role  reflected  the  gay  world’s  image  of  this  kind  of  gay  man,  a  doped‑up,  sexed‑out,  Marlboro man. Although the gay world derisively named this social type the clone, largely because  of  is  uniform  look  and  life‑style,  clones  were  the  leading  social  type  within gay  ghettos  until  the  advent of AIDS. At this time, gay media, arts, and pornography promoted clones as the first post‑  Stonewall  form  of  homosexual  life.  Clones  came  to  symbolize  the  liberated  gay  man.”  (Levine,  “The Life and Death of Gay Clones.” p.69‑70 in Gay Culture in America: Essays from the  Field editor Gilbert Herdt.)  “Four features distinguished clones: (1) strongly masculine dress and deportment; (2) uninhibited  recreational sex with multiple partners, often in sex clubs and baths; (3) the use of alcohol and other  recreational drugs; and (4) frequent attendance at discotheques and other gay meeting places. Clone  culture with its pattern of sexual availability, erotic apparel, multiple partners, and reciprocity in  sexual technique became an important organizing feature of gay male life during the 1970s. It also  became a seedbed for high rates of sexually transmitted diseases as well as frequent transmission of  the hepatitis B virus. Many treated sexually transmitted diseases as a price that had to be paid for a  life style of erotic liberation.” (Jonsen and Stryker, editors, The Social Impact of AIDS in the  United States, p. 261‑262)  “A key factor in the formulation and promulgation of the cult of masculinity that also dismayed the  gay  liberationist  was  that  the  dominant  gender  style  was  now  supermasculine.  It  was  as  if  the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  73 

1960s and the counter culture androgyny never occurred. Gay male culture was still reeling from  the  crisis  of  masculinity  that  had  affected  homosexuals  for  decades.  Gay  men,  attracted  to  the  masculine  ideas  they’d  cultivated  in  the  furtive  days  prior  to  Stonewall,  seemed  now  institutionalize and exaggerate a heterosexual‑inspired, macho look. The 1970s clone was born, and  his  look  explored  on  the  streets  of  rapidly  growing  gay  ghettos  in  dozens  of  American  cities.”  (Signorile, Life Outside, p.52‑53)  “A whole industry was sprouting from and glorifying this male culture, with clothing stores like  All American Boy on Castro Street, a gym called Body Works, and dozens of sex clubs and baths,  with names like Animals. The sex clubs catered to every to every imaginable sexual taste: the leather  set; men who enjoyed being tied up; men who wished to be urinated on. The bathhouses had once  been seen as an expression of gay liberation, at least among those who equated gay liberation with  sexual  abandon.  Now,  they  were  celebrating  and  enforcing  the  values  that  Evans  saw  parading  down  the  Castro  every  day:  The  Premium  was  put  on  physical  appearance  and  conformity.”  (Clendinen and Nagourney, Out for Good: The Struggle to Build a Gay Rights Movement  in America, p.445)  For  the  “gay  male  clone”  what  resulted  was  not  “gay  liberation”  or  freedom  from  alienation by society, but was bondage into the enforced cult of modern homosexuality.  “For  a  great  many  gay  men  in  the  urban  centers‑the  majority  of  which,  some  studies  since  the  1970s have shown, have hundreds of partners throughout their lives‑living the fantasy has of course  all been under the guises of liberation. But perhaps there is no such thing as true liberation. When  we  break  from  one  rigid  system,  we  often  create  another.  It’s  true  that  most  gay  men  in  urban  America are not having a life of enforced heterosexuality, as gay liberationist might call it, with a  driveway,  a  picket  fence,  and  children  to  nurture.  Many  are,  however,  instead  living  a  life  of  enforced  cult  homosexuality,  with  parties,  drugs,  and  gyms  ruling  their  lives.”  (Signorile,  Life  Outside, p.26‑27)  In New York City, San Francisco, and other large cities many gay and lesbians had formed  large  “gay  communities.”  So  it  was  now  possible  to  live,  work,  and  socialize  in  what  became  “gay  gehettos.”  The  following  quote  is  making  reference  to  the  opening  of,  The  Saint, a large disco for gay males in New York City.  “It  was  mailed  only  to  Mailmans’  friends  and their  friends,  a  self‑selected  group that formed  the  base of The Saint’s membership of three thousand. Anyone who wanted to join had to be referred by  a  member  to  the  membership  office  for  screening.  The  clientele  reflected  the  screening  process:  nearly all white, professional in their twenties and thirties, mostly good‑looking and muscled, with  the mustaches and short hair that were the style of the time.” (Clendinen and Nagourney, Out  for Good: The Struggle to Build a Gay Rights Movement in America, p.442‑443)  “The  streets  of  San  Francisco  offered,  in  theory  at  least,  a  cross‑section  of  America’s  male  homosexual community, but, Evans thought, one would never know it to walk down Castro Street.  All  these  men  looked  identical,  with  their  short haircuts,  clipped  mustaches  and  muscular  bodies,  turned out in standard‑issue uniforms of tight faded blue jeans and polo shirts. The image was one 74  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

part military, one part cowboy, one part 1950s suburbia and conformity, and they swaggered down  the  street,  many  aloof  and  unfriendly,  as  if  their  affected  distance  enhanced  their  masculinity.”  (Clendinen and Nagourney, Out for Good: The Struggle to Build a Gay Rights Movement  in America, p.444)  Bibliography  Clendinen,  Dudley  and  Adam  Nagourne.  Out  for  Good:  The  Struggle  to  Build  a  Gay  Rights Movement in America. Simon and Schuster. New York, 1990.  Ghaziani,  Amin.  “The  Circuit  Party’s  Faustin  Bargain.”  The  Gay  &  Lesbian  Review  /  Worldwide. July‑August, 2005, Volume XII, Number 4, p. 21‑24.  Jonsen, Albert R. and Jeff Stryker. The Social Impact of AIDS in the United States. National  Academy Press. Washington D.C., 1993.  Levine, Martin P. Gay Macho. New York University Press. New York and London, 1998.  Levine, Martin P. “The Life and Death of Gay Clones.” p. 68‑86 in Gay Culture in America:  Essays from the Field editor Gilbert Herdt.  Mansergh,  Gordon,  PhD,  Grant  N  Colfax,  MD,  Gary  Marks,  PhD,  Melissa  Rader,  MPH,  Robert Guzman, BA, & Susan Buchbinder, MD. “The Circuit Party Men’s Health Survey:  Findings  And  Implications  for  Gay  and  Bisexual  Men.”  American  Journal  of  Public  Health. June 2001, Vol. 91, No. 6, 953‑958.  Signorile, Michelangelo. Life Outside. HarperCollins Publishers. New York, 1997. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article69 

Chapter  Nine  Gay  Male  Homosexual  and  Sexual  Behavior  of  Gay  Male  Homosexuals 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  Chapter Nine Gay Male Homosexual and Sexual Behavior of Gay Males  The  “gay  male  clone”  was  not  a  representative  male  homosexual  of  “gay  liberation”  during the late 1960s and early 1970s. But what was representative of male homosexuality  was  what  became  to  be  known  as  the  gay  male  lifestyle.  What  it  meant  to  be  me  a  gay  male  homosexual  was  extremely  sexualized,  a  lifestyle  that  revolved  around  sexual  activity.  In  all  of  history  the  male  homosexual  of  “gay  liberation”  appears  to  be  unique.  Historically significant too are the consequences resulting from this “gay liberation” for all  homosexuals and for all of society. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  75 

A change in who homosexuals actually have sex with, became more significant during the  1960s and resulted in new sexual behaviors among male homosexuals. Prior to the 1960s  homosexual men had sex with heterosexual men who were called ʺtradeʺ. The latter was  the  passive  partner  in  a  sex  act;  usually  this  was  an  oral  sex  act.  Although  there  were  occasions when the heterosexual “trade” was the active insertive partner in anal sex. But  as  the  stigma  against  homosexuality  increased  heterosexual  men  became  frightened that  they too might be labeled homosexual and thus were no longer willing to be participate in  sexual activity with homosexual men. This resulted in more homosexual men having sex  with  other  homosexual  men  and  the  specific  sexual  behaviors  themselves  also  changed.  This  change  in  male  homosexual  behavior  also  resulted  in  the  changes  in  some  of  the  specific  diseases  that  effected  male  homosexuals  and  dramatic  rates  in  the  instances  of  sexually transmitted diseases among male homosexuals.  “Indeed,  there  is  no  record  of  any  culture  that  accepted  both  homosexuality  and  unlimited  homosexual  promiscuity.  Far  from  being  the  universal  default  mode  of  male  homosexuality,  the  lifestyle  of  American  gay  men  in  the  seventies  and  eighties  appears unique  in  history.”  (Rotello,  Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 225)  “For the first time ever, a community standard developed that transformed anonymous sex into a  god thing ‑ another choice on the broadening sexual palette. Casual sex encounters no longer took  place  simply  because  men  needed  to  conceal  their  identities,  but  because  it  was  considered  hot  to  separate sex from intimacy.” (Sadownick, Sex Between Men, p. 83)  “In  the  1970s,  a  new  cultural  scenario  developed  that  celebrated  and  encouraged  sexual  experimentation and the separation of sex from intimacy among gay men; this, in turn, reinforced  the  transactional  nature  of  the  market  as  anonymous  sexual  encounters  and  multiple  partners  became normative (see Murray, 196, 175; Sadownick, 1996, 77‑112). Levine (1992, 83) summarizes  the effect of gay liberation on gay sexual scripts: “Gay liberation’s redefinition of same‑sex love as a  manly  form  of  erotic  expression  provoked  masculine  identification  among  clones,  which  was  conveyed  through  butch  presentational  strategies,  and  cruising,  tricking,  and  partying  .  .  .  In  a  similar  vein,  the  roughness,  objectification,  anonymity,  and  phallocentrism  association  with  cruising  and  tricking  expressed  such  macho  dictates  as  toughness  and  recreational  sex  .  .  .  The  cultural  idea  of  self‑gratification  further  encouraged  these  patterns,  sanctioning  the  sexual  and  recreational  hedonism  inherent  in  cruising,  tricking,  and  partying.”  While  relational  sex  or  coupling and safe sex may have become symbolically important in the 1980s and 1990s, scripts that  legitimate the transactional market are still prominent, and there is no conclusive evidence that the  market has become relational (see Sadownick, 1996 chapters 5‑7; Murray 1996, 175‑78; cf. Levine  1992, 79‑82.)”  (Laumann, Ellingson, Mahay, Paik, and Youm, The Sexual Organization of  the City, p. 97)  “In  sum,  gay  sex  institutions  and  the  sexual  activity  in  them  became  the  functional  social  equivalent of family, friends, and community: They promoted social bonds that gave gays a sense of  belonging  and  social  support.”  (Rushing,  The  AIDS  Epidemic  Social  Dimensions  of  an  Infectious Disease, p. 30) Larry Houston – www.banap.net  76 

“The  institutions  of  the  gay  world  have  often  made  it  easier  for  men  to  meet  for  sex  than  for  companionship,  and  most  long‑lasting  relationships  accept  sexual  ‘infidelity’,  through  the  word  itself  rings  oddly.”  (Altman,  Defying  Gravity:  A  Political  Life,  p.118)  “In  general,  sexual  adventure is regarded within the gay world as an end in itself, not necessarily linked to emotional  commitment‑ while, in reverse, emotional commitment does not demand sexual constancy (may not  even demand sex at all) to survive.” (Altman, Defying Gravity: A Political Life, p.118)  “These  observations  of  new  syndromes  associated  with  a  very  active  male  homosexual  life‑style  suggests  that  both  the  type  of  sexual  activity  and  the  extent  of  promiscuity  associated  with  it  changed  markedly during  the 1970s.” (Root‑Bernstein,  Rethinking  AIDS: The  Tragic  Cost of  Premature Consensus, p. 285‑286)  “The extensive casual networks of gays engaging in sex apparently for the sole purpose of sensuous  pleasure, and in so many different ways, went far beyond anything that had occurred before in the  United States or elsewhere or that anyone could have imagined just a few years previously. Without  question, “the sexual style of gay communities in the 1970s and early 1980s was a specific historic  phenomenon”  (Bateson  and  Goldsby,  1988:44).”  (Rushing,  The  AIDS  Epidemic  Social  Dimensions of an Infectious Disease, p. 27)  “The complex research agenda that characterized the period from the early 1970s to the beginning of  the  AIDA  epidemic  reflected  major  changes  within  the  gay  and  lesbian  communities  themselves.  The  decision  by  a  large  number  to  openly  label  themselves  gay  men  and  lesbian  changed  the  experience  of  same‑gender  sexuality.  From  a  relatively  narrow  “homosexual”  community  based  primarily on sexual desire and affectional commitment between lovers and circles of friends, there  emerged  a  community  characterized  by  the  building  of  residential  areas,  commercial  enterprises,  health  and  social  services,  political  clubs,  and  intellectual  movements.”  (Turner,  Miller,  and  Moses, Editors. AIDS Sexual Behavior and Intravenous Drug Use, p.127)  “Gay historian Dennis Altman notes that in the “liberated” seventies, when promiscuity was seen  as  a  virtue  in  some  segments  of  the  gay  community,  “being  responsible  about  one’s  health  was  equated  with  having  frequent  checks  for  syphilis  and  gonorrhea,  and  such  doubtful  practices  as  taking a couple of tetracycline capsules before going to the baths.” To gay men for whom sex was  the  center  and  circumference  of  their  lives,  their  only  real  health  concern  was  that  illness  would  prevent  them  from  having  sex  ‑  which,  to  their  way  of  thinking,  meant  they  would  no  longer  be  “proudly”  gay.”  (Andriote,  Victory  Deferred:  How  AIDS  Changed  Gay  Life  in  America,  p.37)  “When  AIDS  hit  the  homosexual  communities  of  the  US,  several  studies  were  conducted  by  the  vigilant  CDC  to  determine  what  it  was  in  the  homosexual  lifestyle  which  predisposed  to  this  immunosuppressive  condition.  There  were  really  only  two  things  which  distinguished  the  homosexual  lifestyle:  the  promiscuous  sex  and  the  extensive  use  of  recreational  drugs.”  (Adams,  AIDS: The HIV Myth, p.127)  “Other  men  who  had  participated  enthusiastically  in  the  life of  the ghetto had  grown  tired  of  its  anonymity and inverted values. They questioned why membership in the gay community had come 77  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

to require that one be alienated from his family, take multiple drugs and have multiple sex partners,  dance all night at the “right” clubs, and spend summer weekends at the “right” part of Fire Island.  Rather  than  providing  genuine  liberation,  gay  life  in  the  ghettos  had  created  another  sort  of  oppression with its pressure to conform to social expectations of what a gay man was “supposed” to  be,  believe,  wear,  and  do.”  (Andriote,  Victory  Deferred:  How  AIDS  Changed  Gay  Life  in  America, p.24)  ∙ Sexual Behavior of Gay Male Homosexuals  Unique in the history of homosexuality is what begin to occur in the 1960s and continues  today.  That  is  the  social  behavior  and  sexual  behavior  of  gay  male  homosexuals.  This  fundamental change began with gay male self‑perceptions and beliefs in what it meant to  be a gay male homosexual. What it meant to be me a gay male homosexual was extremely  sexualized, a lifestyle that revolved around sexual activity. This resulting change in social  behavior resulted in correspondingly changes in sexual behavior. That is the sexual habits  of gay male homosexuals: ways of having sex, kinds and numbers of partners. Gay male  homosexuals  abandoned  strict  role  separation  in  the  sex  act  itself,  and  played  both  the  insertive and receptive roles in anal sex. Even more dramatic in gay male sexual behavior  was the number of partners that is the promiscuity of gay male homosexuals.  “Furthermore,  in  previous  periods  in  history  when  homosexuality  had  been  widely  accepted  socially, as, for example, in classical Greece, there had been no sexual practices remotely resembling  those  associated  with  the  gay  subcultures  of  the  1970s  and  1980s.”  (Rushing,  The  AIDS  Epidemic Social Dimensions of an Infectious Disease, p. 27)  “Evidence convincingly argues that before the middle of the century gay sexual behavior was vastly  different from what it was to become later, that from mid century onward there were fundamental  changes  not  only  in  gay  male  self‑perceptions  and  beliefs,  but  also  in  sexual  habits,  kinds  and  numbers of partners, even ways of making love. These revolutions reached a fever pitch just as at  the moment HIV exploded like a series of time bombs across the archipelago of gay America. When  gay  experience  is  viewed  collectively,  it  appears  that  the  simultaneous  introduction  of  new  behaviors and a dramatic rise in the scale of old ones produced one of the greatest shifts in sexual  ecology  ever  recorded.  There  is  convincing  evidence  that  this  shift  had  a  decisive  impact  on  the  transmission of virtually every sexually transmitted disease, of which HIV was merely one, albeit  the most deadly.” (Rotello, Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 39)  “In  the  1970s  an  extraordinary  proliferation  of  clubs,  bars,  discotheques,  bathhouse,  sex  shops,  travel agencies, and gay magazines allowed the community to “come out” and adopt a whole new  repertoire of erotic behavior, out of all measure to any similar past activities.” (Grmek, History of  AIDS, p. 168‑169)  “We  don’t  know,  in  real  quantitative  terms,  what  really  changed  in  homosexual  behavior  in  the  1970s,  but  it  is  possible  to  identify  three  major  areas  of  change:  the  expansion  of  homosexual  bathhouses  and  sex  clubs,  which  facilitate  numerous  sexual  contacts  in  one  night  (by  1984  one  bathhouse  chain  included  baths  in  forty‑two  American  cities,  including  Memphis  and  London, 78  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

Ontario),  the  emergence  of  sexually  transmitted parasites  as  a  major  homosexual  health problem,  especially  in  New  York  and  California,  and  a  boom  in  “recreational  drugs”  ‑  that  is,  the  use  of  chemical  stimulants  such  as  MDA,  angel  dust,  various  nitrates,  etc.  ‑  in  conjunction  with  what  came to be known  as “fast‑lane sex.” These three elements would all be linked to various theories  about AIDS during the 1980s.” (Altman, AIDS in the Mind of America, p. 14)  “Anal  sex had  come  to be  seen  as  an  essential  ‑  possibly the  essential  ‑ expression  of  homosexual  intimacy by the 1980s.” (Rotello, Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 101)  “In the middle of the century, and particularly in the sixties and seventies, gay men began doing  something that appears rare in sexual history: They began to abandon strict role separation in sex  and alternately play both the insertive and receptive roles, a practice sometimes called versatility.”  (Rotello, Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 76)  “Another  relative  novelty  was  the  increasing  flexibility  of  sex  roles.  Homosexuality  in  more  traditional cultures had typically followed rigid patterns: certain men were the insertive partners in  oral  and  anal  intercourse,  others  the  receptive  ones.  In  the  1970s  and  1980s,  however,  American  gay men often took both insertive and receptive roles. Rather than serve as cul‑de‑sac for the virus,  as heterosexual women often did, gay and bisexual men more often acted as an extremely effective  conduit for HIV.” (Allen, The Wages of Sin: Sex and Disease, Past and Present, p. 125‑126)  “As  the  gay  version  of  the  sexual  revolution  took  hold  among  certain  groups  of  gay  men  in  America’s largest cities, it precipitated a change in sexual behaviors. Perhaps the most significant  change  was  the  fact  that  some  core  groups  of  gay  men  began  practicing  anal  intercourse  with  dozens or even hundreds of partners a year. Also significant was a growing emphasis on “versatile”  anal  sex,  in  which  partners  alternately  played  both  receptive  and  insertive  roles,  and  on  new  behaviors  such  as  analingus,  or  rimming  that  facilitated  the  spread  of  otherwise  difficult‑to‑  transmit  microbes.  Important, too,  was  a  shift  in  patterns  of partnership, from diffuse  systems  in  which  a  lot  of gay  sex  was  with non‑gay  identified partners  who  themselves  had  few  contacts,  to  fairly  closed  systems  in  which  most  sexual  activity  was  within  a  circle  of  other  gay  men.  Also  important  was  a  general  decline  in  “group  immunity”  caused  by  repeated  infections  of  various  STDs, repeated inoculations of antibiotics and other drugs to combat them, as well as recreational  substantive  abuse,  stress,  and  other  behaviors  that  comprised  immunity.”  (Rotello,  Sexual  Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 57‑58)  “The magical link was through a key term. “One word”, the gay writer Nathan Frain has written,  ‘is like a hand grenade in the whole affair: promiscuity.’ Although promiscuity has long been seen  as a characteristic of male homosexuals, there is little doubt that the 1970s saw a quantitative jump  in its incidence as establishments such as gay bath‑houses and back‑room bars, existing specifically  for the  purposes  of  casual  sex,  spread  in  all  major  cities  of  the  United  States  and  elsewhere  from  Toronto to Pairs, Amsterdam to Sydney (though London remained more or less aloof, largely due to  the  effects  of  the  1967  reform).  Michel  Foucalt  has  written  characteristically  of  the  growth  of  ‘laboratories  of  sexual  experimentation’  in  cities  such  as  San  Francisco  and  New  York,  ‘the  counterpart of the medieval courts where strict rules of proprietary courtship were defined’. For the Larry Houston – www.banap.net  79 

first time for most male homosexuals, sex became easily available. With it came the chance not only  to have  frequent partners  but  also  to  explore  the varieties  of  sex.  Where  sex  becomes  to  available,  Foucault suggests, constant variations are necessary to enhance the pleasure of the act. For many  gays coming out in the 1970s the gay world was a paradise of sexual opportunity and of sensual  exploration.”  (Weeks, Jeffery. Sexuality and Its Discontents Meanings, Myths and Modern  Sexualities, p.47‑48)  “These data demonstrate definitively that the gay liberation movement resulted in a great increase  in promiscuity among gay men, along with significant changes in sexual practices that made rectal  trauma,  immunological  contact  with  semen,  use  of  recreational  drugs,  and  the  transmission  of  many viral, amoebal, fungal, and bacterial infections far more common than in the decades prior to  1970.  The  same  data  strongly  suggest  that  recent  changes  in  sexual  and  drug  activity  played  a  major  role  in  vastly  enlarging  the  homo‑  and  bisexual  male  population  at  risk  for  developing  immunosuppression. Since promiscuity, engaging in receptive anal intercourse, and fisting are the  three highest‑risk factors associated with AIDS among gay men and since each of these risk factors  is  correlated  with  known  cases  of  immunosuppression,  they  represent  significant  factors  in  our  understanding of why AIDS emerged as a major medical problem only in 1970.” (Root‑Bernstein,  Rethinking AIDS: The Tragic Cost of Premature Consensus, p. 290‑291)  “Whatever  the  cause  of  AIDS,  single  or  multi‑factorial,  it  is  certain  that  the  promiscuous  homosexuals of the late seventies and early eighties were fertile ground for an epidemic.ʺ (Adams,  AIDS: The HIV Myth, p.131)  “The  primary  factor  that  led  to  increase  HIV  transmission  was  anal  sex  combined  with  multiple  partners,  particularly  in  concentrated  core  groups.  By  the  seventies  there  is  little  doubt  that  for  those  in  the  most  sexually  active  core  groups,  multipartner  anal  sex  had  become  a  main  event.  Michael Callen, both an avid practitioner and a careful observer of life in the gay fast lane, believed  that  this  was  a  “historically  unprecendented  aspect”  of  the  gay  sexual  revolution.”  (Rotello,  Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 75)  “It was an historic accident that HIV disease first manifested itself in the gay populations of the east  and  west  coasts  of  the  United  States,”  wrote  British  sociologist  Jeffrey  Weeks  in  AIDS  and  Contemporary  History  in  1993.  His  opinion  has  been  almost  universal  among  gay  and  AIDS  activists even to this day. Yet there is little “accidental” about the sexual ecology described above.  Multiple  concurrent  partners,  versatile anal  sex, core  group  behavior  centered  in  commercial  sex  establishments, widespread recreational drug abuse, repeated waves of STDs and constant intake of  antibiotics,  sexual  tourism  and  travel  ‑these  factors  were  not  “accidents.”  Multipartner  anal  sex  was  encouraged, celebrated,  considered  a  central  component  of  liberation.  Core  group  behavior  in  baths  and  sex  clubs  was  deemed  by  many  the  quintessence  of  freedom.  Versatility  was  declared  a  political  imperative.  Analingus  was  pronounced  the  champagne  of  gay  sex,  a  palpable  gesture  of  revolution. STDs were to be worn like badges of honor, antibiotics to be taken with pride.  Far  from  being  accidents,  these  things  characterized  the  very  foundation  of  what  it  supposedly  meant  to  experience  gay  liberation,  Taken  together  they  formed  a  sexual  ecology  of  almost Larry Houston – www.banap.net  80 

incalculably catastrophic dimensions, a classic feedback loop in which virtually every factor served  to amplify every other. From the virus’s point of view, the ecology of liberation was a royal road to  adaptive  triumph.  From  many  gay  men’s  point  of  view,  it  proved  a  trapdoor  to  hell  on  earth.”  (Rotello, Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men, p. 89)  Bibliography  Adams, Jad. AIDS: The HIV Myth. MacMillian London, Inc., London, 1989 . Allen, Peter  Lewis.  The  Wages  of  Sin:  Sex  and  Disease,  Past  and  Present.  The  University  of  Chicago  Press. Chicago and London, 2000.  Altman,  Dennis.  AIDS  in  the  Mind  of  America.  Anchor  Books.  Garden  City,  New  York,  1987.  Altman,  Dennis.  Defying  Gravity:  A  Political  Life.  Allen  &  Unwin  Pty  Ltd.  St  Leonards,  Australia. 1997.  Andriote, John‑Manuel. Victory Deferred: How AIDS Changed Gay Life in America. The  University of Chicago Press. Chicago and London, 1999.  Laumann, Edward O., Stephen Ellingson, Jenna Mahay, Anthony Paik, and Yoosik Youm  editors.  The  Sexual  Organization  of  the  City.  The  University  of  Chicago  Press.  Chicago  and London, 2004.  Root‑Berstein,  Robert  S.  Rethinking  AIDS: The  Tragic  Cost of  Premature Consensus.  The  Free Press. New York, 1993.  Rotello, Gabriel. Sexual Ecology: AIDS and the Destiny of Gay Men. A Dutton Book. New  York, 1997.  Rushing,  William  A.  The  AIDS  Epidemic:  Social  Dimensions  of  an  Infectious  Disease.  WestviewPress. Boulder, CO, 1995.  Sadownick,  Douglas.  Sex  Between  Men:  An  Intimate  History  of  the  Sex  Lives  of  Men  Postwar to Present. HarperSanFrancisco. San Francisco, 1996.  Turner,  Charles  F.,  Heather  G.  Miller,  and  Lincoln  E.  Moses,  Editors.  AIDS  Sexual  Behavior and Intravenous Drug Use. National Academy Press. Washington, D.C., 1989.  Weeks,  Jeffery.  Sexuality  and  Its  Discontents  Meanings,  Myths  and  Modern  Sexualities.  Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, 1988. 

http://www.banap.net/spip.php?article84 Larry Houston – www.banap.net  81 

Chapter Ten Homosexual Identity Formation 
Saturday 26 May 2007.  The  past  25  years  we  have  seen  an  increasing  number  of  studies  concerning  homosexuality.  These  studies  have  dealt  with  both  the  positive  and  negative  effects  of  homosexuality.  There  has  been  a  focused  attempt  to  validate  homosexuality  as  an  “alternate lifestyle.” This research is both good and bad, in that what is being studied itself  is a new concept; a “gay identity.” More importantly this research is questionable because  of the  motives of  the researchers themselves,  many  who  have accepted a “  gay identity”  and adopted a homosexual lifestyle. The research has tended to emphasize the uniqueness  of this gay identity. In doing so they have created highly specialized bodies of theory and  research  that  are  isolated  from  general  fields  of  study.  This  is  a  common  problem  of  all  new  fields of  studies.  Still  we must  be especially  careful in researching “homosexuality”  because we are dealing with life long consequences in the lives of people who are choosing  to  accept  what  has  always  fallen  and  continually  falls  outside  the  bounds  of  societal  norms.  “Psychological  theory,  which  should  be  employed  to  described  only  individual  mental,  emotional,  and  behavioral  aspects  of  homosexuality,  has  been  employed  for  building  models  of  personal  developmental that purport to mark the steps in an individual’s progression toward a mature and  egosyntonic gay or lesbian identity. The embracing and disclosing of such an identity, however, is  best  understood as  a  political phenomenon  occurring  in  a historical  period during  which  identity  politics  has  become  a  consuming  occupation.”  (De  Cecco  &  Parker,  “The  Biology  of  Homosexuality: Sexual  Orientation or  Sexual  Preference?”  p. 20 in Sex,  Cells, and Same‑  Sex Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference edited by De Cecco and Parker)  “While  some  suggest  that  identity  has  become  a  watchword  of  our  times  as  it  provides  a  much  needed vocabulary in terms of how we define our loyalties and commitments (Shotter, 1993), others  suggest that identity only becomes an issue when it is in crisis. In this sense the crisis of identity  occur, as Mercer suggests, when something we assume to be fixed, coherent and stable is displaced  by the experience of doubt and uncertainty.  Within much of the recent social‑scientific work on the topic, the notion of identity as fixed, neutral  and  unproblematic  has  been  questioned.  As  Kitzinger  (1998)  suggests,  rather  than  viewing  identities as freely created products of introspection, or the reflections of some unproblematic inner  self,  they  are  more  accurately  understood  as  being  profoundly  political,  both  in  origins  and  implications.”  (Heaphy,  “Medicalisation  and  Identity  Formation:  Identity  and  Strategy  in  the Context of AIDS and HIV”, p.139; article found in the following book by Weeks and  Holland editors. Sexual Cultures Communities, Values, and Intimacy)  I am especially concerned with the theorizing and promoting the concept of the formation  of a homosexual/gay identity. Individuals who have always been at a difficult stage of life,  adolescents,  are  being  encouraged  to  accept  this  idea  of  a  homosexual/gay  identity.  Adolescence  is  a  period  of  immense  physical,  mental,  psychosocial  change  and Larry Houston – www.banap.net  82 

development  in  life.  An  adolescent  is  one  that  is  no  longer  a  child,  but  not  yet  mature  enough  to  understand  the  changes  going  on.  This  is  a  confusing  time  in  life,  a  time  of  questioning. A period of time for an individual who wants to remain close to their parents  and at  the  same  time is  seeking  independence. It is  during this  period of  life that  sexual  and  emotional  bonding  is  beginning  to  develop,  typically  along  societal  norms  towards  members  of  the  opposite  sex.  There  is  also  same‑sex  sexual  physical  activity  that  often  takes place among adolescent males. But for some, a sexual confusion may arise, and they  feel attracted to members of their own sex.  “Although  turmoil  theory  has  been  largely  refuted,  adolescence  is  still  noted  for  its  dynamic  changes  in  physical  and  psychological  development,  parental  relations,  self‑esteem,  identity  formation, and cognitive development. It is a time of pervasive adjustment to the vicissitude of the  inner  self  and  the  adult  world.”  (Mills,  “The  Psychoanalytic  Perspective  of  Adolescent  Homosexuality: A Review,” p. 913)  “Homosexual activities are behaviors that are common in adolescence and which may progressively  contribute  to  sexual  orientation  and  identity.  Like  masturbation,  homosexual  activity  may  be  a  means  of  experimentation  and  self‑exploration.  The fantasies  which  accompany  masturbation  and  allow  the  adolescent  to  safely  try  out  sexual  possibilities  and  help  him  or  her  manage  infantile  sexual  propensities  which  surface  at  this  time  of  development.  Early  adolescent  homosexuality  carries  this  process  further  to  include  another  person  who  aids  in  the  process  of  self‑discovery.  Within  this  narcissistic  alliance,  homosexual  activity  offers  opportunities  for  comparison,  information gathering,  experimentation  reassurance,  and help  in dealing  with guilt  over  infantile  wishes (Glasser, 1977).  Normal homosexual behavior in early adolescent boys is distinguished from its counterpart in that  there is a strong preponderance of strong heterosexual interest in the homosexual activity (Glasser,  1977). Homosexual experimentation allows early adolescent boys to imagine what girls are like and  how they should be approach sexually. This experimentation also helps them to integrate their own  feminine  identifications  into  their  own  personality.  Another  element  of  normal  adolescent  homosexual activity is that sexual acts with older men are considered forbidden and taboo. Young  boys  who  experiment  with  homosexual  activities  view  themselves  as  very  different  from  adult  homosexuals and look upon these men with disdain.” (Mills, “The Psychoanalytic Perspective of  Adolescent Homosexuality: A Review,” p. 918‑919)  “Homosexual  activities  and  homosexual  identity  in  adolescence  should  be  viewed  differently  in  terms  of  their  consequences.  As  a  person  progresses  through  the  various  stages  of  adolescent  development,  homosexual  experimentation  can  be  a  means  of  self‑discovery  and  ameliorating  infantile  conflict.  Normatively,  by  the  time the  person  reaches  late  adolescence,  these  homosexual  tendencies  and  activities  have  abated  and  been  replaced  with  a  heterosexual  orientation.”  (Mills,  “The Psychoanalytic Perspective of Adolescent Homosexuality: A Review,” p.921)  “Adolescence  is  a  time  of  exploration  and  experimentation;  as  such  sexual  activity  does  not  necessarily reflect either present or future sexual orientation. Confusion about sexual identity is not Larry Houston – www.banap.net  83 

