PMP Preparation Training

Human Resource Management
Chapter 9

Human Resource Management
Processes required to make effective use of the people involved with the project Organizational Planning Staff Acquisition Team Development
Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia, Inc. 9-2

Managing People on the Project
• Select techniques that are appropriate for personal and organizational relationships that are temporary and new
• The nature and number of project stakeholders will often change as the project moves from phase to phase. Choose techniques that are appropriate to the current needs of the project • Team must be sufficiently aware of HR administrative requirements to ensure compliance
Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia, Inc. 9-3

9-4 .3 Team Development 9. Inc.Human Resource Management Planning Executing 9.1 Organizational Planning 9.2 Staff Acquisition Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

and assigning project roles. and reporting relationships • Individuals and groups may be part of the organization performing the project or may be external to it • Internal groups are often associated with a specific functional department. such as engineering. documenting. 9-5 .Organizational Planning Planning. marketing. responsibilities. or accounting Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. identifying. Inc.

9-6 Source: pmbok guide 2000 . Inc.Organizational Planning Tools & Techniques • • • • Templates HR practices Organizational theory Stakeholder analysis Inputs • Project interfaces • Staffing requirements • Constraints Outputs • Role and responsibility assignments • Staffing management plan • Organization-chart • Supporting detail © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

Inc.Organizational Planning Inputs Project interfaces – Organizational interfaces – Formal and informal reporting relationships among different organizational units – Technical interfaces – Formal and informal reporting relationships among technical disciplines – Interpersonal interfaces – Formal and informal reporting relationships among different individuals working on the project Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. 9-7 .

) • Staffing requirements – Definition of the kinds of competencies required and in what time frame and from which kinds of individuals • Constraints – Factors that limit project team’s options – Organizational structure of the performing organization • Strong matrix • Weak matrix – Collective bargaining agreements with unions or other employee groups – Preferences of the project management team – Skills and capabilities of the staff Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.Organizational Planning Inputs (cont. 9-8 . Inc.

guidelines. 9-9 . and should. Inc. be structured • Stakeholder analysis – Ensures their needs are met Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. and procedures used as organizational-planning aid • Organizational theory – Body of literature describing how an organization can.Organizational Planning Tools & Techniques • Templates – Role and responsibility definitions or reporting relationships from a similar project • HR practices – Variety of policies.

Inc. 9-10 .Organizational Planning Outputs Assignments – Roles and responsibilities assigned to the appropriate stakeholder Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

OBE indicates which organizational unit is responsible for which work items • Supporting Detail: – Organizational impact – What alternatives are precluded by organizing in this manner? – Job descriptions – Written outline of characteristics involved in performing a given job – Training needs – To develop skills needed to perform job Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.Organizational Planning Outputs (cont. 9-11 . the project team • Organization Chart – Graphic display of project reporting relationships.) • Staffing Management Plan – Describes when and how human resources will be brought onto. Inc. and taken off of.

Inc.Organizational Planning Resource Histogram 300 275 250 225 200 175 150 Senior Designers Resource Usage 125 100 75 50 25 0 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24 1 8 15 22 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Resource Usage Staff Hours Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. 9-12 .

9-13 .Organizational Planning Reward Systems • Extrinsic (External) – Salary – Work conditions – Status • Intrinsic (Internal) – Achievement – Responsibility – Advancement • Rewards given timely and in public Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. Inc.

Inc. 9-14 .Staff Acquisition Getting the needed human resources assigned to and working on the project Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

Outputs • Project staff assigned • Project team directory 9-15 .Staff Acquisition Tools & Techniques • Negotiations • Pre-assignment • Procurement Inputs • Staffing management plan • Staffing-pool description • Recruitment practices Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. Inc.

Staff Acquisition Inputs • Staffing management plan • Staffing-pool description – Characteristics of the potentially available staff – – – – – Previous experience Personal interests Personal characteristics Availability Competencies and proficiency • Recruitment practices – Policies. Inc. and procedures governing staff assignments Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. 9-16 . guidelines.

9-17 .Staff Acquisition Tools & Techniques • Negotiations – With FMs or other project management teams. Inc. to ensure receiving appropriate resources within required time frames • Pre-assignment – Staff have been assigned because they were promised in the proposal or were defined in the project charter • Procurement – People outside the organization obtained to perform project activities Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

part-time. or variably • Project team directory – Lists of all project team members and other key stakeholders Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.Staff Acquisition Outputs • Project staff assigned – Appropriate people have been assigned to work on the project full-time. Inc. 9-18 .

9-19 . Inc.Team Development Enhancing the ability of stakeholders to contribute as individuals as well as enhancing the ability of the team to function as a team Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

9-20 . Inc.Team Development Tools & Techniques • • • • • Team-building activities General management skills Reward and recognition systems Collocation Training Inputs • • • • • Project staff Project plan Staffing management plan Performance reports External feedback Outputs • Performance improvements • Inputs to performance appraisals Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

Inc. 9-21 .Team Development Inputs • Project staff • Project plan • Staffing management plan • Performance reports • External feedback – Team measure itself against the expectations of those outside the project Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

Team Development Tools & Techniques • Team-building activities – Include management and individual actions taken to improve team performance • General management skills • Reward and recognition systems – Formal management actions that promote or reinforce desired behavior • Collocation – Placing all or most of the team members in the same physical location • Training – Includes all activities designed to enhance the skills. knowledge. and capabilities of the project team Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. 9-22 . Inc.

Team Development Outputs • Performance improvements – Improvements in individual skills – Improvements in team behaviors – Improvements in either individual skills or team capabilities • Inputs to performance appraisals Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. Inc. 9-23 .

9-24 . Inc.Team Development Management Styles Autocratic • Strength – Mature. well defined projects – Quick decisions required • Weakness – Limits staff buy-in leading to low morale – Possible arbitrary decisions Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

Team Development Management Styles Laissez-Fair • Strength – Innovative projects – High morale of self-motivated staff • Weakness – Confusion about objectives of the project – Inability to make decisions Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. Inc. 9-25 .

sense of competence Social – Need for love. 9-26 . Inc. sense of belonging Lower Order Needs Safety – Need for security. protection and stability Physiological – Need for biological maintenance (food.) Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.Team Development Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Higher Order Needs Self-Actualization – Need to grow and use abilities to the fullest and most creative extent Esteem .Need for respect. water etc. recognition. affection. prestige.

lazy • Theory Y – Workers: Viewed as willing and eager to accept responsibility – Managers: Create environment that aids workers in achieving goals Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. Inc.Team Development McGregor’s Theory • Theory X – Traditional view of management. 9-27 . top-down – Managers: Control the people – Workers: Viewed as inherently self-centered.

Inc.Team Development Hertzberg’s Motivation Theory • Hygiene – Pay. 9-28 . working conditions. boss’s attitude – Poor hygiene factors negatively impact motivation – Good hygiene factors increase motivation • Motivators – Positive motivation leads to achievement and selfactualization – Workers have a sense of personal growth and responsibility Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

Inc. 9-29 .Team Development Communications Skills Tips • Written – Use active voice – KISS principle • Oral – – – – Anticipate reaction Say what you mean Make eye contact NEVER LIE Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia.

9-30 .Summary Review Questions Source: pmbok guide 2000 © 2002 Robbins-Gioia. Inc.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful