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Prepared by: Mrs.

Hazzel Fermin-Alvarez

PRE-HISPANIC ERA
Penniform Gold Barter Ring

Trade among the early Filipinos and with traders from the neighboring islands was conducted through barter. The inconvenience of barter later led to the use of some objects as medium of exchange. Gold, which was plentiful in many parts of the islands, invariably found its way into these objects that included the piloncitos, small beadlikeb gold bits considered by the local numismatists as the earliest coin of the ancient Filipinos, and gold barter rings.

SPANISH PERIOD
Three hundred years of Spanish rule left many indelible imprints on Philippine numismatics. At the end of the Spanish regime, Philippine money was a multiplicity of currencies that included Mexican pesos, Alfonsino pesos and copper coins of other currencies. The cobs or macuquinas of colonial mints were the earliest coins brought in by the galleons from Mexico and other Spanish colonies. The silver dos mundos or pillar dollar is considered one of the worlds most beautiful coins. The barilla, a crude bronze or copper coin worth about one centavo, was the first coin struck in the country. Coins from other Spanish colonies also reached the Philippines and were counterstamped. Gold coins with the portrait of Queen Isabela were minted in Manila. Silver pesos with the profile of young Alfonso XIII were the last coins minted in Spain. The pesos fuertes, issued by the countrys first bank, the El Banco Espanol Filipino de Isabel II, were the first paper money circulated in the country.

Cincuenta (50) Pesos Fuertes issued by El Banco Espaol Filipino de Isabel II (1865)

The Philippine peso was established on May 1, 1852, when the Banco Espaol-Filipino de Isabel II, the first commercial bank in the Philippines and now the Bank of the Philippine Islands, introduced notes denominated in pesos fuertes (strong pesos, written PF).

Cincuenta (50) Pesos Fuertes issued by El Banco Espaol Filipino (1883)

In 1868, the Spanish Revolution overthrew Isabel II who was forced to exile in Paris, France. Upon hearing the news, the Banco dropped the name of Isabel II and renamed it the El Banco Espaol Filipino.

Veinte Cinco (25) Pesos Fuertes Treasury Note issued by El Banco Espaol Filipino (1877)

The Insular Government then issued Treasury Notes in 1877 also denominated in pesos fuertes.

REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD

Asserting its independence, the Philippine Republic of 1898 under General Emilio Aguinaldo issued its own coins and paper currency backed by the countrys natural resources. One peso and five peso notes printed as Republika Filipina Papel Moneda de Un Peso and Cinco Pesos were freely circulated. 2 centimos de peso copper were also issued in 1899.

Un Peso Banknote Philippine Republic of 1898


This Un (1) Peso banknote was used by the Philippine Government of 1898 under General Emilio Aguinaldo. Notes like this with serial numbers and signatures are very rare. This note was circulated along with Cinco Pesos banknotes and 2 centimos de peso copper coins. The printing of these currency displays the determination of the Aguinaldo Government to assert its independence. Text on obverse: Republica Filipina Papel Moneda de Un Peso Ley 24 Abril 1899, El Delgado del Gobierno 1 Peso Text on obverse: Republica Filipina Un Peso El Presidente de la Republica, Emilio Aguinaldo; El Presidente Consejo de Gobierno, Pedro A. Paterno Este billete sera opportunamente cambiado por la Republica Filipina, y recibido en nago de contribuciones, derechos de Aduana y todo genero obligaciones El falsificador sera castigado con todo el rigor de la Ley Z. Fajardo

AMERICAN PERIOD

The Americans instituted a monetary system for the Philippine based on gold and pegged the Philippine peso to the American dollar at the ratio of 2:1. The US Congress approved the Coinage Act for the Philippines in 1903.

The coins issued under the system bore the designs of Filipino engraver and artist, Melecio Figueroa. Coins in denomination of one-half centavo to one peso were minted. The renaming of El Banco Espanol Filipino to Bank of the Philippine Islands in 1912 paved the way for the use of English from Spanish in all notes and coins issued up to 1933. Beginning May 1918, treasury certificates replaced the silver certificates series, and a one-peso note was added.

20 Pesos Banknote Philippine National Bank Circulating Note (series of 1937)

Obverse: William A. Jones and seal of the Philippine National Bank Reverse: Seal of the Philippine National Bank
Text Obverse: The Philippine National Bank will pay the bearer on demand twenty pesos in lawful money of the Philippines. Issue authorized March 24, 1937 under the provisions of act numbered 2612 of the Philippine Legislature as amended.

1941 Ten Pesos Banknote American Period Treasury Certificate (series of 1941
Obverse: George Washington and seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth
Text Treasury Certificate. By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature; Approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922. This certifies that there have been deposited in the treasury of the Philippines; Ten Pesos; payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of Equivalent Value.

200 Peso Banknote - Bank of the Philippine Islands (1928) American Regime
The front features Lady Justice holding scales and the seal of the Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI). The signatures are of D Garcia (cashier) and Fulg Borromeo (president) . The serial number has been smudged in the scan upon request of the contributor.
This is one of the rarest banknotes ever issued during the American Regime. Only 1,700 were printed and not so many have survived. A more worn out version of this banknote was sold at ebay for more than $1,000.

Twenty Peso Banknote American Period Treasury Certificate


Obverse: Mayon Volcano and seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth Reverse: Seal of the Commonwealth Text Philippine treasury Certificate. By an Act of the Philippine Legislature. Approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922. This certifies that there have been deposited in the treasury of the Philippine Islands twenty pesos payable to the bearer on demand, in silver pesos or in gold coin of the United States of equivalent value. Mt Mayon.

Fifty Peso Banknote (1920 series) issued in the Philippines by the American Government

The front features Maj. Gen. Henry W. Lawton. An overprint on top of the PNB seal reads "Manila, P.H., May 2, 1916". The reverse features the seal of the Philippine National Bank.
Text reads: "Philippine National Bank Circulating Note"; "The Philippine National Bank will pay the bearer on demand Fifty Pesos in lawful currency of the Philippine Islands"

One Peso Banknote from the American Series


Obverse: portrait of Apolinario Mabini, seal of the PhilippineAmerican Commonwealth with overprint: "Manila, Philippines" Reverse: "One Philippine Peso" Text reads: "By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature, approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922; This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the; Philippines; One Peso; Payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Series of 1936, Treasury Certificate

Twenty Centavo Coin (1922) Culion Leper Colony

Reverseo: Caduceus, "Philippine Health Service", year mark (1922) flanked by two stars Obverse: "20 Centavos", "Culion Leper Colony", "Philippine Islands"
Shape: Round Material: Copper-Nickel

20 Centavo Banknote Culion Leper Colony (1942)


Obverse: This certifies that the Philippines Commonwealth Bureau of Health Culion Leper Colony is obligated to pay the bearer twenty centavos in legal tender currency. Reverse: Issued by authority of the President of the Philippines. Transmitted 2/9/42 through the Commanding General, USAFFE, Iloilo

1/2 Centavo Coin (1913) Culion Leper Colony


Obverse: Caduceus, Bureau of Health, year mark (1913) flanked by two stars Reverse: "1/2 Centavo", "Culion Leper Colony", "Philippine Islands" Shape: round Diameter: 19mm Composition: aluminum Note on metal composition: This coin belongs to the first batch issued by the American Period in 1913. This batch and another in 1920 were made of aluminum which was later found to be corrosive to antisepctics used in the sanitarium. Later issues in 1922, 1925, 1927, and 1930 were made of nickel. Note on Caduceus: The caduceus is typically depicted as a short herald's staff entwined by two serpents in the form of a double helix, and sometimes is surmounted by wings. The caduceus is sometimes used as a symbol for medicine, especially in North America.

One Peso Coin (1925) Culion Leper Colony


Obverse: Dr. Jose P. Rizal, "Culion Leper Colony", Philippine Islands Reverse: Seal of the Philippine Health Service, "Philippine Health Service", "One Peso", year mark
Diameter: 35mm Composition: copper-nickel

Mintage: 20,000

One Peso Coin American Occupation (1905)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "One Peso", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The coin in the image above is very expensive! It's selling for $4000! The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth This is a broadwinged eagle, sitting atop a shield divided into two registers. The upper register has 13 stars, and the lower register has 13 vertical stripes.

Fifty Centavo Coin American Occupation (1908)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Fifty Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth This is a braodwinged eagle, sitting atop a shield divided into two registers. The upper register has 13 stars, and the lower register has 13 vertical stripes.

Twenty Centavo Coin American Occupation (1903)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Ten Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 20.5mm Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth This is a braodwinged eagle, sitting atop a shield divided into two registers. The upper register has 13 stars, and the lower register has 13 vertical stripes.

Ten Centavo Coin American Occupation (1919)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Ten Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 11.0mm Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth This is a braodwinged eagle, sitting atop a shield divided into two registers. The upper register has 13 stars, and the lower register has 13 vertical stripes.

Five Centavo Coin American Occupation (1903)


Obverse: figure of a man seated beside an anvil and holding a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Five Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark

Shape: round Edge: plain


Diameter: 21.2 mm (1903-28) 19mm (1930-45) Weight: 77.16 grains (1903-28) 75.16 grains (1930-45) Composition: 75% copper, 25% nickel (1903-41), 65% copper, 12% nickel, 23% zinc (1944-45) Designer: Melecio Figueroa The dimensions of this coin were changed in 1930. When the size of the 20 centavo coin was reduced, it had about the same size as the 5 centavo coin. Because of the losses because of the confusion between the two coins, the 5 centavo coin was reduced in size. The figure of the man in the obverse is an allegory for the hard work being done by the Filipinos in building their own future.

Half Centavo Coin American Occupation (1911)


Obverse: figure of a man seated beside an anvil and holding a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Five Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: plain Material: copper Diameter: 24mm Weight: 40 grains Composition: 95% copper, 5% zinc and tin (1903-1941); 95% copper, 5% zinc (1903-1941) Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of the man in the obverse is an allegory for the hard work being done by the Filipinos in building their own future. Arms of the US Territories This is a braodwinged eagle, sitting atop a shield divided into two registers. The upper register has 13 stars, and the lower register has 13 vertical stripes.

Half Centavo Coin American Occupation (1903)


Obverse: figure of a man seated beside an anvil and holding a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Five Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the US Territories, "United States of America", year mark

Shape: round Edge: plain Material: copper


Diameter: 17.8mm Weight: 30 grains Composition: 95% copper, 5% zinc and tin Designer: Melecio Figueroa The minting of this coin was only until 1904. The small size and value of the coin made it unpopular to the public. Proofs were struck until 1908. I personally find it weird why they would bother making a coin of this value. The figure of the man in the obverse is an allegory for the hard work being done by the Filipinos in building their own future. Arms of the US Territories This is a braodwinged eagle, sitting atop a shield divided into two registers. The upper register has 13 stars, and the lower register has 13 vertical stripes.

JAPANESE OCCUPATION
The outbreak of World War II caused serious disturbances in the Philippine monetary system. Two kinds of notes circulated in the country during this period. The Japanese Occupation Forces issued war notes in big denominations. Provinces and municipalities, on the other hand, issued their own guerrilla notes or resistance currencies, most of which were sanctioned by the Philippine government inexile, and partially redeemed after the war.

One Thousand Peso banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation

As inflation crept in, the Japanese printed banknotes in larger denominations. This bill is the last of the third series along with the 100 and 500 peso JIM. It was printed just before their surrender in 1945.
Due to dwindling resources, this banknote is smaller than the others and is printed on cheap paper, the reason why the blue ink at the front bleeds through the back

JAPANESE PERIOD
Five hundred Peso banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation

One Hundred Peso banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation.

Ten Peso banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation.

Ten Peso banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation. The front features the Rizal Monument.

Five Peso banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation. The front features the Rizal monument.

One Peso Bill - Japanese Occupation

Fifty centavo banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation.

Ten centavo banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation.

Five centavo banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation.

One centavo banknote issued in the Philippines during the Japanese occupation

Five Peso Guerilla Note Series of 1943


Text reads: "Philippine National Bank; Emergency Circulating Note of 1943; Issued by authority if the President of the Philippines' "The Philippine National Bank will pay the bearer on demand FIVE PESOS in lawful currency of the Philippines; Iloilo Currency Committee." The seal featuring an eagle on top of the Philippine coat of arms is stamped with "City of Iloilo; Feb 22, 1943".

The reverse reads "Philippine National Bank; Iloilo City, Philippines; Feb. 22, 1943; Emergency Circulating Note"

One Peso Guerilla Note


Text reads: "Philippine National Bank Emergency Circulating Note of 1941'
"Issued by the Cebu Currency Committee by authority of the President of the Philippines of December 29, 1941. The Philippine National Bank will pay to the bearer on demand ONE PESO'

"One Peso has been deposited in the treasury of the Philippines for the redemption of this certificate."

One Peso Emergency Guerilla Note Series of 1944


The text reads:
"Issued by authority of the President of the Philippines. This certifies that the Commonwealth of the Philippines will redeem this certificate at face value upon termination of emergency." "Payable to the bearer on demand in Silver Pesos or in legal tender currency of the Negros Emergency Currency Board." The green seal features an eagle on top of the Philippine coat of arms with text, "Commonwealth of the Philippines" and "United States of America"

One Peso emergency circulating note of 1942

One Peso emergency circulating note of 1942 with President Manuel Quezon's bust. Issued by authority of the President of the Philippines on January 20, 1942 by the Negros Occidental Provincial Currency Committee. Printed in the City of Bacolod January 26, 1942.

10 Centavo Bohol Emergency Banknote (1942 series)


Text Obverse: The Commonwealth of the Philippines will Pay to the bearer on demand 10 Centavos in lawful currency of the Philippines. Bohol Emergency Currency Board. Series of 1942. Actg. Prov. Treas. - Prov. Auditor - Prov. Fiscal. Reverse: Issued by the Bohol Emergency Currency Board, Tagbilaran, Bohol, Philippines. Ten Centavos.

Five Centavos Mountain Province Emergency Note


Obverse: Mountain Province Emergency Note. This Certifies that there has been deposited in the Philippine National Bank the equivalent of five centavos payable to bearer on demand. N.S. Vergara, Provincial Treasurer. Countersigned June 1943, Mun. Dist. Treasurer (overprint). Reverse: Five Centavos. Mountain Province Emergency Note. This note is issued under the authority of the Provincial Board of the Mountain Province during this emergency and is only good and negotiable within said province. Not valid unless signed by the Provincial Governor and Provincial Treasurer and countersigned by the Provincial Auditor and sealed with the official seal of the Mountain Province.

A nation in command of its destiny is the message reflected in the evolution of Philippine money under the Philippine Republic. Having gained independence from the United States following the end of World War II, the country used as currency old treasury certificates overprinted with the word Victory.
With the establishment of the Central Bank of the Philippines in 1949, the first currencies issued were the English series notes printed by the Thomas de la Rue & Co., Ltd. in England and the coins minted at the US Bureau of Mint. The Filipinazation of the Republic coins and paper money began in the late 60s and is carried through to the present. In the 70s, the Ang Bagong Lipunan (ABL) series notes were circulated, which were printed at the Security Printing Plant starting 1978. A new wave of change swept through the Philippine coinage system with the flora and fauna coins initially issued in 1983. These series featured national heroes and species of flora and fauna. The new design series of banknotes issued in 1985 replaced the ABL series. Ten years later, a new set of coins and notes were issued carrying the logo of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas.

Five Hundred Peso Banknote Victory Series


Obverse: Miguel Lopez de Legazpi, seal

of the Philippine-American Commonwealth Reverse: "Central Bank of the Philippines VICTORY" overprint, seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth Text By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature. Approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922. This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the Philippines Five Hundred Pesos payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Victory series no. 66, Treasury Certificate

Two Peso Banknote from the Victory Series


Obverse: Portrait of Jose Rizal, seal of the Philippine-American Commonwealth with overprint: "Manila, Philippines" Reverse: "Philippines", "2 Pesos" with "Victory" overprint
Text: "By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature, approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922; This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the; Philippines; Two Pesos; Payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Victory series no. 66

One Peso Banknote from the Victory Series


Obverse: portrait of Apolinario Mabini, seal of the PhilippineAmerican Commonwealth with overprint: "Manila, Philippines" Reverse: "One Philippine Peso" with VICTORY overprint
Text reads: "By authority of an act of the Philippine Legislature, approved by the President of the United States June 13, 1922; This certifies that there has been deposited in the treasury of the; Philippines; One Peso; Payable to the bearer on demand; in silver pesos or in legal tender currency of the United States of equivalent value." Victory series no. 66, Treasury Certificate

One Hundred Peso Banknote 1949 English Series


Obverse: Tandang Sora (Melchora Aquino) and the Central Bank Seal Reverse: various flags of the Katipunan Signatures: Philippine President Elpidio Quirino and Central Bank Governor Miguel Cuaderno, Sr. Text Obverse: Central Bank of the Philippines. This note is a liability of the Central Bank of the Philippines and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines. One Hundred Pesos. This note is legal tender in the Philippines for all debts, public and private. Thomas De La Rue & Co. Ltd.

Five Hundred Peso Banknote English Series


Obverse: Manuel Roxas and Central Bank Seal
This note is signed by former Philippine President Elpidio Quirino.

Text Obverse: Central Bank of the Philippines, This note is a liability of the Central Bank and fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines. Five Hundred Pesos. This note is legal tender in the Philippines for all debts, public and private. Thomas De La Rue & Co. Ltd.
Reverse: Five Hundred Pesos. former Central Bank Building.

Two Hundred Peso Banknote English Series


Obverse: Manuel Quezon and the Central Bank Seal Reverse: the former Legislative Building
This banknote is signed by former president Elpidio Quirino. Text Obverse: Central Bank of the Philippines. This note is a liability of the Central Bank of the Philippines and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines. Two Hundred Pesos. This note is legal tender in the Philippines for all debts, public and private. Thomas De La Rue & Co. Ltd.

Twenty Peso Banknote English Series


Obverse: Andres Bonifacio and Emilio Jacinto Reverse: Cartilla of the Katipunan, Cry of Balintawak Monument This note is signed by President Ferdinand Marcos. Andres Bonifacio was the founding leader of the Katipunan, the Philippine Revolutionary Movement during the Spanish Era. Emilio Jacinto was his adviser and is regarded as the Brain of the Katipunan. Emilio Jacinto wrote the Kartilya ng Katipunan. The Cry of Balintawak signaled the start of the revolution. Text Obverse: Central Bank of the Philippines. This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines. This note is legal tender in the Philippines for all debts, public and private. Reverse: Twenty Pesos. Cartilla of the Katipunan and the Balintawak Monument.

Five Peso Banknote English Series


Obverse: Marcelo del Pilar on the left, and Graciano Lopez Jaena on the right Reverse: La Solidaridad, "Five Pesos" This note is signed by President Ramon Magsaysay. The La Solidaridad which was the principal organ of the Philippine propaganda movement in Spain from February 15, 1889 to November 15, 1895. Text: "Central Bank of the Philippines; This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines". "This note is legal tender in the Philippines for all debts, public and private."

Half Peso Banknote English Series - Small Denomination Currency Text: "Central Bank of the Philippines; This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines". "This note is legal tender in the Philippines for all debts, public and private. This note is signed by President Carlos Garcia.

Fifty Centavo Banknote English Series - Small Denomination Currency


Text: "Central Bank of the Philippines; This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines". "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private." This note is signed by President Ramon Magsaysay. The reverse shows that the bill was printed by "Thomas de la rue & Company, Limited, London".

Twenty Centavo Banknote English Series - Small Denomination Currency (Scrip Notes) Text: "Central Bank of the Philippines; This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines". "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private." This note is signed by President Carlos Garcia. The reverse shows that the bill was printed by "Thomas de la Rue & Company, Limited, London".

Ten Centavo Banknote English Series - Small Denomination Currency (Scrip Notes) Text: "Central Bank of the Philippines; This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines". "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private." This note is signed by President Ramon Magsaysay. The reverse shows that the bill was printed by "Waterlow & Sons Limited".

Five Centavo Banknote English Series - Small Denomination Currency (Scrip Notes)

Text: "Central Bank of the Philippines; This note is a liability of the Central Bank and is fully guaranteed by the Government of the Republic of the Philippines". "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private."
This note is signed by President Ramon Magsaysay. The reverse shows that the bill was printed by "Waterlow & Sons Limited".

One Hundred Peso Banknote Pilipino Series


Obverse: Manuel Roxas, former Central Bank Seal Reverse: former Central Bank Building Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Sandaang Piso", "Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas" This peso bill is signed by former president Ferdinand Marcos The Pilipino Series banknotes are essentially the same as the Bagong Lipunan Series. They only lack the "Bagong Lipunan" overprint on the front.

Fifty Peso Banknote Pilipino Series


Obverse: Sergio Osmea, former Central Bank Seal Reverse: former Legislative Building, now National Museum Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Limampung Piso", "Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Gusaling Batasan" This peso bill is signed by former president Ferdinand Marcos

Twenty Peso Banknote Pilipino Series


Obverse: Manuel Quezon, former Central Bank Seal Reverse: Malacaang Palace Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Dalawampung Piso", "Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Palasyo ng Malacaan" This peso bill is signed by former president Ferdinand Marcos

Ten Peso Banknote Pilipino Series


Obverse: Apolinario Mabini, former Central Bank Seal Reverse: Barasoain Church

Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Sampung Piso", "Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Simbahang Barasoain"
This peso bill is signed by former president Ferdinand Marcos

Five Peso Banknote Pilipino Series


Obverse: Andres Bonifacio, Central Bank Seal Reverse: initiation of Katipunan members by blood compact Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Limang Piso" "Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Mga bagong kasapi ng Katipunan na lumalagda sa mga kasulatan ng KKK sa pamamagitan ng kanilang dugo". This peso bill is signed by former president Ferdinand Marcos

One Peso Banknote Pilipino Series


Obverse: Jose Rizal, logo of the former Central Bank of the Philippines Reverse: Declaration of Independence in Kawit, Cavite on June 12, 1896 in the reverse. Text Front: "Republika ng Pilipinas; "Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Back: "Pahayag ng Kasarinlan ng Pilipinas noong Hunyo 12, 1898 (Balkonahe ng Mansiyong Aguinaldo

One Hundred Peso Banknote Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: President Manuel Roxas, Central Bank Seal Reverse: Central Bank Complex beside Manila Bay
Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Sandaang Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas"

Fifty Peso Banknote Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: President Sergio Osmea Reverse: Legislative (now National Museum) Building
Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Limampung Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Gusaling Batasan".

Twenty Peso Banknote Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: President Manuel Quezon, Central Bank Seal Reverse: Malacaang Palace
Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Dalawampung Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Palasyo ng Malakanyang".

Ten Peso banknote Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: Apolinario Mabini Reverse: Barasoain Church at the reverse.
Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Sampung Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Simbahan ng Barasoain".

Five Peso Banknote Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: Andres Bonifacio, Central Bank Seal Reverse: initiation of Katipunan members by blood compact
Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Limang Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Mga bagong kasapi ng Katipunan na lumalagda sa mga kasulatan ng KKK sa pamamagitan ng kanilang dugo".

Two Peso Banknote Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: Jose Rizal(Philippine national hero), Central Bank Seal Reverse: Declaration of Independence in Kawit, Cavite in June 12, 1898 Text Obverse: "Republika ng Pilipinas; Ang salaping papel na ito ay isang bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at lubos na pinananagutan ng Pamahalaan ng Republika ng Pilipinas". "Dalawang Piso; Ang salaping papel na ito ay salaping umiiral sa Pilipinas at pambayad sa lahat ng uri ng pagkakautang." Reverse: "Pahayag ng Kasarinlan ng Pilipinas noong Hunyo 12, 1898 (Balkonahe ng Mansiyong Aguinaldo)".

One Thousand Piso Banknote New Design Series


Obverse: Jose Abad Santos, Josefa Llanes Escoda, Vicente Lim, Eternal flame, Laurel Leaves Cenrtral Bank Seal Reverse: Hagdan-hagdang Palayan ng Banawe, Manunggul jar cover and Langgal hut Predominant color: Blue Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic; for newer notes, 1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext 1000

Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, optically variable ink (OVI), and micro-printing
Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sanlibong Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas" Jose Abad Santos (Chief Justice), Josefa Llanes Escoda (civic worker and one of the founders of the Girl Scouts of the Philippines), and Vicente Lim (a general in the Philippine Army, first Filipino graduate of West Point) are considered heroes of the resistance against the Japanese Occupation of the Philippines. The Manunggul Jar is a National Treasure of the Philippines. The jar was found in Chamber A of the Manunggul caves in Palawan. The jar is dated from about 2800 years before the present day. The faces of the figures and on the prow of the boat have eyes and mouth rendered in the same style as other artifacts of Southeast Asia of that period. Note the depiction of sea-waves on the lid. Banaue Rice Terraces (Tagalog: Hagdan-hagdang Palayan ng Banaue) are 2000-year old terraces that were carved into the mountains of Ifugao in the Philippines by ancestors of the Batad indigenous people. The Rice Terraces are commonly referred to as the "Eighth Wonder of the World". They are found in the provinces of Apayao, Benguet, Mountain Province and Ifugao, and are a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Langgal hut is a Muslim place of worship particularly in Sulu, headed by an Imam who is assisted by the Habib and ilal.

Five Hundred Piso Banknote New Design Series


Obverse: Benigno S. "Ninoy" Aquino, Jr., Philippine flag, Central Bank seal, dove of peace, Ninoy's typewriter with his initials ("B.S.A.J."), "Faith in our people and faith in God", "The Filipino is worth dying for", Ninoy's signature Reverse: scenes from Ninoy Aquino's life and some allegorical groups (see note below) Predominant color: yellow Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic; for newer notes, 1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext 500 Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, concealed numerical value, and micro-printing Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Limandaang Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas" The reverse side features a collage of various images in relation to Aquino. He was (out of some of the pictures) a journalist for the Manila Times, a senator (the pioneer of the Study Now, Pay Later education program), the mayor in his hometown of Concepcion, the governor of Tarlac, and was the main driving force behind the People Power Revolution of 1986, some three years after his death in 1983.

It is also interesting to note that unlike the names of the figures on the bills, "Benigno S. Aquino, Jr." is written in gold-coloured, cursive writing with a green laurel wreath as opposed to the name being simply written as with the other banknotes.
Before this note was printed, 500-piso banknote was to have Ferdinand Marcos and its back was the Batasang Pambansa Complex until People Power Revolution when it was replaced by the current 500-piso banknote. Remnants of this version of the banknote are only for media purposes.

Two Hundred Piso Commemorative Banknote New Design Series


Obverse: Diosdado P. Macapagal, Aguinaldo Shrine in Kawit, Kavite Reverse: scene from EDSA II, with Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo being sworn in as president by Chief Justice Hilario Davide Jr. in January 2001 Predominant color: Green Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic/1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext 200 Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, microprinting, 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic/1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext 200, and perfect see-through register Text: Republika ng Pilipinas, Ang Salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas. Dalawandaang Libong Piso This banknote is signed by Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and Rafael Buenaventura. The little girl holding a Bible in between Arroyo and Davide at the reverse of the note is Cecilia Paz Razon Abad, daughter of former Philippine Education Secretary Florencio Abad and Batanes Representative Henedina Razon-Abad. The bill was subject of criticisms by the opposition. They said that the legal tender should only feature deceased national heroes and not an incumbent President. It wasn't the first time that a legal tender featured a sitting President. Legal tender coinage was minted to commemorate the inauguration of Manuel L. Quezon as President of the Philippines in 1935. Emergency currency during World War II had many instances where provincial emergency currency boards placed the image of then President Manuel L. Quezon. In 1975, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas released a 5-Piso coin featuring the face of then President Ferdinand Marcos. Former Presidents Fidel Ramos and Joseph Estrada was also pictured in a limited commemorative 2000-Piso bill that honors the 100-year celebration of Philippine Independence. Also a limited commemorative gold 1000-Piso bill with the picture of former President Joseph Estrada was also issued to honor the 100-year celebration of Philippine Independence. This note is also a commemorative banknote, released in 2002 to commemorate Philippine independence.

One Hundered Piso Banknote New Design Series

Obverse: Manuel A. Roxas, raising of the Philippine flag and lowering of the American flag during the declaration of Independence in July 4, 1946, Central Bank Seal Reverse: Central Bank Complex along Roxas Boulevard with an inset image of the former Central Bank Building Predominant color: Violet Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded magnetic and metallic; for newer banknotes, 1.4 mm windowed colorshift (magenta-green) with cleartext 100 Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 20% abaca, 80% cotton Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridescent band, windowed security thread, and micro-printing Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sandaang Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas" The 100-piso banknote became subject of controversy after banknotes printed in France in time for the Christmas season were printed with the President's name misspelled, the first in Philippine history. The banknotes, of which a small amount are in circulation and are still legal tender, spelled the President's name as "Gloria Macapagal-Arrovo" than the correct Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo.

Fifty Piso Banknote New Design Series

Obverse: Sergio Osmea, Fuente Osmea (Osmea Fountain), gavel, Central Bank Seal Reverse: National Museum "Pambansang Museo" (formerly Legislative Building) Predominant color: Red Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded and metallic Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton

Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing, iridiscent band, windowed security thread, and microprinting
Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Limampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas" Sergio Osmea was the second president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines. He served as president from 1944, after Quezon's death, to 1946, when the United States granted the Philippines' independence. The National Museum featured on the reverse side of the banknote, used to be the Legislative Building, where the House of Representatives that Osmena presided over as Speaker from 19071922 was located. The building was then renamed Executive House during the Martial Law period and was labeled as such in the fiftypiso banknote until recently.