uncommon  in  adolescents.  Many  youth  engage  in  same‑sex  behavior;  attractions  or  behaviors  do  not  mean  that  an  adolescent  is  lesbian  or  gay.  Moreover  sexual  activity  is  a  behavior,  whereas  sexual  orientation  is  a  component  of  identity.  Many  teens  experience  a  broad  range  of  sexual  behaviors that are incorporated into an evolving sexual identity consolidated over a period of time.”  (Ryan and Futterman, Lesbian and Gay Youth, p.10)  In  order  to  try  to  understand  this  idea,  the  concepts  of  sexual  orientation  and  a  homosexual/gay  identity  have  been  theorized.  A  variety  of  developmental  stage  models  for a homosexual/gay identity formation have been formulated within recent years. All of  these  models  accept  and  promote  the  concept  of  “coming  out”,  which  is  a  public  annunciation of accepting a homosexual/gay identity.  “Identity,  according  to  Troiden,  is  a  label  which  people  apply  to  themselves  and  which  is  representative of the self in a specific social situation. Frequently, identity refers to placement in a  social  category,  such  as  homosexual,  gender  group,  and  so  on.”  (Cox  and  Gallios,  “Gay  and  Lesbian Identity Developmental: A Social Identity Perspective,” p. 3)  “The process of assuming a self‑definition as a lesbian, gay, and bisexual is commonly referred to as  “coming  out.  .  . . The  term  coming  out  originates  in gay  and  lesbian  culture.  . . . Thus  the term  coming  out,  as  used  in  the  gay  and  lesbian  community  and  in  the  gay  liberation  movement,  has  always implied some level of public declaration of one’s homosexuality.” (Appleby and Anastas,  Not Just a Passing Phase, p. 66)  “Coming out” is viewed as the developmental process through which an individual recognizes their  sexual preference for members of their own sex, and choosing to integrate this knowledge into their  personal lives.  Taken together, they describe a progression from vague awareness of difference, through a gradual  definition  of  sexual  feelings,  to  identification  with  a  social  category,  and  sometimes  beyond  to  a  recontextualizing  stage.  These  developmental  models  affirm  the  idea  that  the  homosexual  orientation  is  an  inner  potential,  waiting  to  be  discovered  and  expressed.”  (Lipkin,  Understanding  Homosexuality,  Changing  Schools  A  Text  for  Teachers,  Counselors,  and  Administrators. p. 101)  “The common assumption is that GLB identities develop as individuals work through conflicts and  stresses  that  are  related  to  their  sexual  orientation.  Resolving  feelings  of  inner  confusion,  ambivalence, and fear of rejection, they gradually consolidate a affirmative sense of self that enables  them  to  accept  and  express  their  same‑gender  feelings.  It  is  hypothesized  that  this  process  is  organized in a developmental sequence of stages that is delineated in a somewhat different way by  each  of  the  various  models.”  (Elizur  &  Ziv,  “Family  Support  and  Acceptance,  Gay  Male  Identity Formation, and Psychological Adjustment: A Path Model,” p.127)  As with all new fields of study, there are differing and some times contradicting ideas or  theories. It is clearly seen that humans grow developmentally physically, emotionally, and  mentally.  This  is  how  a  gay  identity  is  theorized  to  occur,  in  developmental  stages.  The Larry Houston – www.banap.net  84 

scholarship  on  the  formation  of  these  theories  primarily  occurred  in  the  fields  of  psychology (Cass) and sociology (Coleman and Troiden).  “During  the  past  decade,  several  investigators  have  proposed  theoretical  models  that  attempt  to  explain the formation of homosexualities (Cass 1979, 1984; Coleman 1982; Lee 1977; Ponse 1978;  Schafer1976;  Troiden  1977,1979;  Weinberg  1977,1978).  Although  the  various  models  propose  different  numbers  of  stages  to  explain  homosexual  identity  formation,  they  describe  strikingly  similar  patterns  of  growth  and  change  as  major  hallmarks  of  homosexual  identity  development.  First, nearly all models view homosexual identity formation as taking place against a backdrop of  stigma.  The  stigma  surrounding  homosexuality  affects  both  the  formation  and  expression  of  homosexual identities. Second, homosexual identities are described as developing over a protracted  period and involving a number of ʺgrowth points or changesʺ that may be ordered into a series of  stages  (Cass  1984).  Third,  homosexual  identity  formation  involves  increasing  acceptance  of  the  label  ʺhomosexual”  as  applied  to  the  self.  Fourth,  although  coming  out  begins  when  individuals  define themselves as homosexual, lesbians and gay males typically report an increased desire over  time  to  disclose  their  homosexual  identity  to  at  least  some  members  of  an  expanding  series  of  audiences.  Thus,  coming  out,  or  identity  disclosure,  takes  place  at  a  number  of  levels:  to  self,  to  other  homosexuals,  to  heterosexual  friends,  to  family,  to  coworkers,  and  to  the  public  at  large  (Coleman  1982;  Lee  1977).  Fifth,  lesbians  and  gays  develop  ʺincreasingly  personalized  and  frequent”  social  contacts  with  other  homosexuals  over  time.  (Cass  1984)”  (Garnets  &  Kimmel,  Psychological Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Male Experiences, p.195)  “Clinical  and  developmental  psychologists  first  proposed  coming‑out  models  or  sexual  identity  models  over  two  decades  ago.  These  theoretical  constructions  described  the  advent  of  a  same‑sex  identity through a series of invariant steps or stages by which individuals recognize, make sense of,  give a name to, and publicize their status as lesbian or gay (bisexuality is seldom addressed). The  reification of these “master” models to explain nonheterosexuality remains popular today. Although  diverse  in  conceptual  underpinnings,  they  are  nearly  universal  in  their  stage  sequences  and  assumptions regarding the ways in which youths move from a private, at times unknown, same‑sex  sexuality to a public, integrated sexuality.” (Savin‑Williams, Mom, Dad, I’m Gay p.16)  Three  models  of  homosexual/gay  identity  formation  will  be  looked  at  and  than  one  person’s merger of all three models into a “mega‑model” will be discussed. All models are  based on adult  recollections.  Coleman and Troiden  have been accused of  male bias with  their  models.  Also  Horowitz  and  Newcomb  in  their  article,  “A  Multidimensional  Approach  to  Homosexual  Identity”  write  that  Troiden  and  Coleman  have  no  empirical  validation  whatsoever  to  their  theorized  models  of  homosexual/gay  identity  formation.  These  stage  models  tend to  be  linear in  nature  and are over  simplistic. In  doing  so  they  thus tend to deny the wide range and variety of individual homosexual experiences.  ∙ Cass  The  first  person  to  formulate  and  publish  a  theory  on  a  homosexual  identity  formation  was V.C. Cass in 1979. At time she formulated her theory Cass was a Clinical Psychologist Larry Houston – www.banap.net  85 

at  Murdoch  University  in  Western  Australia.  Cass’s  model  for  homosexual/gay  identity  development  uses  six  stages.  Her  model  is  non‑age  specific  and  is  not  linear.  The  individual may be in more then one stage at a time and also they may return to a previous  stage. There are six stages in her theory of homosexual identity formation.  1)  Identity  confusion.  “Am  I  a  homosexual?”  In  this  first  stage  an  individual  begins  to  recognize  that  “I  may  be  different.”  The  basis  is  on  behavior,  actions,  feelings,  and  or  thoughts  in  which  he  may  think  he  is  different  from  others.  These  perceived  differences  may  be  “labeled”  homosexual.  Resulting  emotional  tension  may  be  experienced  in  the  form of confusion, bewilderment, anxiety, etc. This emotional tension arises because now  there  is  the  knowledge  of  a  difference  between  homosexual  and  heterosexual.  There  are  three possible paths an individual may take for resolution of this identity confusion. This  homosexual identity can be rejected and resisted, by avoiding behaviors that are perceived  to  be  homosexual  and  by  shutting  out  information  that  might  confirm  a  homosexual  identity.  A  second  path  would  be  that  this  identity  is  accepted  as  legitimate,  but  yet  undesirable.  The  third  possible  path  would  be  to  accept  the  homosexual  identity  and  evaluate it as desirable.  2)  Identity  comparison.  “I  may  be  a  homosexual.”  An  individual’s  reaction  to  being  different may be positive, while the individual continues to hide their acceptance of being  a  homosexual  from  others.  They  may  do  this  by  trying  to  act  as  a  heterosexual.  The  individual  may  also  have  a  negative  reaction  to  being  different,  seeking  to  avoid  gay  behavior,  gay  identity  or  both,  and  this  may  result  in  self‑hatred.  While  comparing  themselves  to  being  homosexual,  there  is  the  possibility  of  feeling  alienated  from  heterosexual peers, family, and community, while also having a sense of not belonging to  another community of similar people.  3) Identity tolerance. “I am probably a homosexual.” In this stage an individual begins to  tolerate  a  homosexual  identity,  seeking  out  contact  and  acceptance  from  other  homosexuals. The type of contact will influence self‑esteem and social skills. Self‑affirming  interaction can lead to the next stage. However, purely sexual contact, and without a gay  identity or positive socialization, may result in stunted development and possibly be very  damaging.  4)  Identity  acceptance:  “I  am  a  homosexual.”  Relationships  within  the  family  and  with  others  may  be  problematic.  He  may  reveal  to  some  people  he  is  a  homosexual,  while  denying  it  to  others.  Social  acceptance  or  rejection  of  this  accepted  homosexual  identity  continues to cause problems for the individual as he tries to live in “two worlds.”  5)  Identity  pride:  There  is  a  strong  personal  acceptance  of  this  homosexual  identity.  Though  negative  reactions  by  others  may  shake  pride,  a  stronger  identification  and  interaction  with  other  homosexuals  encourages  pride  in  accepting  a  homosexual/gay  identity.  As  shame  diminishes  in  accepting  a  homosexual/gay  identity,  “hiding”  one’s  identity is questioned. In this stage, one may have an “us versus them” or “straight versus Larry Houston – www.banap.net  86 

queer”  attitude.  This  also  includes  the  possibly  strong  tension  between  interacting  with  more groups.  6)  Identity  synthesis:  Sexual  orientation  no  longer  is  the  main  determinant  of  one’s  identity. Homosexuality is viewed as one part of a multifaceted self. There is an ongoing  reevaluation of keeping a homosexual/gay identity separated from the other segments of  one’s identity. This is when the individual fully accepts the homosexual/gay identity.  ∙ Coleman  Eli  Coleman  in  1982,  proposed  a  model  that  has  five  stages,  for  the  formation  of  a  homosexual/gay  identity.  When  Coleman  first  wrote  about  homosexuality/gay  identity  formation he was associated with the U of Minn Medical School. He is a psychologist and  sex therapist, who has also served on the editorial board for the Journal of Homosexuality.  1) Pre‑coming out. This is often a slow and painful process. Within this process there is a  preconscious awareness of an attraction to members of the same sex. In this first stage the  individual may reject, deny, or repress his homosexuality. He is aware of stigma, and does  not want to admit, perhaps even to himself, that he might be or is a homosexual. The stress  of dealing with these feelings may result in depression and can lead to suicide.  2)  Coming  out.  This  stage  begins  in  an  initial  acceptance  of  and  a  reconciliation  to  their  homosexuality.  The  first  expression  to  others,  which  includes  a  positive  response,  particularly from family or close friends may lead to greater comfort and wider disclosure.  Conversely a negative response could send the individual back to stage one. Now hiding  from oneself requires even greater levels of denial than before.  3) Exploration. Now the individual experiments with their new identity both sexually and  socially.  They  begin  contact  with  others  in  the  gay  community.  There  is  often  a  “homosexual  adolescence”  which  includes  promiscuity,  infatuation,  courtship,  and  rejection.  For  the  older  individual,  there  is  the  possibility  of  shame  at  the  seemingly  immature impulses. If one then assumes this stage is representative of their future gay life,  they might try to flee.  4)  First relationship. A  sense of attraction and  sexual  competence  may  lead to  the  desire  for  deeper  and  more  lasting  relationships.  It  requires  skills  to  maintain  a  same‑gender  connection  in a  hostile  environment.  The  intense  expectations,  passiveness, and  mistrust  can  doom  a  first  relationship.  One  partner  may  rebel  by  pursing  sex  outside  the  relationship.  5)  Integration.  In  this  final  stage  the  individual  sees  themselves  as  a  fully  functioning  person  in  their  society.  The  individual’s  public  and  private  selves  become  congruent.  A  growing  self‑acceptance  leads  to  a  greater  confidence  and  the  ability  to  sustain  relationships.  As  openness  and  caring  increase  possessiveness  and  mistrust  diminishes.  Though rejection is grieved, it is not devastating. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  87 

∙ Troiden  In 1989  Richard  Troiden  theorized a  third  model  for  the  formation  of a  homosexual/gay  identity.  Troiden  uses  an  age  specific  four‑stage  model  for  developing  a  homosexual  identity. He was an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology  at Miami University in Oxford, OH when he developed his theory of homosexual identity  formation.  Troiden  is  a  gay  sociologist.  His  model  uses  sociological  theory,  which  represents a synthesis and elaboration on previous research. He called his model an ideal‑  typical  model  of  gay  identity  acquisition.  To  obtain  data  for  his  theory  Troidan  interviewed  150  gay  men.  Participants  to  be  interviewed  were  gained  by  using  a  “snowball technique”, that is they were found by word of mouth.  Stage  1.  Sensitization.  This  stage  occurs  before  puberty,  and  is  generally  not  seen  in  a  sexual  context.  Rather,  heterosexuality  is  accepted  as  the  norm.  So  there  is  no  homosexual/heterosexual labeling to one’s feelings or behaviors. What is noted is gender  conformity  or  nonconformity  to  activities.  Though  there  are  generalized  feelings  of  marginality  and  perceptions  of  being  different  then  their  same‑sex  peers.  These  perceptions  are  seen  primarily  in  childhood  social  experiences.  It  is  the  subsequent  meanings and labeling of childhood experiences, rather than the experiences themselves,  which are significant in the sensitization stage.  Stage  2:  Identity  Confusion.  In  this  stage  there  is  a  confusion  of  identities.  As  specific  things become personalized and sexualized during adolescence an individual may begin  reflecting on the idea that their feelings and behaviors could be regarded as homosexual.  As a result, there is inner turmoil and uncertainty around their ambiguous sexual status.  No longer is a heterosexual identity seen as a given, and as of yet there is no developed  perceptions of having a homosexual identity. There are several factors responsible for this  identity  confusion. One  is  an  altered  perception of  self.  There  is  now  along  with  gender  experiences, genital  and  emotional  experiences  that  set  them apart  from same‑sex  peers.  Added confusion is seen when responding to both heterosexual and homosexual feelings  and  experiences.  A  third  factor  is  the  stigma  surrounding  homosexuality.  An  additional  factor is ignorance and inaccurate knowledge about a social category for these behaviors  and feelings. How does one become a member of this category?  Stage 3. Identity Assumption. A homosexual/gay identity becomes both a self‑identity and  a  presented  identity.  Now  that  this  homosexual/gay  identity  is  tolerated,  there  is  association  with other  homosexuals,  exploration of a  homosexual  subculture, and  sexual  experimentation. Although a homosexual identity is assumed during this stage, it is first  tolerated, and it is accepted later.  Stage 4: Commitment. An individual adopts homosexuality as a way of life. There is a self‑  acceptance  and  a  comfort  with  a  homosexual/gay  identity.  More  emphasis  is  placed  on  this identity being a “way of life,” “state of being,” and an “essential” identity than a set of  behaviors or sexual orientation. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  88 

∙ Lipkin  One  of  the  most  recent  attempts  to  theorize  a  homosexual  identity  model  is  by  Arthur  Lipkin in his book, Understanding Homosexuality, Changing Schools A Text for Teachers,  Counselors, and Administrators. Lipkin is graduated from Harvard University, taught in  public  schools  in  Cambridge,  MA.  He  is  an  instructor  and  research  associate  at  the  Harvard  Graduate  School  of  Education.  Using  the  three  models  just  discussed,  Lipkin  combines them into a mega‑model of five stages. ʺ1. Pre‑Sexuality (Troiden 1) Preadolescent  nonsexual feelings of difference and marginality.  2. Identity Questioning (Coleman 1; Cass 1, 2; Troiden 2) Ambiguous, repressed, sexualized same‑  gender feelings and/or activities. Avoidance of stigmatized label.  3.  Coming  Out  (Coleman  2,  3,  4;  Cass  3,  4;  Troiden  3)  Toleration  then  acceptance  of  identity  through  contact  with gay/lesbian  individuals  and  culture.  Exploration  of  sexual  possibilities  and  first erotic relationships. Careful, selective self‑disclosure outside gay /lesbian community.  4.  Pride  (Coleman  5;  Cass  5;  Troiden  4)  Integration  of  sexuality  into  self.  Capacity  for  love  relationships. Wider self‑disclosure and better stigma management.  5. Post‑Sexuality (Cass 6) A diminishment of centrality of homosexuality in self‑concept and social  relations.ʺ (Lipkin, Understanding Homosexuality, Changing Schools A Text for Teachers,  Counselors, and Administrators, p. 103‑104)  ∙ Weaknesses of the theories  Now that these models, which theorize the formation of a homosexual/gay identity, have  been  discussed,  let  us  look  at  some  of  the  problems,  limitations,  and  pitfalls  that  even  those authors advocating for homosexuality themselves warn about.  “One of the problems with a linear model is that it is assumed that those ho reach the final  stage  have all passed through the same series of steps. Research designed to document “stage‑sequential  models,” however, reveal diversity as well as patterns; the more specific the stages or steps were in a  given  model,  the  less  likely  the  stages  matched  the  experiences  of  the  different  individuals  under  study  (Sophie,  1986)”  (Heyl,  “Homosexuality:  A  Social  Phenomenon,”  p.  331  in  Human  Sexuality:  The  Societal  and  Interpersonal  Context,  Kathleen  McKinney  and  Susan  Sprecher)  “Almost everything known about the coming out process is in question, such as how it happens (e.  g., a discovered essential lesbian, gay, or bisexual identity or a socially constructed identity), when  it happens, its order or disorder, and whether there is an end state to the process or  whether it is  always  open‑ended.”  (Hunter,  Shannon,  Knox  and  Martin,  Lesbian,  Gay,  and  Bisexual  Youths and Adults, p. 67)

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

89 

All  of  these  theories  are  retrospective  in  nature,  based  on  homosexual  male  adults  recalling  their  childhood.  We  are  talking  about  adults  adding  labels  and  definitions  to  childhood feelings, emotions, behaviors, etc. The young child expresses his experiences in  terms  of gender  conforming/nonconforming behavior and  not  sexual  behavior.  A  young  child  may  have  a  perception of  being  different  from his  peers,  but  he  does not  have the  vocabulary  to  express  it.  It  is  during  puberty  and  throughout  adolescence,  when  these  feelings  and  behaviors  become  sexualized.  Also  they  now  have  the  vocabulary  to  begin  seeing  themselves  as  heterosexual  or  homosexual.  The  cultural  stigma  towards  homosexuality now has greater meaning. Adding to their confusion are the many sexual  stimuli,  and  as  well  as  the  fact  that  the  adolescent  body  usually  responds  to  both  homosexual  and  heterosexual  cues.  There  is  a  blurring  of  sexual  cues,  emotional  and  physical  responses  in  adolescence,  and  one  may  be  attracted  toward  members  of  both  sexes. It is a very confusing time for them.  “Notwithstanding  these  contributions,  identity  formation  models  have  come  under  increasing  criticism during the last decade for: (a) over‑emphasizing the differences between gay/ lesbian and  heterosexual families, and under‑emphasizing the diversity among the former (Laird, 1993) and (b)  not being sufficiently sensitive to the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which GLB identity  formation occurs (Boxer & Cohler, 1989; Cox & Gallois, 1996; Eliason, 1996). There are significant  variations  among  these  models  and  discrepancies  have  been  found  between  the  proposed  developmental  sequences  and  the  experiences  of  GLB  respondents  (Eliason,  1996;  Herdt,  1996;  Sophie,  1985/1986).”  (Elizur  &  Ziv,  “Family  Support  and  Acceptance,  Gay  Male  Identity  Formation, and Psychological Adjustment: A Path Model”, p.128)  “Much  of the  research  on  same‑sex  identity  formation presumes some  underlying  and  stable  core  trait of “sexual orientation” that is expressed or experienced and that then leads to the formation of  an identity based upon the available social categories (Cass, 1979; Coleman, 1981/1982b; Troiden,  1979). Thus, such models tend to be linear, positing a single pathway and set sequence of stages in  development of such an identity and defining a specific end objective to this process. Especially in  earlier  models  of  gay  and  lesbian  identity  formation,  the  progression  through  such  stages  is  freighted  with  moralistic  and  social/political  overtones.  These  models  of  identity  development  typically ignore the potential for ongoing shifts in identity across the life course and fail to critically  examine  cultural  assumptions  that  underlie  such  developmental  schemes.”  (Savin‑Williams  &  Cohen. The Lives of Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals Children to Adults, p.442‑443)  “One reason for the failure of the specific stage theories to account for the diversity of experience of  participants  is  the  assumption  of  linearity  which  underlies  these  theories.”  (Sophie,  “A  Critical  Examination of Stage Theories of Lesbian Identity Formation,” p. 50)  Troiden himself cautions against taking his model of a homosexual identity formation too  literally.  As a whole  these  models are largely  descriptive and atheoretical.  These  models  are gross generalizations, ideal types, which vary from individual to individual. It is not a  “one size fits all” model. In doing so they neglect to identify how the individual identity  develops  in  relation  to  group  identity.  Research  that  has  included  female  subjects  has Larry Houston – www.banap.net  90 

yielded  some apparent differences in development  between  lesbians and  gay  males. The  research  data  was  taken  from  small  sample  sizes  and  without  heterosexual  comparison  groups,  i.e.  individuals  acquiring  a  heterosexual  orientation.  The  use  of  stage  models  inherently applies linearity, with implication to an end state and carries the risk of model  reification. What is being observed now is that these theories of homosexual/gay identity  formation may not be applicable to generations after the generational cohort that entered  adolescence  in  the  1960s  and  1970s.  The  experiences  of  adolescents  in  the  1990s  who  acquire a homosexual/gay identity are in a more rapid manner. This may be due in part  because of the “coming out” of earlier generations. Or it may be because these theories of  homosexual/gay identity formation are not a faithful rendering of the process individuals  actually  have  gone  through.  These  models  of  homosexual/gay  identity  formation  are  relatively  silent  on  the  psychological  processes  occurring  in  gay  and  lesbian  individuals  before the discrete and dramatic process termed “coming out.”  “Most  profoundly  they  are  true  –  at  least  in  a  universal  sense.  Although  a  linear  progression  is  intuitively  appealing,  extant  research  suggests  it  seldom  characterizes  the  lives  of  real  sexual‑  minority youth.” (Savin‑Williams, Mom, Dad, I’m Gay p.16)  “Although  coming‑out  models  are  inherently  male‑centric,  recent  research  suggests  that  they  do  not  even  characterize  the  lives  of  current  cohorts  of  males  with  same‑sex  attraction.”  (Savin‑  Williams, Mom, Dad, I’m Gay p.17)  Perhaps the most critical weakness of these models of homosexual/gay identity formation  is  that  these  developmental  stage  models  assume  an  essential  theoretical  orientation,  “sexual identity involves learning what one is” and that a homosexual is a form of being.  Yet  advocates  for  these  theories  of  homosexual  identity  try  to  deny  this  underlying  assumption  of  ‘homosexual  essentiality.”  This  is  how  Troiden  tries  to  express  it  in  the  following quotes.  “First, gay identities are not viewed as being acquired in an absolute, fixed, or final sense. One of  the main assumptions of this model is that identity is never fully acquired, but is always somewhat  incomplete,  forever  subject  to  modification.”  (Troiden,  “Born  Gay?  A  Critical  review  of  Biological Research on Homosexuality,” p.372) “Nor is the model meant to convey the idea that  gay identity development is inevitable for those who experience the first stages. Rather, each stage is  viewed  as  making  the  acquisition  of  a  gay  identity  more  probable,  but  not  as  an  inevitable  determinant.”  (Troiden,  “Born  Gay?  A  Critical  review  of  Biological  Research  on  Homosexuality,” p.372)  “It is quite possible that as adolescents, young adults, or even as adults, a relatively large number of  males  consciously  “test”  the  extent  in  which  they  may  be  sexually  attracted  to  other  men.  As  a  consequence  of  such  sexual  experimentation,  a  substantial  number  of  males  may  decide  that  homosexuality is  not  for  them  and  choose  to  leave  the  scene  entirely.”  (Troiden, “Born  Gay?  A  Critical review of Biological Research on Homosexuality,” p. 372)

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

91 

The earlier discussion of esentialism verses social constructionism views of homosexuality  is  once  again  seen  here  in  our  present  discussion  of  these  models  of  the  formation  of  a  homosexuality/gay identity. Savin‑Williams and  Cohen  who advocate for  homosexuality  write about this in their book.  “Much  of the  research  on  same‑sex  identity  formation presumes some  underlying  and  stable  core  trait of “sexual orientation” that is expressed or experienced and that then leads to the formation of  an identity based upon the available social categories (Cass, 1979; Coleman, 1981/1982b; Troiden,  1979). Thus, such models tend to be linear, positing a single pathway and set sequence of stages in  development of such an identity and defining a specific end objective to this process. Especially in  earlier  models  of  gay  and  lesbian  identity  formation,  the  progression  through  such  stages  is  freighted  with  moralistic  and  social/political  overtones.  These  models  of  identity  development  typically ignore the potential for ongoing shifts in identity across the life course and fail to critically  examine  cultural  assumptions  that  underlie  such  developmental  schemes.”  (Savin‑Williams  &  Cohen. The Lives of Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals Children to Adults, p.442‑443)  Humans  grow and  mature physically,  emotionally,  sexually and  in  mental  capacity. It  is  evident that we grow in developmental stages, yet what is not so evident is what can be  contributed  “to  nature  versus  nurture.”  Is  one  born  a  homosexual  or  did  one  learn  homosexuality.  We  have  the  capacity  to  respond  both  positively  and  negatively  to  a  variety of stimuli. These outcomes are visible to others and to the individual himself.  Applying  these  to  our  sexuality  we  will  realize  many  interesting  things.  Sexuality  is  primarily a learned cultural phenomenon. We must be aware that our physical bodies will  respond  sexually  to a  variety of stimuli,  just as it  responds to  many  sensory  stimuli.  We  are living and growing beings.  “The  research  on  identity  development  documented  not  only  that  individuals  followed  different  paths  for  reaching  new identities,  but  also  that  identities,  once  formed,  were  not  always  as  stable  and permanent as people had thought they would be. Golden (1987) concludes “that the assumption  that we inherently strive for congruence between our sexual feelings, activities, and identities may  not  be  warranted,  and  that  given  the  fluidity  of  sexual  feelings,  congruence  may  not  be  an  achievable  state”  (p.31).  Thus,  behavior,  emotions,  and  identities  do  not  necessarily  develop  into  stable  packages  that  can  be  easily  labeled  as  heterosexual,  gay  or  lesbian,  or  even  bisexual,  even  though the individual or the society or the gay community might desire such consistency.” (Heyl,  “Homosexuality:  A  Social  Phenomenon,”  p.  333  in  Human  Sexuality:  The  Societal  and  Interpersonal Context, Kathleen McKinney and Susan Sprecher)  “Thus,  the  process  of  the  development  of  a  lesbian  identity  or  a  change  in  sexual  orientation  in  general,  must  be  viewed  in  context  of  current  social  and  historical  conditions.”  (Sophie,  “A  Critical Examination of Stage Theories of Lesbian Identity Formation,” p.50)  “Existing sociocultural arrangements define what sexuality is, the purposes it serves, its manner of  expression,  and  what  it  means  to  be  sexual.”  (Troiden  in,  Psychological  Perspectives  on  Lesbian and Gay Male Experiences, p.191) 92  Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

“Because  sexual  learning  occurs  within  specific  historical  eras  and  sociocultural  settings,  sexual  conduct and its meanings vary across history and among cultures.”  (Troiden in, Psychological  Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Male Experiences p.192)  “Developmental  stage  models  have  traditionally  been  used  to  describe  the  process  necessary  to  arrive at a healthy homosexual identity, a healthy homosexual is always considered the final stage of  the model and requires integrating homosexuality into broader personal identity. Anything short of  this  integration  is  judged  to  be  incomplete  or  less  than  optimal  outcome.”  (Horowitz  and  Newcomb, “A Multidimensional Approach to Homosexual Identity,” p.2)  We  must  therefore  take  a  very  cautious  approach  to  the  use  of  theories,  such  as  a  “homosexual identity” to validate homosexuality as an “alternate lifestyle” to adolescents,  who  are  themselves  in  a  very  confusing  time  in  their  lives.  How  does  one  separate  the  behavior from the identity?  “Self‑categorization  is  not  merely  an  act  of  self‑labeling,  but  adoption  over  time  of the  normative  (prototypical  behavior,  characteristics,  and  values  associated  with  the  particular  group  membership.”  (Cox  and  Gallios,  “Gay  and  Lesbian  Identity  Developmental:  A  Social  Identity Perspective,” p. 11)  “Sexual behavior plays a significant role in the development of sexual‑minority (gay and bisexual)  males. Research spanning the last three decades illustrate that sexual‑minority males exhibit greater  sexual  freedom‑engage  in  more  sex  with  partners  (Blumstein  &  Schwartz,  1983),  meeting  more  partners  in  highly  sexualized  environments  (Blumstein  &  Schwartz,  1983),  approving  of  sex  without  love  (Klinkenberg  &  Rose,  1994;  Lever, 1994; Tripp, 1975),  reporting  more sex  partners  (Blumstein  &  Schwartz,  1983;  Lever,  1994),  and  developing  sexually  nonexclusive  romantic  relationships  (Blumstein  &  Schwartz,  1983;  Kurdek,  1989,  McWhirter  &  Mattison,  1984)‑than  their  heterosexual  and  lesbian  counterparts.  Extant  research  suggests  that  sexual  behavior  facilitates the development of close relationships and the garnering of friends (Klinkenberg & Rose,  1993;  Nardi,  1992).”  (Dube, “The  Role  of  Sexual  Behavior  in  the  Identification  Process  of  Gay and Bisexual Male,” p. 123)  More importantly if the final stage of these models is a “healthy homosexual” the truth of  the  matter  as  seen  in  the  lives  of  many  of  those  who  have  accepted  a  “homosexual  identity” reveals the failure of these models.  Bibliography  Abelove,  Henry,  Michele  Aine  Barale  and  David  M.  Halperin.  The  Lesbian  and  Gay  Studies Reader. Routledge. New York and London, 1993.  Appleby,  George  Alan  and  Jeane  W.  Anastas.  Not  Just  a  Passing  Phase.  Columbia  University Press. New York, 1998.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

93 

Beatu,  Lee  A.  “Identity  Development  of  Homosexual  Youth  and  parental  and  Familial  Influences on the Coming Out Process.” Adolescence. Fall 1999, Vol. 34, No. 135, 596‑601.  Bohan,  Janis  S.  Psychology  and  Sexual  Orientation  Coming  to  Terms.  Routledge.  New  York & London, 1996.  Bohan,  Janis  S  and  Glenda  M.  Russel.  Conversations  About  Psychology  and  Sexual  Orientation. New York University Press. New York and London, 1999.  Cass,  Vivenne  C.  “Homosexual  Identity  Formation:  Testing  a  Theoretical  Model.”  The  Journal of Sex Research May 1984, Vol. 20, No.2, 143‑167.  Cox,  BSc  (Hons),  Morg  Psych,  Stephen  and  Cynthia  Gallois,  PhD.  “Gay  and  Lesbian  Identity  Development:  A  Social  Identity  Perspective.”  Journal  of  Homosexuality.  1996,  Vol. 30, (4), 1‑30.  D’Augelli, Anthony R. & Charlotte J. Patterson. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identities and  Youth. Oxford University Press. Oxford and New York, 2001.  De Cecco, PhD John P. and Michael G Shively MA. Bisexual and Homosexual Identities:  Critical Theoretical Issues. The Haworth Press. New York, 1984.  De  Cecco,  John  P.  PhD,  and  David  Allen  Parker,  MA  editors.  Sex,  Cells,  and  Same‑Sex  Desire: The Biology of Sexual Preference. The Haworth Press, Inc. Press. New York, 1995.  D’Emilio,  John.  “Capitalism  and  Gay  Identity,  467‑476,  in  The  Lesbian  and  Gay  Studies  Reader by Henry Abelove, Michele Aine Barale and David M. Halperin. Routledge. New  York and London, 1993.  Dube,  Eric  M.  “The  Role  of  Sexual  Behavior  in  the  identification  Process  of  Gay  and  Bisexual Males.” The Journal of Sex Research. May 2000, Vol. 37, No. 2, 123‑132.  Elizur,  Ph.D.  Yoel  &  Michael  Ziv,  M.A.  “Family  Support  and  Acceptance,  Gay  Male  Identity  Formation,  and  Psychological  Adjustment:  A  Path  Model”.  Family  Process,  Summer 2001,Vol.40, No. 2, 125‑144.  Garnets,  Linda  D.  &  Kimmel,  Douglas C. Editors.  Psychological  Perspectives on  Lesbian  and Gay Male Experiences. Columbia University Press. New York, 1993.  Heyl,  Barbara  Sherman.  “Homosexuality:  A  Social  Phenomenon.”  321‑349  in  Human  Sexuality:  The  Societal  and  Interpersonal  Context.  Kathleen  McKinney  and  Susan  Sprecher. Ablex Publishing Corporation. Norwood, New Jersey, 1989.  Horowitz, Janna  L.  MS  Ed,  PH.D.  and Michael  D Newcomb  Ph.D.  “A  Multidimensional  Approach to Homosexual Identity.” Journal of Homosexuality. 2001, Vol. 42, (2), 1‑19. Larry Houston – www.banap.net  94 

Hunter,  Ski,  Coleen  Shannon,  Jo  Knox  and  James  I.  Martin.  Lesbian,  Gay,  and  Bisexual  Youths and Adults. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA, 1998.  Lipkin,  Arthur.  Understanding  Homosexuality,  Changing  Schools  A  Text  for  Teachers,  Counselors, and Administrators. Westview Press. A Member of the Perseus Books Group.  1999.  McKinney,  Kathleen  and  Susan  Sprecher  editors.Human  Sexuality:  The  Societal  and  Interpersonal Context. Ablex Publishing Corporation. Norwood, New Jersey, 1989.  Mills, John K. “The Psychoanalytic Perspective of Adolescent Homosexuality: A Review”.  Adolescence Volume 25, No. 100, Winter 1990, 913‑922.  Mohler, Marie MA. Homosexual Rites of Passage. Harrington Park Press. New York, 2000.  Ryan, Catlin, Donna Futterman. Lesbian and Gay Youth. Columbia University Press. New  York, 1998.  Schmidt, Thomas E. Straight and Narrow? InterVarsity Press. Downers Grove, IL, 1995.  Savin‑Williams,  Ritch  C.  Mom,  Dad.  I’m  Gay:  How  Families  Negotiate  Coming  Out.  American Psychological Association. Washington DC, 2001.  Savin‑Williams, Ritch C. & Kenneth M. Cohen. The Lives of Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals  Children to Adults. Harcourt Brace College Publishers. Fort Worth, 1996.  Sophie  PhD,  Joan.  “A  Critical  Examination  of  Stage  Theories  of  Lesbian  Identity  Formation.” Journal of Homosexuality. 1985‑1986 Winter, Vol. 12 (2), 39‑51.  Troiden,  Richard  R.  “Becoming  Homosexual:  A  Model  of  Gay  Identity.”  Psychiatry.  November 1979, Vol. 42, 362‑373.  Weeks,  Jeffery  and  Janet  Holland  editors.  Sexual  Cultures  Communities,  Values,  and  Intimacy.  Macmillan.  London,  1996.  Zera,  Deborah.  “Coming  of  Age  in  a  Heterosexist  World:  The  Development  of  Gay  and  Lesbian  Adolescents.”  Adolescence.  Winter  1992,  Vol. 27, No. 108, 849‑854.

Larry Houston – www.banap.net 

95 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->