PowerPoint Overheads for

Sedra/Smith Microelectronic Circuits 5/e

©2004 Oxford University Press.

Oxford University Press

Oxford New York Auckland Bangkok Buenos Aires Cape Town Chennai Dar es Salaam Delhi Hong Kong Istanbul Karachi Kolkata Kuala Lumpur Madrid Melbourne Mexico City Mumbai Nairobi São Paulo Shanghai Taipei Tokyo Toronto
Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press, Inc. Published by Oxford University Press, Inc. 198 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10016 www.oup.com Oxford is a registered trademark of Oxford University Press All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of Oxford University Press.

ISBN 0–19–517267–1

Printing number: 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Printed in the United States of America

2

Introduction to Electronics

3

Figure 1.1 Two alternative representations of a signal source: (a) the Thévenin form, and (b) the Norton form.

Microelectronic Circuits - Fifth Edition

Sedra/Smith

Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press, Inc.

4

Figure 1.2 An arbitrary voltage signal vs(t).

Microelectronic Circuits - Fifth Edition

Sedra/Smith

Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press, Inc.

5

Microelectronic Circuits . Inc. 6 .Figure 1. The angular frequency v = 2pf rad/s.3 Sine-wave voltage signal of amplitude Va and frequency f = 1/T Hz.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

4 A symmetrical square-wave signal of amplitude V.Figure 1. Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits . 7 .

Figure 1. 1. Microelectronic Circuits . 8 .5 The frequency spectrum (also known as the line spectrum) of the periodic square wave of Fig.4.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Inc.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.6 The frequency spectrum of an arbitrary waveform such as that in Fig. 9 .2. Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.Figure 1. 1.

10 .Figure 1. Microelectronic Circuits .7 Sampling the continuous-time analog signal in (a) results in the discrete-time signal in (b).Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Inc.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 11 .Figure 1.8 Variation of a particular binary digital signal with time. Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.

12 . Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits .9 Block-diagram representation of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC).Figure 1.

Microelectronic Circuits . (b) An amplifier with a common terminal (ground) between the input and output ports.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.Figure 1.10 (a) Circuit symbol for amplifier. 13 . Inc.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 14 . Inc.11 (a) A voltage amplifier fed with a signal vI(t) and connected to a load resistance RL. (b) Transfer characteristic of a linear voltage amplifier with voltage gain Av. Microelectronic Circuits .Figure 1. Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

15 . Microelectronic Circuits .12 An amplifier that requires two dc supplies (shown as batteries) for operation.Figure 1. Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Inc.Figure 1.13 An amplifier transfer characteristic that is linear except for output saturation. Microelectronic Circuits .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 16 .

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 17 . Inc.Figure 1. Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. VDD. (b) To obtain linear operation the amplifier is biased as shown. and the signal amplitude is kept small. Observe that this amplifier is operated from a single power supply.14 (a) An amplifier transfer characteristic that shows considerable nonlinearity. Microelectronic Circuits .

e. with a gain that is negative). Inc.2. 18 . Note that this amplifier is inverting (i.Figure 1..Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits .15 A sketch of the transfer characteristic of the amplifier of Example 1.

Inc.Figure 1. Microelectronic Circuits .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 19 .16 Symbol convention employed throughout the book.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. (b) The voltage amplifier with input signal source and load. Microelectronic Circuits .Figure 1. Inc. 20 .17 (a) Circuit model for the voltage amplifier.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits .18 Three-stage amplifier for Example 1.3. 21 .Figure 1. Inc.

Figure 1. Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 22 . Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. (c) An alternative small-signal circuit model for the BJT. Microelectronic Circuits . (b) The BJT connected as an amplifier with the emitter as a common terminal between input and output (called a common-emitter amplifier).19 (a) Small-signal circuit model for a bipolar junction transistor (BJT).

20 Microelectronic Circuits .Figure E1. 23 .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Inc.

Inc. At the test frequency v. 24 .20 Measuring the frequency response of a linear amplifier.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits . the amplifier gain is characterized by its magnitude (Vo/Vi) and phase f.Figure 1.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 25 . Inc.21 Typical magnitude response of an amplifier. Microelectronic Circuits . |T(v)| is the magnitude of the amplifier transfer function—that is.Figure 1. the ratio of the output Vo(v) to the input Vi(v). Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Inc. 26 . Microelectronic Circuits .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.22 Two examples of STC networks: (a) a low-pass network and (b) a high-pass network.Figure 1.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.Figure 1.23 (a) Magnitude and (b) phase response of STC networks of the low-pass type. 27 .

Figure 1. Inc. Microelectronic Circuits . 28 .24 (a) Magnitude and (b) phase response of STC networks of the high-pass type.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

5. 29 . Inc.Figure 1. Microelectronic Circuits .25 Circuit for Example 1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Inc.26 Frequency response for (a) a capacitively coupled amplifier. (b) a direct-coupled amplifier.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. and (c) a tuned or bandpass amplifier.Figure 1. Microelectronic Circuits . 30 .

31 .Figure 1. Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.27 Use of a capacitor to couple amplifier stages. Microelectronic Circuits .

Inc.23 Microelectronic Circuits .Figure E1. 32 .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Figure 1. Microelectronic Circuits . 33 . Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.28 A logic inverter operating from a dc supply VDD.

VIL. Note the four parameters of the VTC (VOH. and VIH) and their use in determining the noise margins (NMH and NML). Inc. Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.29 Voltage transfer characteristic of an inverter. VOL.Figure 1. The VTC is approximated by three straightline segments. Microelectronic Circuits .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 34 .

Inc. Microelectronic Circuits .Figure 1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.30 The VTC of an ideal inverter. 35 .

Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.Figure 1. Note that the switch is assumed to close when vI is high. (b) equivalent circuit when vI is low. and (c) equivalent circuit when vI is high. Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 36 .31 (a) The simplest implementation of a logic inverter using a voltage-controlled switch.

Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.10.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 37 .32 A more elaborate implementation of the logic inverter utilizing two complementary switches.Figure 1. Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. This is the basis of the CMOS inverter studied in Section 4.

This is the basis of the emitter-coupled logic (ECL) studied in Chapters 7 and 11.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 38 . Inc.Figure 1.33 Another inverter implementation utilizing a double-throw switch to steer the constant current IEE to RC1 (when vI is high) or RC2 (when vI is low). Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Microelectronic Circuits .

34 Example 1. Inc.6: (a) The inverter circuit after the switch opens (i.. for t  0). (b) Waveforms of vI and vO. vO rises exponentially.Figure 1.e. starting at VOL and heading toward VOH .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith 39 . Microelectronic Circuits . Observe that the switch is assumed to operate instantaneously. Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

35 Definitions of propagation delays and transition times of the logic inverter. Microelectronic Circuits . Inc. 40 .Figure 1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Figure P1. 41 .6 Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

10 Microelectronic Circuits .Figure P1. Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 42 .

Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.14 Microelectronic Circuits . 43 .Figure P1.

Inc.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.15 Microelectronic Circuits . 44 .Figure P1.

Figure P1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.16 Microelectronic Circuits . 45 . Inc.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 46 .17 Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.Figure P1.

Figure P1. 47 .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.18 Microelectronic Circuits . Inc.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 48 .Figure P1. Inc.37 Microelectronic Circuits .

Inc. 49 .58 Microelectronic Circuits .Figure P1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Inc.63 Microelectronic Circuits . 50 .Figure P1.

Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.65 Microelectronic Circuits . 51 .Figure P1. Inc.

Figure P1.67 Microelectronic Circuits . 52 .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Inc.

Figure P1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.68 Microelectronic Circuits . 53 . Inc.

72 Microelectronic Circuits .Figure P1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. Inc. 54 .

Figure P1.77 Microelectronic Circuits . Inc. 55 .Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.

Inc.Figure P1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press. 56 .79 Microelectronic Circuits .

Table 1.Fifth Edition Sedra/Smith Copyright  2004 by Oxford University Press.1 The Four Amplifier Types Microelectronic Circuits . Inc. 57 .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.