Twenty Piso Banknote New Design Series

Obverse: Manuel Quezon, Coat-of-arms of the Commonwealth, Wikang Pambansa, Saligang Batas 1935, Central Bank Seal Reverse: Malacaan Palace beside the Pasig River "Palasyo ng Malakanyang" Predominant color: Orange Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded broken gold colored plastic Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers, fluorescent printing Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Dalawampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas" Manuel L. Quezon was the first president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines. At the right side of the banknote are the coat-ofarms of the Commonwealth, and two of Quezon's notable accomplishments. The first is Wikang Pambansa, which is Tagalog for "national language". In 1937, the National Language Institute was founded to establish a single national language for the Philippines. This eventually became the Filipino language, which is largely based on Tagalog. The second was the Saligang Batas 1935 or the 1935 Constitution of the Philippines. This was the first real constitution that was nationally effected and large parts of it survive in the current constitution. The Malacaan Palace at the reverse is, more popularly known as Malacaang Palace, the residence of the President of the Philippines, along the banks of the Pasig River. Quezon was the first Philippine president to live in the Palace.

Ten Piso Banknote New Design Series

Obverse: Apolinario Mabini (left) and Andres Bonifacio (right), KKK flag, Kartilya ng Katipunan, a letter written by Mabini Reverse: Barasoain Church "Simbahan ng Barasoain" (left), initiation rites of the Katipunan "Mga bagong kasapi ng Katipunan na lumalagda sa mga kasulatan ng KKK sa pamamagitan ng kanilang dugo" (right) Predominant color: Brown Security thread: 0.75 mm embedded broken gold colored plastic Length: 160mm Width: 66mm Thickness: 100-118 microns Material: 10% linen, 90% cotton Security Features: security thread, red & blue visible fibers Text: "Republika ng Pilipinas", "Sampung Piso", "Ang salaping ito ay bayarin ng Bangko Sentral at pananagutan ng Republika ng Pilipinas" Andres Bonifacio was the founder of the Katipunan, a secret society established to fight the Spanish colonial government. Mabini was the Philippines first Prime Minister and Secretary of Foreign Affairs even though he was a cripple. Because of this, he was often called "The Sublime Paralytic". The Barasoain Church in Malolos, Bulacan is the site of the first Philippine Congress where the Malolos Constitution was drafted. In the initiation rites of the Katipunan, members accepted into the society had to sign their name on the society's roster using their own blood. The 10-piso banknote was issued months after the 5-piso banknote was issued. Before 1998, the 10-piso banknote only depicted Mabini and the Barasoain Church. In recent years, the new banknote has been replaced with a 10-piso coin also bearing the effigies of Bonifacio and Mabini. The Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas has stopped printing this banknote. However, existing banknotes remain legal tender.

Current Legal Tender Philippine Banknotes

Current Legal Tender Philippine Banknotes

Out of print but still legal tender

Fifty Centavos Commemorative Coin, 1936-M Establishment of the Commonwealth

Obverse: Facing busts of incoming Philippine President Manuel Quezon and outgoing GovernorGeneral Frank Murphy, "Commonwealth of the Philippines", "Fifty Centavos" Reverse: arms of the Philippine-American Commonwealth, "United States of America", year mark (1936)
Material: silver Shape: round Mintage: 20,000 This coin is one of three that commemorate the transition from protectorate to commonwealth which occured on November 15, 1935.

Twenty Centavo Coin Philippine-American Commonwealth (1944)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background,"Fifty Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the Philippine American Commonwealth, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 20.5mm Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth When the Philippines became a US Commonwealth, the arms of the Commonwealth were adopted in the reverse of the coins. Compared to the arms of the US Territories, this seal is composed of a much smaller eagle with its wings pointed up, perched over a shield with peaked corners, above a scroll reading "Commonwealth of the Philippines". It is a much busier pattern, and widely considered less attractive.

Ten Centavo Coin Philippine-American Commonwealth (1945)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Ten Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the Philippine-American Commonwealth, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 16.5mm Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth When the Philippines became a US Commonwealth, the arms of the Commonwealth were adopted in the reverse of the coins. Compared to the arms of the US Territories, this seal is composed of a much smaller eagle with its wings pointed up, perched over a shield with peaked corners, above a scroll reading "Commonwealth of the Philippines". It is a much busier pattern, and widely considered less attractive.

Five Centavo Coin Philippine-American Commonwealth (1945)


Obverse: figure of a man seated beside an anvil and holding a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Five Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the Philippine-American Commonwealth, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: plain Diameter: 18.5mm Material: nickel Designer: Melecio Figueroa The 1/2 centavo, 1 centavo, and 5 centavo coins of the American Series show a Filipino man kneeling against an anvil, with a hammer resting at his side. He is on the left side (foreground), while in the right side (background) there is a simmering volcano, Mt. Mayon. This figure is an allegory for the hard work being done by the Filipinos in building their own future. Arms of the Commonwealth When the Philippines became a US Commonwealth, the arms of the Commonwealth were adopted in the reverse of the coins. Compared to the arms of the US Territories, this seal is composed of a much smaller eagle with its wings pointed up, perched over a shield with peaked corners, above a scroll reading "Commonwealth of the Philippines". It is a much busier pattern, and widely considered less attractive.

One Centavo Coin Philippine-American Commonwealth (1944)


Obverse: figure of a man seated beside an anvil and holding a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "One Centavo", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the Philippine-American Commonwealth, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: plain Diameter: 24.5mm Material: copper Designer: Melecio Figueroa The 1/2 centavo, 1 centavo, and 5 centavo coins of the American Series show a Filipino man kneeling against an anvil, with a hammer resting at his side. He is on the left side (foreground), while in the right side (background) there is a simmering volcano, Mt. Mayon. This figure is an allegory for the hard work being done by the Filipinos in building their own future. Arms of the Commonwealth When the Philippines became a US Commonwealth, the arms of the Commonwealth were adopted in the reverse of the coins. Compared to the arms of the US Territories, this seal is composed of a much smaller eagle with its wings pointed up, perched over a shield with peaked corners, above a scroll reading "Commonwealth of the Philippines". It is a much busier pattern, and widely considered less attractive.

Fifty Centavo Coin English Series (1964)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background,"Fifty Centavos", year mark Reverse: seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Central Bank of the Philippines" Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 30mm Designer: Melecio Figueroa The obverse design is adpoted from the earlier coins issued during the American Occupation. The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer.

One Peso Coin Pilipino Series (1967-1974)

Obverse: Jose Rizal, "Piso", "1" Reverse: seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Bangko Sentral", year mark
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 33 mm Material: Copper-Nickel

Fifty Centavo Coin Pilippine-American Commonwealth (1944)


Obverse: Lady Liberty striking an anvil with a hammer with a volcano (Mt. Mayon) erupting in the background, "Fifty Centavos", "Filipinas" Reverse: arms of the Philippine-American Commonwealth, "United States of America", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 27.0mm Material: silver Designer: Melecio Figueroa The figure of Lady Liberty striking the anvil with a hammer is supposed to depict the work done by the Americans in creating a progressive Philippines. Many suspect that the lady in the figure is actually Blanca, the daughter of the designer. Arms of the Commonwealth When the Philippines became a US Commonwealth, the arms of the Commonwealth were adopted in the reverse of the coins. Compared to the arms of the US Territories, this seal is composed of a much smaller eagle with its wings pointed up, perched over a shield with peaked corners, above a scroll reading "Commonwealth of the Philippines". It is a much busier pattern, and widely considered less attractive.

Fifty Centavo Coin Pilipino Series (1972)

Obverse: Marcelo H. del Pilar, "Limampung Sentimos", "50" Reverse: Seal of the Philippines, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 27.0 mm

Twenty-five Centavo Coin Pilipino Series (1967)


Obverse: Juan Luna, "Dalawampu't Limang Sentimos" Reverse: Seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 21 mm

Ten Centavo Coin Pilipino Series (1972)

Obverse: Francisco Baltasar, "Sampung Sentimos" Reverse: seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Republika ng Pilipinas, year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 17.5 mm

Five Centavo Coin Pilipino Series (1974)

Obverse: Melchora Aquino, "Limang Sentimos" Reverse: Seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Shape: round Edge: plain Diameter: 13 mm Material: brass

One Centavo Coin Pilipino Series (1967)

Obverse: Lapulapu, "Isang Sentimo" Reverse: Seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Republika ng Pilipinas". year mark Shape: round Edge: plain Diameter: 10 mm Material: aluminum

One Thousand Piso Commemorative Gold Coin (1975) Ang Bagong Lipunan 3rd Anniversary
Obverse: Pangulong Ferdinand Marcos; Ang Bagong Lipunan; Setyembere 21, 1972; year mark (1975) Reverse: Seal of the Republic of the Philippines;1000 Piso; Republika ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: milled
Diameter: 27 mm Weight: 9.95 grams Material: .900 fine gold Mintage: 13,000 This gold coin was minted to commemorate the 3rd anniversary of the Bagong Lipunan (New Society) which was established September 21, 1972.

Five Thousand Peso Commemorative Gold Coin Bagong Lipunan's 5th Anniversary
Obverse: President Ferdianand E. Marcos and First Lady Imelda R. Marcos, The New Society, "V Anniversary", 1972-1977 Reverse: Seal of the President of the Republic of the Philippines, Republika ng Pilipinas, 5000 Piso Quality: Frosted proof Material: 2.21 troy ounces 900/1000 fine gold Shape: Round Edge: Milled Text on sealed cachet: The 1977 Five Thousand Piso Gold Coin of the Philippines. The proof coin contained within this sealed cachet was struck by The Franklin Mint on March 24, 1977 the first day of minting of this Proof coin. Minted under the authorization of the Central Bank of the Philippines by the Franklin Mint, Franklin Center, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Signed G.S. Licaros (Governor, Central Bank of the Philippines) and Charles L. Andes (Chairman of the Board, The Franklin Mint)

Five Peso Coin Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: "Pangulong Ferdinand Marcos", "Setyembre 21, 1972", "Ang Bagong Lipunan" Reverse: seal of the Republic of the Philippines, "Republika ng Pilipinas", "5 Piso"
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 35.0mm This is one the few coins in Philippine history that displayed a person who was still alive.

One Peso Coin Bagong Lipunan Series (1978)

Obverse: Jose Rizal, "Republika ng Pilipinas", "1 Piso" Reverse: Seal of the Philippines, "Ang Bagong Lipunan", "Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas", year mark Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 28.5 mm

Five Centavo Coin Bagong Lipunan Series (1975)

Obverse: Melchora Aquino, "Republika ng Pilipinas", 5 Sentimos Reverse: former seal of the "Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas", year mark
Shape: some sort of a star Edge: plain Diameter: 13.5 mm Material: brass

One Centavo Coin Bagong Lipunan Series


Obverse: Lapulapu, "Republika ng Pilipinas", "1 Sentimo" Reverse: former seal of the Central Bank of the Philippines, "Ang Bagong Lipunan", year mark Shape: rounded square Edge: plain Length of Side: 11.5 mm Material: aluminum

One Centavo Coin from the Flora and Fauna Series (1988)
Obverse: Lapu lapu, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Voluta imperialis, 1 Sentimo
Shape: round/circular Edge: plain Diameter: 15.50 mm Composition: 99.2% aluminum, 0.8% magnesium Weight: 0.70 grams

Five Centavo Coin from the Flora anf Fauna Series (1987)
Obverse: Melchora Aquino, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Vanda sanderiana (Waling waling, a rare and highlyprized orchid endemic to the island of Mindanao)
Shape: round/circular Edge: plain Diameter: 17.00 mm Composition: 99.2% aluminum, 0.8% magnesium Weight: 1.10 grams

Ten Centavo Coin (1993) Flora and Fauna Series


Obverse: Francisco Baltasar, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Pandaka pygmaea, 10 Sentimo

Shape: round/circular Edge: plain Diameter: 19.00 mm Composition: 99.2% aluminum, 0.8% magnesium Weight: 1.50 grams

Smallest Freshwater Fish The smallest freshwater fish is the pygmy goby (Pandaka pygmaea), a colorless and nearly see-through species which swims in the streams of Luzon in the Philippines. Males are 7.5 - 9.9-mm (0.28 - 0.38-in) long and weigh 4 - 5 mg (0.00014 0.00018 oz).

Fifty Centavo Coin Flora and Fauna Series (1986)


Obverse: Marcelo H. del Pilar, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Pithecophaga jefferyi (Philippine Eagle/Monkey-eating Eagle), 50 Sentimo

Shape: round/circular Edge: plain Diameter: 25.00 mm Composition: 75% copper, 25% nickel Weight: 6.85 grams
Coin Error: In 1983, the scientific name of the Philippine eagle was wrongly minted as Pithecobhaga jefferyi instead of Pithecophaga jefferyi. Philippine Eagle The Philippine Eagle (Pithecophaga jefferyi) is one of the rarest, largest and most powerful birds in the world. It is also known as Haribon or Haring Ibon, meaning "Bird King". The Philippine Eagle can be found in rainforests of four major Philippine islands - Luzon, Samar, Leyte and Mindanao. The Philippine Eagle is now known as the National Bird of the Philippines and this has helped increase awareness of the bird and its plight. Its numbers have slowly dwindled over the decades with only an estimated 500 pairs left. The Philippine Eagle may soon no longer be found in the wild, unless direct intervention is taken

One Peso Coin Flora and Fauna Series (1990)

Obverse: Jose Rizal, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Anoa mindorensis (tamaraw), 1 Piso Shape: round/circular Edge: reeded Diameter: 29.0 mm Composition: 75% copper, 25% nickel Weight: 9.50 grams

Two Peso Coin (1989) Flora and Fauna Series


Obverse: Andres Bonifacio, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Cocos nucifera, 2 Piso
Shape: 10-sided/decagonal Edge: plain Diameter: 31.00 mm across corners, 29.80 across flats Composition: 75% copper, 25% nickel Weight: 12.00 grams

Five Peso Coin (1991) Improved Flora and Fauna Series

Obverse: Emilio Aguinaldo and year mark Reverse: Pterocarpus indicus Shape: Round Edge: Reeded Diameter: 25.5 mm Composition: Nickel brass There was no 5 peso coin in the previous flora & fauna series. When the Bangko Sentral issued the improved series, they introduced this 5 peso coin to replace the 5 peso bill. The peso was diminishing in value due to inflation. The 5 peso banknote changed hands more frequently and got worn out easily. To save on the costs of printing new banknotes to replace those worn out, the Bangko Sentral turned to minting 5 peso coins which last a lot longer compared to paper money. This is the same reason why the Bangko Sentral replaced the 10 peso bills with coins.

Twenty-Five Centavo Coin (1991) Improved Flora and Fauna Series


Obverse: Juan Luna, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Graphium idaeoides, 25 Sentimo
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 16.0 mm Compared to its counterpart in the Flora and Fauna Series, this coin has a smaller size but the same design

Fifty Centavo Coin (1994) Improved Flora and Fauna Series


Obverse: Marcelo H. del Pilar, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Pithecophaga jefferyi (Philippine Eagle/Monkey-eating Eagle)
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 17.5 mm This coin has a yellow color in contrast to its counterpart in the Flora and Fauna Series which is silver. It is also smaller in size.

One Peso Coin (1991) Improved Flora and Fauna Series

Obverse: Jose Rizal, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Anoa mindorensis (tamaraw) Shape: round Edge: plain Diameter: 21.6 mm Weight: 4 grams Composition: stainless steel Aside from its smaller size, this coin is pretty much the same with its counterpart in the Flora and Fauna Series

Two Peso Coin (1992) Improved Flora and Fauna Series


Obverse: Andres Bonifacio, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: Cocos nucifera
Shape: round Edge: reeded Diameter: 24.0 mm Weight: 5 grams Composition: stainless steel This coin has assumed a round shape and a smaller size compared to its counterpart in the Flora and Fauna Series which was larger and a decagon

Ten Piso Coin New BSP Series


beObverse: Apolinario Mabini and Andres Bonifacio, "Republika ng Pilipinas", 10 Piso, year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: interrupted serration Material: bi-metal ring: core/disc Composition: bi-metallic Inner disc: aluminum-bronze (92% copper, 6% aluminum, 2% nickel) Outher ring: cupro-nickel (75% copper, 25% nickel) Weight: 8.7 grams Diameter: 26.5 mm Counterfeit alert This coin has been counterfeited. Philippine Millennium Coin The 2000 series of these 10-piso coins are actually commemorative coins to celebrate the entry of a new millenium.

Five Piso Coin New BSP Series


Obverse: Emilio Aguinaldo, "Republika ng Pilipinas", 5 Piso, year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: plain (design bordered by 12-scallop) Material: nickel, brass Composition: 70% copper, 5.5% nickel, 24.5% zinc
Weight: 7.7 grams Diameter: 27 mm This coin has been counterfeited.

One Piso Coin New BSP Series

Obverse: Jose Rizal, "Republika ng Pilipinas", 1 Piso, year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: reeded Material: cupro-nickel Composition: 75% copper, 25% nickel; from 2004 onwards, steel alloy Weight: 6.1 grams Diameter: 24 mm

25 Sentimo Coin New BSP Series


Obverse: 25 Sentimo, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: plain Material: brass Composition: 65% copper, 35% zinc Weight: 3.8 grams Diameter: 20 mm

Ten Sentimo Coin New BSP Series


Obverse: 10 Sentimo, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: reeded Material: copper-covered steel Composition: 6% copper balance steel Weight: 2.5 grams Diameter: 17 mm

Five Sentimo Coin New BSP Series


Obverse: 5 Sentimo, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round with 4mm hole Edge: plain Material: copper-covered steel Composition: 6% copper balance steel Weight: 1.9 grams Diameter: 15.5 mm This coin is the first in Philippine history to have a hole. Due to its small value, it has been used as a washer, as earrings, and various other kinds of ornaments. The hole actually shaves off part of the production cost by requiring less metal to mint a coin. It also helps differentiate the 5 centavo coin from the 10 and 1 centavo coins which are similar in size.

One Sentimo Coin New BSP Series


Obverse: 1 Sentimo, "Republika ng Pilipinas", year mark Reverse: logo of the Bankgo Sentral ng Pilipinas Shape: round Edge: reeded Material: Copper-covered steel Composition: 6% copper balance steel Diameter: 15.5 mm Weight: 1.9 grams I scoured a huge bank in my city and found only three of these coins. The rarest of the current coins in use, this denomination is hardly necessary but Bangko Sentral has to mint them because they are required by law.

New generation banknote

20 Peso Bill

50 Peso bill

100 Peso Bill

200 Peso Bill

500 Peso Bill

1000 Peso Bill