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February 13, 2013 Delphos Herald Edition
February 13, 2013 Delphos Herald Edition

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DELPHOS

The
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Kasich’s team prepares to defend new school formula, p3

Local action, p6 and 8

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

HERALD
Delphos, Ohio ment isn’t going to inspire new ideas, new businesses and new private sector jobs. It’s going to create uncertainty.” Uncompromising and aggressive, Obama pressed his agenda on social issues and economic ones, declaring himself determined to intervene to right income inequality and boost the middle class. He called on Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants, far-reaching gun control measures and a climate bill to cut greenhouse gas emissions. He threatened to go around Congress with executive actions on climate change if it fails to act. But Obama cannot count on willing partners on those issues, any one of which could tie Congress in knots for months with no guarantee of success. Gun control, which Obama made a focus of his speech, faces dim prospects on Capitol Hill. The prospect for immigration legislation is better, but no sure thing. Climate change legislation is given no chance of success. And Obama addressed relatively briefly the looming fiscal crises confronting the nation and inevitably sucking up oxygen on Capitol Hill — the deep automatic spending cuts or “sequester” to take effect March See STATE, page 3

State of the Union address

Obama proposals face quick fight in Congress
By ERICA WERNER The Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama set up high-stakes clashes over guns, immigration, taxes and climate change in a State of the Union address that showcased a newly re-elected president determined to mark his legacy, facing off against a deeply divided Congress with Republicans eager to rein him in. At the center of it all was a fight over the very role of government, with Obama pushing a raft of new initiatives to improve preschool programs and voting, boost manufacturing and research and development, raise the minimum wage and lower energy use. “It is our unfinished task to make sure that this government works on behalf of the many and not just the few,” he said. Republicans who control the House and hold enough votes to stall legislation in the Senate were just as quick to declare that the government helps best by getting out of the way. “More government isn’t going to help you get ahead. It’s going to hold you back. More government isn’t going to create more opportunities. It’s going to limit them,” Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said in the Republican response Tuesday night. “And more govern-

Ash Wednesday marks Lenten season

St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church parishioners attended Ash Wednesday Mass this morning and received the mark of the ashes. The ashes are made from the burning of the blessed palms distributed the previous year on Palm Sunday. They are sprinkled with holy water before being applied to the forehead in the sign of a cross with the minister’s right thumb. Today marks the beginning of the Lenten season. (Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves)

There are still tickets available for the Museum of Postal History’s second annual Gala Celebration on Sunday. Festivities of cocktails and tours of the museum will begin at 5 p.m. with a buffet dinner and program following at 6 p.m. The event is also celebrating the 100th anniversary of parcel post. Each guest, upon arrival, will receive their own “special delivery parcel.” The Grand Door Prize will be a week’s vacation at the winner’s choice of Lake Tahoe or Palm Springs, Calif. Jubilee Winery and the music of Bob Ulm will add a lively mood to the evening. The cost is $25 per person and a portion of the ticket price may be tax deductible. Reservations can be made by contacting Gary Levitt at 419-303-5482.

Gala tickets still available

Upfront

School board to review supt. applications
BY NANCY SPENCER nspencer@delphosherald.com DELPHOS — With just three days left to accept applications for the superintendent’s position at Delphos City Schools, board of education members set an executive session meeting for 7 p.m. Feb. 21 to review applications received. Board President Perry Wiltsie announced at Monday’s meeting there were nine applications to review so far. The board is to begin the interview process on March 5. Interim Superintendent Frank Sukup will step down at the end of the current school year. Sukup announced more than $25,000 worth of safety upgrades to district buildings have been completed or are scheduled for completion this spring. Following the tragic school shooting in Newtown, Conn., the district visited some areas of concern. A new buzz-in entryway has been installed at Landeck Elementary and Jefferson High School and Middle School will each have the same type installed by spring. Additional security cameras will also be installed at those buildings and Franklin Elementary as well. Board members also approved district-wide bed bug policy Monday. If a student is suspected of having bed bug bites or if a bed bug is found on a student, the student will be discreetly removed from the classroom so the nurse can perform an inspection of the child’s clothing and other belongings. If a specimen is found on a student or their belongings, the bed bug will be removed and parents will be notified. Each child suspected of a current bed bug infestation in the home will place belongings in a sealed storage container until infestation is confirmed or proven false. The student may return their belongings to the classroom after the school has received documentation stating the home has been treated appropriately, the child does not have bed bug bites and/or bed bugs and the school principal and/or nurse feel school personnel and students are not at risk. Procedures have also been put in place for pest management in the school buildings. “By law, we can’t keep the student out of school,” Sukup said. “What we can do is try to minimize the exposure and keep the bed bugs out of our classrooms and buses.” The board also approved a supplemental contract to Jon Kroeger as junior varsity baseball coach for the 2013 season. The next regularly meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. March 11.

At a recent celebration, the Delphos Fire Association honored 3 newly-retired firefighters for their service. Together, these firefighters accounted for 97 years of service to the association and the citizens of Delphos. Pictured with the service awards they received are, from left, Paul Carder (26 years), Dennis Hageman (44 years) and Bob Jettinghoff (27 years). (Submitted photo)

Firefighters retire with 97 years experience

BBB: Email notice from the IRS bogus
Information submitted Consumers have reported to the BBB that they are receiving a notice via email that there has been a problem with their tax return. The “notice” is written in very poor English with numerous misspellings and errors. Below is a copy of one of the emails exactly as it appears; misspellings, bad grammar and all: “Hereby we hav to inform that Your Federal Tax Refund Appeal ({ID: 4290048——), recently has been RETURNED. If you believe that IRS did not properly estimate your case due to miscomprehension of the fact(s), be prepared to equip additional information. You can obtain refusal to accept details and re-submit

Pre-sale tickets at SJ, DJ Pre-sale tickets for two St. John’s boys cage games: at home vs. New Bremen Friday (6:30 p.m.) and at Bath Saturday (6 p.m.); and Jefferson’s game at Bluffton Friday and at home vs. Van Wert Monday; are on sale. For St. John’s, adult pre-sale and all tickets at the gates are $6, $4 for pre-sale students’. For Jefferson, adult presales are $5 and students’ $4; all tix at the gates are $6. Partly cloudy Thursday with a 20 percent chance of rain in the afternoon through midnight. Highs in the upper 40s. Lows around 30. See page 2.

Sports

Pope says he’s resigning for the ‘good of church’
Local priest weighs in on resignation
Staff reports and The Associated Press many in the audience of thousands had tears in their eyes. A huge banner reading “Grazie Santita” (Thank you Your Holiness) was strung up at the back of the room. Benedict appeared wan and spoke very softly, but his eyes twinkled at the flock’s warm and heartfelt welcome. He repeated in Italian what he had told his cardinals Monday in Latin: that he simply didn’t have the strength to continue. “As you know, I have decided to renounce the ministry that the Lord gave to me on April 19, 2005,” he said, to applause. “I did this in full liberty for the good of the church.” He thanked the faithful for their prayers and love, which he said he had “physically felt in these days that haven’t been easy for me.” And he asked them “to continue to pray for me, the church, and the future pope.” Local priest, the Rev. Melvin Verhoff, said the pope’s resignation raises a lot of questions. “The Pope’s resignation raises a gamut of issues,” Father Verhoff said. “Since the election of a new Pope normally takes place after a Pontiff passes away, this is new territory for the Conclave.” Verhoff declined to guess who the next pontiff would be. “Who the candidate is is all speculation,” Father Verhoff explained. “There are a variety of possibilities. The Cardinals will discuss which person will be the good for the church. Another interesting fact is that the Sistine Chapel is being prepared for the election. A specific flooring is being installed to prevent electronic bugging during the election.” The atmosphere in Vatican City was festive and warm, if somewhat bittersweet, as if the crowd was trying to ask him to stay with them for just a bit longer. A chorus of Italian schoolchildren serenaded him with one of his favorite hymns in German — a gesture that won over the pope, who thanked them for singing a piece “particularly dear to me.” “He gave us eight wonderful years of his words,” said Ileana Sviben, an Italian from the northern city of Trieste who couldn’t hide her sadness. “He was a wonderful theologian and pastor.” “We were just coming for vacation, and now we are getting all of this!” marveled Terry Rodger, a tourist from New Orleans as he headed to the audience. “I am very excited. I’m surprised.”

your appeal by clicking a link below. Please enter official website for more details.” They provide an address and website location, which they claim are for the Department of the Treasury. They even include hours of operation to try and convince the taxpayer that it is legitimate. This is a phishing expedition designed to con consumers into revealing sensitive information and also is being used as a tool to hack into databases. Do not open the email and do not “enter the official website” as the email requests. It is all bogus and very bad news. For further information, contact Neil Winget at 419-227-8012.

Forecast

Index

Obituaries State/Local Politics Community Sports Business Classifieds Television World briefs

VATICAN CITY — Pope Benedict XVI told thousands of faithful today that he was resigning for “the good of the church” — an extraordi2 nary scene of a pope explain3 ing himself to his flock that 4 unfolded in his first appear5 ance since dropping the 6-8 bombshell announcement. Looking tired but serene, 9 the 85-year-old Benedict 10 11 basked in a standing ovation when he entered the 12 packed hall for his traditional Wednesday catechism lesson. His speech was interrupted repeatedly by applause and

But the Rev. Reinaldo Braga Jr., a Brazilian priest studying theology in Rome, said he was saddened when he first heard the news. “The atmosphere was funereal but nobody had died,” he said. “But then I realized it was a wise act for the entire church. He taught the church and the world that the papacy is not about power but about service.” It was a sentiment the retiring Benedict himself emphasized today when he told his flock that the “path of power is not the road of God.” The audience included groups of nuns waving papal flags, and among the clerics, U.S. Cardinal Bernard Law, who resigned as archbishop of Boston at the height of the clerical sex abuse scandal in See POPE, page 3

2 – The Herald

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

www.delphosherald.com

Rogue ex-LAPD officer believed dead after standoff
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. (AP) — As police scoured mountain peaks for days, using everything from bloodhounds to high-tech helicopters, the revenge-seeking ex-cop they wanted was hiding among them, holed up in a vacation cabin across the street from their command post. It was there that Christopher Dorner apparently took refuge last Thursday, four days after beginning a deadly rampage that would claim four lives. The search ended abruptly Tuesday when a man believed to be Dorner bolted from hiding, stole two cars, barricaded himself in a vacant cabin and mounted a last stand in a furious shootout in which he killed one sheriff’s deputy and wounded another before the building erupted in flames. He never emerged from the ruins and hours later a charred body was found inside. “We have reason to believe that it is him,” San Bernardino County sheriff’s spokeswoman Cynthia Bachman said. Dorner, 33, had said in a lengthy rant police believe he posted on Facebook that he expected to die in one final, violent confrontation with police, and if it was him in the cabin that’s just what happened. The apparent end came very close to where his trail went cold six days earlier when his burning pickup truck — with guns and camping gear inside — was abandoned on a fire road in the San Bernardino National Forest near the ski resort town of Big Bear Lake. His footprints led away from the truck and vanished on frozen soil. With no sign of him and few leads, police offered a $1 million reward to bring him to justice and end a “reign of terror” that had more than 50 families of targeted Los Angeles police officers under round-the-clock protection after he threatened to bring “warfare” to the LAPD, officers and their kin. Just a few hours after police announced Tuesday that they had fielded more than 1,000 tips with no sign of Dorner, word came that a man matching his description had tied up two people in a Big Bear Lake cabin, stole their car and fled. Authorities didn’t immediately give more details on the two people. Game wardens from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife who were part of the search detail spotted the purple Nissan that had been reported stolen going in the opposite direction and gave chase, department spokesman Lt. Patrick Foy said. The driver looked like Dorner. They lost the purple car after it passed a school bus and turned onto a side road, but two other Fish and Wildlife patrols turned up that road a short time later, and were searching for the car when a

For The Record
OBITUARIES

Prosecutor: Chicago gang war led to teen’s death
By DON BABWIN The Associated Press CHICAGO — Two men circled a park on Chicago’s South Side looking for members of a rival gang before one crept up on a group seeking shelter from the rain under a canopy and opened fire, striking a 15-year-old honor student who once made a video protesting gang violence, prosecutors said Tuesday. New details about the death of Hadiya Pendleton emerged during a court hearing in which a judge denied bail for the two men charged with murder in her death, 18-year-old Michael Ward and 20-year-old Kenneth Williams. Williams’ attorney denied that his client was a gang member, but Cook County Assistant State’s Attorney Jennifer Sexton laid out in sometimes chilling detail — much of it, she said, provided by the defendants themselves — of a hunt for rival gang members that ended with a deadly case of mistaken identity. Authorities have said no one in Pendleton’s group was affiliated with a gang. Her death is one of dozens of homicides in Chicago already this year but has drawn national attention in part because the drum majorette performed as President Barack

white pickup truck sped erratically toward the wardens. “He took a close look at the driver and realized it was the suspect,” Foy said. Dorner, who allegedly stole the pickup truck at gunpoint after crashing the first car, rolled down a window and opened fire on the wardens, striking a warden’s truck more than a dozen times. One of the wardens shot at the suspect as he rounded a curve in the road. It’s unclear if he hit him, but the stolen pickup careened off the road and crashed in a snow bank. Dorner then ran on foot to the cabin where he barricaded himself and got in a shootout with San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputies and other officers who arrived. Two deputies were shot, one fatally. A SWAT team surrounded the cabin and used an armored vehicle to break out the cabin windows, said a law enforcement official who requested anonymity because the investigation was ongoing. The officers then pumped a gas into the cabin and blasted a message over a loudspeaker: “Surrender or come out.” The armored vehicle then tore down each of the cabin’s four walls. A single shot was heard inside before the cabin was engulfed in flames, the law enforcement official told The Associated Press.

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

The Delphos Herald
Vol. 143 No. 174

Elizabeth Smith

Obama’s inaugural festivities just days before the shooting. Sexton said Ward and Williams belonged to the SUWU gang and were trolling the streets about a mile from Obama’s Chicago home on Jan. 29, looking for members of a rival 4-6 Terror gang. They saw Pendleton and her friends huddled under the canopy about 2 p.m., mistook them for members of the other gang and pulled over in an alley, she said. Ward told police the two gangs had been shooting at each other since 2010, and he was angry with the 4-6 Terror gang for shooting and killing a friend of his, Sexton said. He hopped out of the car and was handed a gun by Williams, who police said had been shot in the arm by a member of a rival gang just six months earlier, she said. “Defendant Ward admitted he snuck up on the group and they didn’t see him coming,” Sexton said. He fired at least six times, she told the judge. One bullet struck a 17-year-old in the left ankle, and another grazed the left foot of another 17-year-old. Pendleton was hit in the upper back. “She was able to make it outside of the park and then collapsed on the street,” Sexton said. The teen died later that day.

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High temperature Tuesday in Delphos was 41 degrees, low was 28. High a year ago today was 29, low was 18. Record high for today is 66, set in 1990. Record low is -8, set in 1944. WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county The Associated Press TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 30s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph. THURSDAY: Partly cloudy. A 20 percent chance of rain in the afternoon. Highs in the upper 40s. Southwest winds 10 to 20 mph. THURSDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy. A 20 percent chance of snow showers through midnight. Lows around 30. West winds 10 to 15 mph. EXTENDED FORECAST FRIDAY: Cloudy with a 30 percent chance of snow showers. Colder. Highs in the mid 30s. West winds 10 to 20 mph. FRIDAY NIGHT: Cloudy with a 30 percent chance of snow showers. Lows around 20. SATURDAY: Mostly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of snow showers. Highs in the mid 20s. SATURDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of snow showers. Lows 15 to 20.

Delphos weather

WEATHER

Oct. 12, 1919-Feb. 11, 2013 Elizabeth Smith, 93, of Delphos, died at 5:15 a.m. Monday at Vancrest Healthcare Center. She was born Oct. 12, 1919, in Paulding County to Joseph and Marie (Hrachovska) Sochor, who preceded her in death. On July 30, 1941, she married Lloyd Smith, who survives in Delphos. Other survivors include a son, Donald (Sally) Smith of Hernando, Fla.; two daughters, Susan (John) Ebey of Santa Monica, Calif., and Barb (Kim) Bradshaw of Elida; and two grandchildren, Ryan Bradshaw of Kansas City, Mo., and Laura Bradshaw of Santiago, Chile. She was also preceded in death by a brother, Joseph Sochor; and three sisters, Mary Straznicky, Bessie Polasek and Anna Allmandinger. Mrs. Smith was a teller at Commercial Bank for 19 years. She was a member of St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church and its Altar Rosary Society and CD of A and the First Catholic Slovak Ladies Assoc. She enjoyed baking, sewing, needlework and she loved her grandchildren. Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 11 a.m. Friday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Melvin Verhoff officiating. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call from 2-4, 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, where a parish wake will begin at 7:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family would prefer all donations be made to St. John’s Parish Foundation or St. Vincent dePaul Society.

By The Associated Press Today is Ash Wednesday, Feb. 13, the 44th day of 2013. There are 321 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Feb. 13, 1943, during World War II, the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserve was officially established. On this date: In 1542, the fifth wife of England’s King Henry VIII, Catherine Howard, was executed for adultery. In 1861, Abraham Lincoln was officially declared winner of the 1860 presidential election as electors cast their ballots.

TODAY IN HISTORY

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March 22, 1946 - Feb. 11, 2013 John “David” Whittington, 66, of Gomer, passed away at 1:47 p.m. Monday from a massive heart attack at Lima Memorial Hospital. He was born on March 22, 1946, in Lima to John and Norma (Notter) Whittington, who preceded him in death. He was united in marriage to Linda Jane Renner, who survives in Gomer. Other survivors include a daughter, Cynthia Lynn (Scott) Neubert of Delphos; a sister, Nancy (Larry) Miller of Lima; two grandsons, Evan John Neubert and Alex David Neubert; a sister-in-law, Jill (Arnold) Renner; and three nieces and three nephews. He was also preceded in death by his grandparents, Thomas and Mabel (Ballard) Whittington, Penegoes, North Wales; great-grandparents, Thomas and Sara Whittington and Richard and Bernice Notter; and brother-in-law, Allen Keith Renner. Mr. Whittington was a teacher at Perry Local Schools and Delphos Jefferson High School, where he taught science, biology and anatomy and was a guidance counselor. He lectured Indian relic adult education courses at Vantage Vocational School and Science Methods at the OSU Lima Campus. He also served as a student teacher supervisor at OSU Lima campus. He was a harness racing clerk at Shelby, Putnam and Allen County fairs and volunteered as a juvenile probation officer and teacher for the Lima Juvenile Court. He was a member of the Gomer United Church or Christ, the Ohio State Alumni Association, Allen County Go-Bucks Club and Welsh Society of Northwest Ohio, serving as the current president; past member of the Lima Emergency Planning Commission, National Association of Biology Teachers and Ohio Academy of Science Olympiads at OSU; judged local, regional and state science fairs; and directed marine biology camps on Andros Island, Bahamas. He was awarded the N.W. Ohio Science Teacher of the Year, National Association’s Biology Teacher of the Year, Lima Senior High School Hall of Fame and Honorary Wildcat Award at Jefferson. Mr. Whittington graduated from Lima Senior High School in 1964, the Ohio State University in 1968 and the University of Dayton in 1972, where he earned his masters degree in guidance. He enjoyed reading, gardening, harness horse racing, traveling, boxing, gambling and antiquing. He was an avid Indian relic historian and collector. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday at the Gomer United Church of Christ the Rev. David Howell and Brian Knoderer officiating. Burial will follow in the Pike Run and Tawelfan Cemetery in Gomer. Visitation will be from 3-8 p.m. on Friday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home and one hour prior to services Saturday at the church. Memorial contributions may be made to the Welsh Society of Northwest Ohio.

John ‘David’ Whittington

The Delphos Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $1.48 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $97 per year. Outside these counties $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Delphos Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $1.48 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE DELPHOS HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

Ohio man gets 9 years for raping teen girl

Lawsuit results from Ohio drunk driving fatality

BELLEFONTAINE (AP) — An Ohio man has been sentenced to nine years in prison for raping a 14-year-old girl. WHIO-TV says 35-yearold Michael Williams had pleaded guilty in January. He was sentenced Tuesday in Bellefontaine, in west-central Ohio. He will also have to serve five years of probation after he gets out of prison and register as a sex offender. Authorities say Williams was arrested Aug. 3 after a member of the victim’s family reported the crime to Bellefontaine police. Prosecutors noted for the court that the victim suffered “serious emotional harm” at the hands of Williams.

DELAWARE (AP) — The boyfriend of a central Ohio woman killed in crash caused by a repeat drunken driver is suing the man’s employer and those who may have served him alcohol. WBNS-TV says an attorney for Brad Weaver filed the wrongful death lawsuit this week. His girlfriend, Heidi Hecker, was killed in the Nov. 8 crash. Weaver and the couple’s 10-month-old daughter were injured. A jury convicted 45-yearold Marc Kraft last week, and a judge sentenced him to more than 29 years in prison. It was Kraft’s seventh drunkendriving conviction. The lawsuit claims Kraft’s employer knew or should have known about his driving history before entrusting him with the pickup truck he was driving when he slammed into the Subaru at an intersection in Delaware, near Columbus.

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CLEVELAND (AP) — These Ohio lotteries were drawn Tuesday: Mega Millions 09-22-32-38-55, Mega Ball: 44 Megaplier 3 Pick 3 Evening 5-9-3 Pick 3 Midday 6-9-0 Pick 4 Evening 3-4-3-8 Pick 4 Midday 1-6-3-9 Pick 5 Evening 2-4-8-3-3 Pick 5 Midday 9-0-6-6-4 Powerball Estimated jackpot: $50 million Rolling Cash 5 13-24-29-33-39 Estimated jackpot: $130,000

LOTTERY

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Herald – 3

YWCA offer spring travel preview

BRIEFS

Woody Hayes statue goes up on OSU campus

The Van Wert YWCA Spring Travel Preview is scheduled for 3 p.m. Feb. 24. There will be information about all the trips that are planned for 2013. Several of the very popular mystery trips will be available plus exciting destination such as New York City, Alaska, Nashville and Branson. Door prizes will be awarded and refreshments will be served. For more information, call the YWCA at 419-238-6639 or stop in at 408 East Main, Van Wert.

DAYTON (AP) — A former director of a funeral home in southwest Ohio is facing charges of theft, tampering of records and other felony counts. Owner Scherrie McLin is accused of accepting money for prepaid funeral expenses and using the funds for personal use. Montgomery County Prosecutor Mat Heck Jr. said Tuesday McLin illegally converted more than $200,000 for so-called “preneeds” contracts from more than 50 people. Heck says a grand jury has indicted McLin on 17 felony counts, including theft from an elderly or disabled person. Heck’s office says no attorney of record is listed for McLin yet. Last year, more than 50 boxes of cremated human remains were found at a house McLin co-owned that was under foreclosure. The charges Tuesday stemmed from an investigation that was unrelated to the remains.

Funeral home owner in Ohio faces theft charges

COLUMBUS (AP) — An 8-foot-tall bronze statue of legendary football coach Woody Hayes is going up outside the Ohio State University athletic center that bears his name. The Columbus Dispatch reports that the 800-pound likeness of the longtime coach has been in the works for five years. It’s scheduled to be affixed to a granite base Wednesday afternoon outside the Woody Hayes Athletic Center on campus. The statue and other tributes come in recognition of the 100th anniversary of Hayes’ birth on Thursday. The bronze likeness was done by artist Alan Cottrill of Zanesville. Hayes coached at Ohio State for 28 seasons. He died in 1987.

By JULIE CARR SMYTH The Associated Press COLUMBUS — Gov. John Kasich’s education team is setting out to defend a new school funding formula that left many districts, including some of the state’s poorest, surprised at the lack of added cash. Richard Ross, director of the Governor’s Office of 21st Century Education, said he would present to the budgetwriting Ohio House Finance Committee on Wednesday figures that prove the newly proposed equation delivers on the Republican governor’s promise to help poor districts the most. “We have some charts to illustrate that low-income schools actually get significantly more resources than higher wealth schools,” Ross said Tuesday. “Personally, as we talked about it when it was presented on the philosophical basis, I think conceptually school districts liked what they heard.” Then came release of new district-by-district funding breakdowns. The eagerly anticipated spreadsheets were to be the first significant adjustments to state subsidies that Ohio schools had seen in five years. Sixty percent of districts’ allotments turned out to be flat. Superintendents were shocked, some were livid. Kasich’s Achievement Everywhere plan sends $1.2 billion more overall to K-12

Kasich schools team prepares to defend new formula
public school districts over the two-year budget cycle beginning July 1. That included a nearly 6 percent increase in fiscal year 2014 and 3.2 percent more the next year. The proposal brings all schools up to the tax base level of a district with $250,000 in property value per student — the 96th percentile of districts statewide — to ease wide disparities in millage revenues from local levies. Add-ons are provided to account for the number of poor students, English-language learners, gifted students and other special categories. And another $300 million is set aside in a Straight A fund, which will deliver grants to districts for innovation and efficiency measures. The Ohio 8, a coalition of superintendents and teacher union presidents from the state’s eight big-city districts, said in a statement that it’s still reviewing the proposal but an initial analysis suggests “room for improvement.” “We are concerned about potential new restrictions and/or mandates related to funding and significant policy proposals,” said a joint statement from Akron Superintendent David James and Cleveland Teachers Union chief David Quolke. Ross’ presentation Wednesday was to emphasize that the new formula funnels the largest amount of money — 27 percent of what

STATE/LOCAL

State

(Continued from page 1)

Pope

Ohio spends — to the state’s 14 large urban districts, or about $5,500 per student over the biennium. By contrast, the per-pupil amount of the wealthiest 20 percent is about $1,500. More than 60 percent of money goes to poorer districts. Administration estimates Ross was to present show the 20 percent of districts with the lowest property values after the big-city districts gets the next largest amount — more than $2.3 billion, or 18 percent of the total — over two years. Successively wealthier quintiles, representing 20 percent each, receive a successively smaller share of the total, ending with 8.7 percent of funding for the wealthiest 20 percent. Adjusted on a per-pupil basis, the administration says, the story is the same. According to administration calculations, the amount the 14 large urban districts are receiving per student is well above the state average, while the per-pupil funding for the wealthiest districts is well below the state average. Ross said any new forEngraving, A Specialty Since 1950 mula was bound to come with growing pains, including adjustments for significant 1175 W. North St. shifts in enrollment numbers and property values since the Lima, OH 45805 state has been without a new BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM?? www.trophycenter.net ARE YOU formula. We also have The formula ties money more closely to students wedding party gifts! rather than districts, he said.

followed by the government running out of money to fund federal agencies March 27. He made clear he will continue to press for the rich to pay more in taxes, a position Republicans have rejected. Republicans, meanwhile, made clear they’re in little mood to cooperate. “We are only weeks away from the devastating consequences of the president’s sequester, and he failed to offer the cuts needed to replace it,” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said in a statement. “In the last election, voters chose divided government which offers a mandate only to work together to find common ground. The president, instead, appears to have chosen a go-it-alone approach to pursue his liberal agenda.” Earlier Tuesday, in a meeting with television correspondents and anchors, Boehner said immigration is about the only item on Obama’s list that has a chance of passing this year. He said the president is more interested in getting a Democratic majority in both chambers next year and said

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he doesn’t believe Obama “has the guts” to take on liberals in his party over spending cuts. Obama did reiterate his willingness to tackle entitlement changes, particularly on Medicare, though he has ruled out increasing the eligibility age for the popular benefit program for seniors. “Those of us who care deeply about programs like Medicare must embrace the need for modest reforms — otherwise, our retirement programs will crowd out the investments we need for our children and jeopardize the promise of a secure retirement for future generations,” he said. “But we can’t ask senior citizens and working families to shoulder the entire burden of deficit reduction while asking nothing more from the wealthiest and most powerful.” On immigration, a bipartisan group of negotiators in the Senate is working to craft legislation embracing Obama’s call for a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants but making such a path contingent on first securing the border, a linkage Obama has not supported.

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the United States. Sat., FEBRUARY 23rd @ 9AM Benedict is the first pope to resign in nearly 600 years, and the decision has placed the Vatican in uncharted waters: No 2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804 Sat., FEBRUARY 23rd @ 9 AM one knows what he’ll be called or even what he’ll wear after Directions: From Rt. 75 Hwy (Rt.east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site. 2750 Harding exit Feb. 28. ALLEN CO.125, 309) • Lima, OH 45804 FAIRGROUNDS Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site. The Vatican, however, revealed some details of his final YOU’VE day as pope, saying he would attend a morning farewell cerYOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF GOT TO FEBRUARY OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS Sat., CHECK OUT 23rd @ 9AM INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!! emony with his cardinals and then fly off by helicopter at 5 OF INVENTORY AND(Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804 PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY! 2750 Harding Hwy p.m. to the papal summer retreat at Castel Gandolfo. 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4 — The Herald

POLITICS

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

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“It is not so much what we have done amiss, as what we have left undone, that will trouble us, looking back.” — Ellen Wood, English playwright and journalist (1813-1887)

Obama: Half of US combat troops home within 1 year
By ROBERT BURNS and JULIE PACE The Associated Press mand. Gen. Joseph Dunford took over Sunday for Gen. John Allen as the commander of allied forces in Afghanistan, and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is planning to retire as soon as his replacement is confirmed. Obama has nominated former Sen. Chuck Hagel to take the Pentagon post, and the Senate Armed Services Committee voted 14-11 Tuesday to advance the nomination to the full Senate for a vote later this week. Without going into specifics, Obama said the phase-out of American combat troops in Afghanistan will continue in 2014. “This drawdown will continue. And by the end of next year, our war in Afghanistan will be over,” he said, adding that al-Qaida is no longer the threat it was on 9/11. “The organization that attacked us on 9/11 is a shadow of its former self,” he said. “Different al-Qaida affiliates and extremist groups have emerged — from the Arabian Peninsula to Africa. The threat these groups pose is evolving. But to meet this threat, we don’t need to send tens of thousands of our sons and daughters abroad, or occupy other nations.” Obama’s decision also reflects Obama’s determination to wind down a war that is the longest in America’s history. He has many other security problems to consid-

IT WAS NEWS THEN
One Year Ago • If one has ever watched a cheer competition or floor tumbling in gymnastics, you’ve witnessed numerous spectacular and dangerous moves like flips, tucks and layouts. Tess Rieger of Ottoville is one of the people who teaches these moves. In the 15 years she’s spent as the tumbling instructor at Dancer By Gina, Rieger has taught girls and boys of all ages everything from cartwheels to back handsprings. 25 Years Ago — 1988 • Franklin Elementary School held its fifth-grade spelling bee. The three students who will represent Franklin at the Middle School spelling Feb. 12 are Susan Ahten, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ron Ahten; Beth Kiracofe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kiracofe; and Erin Lloyd, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Lloyd. • Delphos Lioness Club met at the Lions Den with 21 members present. Norman Vonder Embse of the Kalida Lions Club presented a program on diabetes. Wilma Runyan’s name was drawn for the door prize. Final plans were made for the spaghetti supper Feb. 13 at Jefferson Senior High School. • A retirement dinner was held at Flanagan’s Restaurant in honor of Jed Franklin. Franklin recently retired from Progressive Tool & Die Co., 210 E. Cleveland St., where he was employed for 24 years. Fellow employees sponsored the retirement party and presented Franklin with a scanner. He also received a watch from the company. 50 Years Ago – 1963 • Plans for the opening of the golf season early in April were made Tuesday night at a meeting of the board of directors of Delphos Country Club, Inc. The meeting was held at the clubhouse with the new president of the board, R. B. Rozelle, presiding. It was announced by club manager, Dick Miller, that dinners will be served at the club on Saturday and Sunday evenings by reservations. It was also announced that stag day dinners would continue as usual. • Obligation night was observed at the meeting of Crescent Temple, No. 50, Pythian Sisters held Tuesday night in the K of P Hall. During the meeting, Mrs. Winfred Teman was installed as manager. Bessie Heiss served as grand senior installing officer, Caroline Rice as grand manager and Mrs. Louis Redd was the grand installing officer. • The Delphos Jefferson Wildcats, trailing 44-38 at the three-quarter mark last night, came roaring back to outscore Columbus Grove 24-12 in the final home game of the season, 62-56. High point man in the game was Grove’s Don Hamilton who meshed 21 in the losers’ cause. For Jefferson, Ed Jackson had 16 and Ken Jackson and Gordie Vogt each had 15. 75 Years Ago — 1938 • The grade teachers and the senior band members will be guests of honor at a banquet to be given Monday at Jefferson School by the Delphos Band Parents Association. John Lloyd will be master of ceremonies for the program which includes: A song by Jefferson pupils Grace Feathers and Charles Swift; a piano solo by Robert Buchanan, Lincoln Building; a song by Marietta Curry, Franklin Building; a recitation by Jeannette Allemeier, Franklin School and the male quartet, K. W. Findley, Paul Harter, Carl Dienstberger and Gilbert Miller. • Two young teams, comprised of up-and-coming basketeers, met on St. John’s hardwood court Thursday afternoon before an enthusiastic student crowd. The eighth graders of St. John’s managed to eke out a 20-14 win over the strong Bockey School aggregation. E. Osting played a bang-up game for the Bockey team while Hageman turned in a neat game for St. John’s. • Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Gladen, East Third Street, were hosts to the members of the 1924 Five-hundred Club at their home Friday evening. Mrs. O. S. Schosker and Henry Imholt were high in cards and Mrs. Carl Gladen and Mr. Schosker were second high. In two weeks, the club will meet with Mr. and Mrs. Carl Gladen, S. Washington Street.

Senate Dems, GOP clash over need for new gun curbs

WASHINGTON (AP) — The toll of gun violence and the widespread disgust it has generated makes it time for new federal gun curbs that balance public safety with gun rights, Democrats said Tuesday at the Senate’s latest hearing on restricting firearms. Republicans said today’s unenforced gun laws give criminals no reason to fear ignoring them. And they warned that the Constitution’s right to bear arms must be protected, even after unspeakable events like the December slaughter of 20 first-graders in Connecticut. Each side trotted out their own legal experts, statistics and even relatives of people slain by gun-wielding assailants. In the end there was little partisan agreement, though Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said cooperation was possible on stopping straw purchases, in which someone legally buys a gun for a criminal or a person barred from owning one. As always with guns, emotion and the issue’s personal impact colored the day’s session. The crowded hearing room was filled with people from gun control groups and according to Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., included relatives of some killed in the Newtown, Conn., elementary school shootings. Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., chairman of the Senate Judiciary subcommittee holding the hearing, asked friends and families of gun victims to stand, and dozens rose. “We know that we have to act,” Durbin said. At another point, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., began his questioning of the panel’s first witness, Timothy J. Heaphy, the U.S. attorney for the western district of Virginia and an appointee of President Barack Obama, with one question: “Do you own a gun?” “No,” responded Heaphy, who said, “I do not feel comfortable having a gun in our home” because he has children.

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama said Tuesday he will bring home within a year about half of the 66,000 U.S. troops now in Afghanistan, shrinking the force to the size he found it when he entered the White House vowing to reinvigorate a stalemated war. More will leave the battlefield in 2014, he said, but he did not spell out what U.S. military presence would remain after 2014, when the U.S.led combat mission is scheduled to end. The stated goal is to prepare Afghanistan’s army and police to handle the Taliban insurgency largely on their own by then. Obama said that his war goals could be achieved by bringing 34,000 U.S. troops home by this time next year, leaving somewhere between 32,000 and 34,000 to support and train Afghan forces. That is about the number in Afghanistan when he took office in January 2009; in a series of moves designed to reverse the Taliban’s battlefield momentum, he tripled the total American force before starting to scale it back in the summer of 2011. Obama’s new move, announced in his State of the Union speech, coincides with a major shake-up in his war comBy ERICA WERNER The Associated Press

Senators take up immigration in first hearing
WASHINGTON — Senators are weighing one of President Barack Obama’s second-term priorities at the first Senate hearing on a comprehensive immigration overhaul. Many stubborn fault lines are sure to emerge. Today’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, which comes amid a concerted focus on immigration reform from the White House to Capitol Hill, was to feature testimony from Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and — in an unusual move for Congress — an illegal immigrant, Jose Antonio Vargas, a former journalist who founded the group Define American, which campaigns for immigration reform. The former head of America Online, Steve Case, also was on the witness list, along with Chris Crane, president of the immigration and customs’ workers union, which has opposed Obama’s immigration policies. The hearing comes a day after Obama, in his State of the Union address, renewed his call for sweeping immigration legislation that includes a pathway to citizenship for the nation’s estimated 11 million illegal immigrants. Meanwhile, a bipartisan group of eight senators has been meeting to develop a bill by next month that accomplishes eventual citizenship for illegal immigrants while also containing enough border security and enforcement measures to gain conservative support. The bipartisan Senate negotiators, including Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and John McCain, R-Ariz., are operating separately from the Senate Judiciary Committee, but the committee is expected to vote on any legislation they produce. In his opening statement for today’s hearing, Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., planned to emphasize the importance of a straightforward and attainable path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, including the youths known as “dreamers” brought here by their parents. “Comprehensive immigration reform must include a fair and straightforward path to citizenship for those ‘dreamers’ and families who have made the United States their home — the estimated 11 million undocumented people in the United States,” Leahy’s statement said. “I am troubled by any proposal that contains false promises in which citizenship is always over the next mountain. I want the pathway to be clear and the goal of citizenship attainable.” But with conservative lawmakers heavily represented on the panel, the hearing seemed likely to put into harsh perspective the difficulties of getting comprehensive legislation through Congress despite the commitment from Obama and many Republican leaders. A number of these leaders have come to view immigration legislation as a political imperative after November’s election, when Latino voters flocked to Obama and helped ensure his re-election. But that view has not been embraced by all rank-and-file Republicans. “The biggest obstacle we face to reform is this nation’s failure to establish lawfulness in the system,” a top committee Republican, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said after Obama’s State of the Union speech. “The president’s plan meets the desire of businesses for low-wage foreign workers while doing nothing to protect struggling American workers.”

er around the globe — from North Korea’s development of nuclear weapons to civil war in Syria to the worrisome spread of al-Qaida affiliated terrorist groups in the Middle East and North Africa. The White House said the president made his decision about 2013 troop reductions based on recommendations by the military and his national security advisers, as well as consultations with allies such as Britain and Germany and talks with Afghan President Hamid Karzai. The White House did not spell out the pace at which the 34,000 troops will be withdrawn over the coming year. Defense officials said it’s likely that the bulk of them will be kept through summer. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because details of the withdrawal had not been announced. Private analysts are divided on the wisdom of accelerating the withdrawal of American forces. Michael O’Hanlon of the Brookings Institution wrote that he believes the current U.S. troop level should remain until autumn, when a seasonal lull in Taliban activity usually begins. “The president should be patient with what happens over the next eight months,” O’Hanlon wrote in an opinion piece for Politico, adding that Dunford needs time to consolidate progress in eastern Afghanistan.

Moderately confused

WASHINGTON — Now is the time for all good women to pay homage to Betty Friedan, who 50 years ago wrote the game-changing manifesto “The Feminine Mystique.” With that book, Friedan helped propel a revolution led by, of all people, unhappy housewives. One feels silly even writing such a sentence, but revolutions have to start somewhere. Why not in the checkout line at the Piggly Wiggly? Or wherever Friedan, who was actually writing magazine stories the whole time she was bored, went to shop. Friedan did, indeed, identify and give shape to “the problem that has no name” — female angst born of privilege — but she also helped launch a flotilla of myths that have many women (and men) still scratching their heads. As her critics have noted, Friedan didn’t tackle any of the legal obstacles to women’s equality. Nor did she pay attention to women of color or members of the working class. She mostly noted that women like her — well-todo, well-educated and stifled by domestic bliss — wanted and deserved more. It simply wasn’t fair that men had fulfilling lives, intellectually and monetarily, while women were expected to find satisfaction in the latest invention

The feminist mystique at 50
KATHLEEN PARKER

aimed at whiter collars and cleaner toilet bowls. Anyone familiar with “The Stepford Wives” can grasp this notion. Thus, thousands of women like Friedan, recognizing themselves in her lament, charged out of their houses and into the streets. Doubtless I would have been a member of the stampede had I been of age, but as it happens, I was being raised by a widower and assumed that all men delighted in carpooling and cooking. How little I knew of the toils of sad, wealthy women. Thus, the feminist movement left the station without me except to the extent, as readers sometimes remind me, that I benefited from the protests of my foremothers. Indeed, I am grateful for the suffragists who thought my vote should be equal to any man’s. And I am thankful that the workplace into which I entered recognized my value. But the world in which I grew up never suggested otherwise. In all those years when Friedan and colleagues were demanding an equal rights amendment, I only heard

Point of View

words of encouragement from a lawyer/father who demanded much and often intoned: “An unnecessary law is always a bad law.” He never once suggested that a girl was in any way less capable than a boy in any arena (the combat exception was so obvious in a household of male warriors that no one bothered to debate it). The focus of most conversation was on simple principles: Hard work leads to accomplishment leads to self-respect. I could not divine a gender element to these truths. I also saw plenty of working women, including my pediatrician, as well as those who, despite having been professionals before becoming mothers, had chosen to run busy households. Nevertheless, I was marinating in a culture that was shifting and I was surely absorbing the zeitgeist. But members of my generation also were becoming unwitting hostages to myths that few were brave enough to challenge. My own skepticism came to full fruition the moment I became a mother. Unlike Friedan, I wasn’t tethered to home but to a job. Rather than resenting the prospect of staying home with a baby, I was stricken by the realization that I couldn’t. The “strange stirring, a sense of dissatisfaction, a yearn-

ing,” words Friedan used to describe thwarted ambition, was for me the sense of having abandoned my son. Revolutions are like children — eager and hopeful in the beginning, then, like teenagers, suddenly riotous and unruly. They have their own ideas about things and pick up friends who are bad influences. Sometimes they need to be spanked. Fine, OK, a timeout. Fifty years later, Friedan’s movement has reached full adulthood and, one hopes, is seeing a shrink. Among lessons gleaned from the couch is that maturation requires recognizing our mistakes and our own roles in unwelcome consequences. What worked for privileged, educated women hasn’t worked so well for those at the other end of the socioeconomic spectrum. And while women have the same need as men to lead meaningful lives, the feminist mystique’s great failing was in advancing the notion that caring for children posed an obstacle to self-realization. In a twist to delight The Fates, Friedan’s ultimate legacy may well be a stayat-home dad, grateful for the latest appliance that liberates him to carpool and make organic treats — squealing oui, oui, oui! all the way home.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Herald – 5

LANDMARK

Senior Citizens Center Delphos

Joe off work, helping at home
My husband Joe has been home the last three days, not having any work. Makes it a little harder on payday but we shouldn’t complain. God always provides a way if we keep our trust in him. Meanwhile, Joe has been kept busy here at home. Yesterday our two oldest girls, Elizabeth and Susan, were working and the six youngest were in school. Joe helped me do the laundry and then we made noodles the rest of the day. It is a good feeling to see a table full of noodles drying. My noodle maker gave up on us. It was a wedding gift from my brother Albert and his wife Sarah Irene. I guess it would be almost 20 years old already. It is hard to believe we will have our 20th anniversary in July. While we were making noodles we had company stop by. It was Joe’s cousin Leander, his wife Rosina and son and also two girls from their community in Rochester, Ind. It was a nice surprise but we were glad they stopped in even if their visit was short. Joe and Leander grew up together and have a lot of fun memories to recall. Joe is always glad for a chance to visit with Leander. There is a new family moving into our community and they were assisting them in unloading their belongings. Daughter Susan is baking monster cookies. We will take 100 of them to the family gathering on Saturday. Joe’s sister Salome and Morris are hosting a late family Christmas. We will all get together for a 10:30 a.m. carry-in brunch. This will be a 2-hour journey for us. Our plans are to start out around 6:30 a.m. Joe has 8 sisters and 3 brothers and we hope they will all be able to attend. We hope for good weather and safe roads. We had still been having some snow days and cold weather this week. A happy birthday goes to Susan’s friend Mose who’s birthday was on Tuesday, Feb. 5. Susan prepared a birthday supper for Mose and his family here at home to take along in honor of his birthday. Since Joe was home from work he offered to grill the chicken for her. Susan was really glad she did not have to grill the meat in the cold weather. Joe doesn’t mind and he enjoys grilling. We had the grill close by the walk-out basement doors. He could step inside and warm up. Tuesday Joe also took a buggy ride over to visit with brother-in-law Jacob. Jacob’s arthritis was fired up keeping him home from work for a few days. Joe asked me to go along for the ride but I had dough rising for bread cinnamon rolls that needed taken care of. It would have been nice to have gotten out of the

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR OF
TODAY 4 p.m. — Delphos Public Library board members meet at the library conference room. 6 p.m. — Shepherds of Christ Associates meet in the St. John’s Chapel. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. THURSDAY 9-11 a.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Shop is open for shopping. 8 p.m. — American Legion Post 268, 415 N. State St. FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.

EVENTS

house for awhile. It would be nice to have a heater hooked up in our buggy which would make for warmer trips to town and back. Although we are already a lot warmer in our covered buggies than the open ones we used to drive when we lived in Indiana. I had a letter from cousin Lydia asking for family information. She is putting together a family record book of my mother’s family. I am excited to see it when it is finished. We were 88 grandchildren so it is hard to keep track of where everyone lives and how many children they have. Although there will be a lot of sad changes since the last book like this was made in 2004. We’ve had quite a few deaths since the last book was made. But we’ve also had some happy additions. Our youngest child, Kevin, wasn’t born yet when that book was made. Try this meat coating for breading your meat. It can be used on chicken, pork, or steaks. What isn’t used can be sealed and stored for later use. MEAT COATING 4 cups wheat flour 2 teaspoons onion salt 2 teaspoons garlic salt 2 tablespoons sugar 4 tablespoons salt 3 tablespoons paprika 4 cups crushed soda crackers Mix all ingredients well. Coat your favorite meat with this and prepare as usual. Store in an air-tight container.

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CAMPUS NOTE

Richmond named to dean’s list
Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Ind., named Hannah Richmond to the dean’s list for the fall 2012 semester. Richmond is the daughter of James and

Bidlack on Kettering dean’s list

Colleen Richmond of Spencerville. To earn academic honors, a student must achieve a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.6, have at least 12 graded credit hours.

Kettering College has announced an area students has been named to the school’s dean’s list for the fall semester 2012. Dean’s list students must have completed at least 12 total credit hours and have a minimum grade-point average of 3.5. Stephanie Ann Bidlack of Fort Jennings is on the list.

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SATURDAY 9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos Project Recycle at Delphos Fuel and Wash. 9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. St. Vincent DePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School parking lot, is open. 10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal The Putnam County District Library in Ottawa has Commission Museum, 241 N. announced the following upcoming events at its location: Main St., is open. Family Fun Movie Night at the Library 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. The library will show Hotel Transylvania at 6 p.m. on Feb. John’s Little Theatre. 26. All are welcome to see this free movie. SUNDAY This program is sponsored by The Friends of the Putnam 8-11:30 a.m. — Knights County District Library. For any questions call the Ottawa of Columbus benefit for St. Library at 419-523-3747. John’s School at the hall, Jewelry Making Class Elida Ave. The library will host a Jewelry Making Class at 6:30 p.m. 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos on March 11. Canal Commission Museum, Join Pat Kern and make a pair of earrings to take home. 241 N. Main St., is open. There is a $15 fee and participants must register; class size is limited. MONDAY Call the Ottawa Library at 419-523-3747. 11:30 a.m. — The Green Visit mypcdl.org for more programs. Thumb Garden Club will

Ottawa library to host movie, jewelry-making

Happy Birthday
FEB. 14 Michael Krolak Kim Wagoner Merle Harruff Andrew Aldrich Danielle Harman

meet at the Delphos Public Library for luncheon and program. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 6:30 p.m. — Shelter from the Storm support group meets in the Delphos Public Library basement. 7 p.m. — Washington Township Trustees meet at the township house. Delphos City Council meets at the Delphos Municipal Building, 608 N. Canal St. 7:30 p.m. — Jefferson Athletic Boosters meet at the Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth St.

6 – The Herald

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

LadyCats survive vs. St. John’s
By JIM METCALFE jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com KALIDA — Offense in the St. John’s at Kalida girls basketball contest was at a premium Tuesday night is one way to look at it as both teams were as cold as the weather outside. The other way was that defenses ruled the day and made it difficult for K. Vorst the offenses to get any clean looks. As usual, somewhere in the middle was the reality as the LadyCats survived a 29-23 victory over the Lady Blue Jays at The Wildcat Den. The stats don’t lie: the Blue Jays (8-13) canned a cold 9-of-35 shots (2-of-14 downtown) for 25.7 percent versus Kalida’s full-court trapping defense and man half-court scheme versus a slightly “warmer” 10-of35 for the LadyCats (13-7), including 5-of-17 3-balls, for 28.6 percent against the Jays’ man-to-man. The Jays, who had only three players score: senior Katie Vorst (11 points, 7 boards), senior Jessica Recker (8 counters) and freshman Sydney Fischbach (4); never led in this game, although there was one tie. “We continue to struggle with confidence, not only in ourselves but in our teammates. We just don’t seem to trust each other right in what we’re doing,” Jays mentor Dan J. Grothouse noted. “We need to keep working at that but it’s been a struggle all season with that. You have to play with confidence on offense, not only with what you’re doing with the ball but in believing in your teammates. Simply put, you have to have more than three score.” For Kalida coach Adam Huber, it was survival. “We might have been emotionally drained after a big league win versus Leipsic Saturday; it so, we have to be able to bounce back better,” Huber explained. “You just know St. Recker John’s is going to come in, play hard and make things tough for you; they are too well-prepared defensively. We didn’t get much going consistently at the offensive end. At best, we managed to survive.” Kalida scored first at 6:01 when senior Summer Holtkamp (7 counters, 3 dimes) hit a 6-footer in the lane and she followed shortly after with another basket. The Jays, who shot a cold 1-of-9 in the period, scored their only basket at 2:50 when Recker swished a triple from the right side. Kalida, who was 3-of-11 shooting, took a 6-3 edge with 2.1 ticks left when senior Amy Smith hit a running 10-foot banker from the right side. Kalida has six of their 14 total miscues in the period, while the Jays had four (13 overall). After the LadyCats got a 3-ball from sophomore Nicole Recker (9 markers on 3 treys) and another from sophomore Jackie Gardner (7 counters, 6 boards, 3 steals) in their first two possessions of the second period, the Jays, thanks to their defense, rallied despite the offense only getting three shots. Recker canned a deuce at 5:51, Vorst two singles at 4:00 and Recker a long ball from the right wing at 1:59 to get within 12-10. Kalida closed the half up 14-10 courtesy of a baseline 12-footer from junior Elizabeth Turnwald at 26 seconds. The third period saw the offenses fall all but silent. The Jays were 2-of-12 versus Kalida’s 1-of-9. The only scores came at 4:36 — Vorst inside; Kalida freshman Kylie Osterhage on a putback at 3:20; and Fischbach on a transition layin at the 12-second mark; to make the score 16-14, Kalida. Fischbach took a high-low lob from Vorst for a deuce to tie the contest at 16 with 6:39 showing. However, the LadyCats hit three treys on their next four possessions: Holtkamp at 5:03 and Recker at 4:09 and 3:20; around a Vorst power-dribble basket at 3:38; to put the Maroon and White up 25-18. That forced the Jays to start fouling in this cleanly-played game — up to that point. Kalida managed to hit 4-of-8 singles in the final 1:52 (4-of-10 overall for 40%) around five markers from Vorst to close the game. In toto, St. John’s was a perfect 3-of-3 on free throws; nabbed 25 caroms (7 offensive) as junior Emilie Fischbach added six; and amassed 13 turnovers and 15 fouls. They visit New Bremen Thursday to close the regular season. “We play our butts off defensively; we do everything we can to hold teams down. We got hurt tonight rebounding, giving up too many second shots,” Grothouse added. “Unfortunately, we’re not rewarding ourselves on the other end. It’s frustrating to play so hard on one end and not take advantage at the other.” Kalida ended up with 29 boards, 10 offensive, as Smith had seven; 14 miscues; and nine fouls. They host Continental Thursday. “Both teams played awful-

SPORTS

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ly hard defensively; nothing was easy. We both pride ourselves on that fact,” Huber added. “We got senior Julia Vandemark back a week ago against Holgate from an injury. She has played in three games and has extended her minutes each time as she gets in better shape. She gives us experienced leadership and another ballhandler. When everyone else now has tired legs and is banged up, she brings fresh legs.” In junior varsity action, Kalida outscored St. John’s 7-4 in overtime to grab a 30-27 triumph. The LadyCats (16-4) outscored the Blue Jays (7-13) 12-0 in the fourth to force the extra session. Kennedy Hoffman led the victors with nine. Colleen Schulte dropped 16 (3 bombs) for the visitors.
VARSITY ST. JOHN’S (23) Tara Vorst 0-0-0, Emilie Fischbach 0-0-0, Brooke Zuber 0-0-0, Rebekah Fischer 0-0-0, Katie Vorst 4-3-11, Erica Saine 0-0-0, Jessica Recker 3-0-8, Amanda Boberg 0-0-0, Sydney Fischbach 2-0-4. Totals 7-2-3/3-23. KALIDA (29) Jackie Gardner 1-4-7, Nicole Recker 3-0-9, Summer Holtkamp 3-0-7, Julia Vandemark 0-0-0, Nicole Recker 0-0-0, Amy Smith 1-02, Elizabeth Turnwald 1-0-2, Kristi Honigfort 0-0-0, Kylie Osterhage 1-02, Brittany Kahle0-0-0. Totals 5-54/10-29. Score by Quarters: St. John’s 3 7 4 9 - 23 Kalida 6 8 2 13 - 29 Three-point goals: St. John’s, Recker 2; Kalida, Recker 3, Gardner, Holtkamp. ——JUNIOR VARSITY ST. JOHN’S (27) Rachel Pohlman 2-0-4, Emilie Grothouse 3-0-7, Maddie Pohlman 0-0-0, Ashlyn Troyer 0-0-0, Sam Kramer 0-1-1, Samantha Wehri 0-0-0, Colleen Schulte 4-5-15. Totals 5-45/10-27. KALIDA (30) Laine Laudick 1-0-2, Katelyn Siebeneck 0-0-0, Allison Recker 3-17, Joni Kaufman 1-3-5, Nicole Reindel 0-1-1, Kiersten Recker 0-0-0, Kylie Siebeneck 0-0-0, Cathy Basinger 1-02, Kennedy Hoffman 2-5-9, Makenna Vorst 2-0-4. Totals 10-0-10/15-30. Score by Quarters: St. John’s 3 16 4 0 (4) - 27 Kalida 6 3 2 12 (7) - 30 Three-point goals: St. John’s, Schulte 3, Grothouse; Kalida, none.

Big second half propels Panthers over Big Green
By BOB WEBER The Delphos Herald btzweber@bright.net OTTOVILLE – The McComb Panthers, under the direction of head coach Aaron Roth, traveled down Route 224 to take on the Ottoville Big Green in a nonleague boys basketball game Tuesday night. The game was a tale of two halves, with the Big Green roaring out of the gate to take a 26-15 lead at halftime. T h a t changed in the second half as the D. Schimmoeller Panthers outscored the home team 28-13 in the second half to come away with a 43-39 win. Tuesday night marked the final time several seniors for the Big Green performed in the L.W. Heckman Gymnasium. Derek Schimmoeller, Ryan Honigford and Cory Fischer played their last home game in front of the Big Green faithful. Kendra Koester, Marissa Pohlabel, Brittany Foster, Alyssa DeLong and Mascot Alex Justel cheered for the final time at home. Logan Gable, Kara Hoersten, Tori Jackson, Kendra Koester, Paige Lucas, Audrey Rieger, Abby Siefker, Jacob Turnwald, Rachel Turnwald and Zach Weber played their last songs for the Big Green pep band on this evening. The first half, it looked like everything: from the basketball team, to the cheerleader’s routines, to the notes coming from the pep band; were right on target as the Big Green charged out to a 9-5 lead after the first quarter and followed it up with a 17-point second quarter to send the Panthers to the locker room at halftime trailing 26-15. Honigford (12 points) and junior Luke Schimmoeller (9 points) led the Big Green in scoring in the half. The Big Green stymied the Panthers’ attack the entire half as they held the Panthers’ leading scorer, senior Jerry Brown, to only two points in the half. The Panthers stayed within striking range in the half behind three 3-pointers from junior Taylor Reardon. Whatever Coach Roth said to his squad at halftime really had his team ready to play heading into the second half. The Panthers stormed back in the third quarter as they outscored the Big Green 19-7 and were able to take the lead at 34-33 at the quarter break. They were 8-of-9 from the field and 2-of-2 from

Lady Lancers knock off Musketeers RURAL MIDDLE POINT — The Fort Jennings girls basketball team was looking to build off its big win over Jefferson Monday night when they invaded The Lancerdome of Lincolnview High School Tuesday night in a makeup game with the Lady Lancers. Didn’t happen. The host Lancers came away with a 58-42 nonleague win. Sophomore guard Julia Thatcher and senior center Kaitlyn Brant each scored 11 to lead Lincolnview in the scoring column; the pair was followed by senior guards Katie Dye and Kaylee Thatcher, who both scored nine. Emily Kehres topped the visitors with 10 points and Macy Schroeder and Gabbi German nine each. Ashley Gable tossed in eight. The Lady Lancers took a 14-10 lead after a quarter of play and led 25-20 at the break. Lincolnview gradually pulled away in the second half and was not outscored in any quarter on the night. The Lady Lancers shot 52.4 (22-of-42) on the night, including 3-of-4 downtown, to Fort Jennings’ 38.1 percent (16-of-42). The Lady Lancers won the battle of the boards 19-15 (8-8 offensively) — Brant led the hosts with five, while Kehres also had five for the Musketeers — and the turnovers 17-21. The Lady Lancers scored 16 bench points to the Lady Musketeers four. Jennings (8-13) shot 9-of13 free throws (69.2%) versus 11-of-18 for the hosts (61.1%). Schroeder added four steals and three dimes. The win improves Lincolnview to 16-5 on the season and they host Spencerville Thursday for the regular-season finale and a chance to claim second place in the NWC. Jennings visits Miller City for its annual Friday night finale. FORT JENNINGS (42)
Macy Schroeder 2-1-2-9, Ashley Gable 3-0-2-8, Cassie Lindeman 1-0-0-2, Gabbi German 4-0-1-9, Erin Osting

Local Roundup

T-Birds rout Bearcats SPENCERVILLE — Lima Central Catholic put a quartet in double digits, led by the 23 of Meredith Shepherd, to bounce Spencerville 76-43 in Northwest Conference girls action Tuesday at Spencerville. Sydney Santaguida added 17 and Kayla Verhoff and Elizabeth Taflinger 10 each for the Lady Thunderbirds (10-11, 4-4 NWC). Shepherd added 12 boards for a doubledouble. Guiding the Lady Bearcats (3-18, 2-6 NWC) was Schylar Miller with 10. Spencerville won the junior varsity game 23-16 in overtime (2 quarters of regular play) to drop LCC to 10-10. Spencerville visits Lincolnview Thursday to finish the regular season.
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC (76) Meredith Shepherd 6-2-5-23, Sydney Santaguida 7-1-0-17, Sydney Mohler 4-0-0-8, Elizabeth Kidd 1-1-0-5, Kayla Verhoff 2-2-010, Elizabeth Taflinger 5-0-0-10, Shelby Warner 0-0-0-0, Shanna Farler 0-0-0-0, Sydney Zerante 0-0-0-0, Lauren Dardio 0-0-3-3. Totals 25/59-6/11-8/20-76. SPENCERVILLE (43) Alyssa Mulholland 5, Abby Freewalt 5, Karri Purdy 9, Schylar Miller 10, Katie Merriman 2, Megan Miller 4, Emilee Meyer 2, Jacey Grigsby 6. Score by Quarters: Lima CC 23-19-22-12 — 76 Spencerville 10-11-15- 7 — 43 JV score: Spencerville 23-16. ——-

1-0-0-2, Emily Kehres 4-0-2-10, Gina Stechschulte 0-0-2-2. Totals 15-1-9-42. LINCOLNVIEW (58) Kaylee Thatcher 3-1-0-9, Claire Dye 1-1-0-5, Katie Dye 1-1-4-9, Julia Thatcher 5-0-111, Hannah McCleery 3-0-0-6, Christine Stemen 1-0-3-5, Ashley Teman 1-0-0-2, Kaitlyn Brant 4-03-11. Totals 19-3-11-58. Score by Quarters: Ft. Jennings 10 10 13 9 - 42 Lincolnview 14 11 18 15 - 58 JV score: 46-41 (Fort Jennings). ——-

BELLEFONTAINE (45) AJ Gorham 11, Matt Gump 10, Logan Mitchell 10, Tristin Tillman 6, Mox Oyer 5, Jake Kennedy 3. Totals 19-2-45. ELIDA (56) Aric Thompson 18, Dakota Mathias 12, Austin Allemeier 10, Marquevious Wilson 8, Louis Gray 5, Max Stambaugh 3. Totals 20-8-56. Score by Quarters: Bellefontaine 10 16 7 12 - 45 Elida 9 15 13 19 - 56 Three-point goals: Bellefontaine, Gorham 3, Gump, Kennedy; Elida, Thompson 3, Mathias 2, Wilson, Gray, Stambaugh. JV score: 53-50 (Bellefontaine) ——-

AJ Gorham was tops for Bellefontaine (10-10) with 11, while Matt Gump and Logan Mitchell added 10 each. Elida visits Celina Friday night.

Bulldogs bounce Bellefontaine ELIDA — Elida’s boys basketball team handed visiting Bellefontaine a 56-45 loss Tuesday night in nonleague action on the Union Bank Court of the Elida Fieldhouse. Aric Thompson led the Bulldogs (12-8) with 18 markers, while Dakota Mathias was held to 12 and Austin Allemeier added 10.

Benjamin joins 1,000point club as Spartans down Lady Cougs By JIM COX DHI Correspondent sports@timesbulletin.com LIMA - For 25 minutes Tuesday night, a feisty bunch of underdogs from Van Wert gave Lima Senior all it could handle. Then came the last seven. The Lady Spartans started that with a 17-3 run to turn a 45-44 Cougar lead into a 61-48 deficit. After that, it was only a matter of time. Lima is now 13-8, while Van Wert falls to 9-12. Senior started the fourth period with a 44-43 lead but Van Wert’s Alexa Dunlap muscled in a putback to make it 45-44, Cougars. That’s when the roof caved in on the Cougs. The Spartans’ lone senior, Stacia Allen, hit 1-of2 free throws, then canned consecutive threes from each wing — 51-45 at 5:53. Then the other half of Lima’s 1-2 punch of 1,000-point scorers, Indiya Benjamin, took over, starting with a dandy runner from the foul-line area. Van Wert’s Erin Morrow stopped the bleeding with a trey from the right wing but Spartan Imara Haynes followed with a breakaway layup. Then Benjamin scored on a breakaway and hit both ends of a 1-and-1. Lima freshman Essence Cowan hit two freebies — 61-48 at 2:37. Morrow ended the run with another three but by then the outcome was no longer in

doubt. The big question as the game started was how soon Benjamin, only a junior, would get her fifth point of the game and the 1,000th of her career. As it turned out, it would take awhile. The Spartans hit four 3-pointers in the first quarter — two by Allen and two by freshman Caterrion Thompson. Van Wert sophomore Alexis Dowdy’s three buckets kept the Cougars close in the early going. Cheyenne Handy came off the bench to hit a slashing layup and two free throws late, followed by a trey by another sub, Emilie Moonshower, to give Van Wert a 15-14 lead after one. Benjamin got her 998th point on a 3-pointer from the right wing with 7:04 left in the second period and her 1,000th on a 15-foot turnaround jumper from the right wing at 3:28. The game was stopped at that point to present her with the ball and to announce that she had just become the sixth Lady Spartan to reach the coveted plateau. Allen had been the fifth earlier this season. Alexa Dunlap scored seven second-period points to lead a 17-12 quarter that had the visitors up 32-26 at the break. Although the Cougs missed a few bunnies during those 16 minutes, they couldn’t have played much better. At that point, Van Wert had outshot the Spartans from the field 44 percent (12of-27) to 33 percent (10-of30) and even had a surprising 20-13 rebounding edge. Those numbers would turn around drastically in the second half, however. Benjamin started the third quarter by splitting a pair at the line but the Cougs followed that with consecutive layups by Hannah Hulbert and Claire Butler, both via Morrow assists — 36-27 at the 6:26 mark. Then came the first of two fatal Van Wert lulls. Lima whipped off 10 straight points in two minutes to take a 37-36 lead, after which the lead went back and forth until Livia Butler’s 15-foot baseliner gave the Cougars a 44-43 lead after three. See ROUNDUP, page 8

the stripe during the period. Brown’s 10 points led the way for the visitors. The final period of play saw both teams struggling to put the ball in the hoop. Both teams had numerous changes to either ice the game or cut the deficit from the charity stripe. With the Panthers stretching out their lead during the fourth quarter, the Big Green was forced to foul to stay in the R. Honigford game. The Panthers struggled in three consecutive chances to connect on opportunities from the line. The Big Green, however, did not take advantage of their opportunities, either, turning the ball over four times in the period in helping the Panthers escape with a 4-point win. Fischer The Big Green (8-12) was led in scoring by Honigford and Luke Schimmoeller with 15 points each. The home team was 15-50 (30%) from the field, 6-9 (67%) from the foul line, hauled in 22 rebounds (Luke Schimmoeller 9) and committed only eight turnovers (4 in the final quarter of play). The Pirates (11-9) were led in scoring by Brown and Reardon with 16 and 11 points, respectively. The visitors were 16-38 (42%) from the field, 7-10 (70%) from the charity stripe, hauled down 29 rebounds and turned the ball over 11 times. The JV contest was won by Ottoville in overtime, 25-22. Ottoville visits Leipsic 7 p.m. (varsity only) Saturday.
VARSITY McComb (43) Taylor Reardon 0-3-2-11, Dalton Buck 1-0-1-3, Cody Wilson 3-0-1-7, Jerry Brown 6-1-1-16, Clay Grubb 2-02-6, Schroeder 0-0-0-0, Dysert 0-0-00, Schrop 0-0-0-0. Totals 12-4-7-43. Ottoville (37) Derek Schimmoeller 0-0-3-3, Ryan Honigford 5-2-1-17, Austin Honigford 0-0-0-0, Brandt Landin 1-0-1-3, Luke Schimmoeller 7-0-1-15, Tyler Roby 0-1-0-3, Cory Fischer 0-0-0-0. Totals 12-3-6-39. Score by Quarters: McComb 5-10-19-9 — 43 Ottoville 9-17- 7-6 — 39 ——JUNIOR VARSITY McComb (22) Blake Glaser 1-0-0-2, Drew Siferd 1-1-0-5, Andrew Adams 1-0-1-3, Chas Shoop 1-0-1-3, Travis Clark 2-0-0-4, Trey Hanes 1-1-0-5. Totals 7-2-2-22. Ottoville (25) Brendon Schnipke 3-1-1-10, Tyler Roby 2-2-1-11, Matthew Turnwald 0-00-0, Dustin Trenkamp 2-0-0-4, Rudy Wenzlick 0-0-0-0. Totals 7-3-2-25. Score by Quarters: McComb 14- 4- 4 — 22 Ottoville 2-16- 7 — 25

3B Scott Rolen chooses not to attend Reds camp
By GARY SCHATZ The Associated Press GOODYEAR, Ariz. — Third baseman Scott Rolen declined the Cincinnati Reds’ offer to attend spring training but stopped short of saying he’s ready to retire. The 7-time All-Star informed the team of his decision on Tuesday, when Reds pitchers and catchers reported for the start of camp. Rolen, who turns 38 on April 4, had been mulling an offer to fill a reserve role with the NL Central champions. He’s been limited each of the last three seasons by chronic problems with his left shoulder and back spasms. “Right now, I’m simply not ready to make a commitment,” Rolen wrote in a statement released by the team. “I would like to leave my options open, without closing any doors. I am looking forward to all of the challenges, both personally and professionally, I will face in the future.” Rolen became a free agent after last season, when he batted .245 in 92 games with eight homers and 39 RBIs. He missed time with the shoulder and back problems. Todd Frazier is set to take over at third base this season but the Reds offered Rolen a chance to stay in a reduced role. “It’s tough for me because

he’s a good guy to talk to every day about third base,” Frazier said after learning of Rolen’s decision. “I understand he wants to be with his family or whatever he wants to do. All the best to him. But I’d like him to be here so I could get more knowledge from him, for sure.” Rolen’s arrival in Cincinnati coincided with the Reds’ resurgence. General manager Walt Jocketty traded for Rolen midway through the 2009, bringing in a veteran leader for a young team. The Reds won the NL Central two of the last three years, with Rolen becoming one of the clubhouse’s leaders. “Scott made significant contributions to our team’s recent success and it isn’t a coincidence we made the playoffs in two of his three full seasons here,” Jocketty said. Manager Dusty Baker said Rolen’s absence would be felt deeply. “It would be like losing a member of the family,” Baker added. “He was a leader. Whenever you lose a leader like that, someone else comes along to take over. We don’t know who that is but a leader will come out.” Rolen is the only third baseman in major-league history to get at least 2,000 hits, 500 doubles, 300 homers, See ROLEN, page 7

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The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct New York 32 17 .653 Brooklyn 30 22 .577 Boston 27 24 .529 Philadelphia 22 28 .440 Toronto 20 32 .385 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 35 14 .714 Atlanta 28 22 .560 Washington 15 35 .300 Orlando 15 36 .294 Charlotte 12 39 .235 Central Division W L Pct Indiana 31 21 .596 Chicago 30 21 .588 Milwaukee 25 25 .500 Detroit 20 33 .377 Cleveland 16 36 .308 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 41 12 .774 Memphis 33 18 .647 Houston 29 25 .537 Dallas 22 29 .431 New Orleans 18 34 .346 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 39 1 3 .750 — Denver 33 20 .623 Utah 29 24 .547 Portland 25 27 .481 Minnesota 19 30 .388

NBA GLANCE
GB — 3 1/2 6 10 1/2 13 1/2 GB — 7 1/2 20 1/2 21 24 GB — 1/2 5 11 1/2 15

GB — 7 12 1/2 18 22 1/2 GB 6 1/2 10 1/2 14 18 1/2

The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts New Jersey 13 8 2 3 19 Pittsburgh 13 8 5 0 16 N.Y. Rangers 12 7 5 0 14 Philadelphia 14 6 7 1 13 N.Y. Islanders 12 4 7 1 9 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Boston 11 8 1 2 18 Ottawa 13 7 4 2 16 Toronto 13 8 5 0 16 Montreal 12 7 4 1 15 Buffalo 14 5 8 1 11 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Carolina 12 7 4 1 15 Tampa Bay 12 6 5 1 13 Winnipeg 12 5 6 1 11 Florida 12 4 6 2 10 Washington 13 4 8 1 9

NHL GLANCE
GF 35 41 33 34 36 GF 32 33 39 35 39 GF 38 46 32 30 36 GA 28 32 30 40 43 GA 25 23 33 33 48 GA 36 36 40 46 46 Pacific Division GP Anaheim 12 San Jose 13 Dallas 13 Phoenix 13 Los Angeles 11

Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 37 17 .685 — Golden State 30 22 .577 6 L.A. Lakers 25 28 .472 11 1/2 Sacramento 19 34 .358 17 1/2 Phoenix 17 36 .321 19 1/2 ——— Monday’s Results Minnesota 100, Cleveland 92 Charlotte 94, Boston 91 L.A. Clippers 107, Philadelphia 90 Brooklyn 89, Indiana 84, OT New Orleans 105, Detroit 86 San Antonio 103, Chicago 89 Washington 102, Milwaukee 90 Atlanta 105, Dallas 101 Tuesday’s Results Toronto 109, Denver 108 Miami 117, Portland 104 Memphis 108, Sacramento 101 Utah 109, Oklahoma City 94 Houston 116, Golden State 107 L.A. Lakers 91, Phoenix 85 Today’s Games San Antonio at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at New York, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Portland at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Miami at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

No. 8 Michigan State routs No. 4 Michigan 75-52
By LARRY LAGE The Associated Press EAST LANSING, Mich. — Michigan State has muddled through much of its season, finding ways to win games short on style with gritty substance. The eighth-ranked Spartans, though, showed their potential in an impressive 75-52 win over No. 4 Michigan on Tuesday night in the rivalry’s first matchup of top 10 teams. “The sky is the limit,” guard Keith Appling said. If Michigan State can play anything like it did against the Wolverines, Appling might be right. The Spartans (21-4, 10-2 Big Ten) broke a first-place tie in the conference with No. 1 Indiana, which plays at Michigan State next Tuesday after the Spartans try to avoid a letdown Saturday night at Nebraska. Appling acknowledged he was a little bit surprised by the lopsided victory — the school’s largest since beating Michigan by 27 points in 2002 — but shrugged off the significance of it with much of the regular season remaining. “We just have to take it for what it is and prepare for our next game,” Appling added. The Wolverines (21-4, 8-4) have lost 3-of-4 but the closely-contested setbacks on the road against the Hoosiers and at Wisconsin were nothing like the latest when they were held to a season-low points total. “They bullied us — point blank,” said Tim Hardaway Jr., who matched a career low with two points. Michigan State didn’t trail once, led by as many as 16 points in the first half and enjoyed 30-point leads in the second. “We probably played our best game in three years,” Spartans coach Tom Izzo said. “And they probably played one of their worst.” Michigan coach John Beilein agreed. “That was the worst we’ve played in a long, long time and credit Michigan State for that,” he said. Burke scored 18 points for the Wolverines and didn’t get much help from his teammate offensively, or defensively. Hardaway Jr. was held scoreless until making a layup in the opening minute of the second half — after turning down Beilein’s suggestion to work on his shot during halftime warmups — and didn’t score again. Hardaway was 1-of-11 from the field. Glen Robinson III was 1-of-4 and scored two points to match his season low. The Wolverines, who pride themselves on taking care of the basketball, had a seasonhigh 16 turnovers and didn’t have much success getting the ball away from the turnoverprone Spartans. Michigan made fewer than 40 percent of its shots and scored one fewer point than it did in a threepoint loss at Ohio State. Everything went right for Michigan State, which had just eight turnovers and made 48-plus percent of its shots. Gary Harris scored 17 points, making five 3-pointers, and Derrick Nix had his way on the inside, scoring 14 points as part of a balanced offense. Appling had 11 points and Branden Dawson scored 10 before leaving the court late in the game because Michigan’s Mitch McGary hit him in the face inadvertently with his right arm. Izzo said Dawson got hit in the nose and had a cut on his lip. Matt Costello scored a season-high eight points and fellow freshman Denzel Valentine had seven points to help Michigan State win its second straight in the series after losing three in a row following a run of dominance for the Spartans. White-clad fans in the stands were fired up before the game even started and they stayed enthusiastic, standing for much of the game, because the home team gave them plenty of reasons to cheer from start to finish. In the first matchup of 20-win teams in Division I basketball this season, Michigan State showed it might not be rebuilding this season. Michigan, meanwhile, has been humbled since being ranked No. 1 last month for the first time since the 1992-93 season.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Herald — 7

W 9 7 7 6 4

L 2 3 5 5 5

OT Pts 1 19 3 17 1 15 2 14 2 10

GF 42 36 30 35 26

GA 33 29 29 35 32

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Chicago 13 10 0 3 23 Nashville 13 6 3 4 16 Detroit 12 7 4 1 15 St. Louis 12 6 5 1 13 Columbus 13 4 7 2 10 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts Vancouver 12 8 2 2 18 Edmonton 13 5 5 3 13 Minnesota 13 6 6 1 13 Calgary 10 3 4 3 9 Colorado 11 4 6 1 9

GF 44 25 33 39 30 GF 35 29 27 26 23

GA 28 26 32 40 41 GA 25 34 32 35 29

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Results Minnesota 2, Calgary 1, SO Toronto 5, Philadelphia 2 Carolina 6, N.Y. Islanders 4 Columbus 6, San Jose 2 Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 1 Phoenix 3, Colorado 2, OT Tuesday’s Results N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, SO Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3, SO Anaheim 3, Chicago 2, SO Carolina 4, New Jersey 2 Ottawa 2, Buffalo 0 Washington 6, Florida 5, OT Philadelphia 3, Winnipeg 2 Nashville 1, San Jose 0, OT Dallas 4, Edmonton 1 Vancouver 2, Minnesota 1 Today’s Games Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m. Washington at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

LeBron on a roll unlike any in NBA history
James added. “Like I say over and over, I know the history of the game. I know how many MIAMI — When LeBron unbelievable players who James first heard about this came through the ranks, who streak of games with at least 30 paved the way for me and my points and 60 percent shooting, teammates. he did not immediately think “And for me to be in the about who was on the list. record books by myself with He thought about who such a stat — any stat — it’s wasn’t. big-time.” Wilt Chamberlain? Not Dwyane Wade added 24 there. Michael Jordan? Not points for Miami, which wastthere. Shaquille O’Neal? Not ed a pair of 14-point leads — there, either. In NBA his- then put the game away with tory, only Adrian Dantley a 14-0 run in the final minutes. and Moses Malone had put Ray Allen added 14 for Miami. together five straight 30-point, Damian Lillard had a game60-percent efforts — that is, high 33 points for Portland, until James joined their super- which got 29 from LaMarcus exclusive club. Aldridge and 20 from Wesley And now, he stands alone. Matthews. Just like the Heat, James scored 30 points on the Blazers also saw a 14-point 11-for-15 shooting to get into lead slip away in the game and the NBA record books, Chris then simply got shut down late Bosh scored 32 points and by a stretch of airtight Miami grabbed 11 rebounds and the defense. Miami Heat wound up beat“That was typical Miami ing the Portland Trail Blazers Heat stuff,” Lillard said. 117-104 in a wild, momentum- “Transition, finishing strong swinging game Tuesday night. around the rim and LeBron “It kind of blew my mind,” picking defenses apart.” James said. “To see how small Pretty good assessment the list was and for me to even from the rookie. For as great be a part of the list, to start off, as he was, it was James’ night. it’s like, ‘Wow’.” And on a night when “Wow” doesn’t even come the teams took turns putting close to summing up how he’s together big runs, it was the been in the last six games. Heat who had the last rally He’s shot 66-for-92 — and — ultimately, the last laugh take away a “slow” 6-for-12 as well. start at Toronto on Feb. 3, he’s With the game tied at 99, made 60 of his last 80 field- James drove baseline on forgoal tries, a ridiculous 75 per- mer Cleveland teammate cent success rate. He’s scored Sasha Pavlovic for a 2-handed either 30, 31 or 32 points in all slam that he punctuated with a six of these games. long scream. His latest brilliance came in The Heat immediately Miami’s 1,000th regular-sea- responded. Matthews made a son win. But the only history 3-pointer on the next Portland anyone will remember was possession to give the Trail what James accomplished. Blazers their last lead. Miami “I’m at a loss for words,” scored the next 14 points and when James got loose for a dunk with 2:38 remaining, the 30-point mark — and history shoulder was never going to — was his. get back to normal. He also Bosh made a jumper with missed 17 games because of 1:55 left to end the run and seal back spasms. the win, Miami’s sixth straight Latos, Reds agree to overall. $11.5M, 2-year deal: RightMiami next plays Thursday hander Mat Latos has agreed night in Oklahoma City, an to an $11.5 million, 2-year contract with the Cincinnati Reds, NBA Finals rematch before avoiding what would have been heading into the All-Star break. baseball’s first salary arbitration The Heat topped the Thunder hearing of the year. in the first meeting of the clubs Latos will receive salaries of this season, winning in Miami $4.25 million this year and $7.25 on Christmas Day. million in 2014 under the deal. A glance at the halftime Cincinnati obtained Latos from San Diego before the 2012 boxscore — Portland 59, season. He solidified a rotation Miami 58 — would have sugthat was one of the NL’s best, gested the opening two quarhelping the Reds win the NL Central for the second time in ters were closely contested, three seasons. Latos went 14-4 back-and-forth basketball. with a 3.48 ERA and two comNot exactly. plete games in 33 starts. Miami started with a flurry, Latos made $550,000 last season. Eligible for arbitration for hitting its first seven shots and the first time, he had asked for doing so with James collecting $4.7 million in arbitration and had five assists in the game’s first been offered $4.15 million. 3:52. The Heat led 14-5 after Right-hander Homer Bailey is that burst and were still shootthe last Reds player in arbitration. He has asked for $5.8 million, ing 75 percent with a minute to and the Reds have offered $4.75 go in the opening quarter. million. They’ve also discussed a They also were trailing at multiyear deal with Bailey, who that point. The Blazers were pitched a no-hitter at Pittsburgh doing anything they wanted on last Sept. 28. the offensive end. By TIM REYNOLDS The Associated Press

No. 7 FLORIDA 69, No. 25 KENTUCKY 52 GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Scottie Wilbekin had 14 points and eight assists and Pat Young recorded his sixth double-double of the season for Florida. The Gators (20-3, 10-1 Southeastern Conference) snapped a 5-game losing streak in the series and coach Billy Donovan improved to 2-7 against Kentucky’s John Calipari. The Wildcats (17-7, 8-3) lost for the first time in six games and it may have been costly. Nerlens Noel, the nation’s leading shot-blocker, injured his left knee in the second half and did not return. Noel, a freshman who averages 10.6 points, 9.6 rebounds and 4.5 blocks a game for the defending national champions, landed awkwardly on his leg with about 8 minutes to play. WOMEN WACO, Texas — Brittney Griner had 10 points and 11 rebounds for her 54th career double-double and the top-ranked Baylor Lady Bears moved closer to another Big 12 title with their 52nd consecutive home win, 89-47 over Texas Tech on Tuesday night. Griner, the 2-time All-American senior, also had seven blocked shots and five assists while leading four players scoring in double figures for Baylor.

Along with their nation’s best home winning streak, Baylor has several other impressive winning streaks: the Lady Bears have won 21 games in a row overall and 35 consecutive Big 12 regular-season games. Odyssey Sims had 18 points, six steals and five assists for Baylor. Brooklyn Pope had 17 points, while Kimetria Hayden had 10 points and seven assists. Chynna Brown had 15 points to lead Texas Tech (18-7, 8-5), and Casey Morris had 10. No. 3 CONNECTICUT 105, PROVIDENCE 49 PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Kaleena Mosqueda Lewis scored 17 points and Kelly Faris aded 16 to lead No. 3 Connecticut to a 105-49 win Tuesday night over Providence, the Huskies fourth 100-point game this season. Faris, who was making her 100th consecutive start, hit six of her eight shots and added six rebounds and five assists. Mosqueda-Lewis, the nation’s leading 3-point shooter, had three more for the Huskies (23-1, 10-1 Big East), who had six players in double figures. Brianna Edwards had 17 points to lead Providence (7-17, 2-9), and Tori Rule added 11. UConn hit 24 of its 30 attempts from the foul line, while Providence attempted just four free throws, hitting two. It was UConn’s 28th straight win over Providence, which has not beaten the Huskies since the semifinals of the 1993 Big East tournament. No. 23 SYRACUSE 69, GEORGETOWN 60 WASHINGTON — Brianna Butler scored 16 points and Kayla Alexander had 13 points and 10 rebounds as Syracuse pulled ahead with a 20-4 second-half run for a win over Georgetown. In the final regular-season game between the Big East rivals, the Orange (20-3, 8-2) held Sugar Rodgers, the nation’s second-leading scorer at 23.2 points per game, to eight points on 1-of-12 shooting. Syracuse has won four straight games. Dominique Vitalis had 15 points and Katie McCormick 14 for the Hoyas (13-11, 4-7), losers of three straight. Georgetown committed a season-high 27 turnovers. Elashier Hall scored 14 points for the Orange, who triumphed despite going more than 10 minutes without a field goal. After leading by nine in the first half, Syracuse trailed 35-27 early in the second. Hall’s jumper ended the drought and her 3-pointer put Syracuse ahead for good at 38-35.

Individuals Scoring Anthony, NYK Durant, OKC James, MIA Bryant, LAL Harden, HOU Irving, CLE Westbrook, OKC Aldridge, POR Wade, MIA Curry, GOL Parker, SAN FG Percentage Chandler, NYK Jordan, LAC Splitter, SAN Howard, LAL Lopez, NOR James, MIA Hickson, POR McGee, DEN Faried, DEN Johnson, TOR Rebounds Howard, LAL Asik, HOU Vucevic, ORL Randolph, MEM Noah, CHI Chandler, NYK Lee, GOL Hickson, POR Cousins, SAC Faried, DEN Assists Rondo, BOS Paul, LAC Vasquez, NOR Holiday, PHL Westbrook, OKC Parker, SAN Williams, Bro Nelson, ORL Calderon, DET Lawson, DEN ---Team Offense Houston Oklahoma City Denver San Antonio

The Associated Press THROUGH FEB. 12 G 42 52 49 53 53 41 52 50 45 48 50 FG 210 204 212 277 259 507 263 204 265 205 G 47 54 51 49 47 49 51 51 48 53 G 38 42 52 46 52 50 50 40 50 52 G 54 52 53 53 FG 421 486 507 507 412 360 413 434 358 353 411 FGA 312 339 357 481 458 898 467 363 473 369 OFF 154 180 182 208 184 220 145 179 153 187 AST 420 398 491 406 417 383 379 300 372 365 Pts 5741 5520 5566 5530

NBA LEADERS
PTS 1218 1508 1326 1429 1383 979 1171 1059 951 1007 1036 AVG 29.0 29.0 27.1 27.0 26.1 23.9 22.5 21.2 21.1 21.0 20.7 Miami L.A. Lakers Golden State Dallas New York L.A. Clippers Utah Toronto Milwaukee Portland Cleveland Sacramento Atlanta Boston Detroit Minnesota Brooklyn Phoenix Orlando Charlotte New Orleans Memphis Chicago Indiana Philadelphia Washington ——— Team Defense

FT 259 434 244 324 455 177 278 190 220 152 192 PCT .673 .602 .594 .576 .566 .565 .563 .562 .560 .556 DEF 403 447 408 357 345 328 407 349 323 330 AVG 11.1 9.5 9.4 8.8 8.0 7.7 7.6 7.5 7.4 7.0 Avg 106.3 106.2 105.0 104.3

49 53 52 51 49 54 53 52 50 52 52 53 50 51 53 49 52 53 51 51 52 51 51 52 50 50 G 52 51 51 54 52 50 50 53 49 51 50 49 52 53 49 52 50 53 51 52 52 53 53 53 52 52 51 51 54 53

5051 5387 5251 5147 4929 5394 5210 5087 4876 5060 5044 5129 4837 4912 5048 4663 4926 5017 4812 4800 4888 4778 4772 4818 4615 4572 Pts 4687 4600 4689 5050 4909 4760 4770 5077 4694 4912 4829 4740 5046 5150 4764 5082 4931 5233 5057 5162 5183 5297 5324 5362 5263 5271 5239 5243 5575 5481

103.1 101.6 101.0 100.9 100.6 99.9 98.3 97.8 97.5 97.3 97.0 96.8 96.7 96.3 95.2 95.2 94.7 94.7 94.4 94.1 94.0 93.7 93.6 92.7 92.3 91.4 Avg 90.1 90.2 91.9 93.5 94.4 95.2 95.4 95.8 95.8 96.3 96.6 96.7 97.0 97.2 97.2 97.7 98.6 98.7 99.2 99.3 99.7 99.9 100.5 101.2 101.2 101.4 102.7 102.8 103.2 103.4

“I thought it was a good effort by our team,” Blazers coach Terry Stotts said. “Miami’s one of the best if not the best team in the league right now and they are playing at a high level. We matched it for about 44 minutes.” Aldridge went on a personal 13-0 run over a stretch of nearly four minutes midway through the half, singlehandedly seeming to turn what was a 29-24 Portland deficit into a 37-29 Portland lead. And another quick burst, this time a 10-1 run by the Blazers, gave the visitors what was their biggest lead, 57-43 with 4:48 left in the half. Take away Miami’s sizzling start and the Blazers outscored the Heat 52-29 over a huge swath of the first half. Miami answered with a 34-12 run, rebuilding a 14-point lead midway through third.

TOT 557 627 590 565 529 548 552 528 476 517

AVG 11.9 11.6 11.6 11.5 11.3 11.2 10.8 10.4 9.9 9.8

Rolen

Indiana Memphis Chicago L.A. Clippers Brooklyn Washington Philadelphia San Antonio New York Boston Atlanta Miami Oklahoma City Detroit Minnesota New Orleans Milwaukee Utah Orlando Toronto Portland Phoenix L.A. Lakers Denver Golden State Cleveland Charlotte Dallas Houston Sacramento

(Continued from Page 6)

1,200 RBIs and six Gold Glove awards. His 517 doubles rank 45th on the career list. He has won eight Gold Glove awards, third-most among third baseman behind Hall-of-Famers Brooks Robinson (16) and Mike Schmidt (10). He won his last Gold Glove in 2010, when he played in 134 games. He was limited to fewer than 100 games ethe last two seasons. “I think he was playing through some pain for most of the time he was out here,” reliever Sean Marshall said. “That’s the sign of a gamer. He was doing it for 17 years. I’ve been doing it for seven and it seems like a long time. I can only imagine how much of a toll it takes on your body to play every day for that many years.” Rolen was only the seventh player unanimously picked as

the NL rookie of the year in 1997 with the Phillies, who traded him to the Cardinals midway through the 2002 season. He had his best years in St. Louis, teaming with Albert Pujols and Jim Edmonds in a formidable lineup. He helped St. Louis reach the World Series in 2004, when he batted .314 with a career-high 34 homers and 124 RBIs. The Cardinals were swept by the Red Sox for the championship. St. Louis reached the World Series again in 2006, when Rolen batted .296 with 22 homers and 95 RBIs. The Cardinals beat Detroit for the title that time, with Rolen batting .421 during the fivegame World Series. In-between the World Series appearances, Rolen’s injuries started taking a toll. He tore the labrum in his left shoulder in 2005, missed much of the 2007 season with more shoulder problems and

was traded to Toronto before the 2008 season. He also missed time that season with a sore left shoulder. The Reds acquired him for three players midway through the 2009 season. Jocketty — a friend of Rolen from their days together in St. Louis — decided he could bring a young Reds team the leadership it lacked. Rolen had a sensational first half of the season in 2010, getting the Reds in position to win the NL Central. He tailed off in the second half of the season, when stiffness in his shoulder, neck and back robbed him of his power. He made the All-Star team a year later but spent two stints on the disabled list with shoulder problems. He had surgery to remove bone spurs and fragments from the left shoulder. The shoulder continued to bother him last season, costing him 34 games. He acknowledged that the

LAKERS 91, SUNS 85 LOS ANGELES — Dwight Howard had 19 points and 18 rebounds, Antawn Jamison added 19 points and Los Angeles survived Kobe Bryant’s bizarre 4-point performance for its eighth win in 11 games. Bryant didn’t attempt a shot in the first half and scored his first basket with 2:13 to play, finishing 1-for-8 with eight turnovers in one of the oddest games of his 17-year career. Yet the Lakers survived against the Suns, getting 17 points from Metta World Peace and maintaining a small lead down the stretch of their 12th win in Phoenix’s last 13 visits to Staples Center. RAPTORS 109, NUGGETS 108 TORONTO — Rudy Gay hit a pull-up jump shot with less than five seconds remaining and Toronto beat short-handed Denver. DeMar DeRozan scored 22 points, Gay had 17 and John Lucas scored 12 of his 14 points in the final quarter as the Raptors won their third straight. It was the second game-winner in three games for Gay, who beat Indiana with an overtime jumper last Friday. Kyle Lowry had 11 points and 10 assists and Alan Anderson had 10 for Toronto, which made seven 3-pointers in the fourth quarter. Ty Lawson led Denver with 29 points, Kenneth Faried had 15 points and 11 rebounds and Anthony Randolph scored 16. GRIZZLIES 108, KINGS 101 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Marc Gasol had 24 points and 12 rebounds, Mike Conley scored 22 points and Memphis beat Sacramento. Tony Allen added a season-high 19 points to help the Grizzlies win their sixth straight over the Kings at home. Memphis entered the All-Star break with a 3-game win streak, their longest in more than a month. DeMarcus Cousins scored 23 points and Tyreke Evans had 20 for the Kings. JAZZ 109, THUNDER 94 SALT LAKE CITY — Al Jefferson scored 23 points, Paul Millsap had 18 and Utah ended Oklahoma City’s 4-game winning streak. Utah’s bench outscored Oklahoma City’s 49-25 and the Jazz bigs dominated the boards, holding a 16-7 edge on offensive rebounds. The Thunder committed 20 turnovers. The game was scrappy from the start, with Kendrick Perkins and Kevin Durant both called for flagrant fouls,and Perkins whistled for a technical. It was the first flagrant foul of Durant’s career. Durant finished with 33 points on 11-of16 shooting and Russell Westbrook added 22 points. ROCKETS 116, WARRIORS 107 OAKLAND, Calif. — James Harden had 27 points and seven rebounds on a nagging left knee, Chandler Parsons added 21 points and nine assists and Houston beat slumping Golden State. Jeremy Lin finished with 14 points and 10 assists to help the Rockets past his former team for the second time in eight days. A week after Houston tied the NBA record with 23 made 3-pointers in a testy 140-109 rout of the Warriors, the Bay Area rematch took longer to decide. Stephen Curry had 27 points and six assists and Jarrett Jack scored 22 points after missing the past three games with a shoulder injury for the Warriors.

8 – The Herald

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

www.delphosherald.com

HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS Lady Musketeers stymie Jeffcats
The Associated Press How a state panel of sports writers and broadcasters rates Ohio high school girls basketball teams in the final weekly Associated Press poll, by OHSAA divisions, with won-lost record and total points (first-place votes in parentheses): DIVISION I 1, Twinsburg (19) 21-0 211 2, Kettering Fairmont (2) 20-1 189 3, Centerville (1) 21-1 160 4, Mason 19-1 137 5, Reynoldsburg 20-2 132 6, Wadsworth 19-2 106 7, Solon 17-4 74 8, Perrysburg 18-1 56 9, Dublin Coffman 16-2 27 10, Hudson 17-4 24 Others receiving 12 or more points: 10, N. Can. Hoover 24. 12, Lewis Center Olentangy Orange 14. DIVISION II 1, Clyde (13) 21-0 203 2, Oxford Talawanda (3) 21-0 164 3, Millersburg W.Holmes (3) 19-1 158 4, Geneva (2) 19-1 134 5, Jackson 21-1 96 6, Tol. Rogers 17-3 94 7, Shaker Hts. Hath. Br. (1) 15-6 80 8, Bellbrook 19-3 67 9, Kettering Alter 16-4 36 10, Celina 18-2 32

BASKETBALL POLL

Roundup

Others receiving 12 or more points: 11, Canfield 28. 12, Beloit W. Branch 21. 13, Bellevue 20. 14, Akr. Hoban 18. 15, Day. Carroll 16. DIVISION III 1, Smithville (17) 20-0 211 2, Proctorville Fairland (2) 19-0 157 3, Archbold 19-1 152 4, Orrville (2) 18-2 115 5, Richwood N. Union 20-1 108 6, Cols. Africentric 17-5 92 7, Gates Mills Gilmour (1) 18-2 91 8, Casstown Miami E. 21-1 79 9, Versailles 19-3 45 10, Beachwood 18-2 29 Others receiving 12 or more points: 11, Beverly Ft. Frye 26. 12, Anna 18. 12, Middletown Madison 18. 14, Collins Western Reserve 15. 15, Hanoverton United 13. DIVISION IV 1, Ottoville (19) 20-0 216 2, Berlin Hiland (2) 17-3 172 3, Hamler Patrick Henry 20-1 146 4, Newark Cath. 17-1 126 5, New Madison Tri-Village 21-1 118 6, Zanesville Rosecrans 21-1 102 7, Ft. Loramie 19-3 94 8, N. Ridgeville Lake Ri. (1) 19-3 62 9, Bridgeport 17-2 42 10, Reedsville Eastern 18-4 26 Others receiving 12 or more points: 11, New Knoxville 21.

(Continued from Page 6) “For whatever reason, we just totally lost energy,” said Van Wert coach Lance Moonshower of the thirdquarter lull. “They just started to press and they got a couple of buckets, and it’s like our heads just dropped. We’re trying to run certain things in our press-breaker and nobody’s in the right position. That’s the thing with this team — we have these lulls where all of a sudden it’s like we’ve never played basketball before, even though in the first half we played about as well as we’ve played in a while.” Van Wert’s second-half problems also extended to the other end of the court. “We kinda stopped guarding people,” added Moonshower. “Even early on, we had a heckuva time jogging back down the floor, and when you do that with Indiya, she’ll run right by you every time. It seemed like in the second half we did the same thing; we’re jogging back and by the time you turn around, they’re right on top of us, and they’re getting good looks that way. But they hit some tough shots in the third quarter, some runners and stuff like that, so it wasn’t all us — a lot of it was them.” Lima had the better of it

in all statistical categories. The Lady Spartans shot better from the field — 43 percent (23-of-54) to 37 percent (21of-57) — and from the stripe — 70 percent (14-of-20) to 54 percent (7-of-13). Senior won the boards 35-29 and had fewer turnovers — 19-21. Lima’s sharpshooting trio of Benjamin, Allen, and Thompson all hit double digits — 21, 20 and 10, respectively. Dowdy and Dunlap led Van Wert with 16 and 13, respectively. Lima Senior (10-11) broke out of a fourth-quarter tie to win the jayvee game 51-38. Amelya Upthegrove led the Lady Spartan scoring with 17. Phoebe Eutsler had 16 for Van Wert (3-18). Van Wert entertains St. Marys Memorial Thursday.
Van Wert (56) Hulbert 2 0-0 5, Dunlap 6 1-3 13, Claire Butler 1 1-2 3, Morrow 2 1-2 7, Dowdy 6 2-3 16, Livia Butler 1 0-0 2, Moonshower 2 0-0 6, Handy 1 2-2 4, Hall 0 0-0 0. Totals 21 7-13 56. Lima Senior (68) Benjamin 7 6-7 21, Allen 7 1-2 20, Thompson 4 0-0 10, Johnson 0 2-4 2, Haynes 4 0-0 8, Cowan 1 3-5 5, Upthegrove 0 2-2 2, Washington 0 0-0 0, Reed 0 0-0 0. Totals 23 14-20 68. Score by Quarters: Van Wert 15 17 11 13 - 56 Lima Senior 14 12 18 24 - 68 Three-point field goals: Van Wert 7 (Morrow 2, Moonshower 2, Dowdy 2, Hulbert), Lima Senior 8 (Allen 5, Thompson 2, Benjamin).

Ohio High School Cage Scores
50 Fairborn 71, Riverside Stebbins 67 Fairfield Christian 76, Delaware Christian Fayetteville-Perry 78, Bethel-Tate 64 Findlay 74, Tol. St. Francis 43 Franklin 105, Carlisle 44 Franklin Furnace Green 69, Portsmouth Sciotoville 57 Fredericktown 83, Cardington-Lincoln 43 Galloway Westland 58, Cols. Franklin Hts. 49 Garfield Hts. 94, Strongsville 41 Garfield Hts. Trinity 80, Rocky River Lutheran W. 68 Gates Mills Gilmour 58, Perry 53 Gates Mills Hawken 65, Wickliffe 52 Georgetown 67, Ripley-Union-LewisHuntington 48 Girard 54, Struthers 52 Gnadenhutten Indian Valley 68, Zoarville Tuscarawas Valley 41 Goshen 47, Hillsboro 46 Grand River Academy 70, Fuchs Mizrachi 46 Green 66, Can. McKinley 50 Greenup Co., Ky. 51, Wheelersburg 47 Grove City Christian 60, Madison Christian 56 Hamilton Ross 65, Reading 61 Heartland Christian 59, Sebring McKinley 45 Hebron Lakewood 71, Pataskala Watkins Memorial 65 Holland Springfield 57, Maumee 47 Hudson 39, Stow-Munroe Falls 37, 3OT Hudson WRA 45, Parma Normandy 36 Hunting Valley University 56, Chagrin Falls Kenston 55 Ironton 75, Chillicothe 52 Kings Mills Kings 60, Lebanon 55, OT Kinsman Badger 61, Mineral Ridge 54 Lakewood 53, Parma Hts. Valley Forge 36 Leavittsburg LaBrae 77, Windham 57 Lewis Center Olentangy Orange 50, Thomas Worthington 37 Lewistown Indian Lake 86, WaynesfieldGoshen 75 Lisbon David Anderson 48, Rootstown 43 Logan 43, Albany Alexander 36 London 71, Washington C.H. 69, OT Louisville Aquinas 81, Beloit W. Branch 59 Lowellville 76, Vienna Mathews 60 Lynchburg-Clay 75, Chillicothe Huntington 48 Lyndhurst Brush 77, Solon 54 Mansfield Christian 52, Howard E. Knox 40 Marysville 65, Worthington Christian 51 Massillon Jackson 77, Akr. Kenmore 63 Massillon Perry 54, Can. Cent. Cath. 48 Massillon Washington 56, Canal Fulton Northwest 44 McArthur Vinton County 58, Athens 55 McComb 43, Ottoville 39 McDermott Scioto NW 68, New Boston Glenwood 43 Medina 53, Brunswick 51 Mentor Lake Cath. 87, Jefferson Area 48 Miamisburg 66, Day. Oakwood 46 Milford Center Fairbanks 36, Plain City Jonathan Alder 34 Millbury Lake 67, Elmore Woodmore 48 Minerva 73, E. Can. 50 Minford 66, Frankfort Adena 39 Mogadore 66, Mogadore Field 57 Mt. Orab Western Brown 52, Seaman N. Adams 49 N. Royalton 51, Elyria 49 New Concord John Glenn 38, Zanesville Maysville 34 New Madison Tri-Village 55, Sidney Lehman 26 Newark Cath. 49, Cols. Bexley 48 Newcomerstown 61, Warsaw River View 59, OT Newton Falls 57, Orwell Grand Valley 34 Norton 71, Akr. North 58 Oregon Stritch 55, Northwood 42 Parma Padua 72, Elyria Cath. 64 Pataskala Licking Hts. 67, Sunbury Big Walnut 49 Pemberville Eastwood 71, Fostoria 58 Pickerington Cent. 71, Canal Winchester 58 Poland Seminary 75, Streetsboro 52 Portsmouth W. 56, Manchester 49 Proctorville Fairland 77, Coal Grove Dawson-Bryant 66 Reedsville Eastern 45, Pomeroy Meigs 31 Reynoldsburg 69, Dublin Scioto 59 Richfield Revere 71, Fairview 61 Richmond Hts. 60, Beachwood 55 Richwood N. Union 59, Cols. Ready 45 Ridgeway Ridgemont 69, Morral Ridgedale 50 S. Point 66, Bidwell River Valley 56 Salem 74, Campbell Memorial 51 Salineville Southern 64, Hanoverton United 38 Shaker Hts. 75, Mentor 68 Sidney Fairlawn 76, Mechanicsburg 50 Southeastern 53, Circleville 51 Sparta Highland 60, Utica 54 Spring. Shawnee 60, Spring. Cath. Cent. 33 Springfield 58, Spring. Kenton Ridge 44 St. Bernard 78, Williamsburg 60 Stewart Federal Hocking 61, NelsonvilleYork 47 Sugarcreek Garaway 44, Tuscarawas Cent. Cath. 32 Sylvania Northview 78, Sylvania Southview 63 Thornville Sheridan 49, New Lexington 34 Tol. Cent. Cath. 64, Fremont Ross 40 Tol. Christian 87, Tol. Emmanuel Baptist 38 Tol. Maumee Valley 62, Lakeside Danbury 30 Tol. Ottawa Hills 64, Gibsonburg 49 Tol. St. John’s 80, Oregon Clay 36 Tol. Whitmer 77, Lima Sr. 55 Tol. Woodward 62, Lima Perry 50 Tontogany Otsego 78, Genoa Area 52 Tree of Life 52, Granville Christian 46 Troy Christian 78, Day. Miami Valley 70 Twinsburg 68, Cuyahoga Falls 66 Uhrichsville Claymont 50, Philo 40 Uniontown Lake 59, Kent Roosevelt 42 Vermilion 59, Sheffield Brookside 37 Vincent Warren 67, Marietta 47 W. Jefferson 64, Cols. Horizon Science 40 W. Lafayette Ridgewood 48, StrasburgFranklin 42 Warren Howland 62, Cortland Lakeview 43 Westerville Cent. 70, Lancaster 54 Whitehouse Anthony Wayne 54, Perrysburg 48 Willard 78, Norwalk St. Paul 58 Williamsport Westfall 75, Leesburg Fairfield 63 Willow Wood Symmes Valley 58, Crown City S. Gallia 51 Xenia 76, New Carlisle Tecumseh 71 Xenia Christian 53, Day. Christian 49 Youngs. Christian 58, New Middletown Spring. 49 OVAC Tournament Class 5A Semifinal Parkersburg South, W.Va. 57, Wintersville Indian Creek 54 Class 4A Semifinal St. Clairsville 76, Martins Ferry 48 Steubenville 77, Cadiz Harrison Cent. 41 Class 3A Semifinal Lore City Buckeye Trail 80, Woodsfield Monroe Cent. 59 Magnolia, W.Va. 72, Hannibal River 45 Class 2A Semifinal Steubenville Cath. Cent. 81, Cameron, W.Va. 42 Class 1A

“You can’t give up 36 points in a half; I was disappointed with our defensive effort the first half. We FORT JENNINGS — Fort were not good in the first Jennings celebrated Senior half,” Jefferson mentor Dave Night for a trio of 12th-grad- Hoffman said. “We’ve been ers playing their final home much better defensively this games at The Fort, handing year than we showed tonight. visiting Jefferson a We were a little better 56-34 loss. the second half but Senior Macy we had dug Schroeder turned in ourselves too a strong all-around deep of a hole game: 13 points, by then.” The seven assists, six Musketeers steals and five hit 15-of-42 boards. The other shots in the two seniors put in half but had double-doubles: 16 offensive Stockwell Gabbi German added rebounds. The Lady a team-high 14 markWildcats had nine ers and 10 boards and Gina of their own but hit 7-of-24 Stechschulte 11 and 11. fielders. The Musketeers (8-12) “I’m sure our effort was also held the Lady Jeffcats helped by Senior Night; (7-14) to 21.8-percent shoot- we just came out with a ing: 12-of-55; in breaking a lot of emotion and enthusi4-game losing streak against asm,” Jennings coach Kevin the Lady ’Cats. Horstman noted. “All you can The lone Jefferson player ask is to play hard; you’re not in double digits in scoring always going to make good was junior Rileigh Stockwell decisions but you can play with 12. Junior Gabby Pimpas hard. We kind of refocused added nine. ourselves on that lately.” The The Wildcats had the bet- Wildcats managed to slow ter of the early proceedings down the Musketeer attack in against the Jennings’ man- the third period, limiting them to-man defense, building a to 10 markers. However, the 9-6 edge on two singles by Red and White couldn’t put Stockwell at the midway together much scoring of their point of the first period. The own, hitting a mere 2-of-14 Musketeers then had the bet- shots from the field. The closter of the rest of the canto est they could get was 40-26 against Jefferson’s mix of on a single by Stockwell at zones but not by much, get- 3:35 but the Musketeers finting the lead for good at 13-11 ished the period on a 6-0 on a fourth-chance putback spurt, capped by a transition by Stechschulte at the 24-sec- layin at the buzzer by German ond mark. When junior Katie (dish by Schroeder) for a Goergens hit the second of a 46-26 edge. pair of throws at 11.8 ticks, The only decision left in that made the first-period the fourth period was the final score 13-12, Fort Jennings. margin of victory. The largest Schroeder, held scoreless lead by the hosts was 23 and in the first canto, erupted the least was 18. for all 13 of her points in In sum, the Lady ’Cats the decisive second, netting ended up 2-of-17 beyond three straight trifectas in the the arc; 8-of-20 from 15 feet first three minutes to help (40%); with 44 caroms, 22 the Musketeers build a 24-15 offensive, as Goergens and edge. The Wildcats struggled sophomore Brooke Culp had offensively, hitting 3-of-10 eight each and Stockwell and shots, while the Musketeers 6-2 sophomore Shelby Koenig canned 9-of-20. They con- added seven each; with 16 tinuously built a bigger lead, errors; and 11 fouls. They as much as 36-17 on a layin host Bluffton in a Northwest by Erin Osting off a penetra- Conference clash Thursday to tion move by Schroeder at finish the regular season. 30 seconds. However, junior “Offensively, we struggled Makalya Binkley hit a jumper again but that has been a probfrom the right elbow with 13 lem all too often this season,” ticks left for a 36-19 halftime Hoffman added. “We didn’t edge. help ourselves by giving up

By JIM METCALFE jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

all those second and third shots; we didn’t finish off any good defense we played. We also missed a lot of free throws, which has been a problem at times this season. Overall, we didn’t play a good game.” Fort Jennings dropped in 23-of-66 shots, 4-of-9 long range, for 34.8 percent and 6-of-15 at charity (40%); with 51 boards, 23 offensive; with 13 errors; and 18 fouls. Fort Jennings has a makeup game at Lincolnview today. “We were very active on the offensive boards; that really helped us tonight,” Horstman added. “We played with a lot of confidence from the start tonight. Whomever we put in seemed to help right away. That kind of confidence carries over. If things aren’t going so well, that might not happen, but they saw good things going on before they got in.” In junior varsity action, Jennings improved to 9-8 as they handled Jefferson (6-14) 30-24. Sophomore Gabby Clippinger led the Musketeers with 10 counters, while freshman Bailey Gorman topped the Lady ’Cats with 11.
VARSITY JEFFERSON (34) Brooke Culp 2-0-5, Katie Goergens 0-1-1, Rileigh Stockwell 3-6-12, Hannah Sensibaugh 1-0-2, Gabrielle Pimpas 4-1-9, Shelby Koenig 0-0-0, Makayla Binkley 2-0-5, Brooke Hesseling 0-0-0, Jasmine McDougall 0-0-0. Totals 10-2-8/20-34. FORT JENNINGS (56) Jenna Calvelage 1-0-2, Alyssa Schimmoeller 1-0-3, Macy Schroeder 5-0-13, Hannah Clay 0-0-0, Ashley Gable 2-1-5, Cassie Lindeman 1-0-2, Gabbi German 6-2-14, Erin Osting 1-0-2, Gabby Clippinger 0-00, Emily Kehres 2-0-4, Alyssa Louth 0-0-0, Kelsey Klausing 0-0-0, Gina Stechschulte 4-3-11. Totals 19-4-6/1556. Score By Quarters: Jefferson 12 7 7 8 – 34 Ft. Jennings 13 23 10 10 – 56 Three-point goals: Jefferson, Culp, Binkley; Fort Jennings, Schroeder 3, Gable. ——— JUNIOR VARSITY JEFFERSON (24) Taylor Stroh 0-0-0, Heather Pohlman 0-0-0, Lindsay Deuel 0-00, Brooke Gallmeier 0-0-0, Shelby Koenig 2-2-6, Tori Black 0-1-1, Jessica Pimpas 2-2-6, Bailey Gorman 4-3-11. Totals 8-0-8/14-24. FORT JENNINGS (30) Kelsey Klausing 0-0-0, Min Metcalfe 0-0-0, Alyssa Louth 3-0-8, Erin Osting 2-0-4, Gabby Clippinger 4-0-10, Hannah Clay 1-0-2, Jenna Calvelage 1-0-2, Keri Eickholt 1-0-2, Jessica Young 3-0-6, Kasidy Klausing 2-0-4, Kylie Jettinghoff 0-0-0, Madison Grote 0-0-0. Totals 12-2-0/10-30. Score by Quarters: Jefferson 0 11 2 11 - 24 Ft. Jennings 2 6 7 15 - 30 Three-point goals: Jefferson, none; Fort Jennings, Clippinger 2.

BOWLING
Tuesday Merchant Feb. 5, 2013 Caballero’s Tavern 40-16 Lear’s Martial Arts 38-18 Adams Automotive 38-18 R C Connections 32-24 Ace Hardware 30-26 Delphos Sporting Goods 28-28 Kerns Ford 26-30 Topp Chalet 23-33 Unverferth Mfg. 19-37 Men over 200 Dan Stemen 202, Dave Stemen 202, Matt Metcalfe 224230-202, Scott Scalf 222-259, Tony Rahrig 205, Jason Teman 222, Dan Grice 246-232, Dave Moenter 252-214, Dan Wilhelm 250-223, Jason Mahlie 279246-221, Denny Dyke 212-214, John Adams 204, Larry Etzkorn 221, Shane Lear 244-248-266, Bruce VanMetre 204-214-246, Zach Sargent 213, Don Rice 225-220-203, Kyle Early 245, Josh DeVelvis 226-246, John Jones 234-211, John Allen 225, Jeff Lawrence 204-256, Jason Wagoner 204, Joe Geise 257215, Kevin Kill 245-242-205, Ron Wilhelm 222-202, Derek Kill 204-224, Jerry Mericle 213, Brock Parsons 213 Men over 550 Dave Stemen 582, Matt Metcalfe 656, Scott Scalf 670, Tony Rahrig 562, Jason Temen 603, Dan Grice 646, Dave Moenter 659, Dan Wilhelm 652, Jason Mahlie 746, Denny Dyke 604, Shane Lear 758, Bruce VanMetre 664, Zach Sargent 561, Russ Wlhelm 575, Don Rice 648, Kyle Early 630, Josh DeVelvis 665, John Jones 614, Jeff Lawrence 658, Jason Wagoner 569, Joe Geise 667, Kevin Kill 692, Ron Wilhelm 579, Derek Kill 612, Brock Parsons 584 Wednesday Industrial Feb. 6, 2013 DRC 13th Frame Lounge 48-8 John Deere 37-19 K & M Tire 34-22 Delphos Restaurant Supply 33-23 Rustic Cafe 26-30 Strayer’s 26-30 Topp Chalet 26-30 Cabo’s 18-38 D & D Grain 18-38 Moe’s Dougout 14-42 Men over 200 Brian Stepleton 202, Duane Kohorst 203, Tim Strayer 213, Jeff Rode 209, Dave Knepper 207-201, Brian Gossard 215238, Shawn Allemeier 221-215, Phil Austin 210-240-207, Bruce VanMetre 208, Mike Rice 212, Dale Riepebhoff 210-209, Dan Kleman 225, Tony Hire 268202, Shawn Stabler 213, Jeff Kreischer 213-233-225, Butch Prine Jr. 258-288, Clint Harting 216-235, Rick Schuck 204, Frank Miller 234-221, Joe Geise 245, Charlie Lozano 203, John Allen 202, John Jones 211-223213, Kyle Profit 227, Ben Jones 205, Sean Hulihan 203, Dave Jessee 211, Tom Stevenson 202-229, Lenny Hubert 224247-214, Terry Trentman 226 Men over 550 Duane Kohorst 551, Tim Strayer 554, Jeff Rode 559, Dave Knepper 593, Don Rice 561, Brian Gossard 633, Shawn Allemeier 632, Phil Austin 657, Bruce VanMetre 589, Dale Riepenhoff 591, Dan Kleman 587, Tony Hire 653, Shawn Stabler 554, Jeff Kreischer 671, Butch Prine Jr. 731, Clint Harting 650, Frank Miller 626, Joe Geise 638, Charlie Lozano 574, John Jones 647, Kyle Profit 593, Ben Jones 564, Dave Jessee 570, Tom Stevenson 630, Lenny Hubert 685, Terry Trentman 559 Thursday National Feb. 7, 2013 C B 97 38-18 Bowersock Hauling 38-18 First Federal 36-20 D R C Big Dogs 34-22 Erin’s Dream Team 32-24 Westrich 30-26 K-M Tire 24-32 Wannemachers 24-32 VFW 14-18-38 Men over 200 Lenny Hubert 202-207, Rob Ruda 235-225, Kevin Decker 213-217-220, Shawn Allemeier 236-205-207, Dick Mowery 202, Mike Rice 202, Brian Schaadt 233, Bruce VanMetre 220224, Jeff Lawrence 212, Ralph Brickner 207, Jim Looser 204, Warren Mason 202-212, Tom Schulte 212, Chuck Verhoff 223, Brent Hollar 207-222-279, Todd Menke 206-209, Dave Miller 245-209, Frank Miller 204-201, Tim Koester 246-244-239, Ted Wells 225, Doug Milligan Sr. 204-267, Brad Thornburgh 207208-206, Ray Geary 224-205, Rick Schuck 208, John Jones 246-237-244, Rob Shaeffer 213, Jason Wagoner 213, Doug Milligan Jr. 241, Lenny Klaus 207, Dave Moenter 238-248226, Dan Wilhelm 232-205, Jason Mahlie 226-218-212 Men over 550 Lenny Hubert 588, Rob Ruda 649, Kevin Decker 650, Shawn Allemeier 648, Dick Mowery 584, Dan Yoakam 555, Brian Schaadt 614, Don Eversole 569, Bruce VanMetre 600, Jeff lawrence 577, Jim Looser 568, Warren Mason 561, Tom Schulte 572, Chuck Verhoff 565, Brent Hollar 708, Todd Menke 603, Dave Miller 637, Frank Miller 598, Tim Koester 729, Ted Wells 611, Doug Milligan Sr. 663, Brad Thornburgh 621, Ray Geary 629, Rick Schuck 581, John Jones 727, Rob Shaeffer 608, Jason Wagoner 585, Doug Milligan Jr. 569, Dave Moenter 712, Dan Wilhelm 605, Jason Mahlie 656

The Associated Press Tuesday’s Boys Basketball Scores Akr. Coventry 44, Hartville Lake Center Christian 34 Akr. Hoban 68, Akr. East 42 Akr. Manchester 60, Massillon Tuslaw 51 Akr. SVSM 61, Cuyahoga Falls Walsh Jesuit 50 Alliance Marlington 69, Austintown Fitch 53 Amherst Steele 55, Medina Buckeye 51 Avon 70, N. Olmsted 43 Avon Lake 45, Grafton Midview 41 Batavia Amelia 58, N. Bend Taylor 33 Bedford 79, Cle. Rhodes 46 Berea 56, Rocky River 47 Berlin Center Western Reserve 45, Warren Lordstown 36 Berlin Hiland 52, Magnolia Sandy Valley 34 Bloomdale Elmwood 47, Rossford 46 Bowling Green 70, Napoleon 68 Brecksville-Broadview Hts. 58, Cle. Glenville 53 Brookfield 66, Warren Champion 38 Can. Glenoak 69, Akr. Ellet 62 Can. South 63, Dover 47 Can. Timken 61, Navarre Fairless 54 Canfield 61, Youngs. Liberty 57 Casstown Miami E. 45, Milton-Union 37 Centerville 72, Beavercreek 68 Chardon NDCL 55, Youngs. Ursuline 50 Chesapeake 48, Ironton Rock Hill 33 Chesterland W. Geauga 81, Painesville Riverside 49 Chillicothe Unioto 88, Jackson 41 Chillicothe Zane Trace 55, Bainbridge Paint Valley 27 Cin. Anderson 66, Cin. Sycamore 57 Cin. Christian 62, Franklin Middletown Christian 56 Cin. Clark Montessori 63, Cin. Mt. Healthy 44 Cin. Country Day 69, New Richmond 61 Cin. Gamble Montessori 55, Batavia 53 Cin. Indian Hill 60, Boone Co., Ky. 51 Cin. Mariemont 68, Norwood 61 Cin. McNicholas 56, St. Henry, Ky. 51 Cin. NW 84, Cin. Glen Este 74 Cin. Princeton 78, Cin. Winton Woods 57 Cin. Purcell Marian 64, Cin. Seven Hills 59 Cin. Summit Country Day 94, Cin. Taft 70 Cin. Walnut Hills 52, Cin. St. Xavier 37 Cin. Withrow 66, Cin. Shroder 61 Cin. Wyoming 64, Monroe 49 Cle. Cent. Cath. 90, Cle. Collinwood 56 Cle. Hts. 79, Cle. JFK 53 Cle. John Adams 49, Copley 45 Cle. MLK 80, New Day Academy 55 Cols. Beechcroft 65, Cols. Linden McKinley 59 Cols. Brookhaven 75, Cols. Whetstone 49 Cols. DeSales 44, Hilliard Davidson 37 Cols. East 71, Cols. Mifflin 70 Cols. Northland 80, Cols. Centennial 57 Cols. Wellington 92, Johnstown Northridge 80 Columbiana Crestview 70, Lisbon Beaver 67 Conneaut 84, Thompson Ledgemont 33 Crooksville 45, Zanesville W. Muskingum 39 Cuyahoga Falls CVCA 59, Wooster Triway 44 Cuyahoga Hts. 54, Independence 53 Day. Carroll 65, Germantown Valley View 63 Day. Chaminade-Julienne 73, Cin. N. College Hill 43 Day. Dunbar 92, Day. Stivers 55 Delaware Hayes 81, Cols. Briggs 51 Dresden Tri-Valley 71, McConnelsville Morgan 49 Dublin Jerome 43, Granville 38 Eastlake N. 61, Euclid 48 Eaton 54, New Paris National Trail 47 Elida 56, Bellefontaine 45

Semifinal Bishop Donahue, W.Va. 73, Beallsville 66 Bowerston Conotton Valley 82, Paden City, W.Va. 41 Consolation Bellaire St. John 56, Valley Wetzel, W.Va. 50 Beverly Ft. Frye 74, Belmont Union Local 53 Caldwell 66, Bellaire 58 Hundred, W.Va. 62, St. Clairsville E. Richland Christian 60 Madonna, W.Va. 64, Bridgeport 54 Richmond Edison 62, Weir, W.Va. 55 Toronto 37, Oak Glen, W.Va. 25 Trinity, W.Va. 73, Shadyside 71, OT Wheeling Park, W.Va. 73, E. Liverpool 39 Girls Basketball Arcadia 53, New Riegel 49, OT Archbold 53, Ottawa-Glandorf 51 Attica Seneca E. 68, Plymouth 47 Baltimore Liberty Union 51, Sugar Grove Berne Union 34 Bellevue 66, Milan Edison 30 Bellville Clear Fork 44, Loudonville 33 Bucyrus 43, Mt. Blanchard Riverdale 36 Carey 55, Arlington 52 Celina 70, Ft. Recovery 49 Cols. Grandview Hts. 32, Millersport 13 Cols. Watterson 34, Westerville S. 30 Defiance Ayersville 66, Continental 60, OT Doylestown Chippewa 58, Creston Norwayne 49 Dublin Coffman 45, Galloway Westland 39 Findlay Liberty-Benton 61, Bluffton 39 Fostoria St. Wendelin 67, Cory-Rawson 53 Galion 67, Crestline 35 Gorham Fayette 58, Delta 56 Hamler Patrick Henry 56, Leipsic 52 Heath 53, Whitehall-Yearling 26 Hillsboro 59, Goshen 55, OT Kalida 29, Delphos St. John’s 23 Kidron Cent. Christian 54, Mansfield Temple Christian 23 Lancaster Fairfield Union 61, Ashville Teays Valley 59 Lewis Center Olentangy 58, Newark 45 Lima Cent. Cath. 76, Spencerville 43 Lima Sr. 68, Van Wert 56 Madison 52, Conneaut 26 Mansfield St. Peter’s 65, Mansfield Sr. 60 Maria Stein Marion Local 64, St. Marys Memorial 35 Marion Elgin 48, Sparta Highland 25 McGuffey Upper Scioto Valley 55, Kenton 48 Minster 56, Wapakoneta 39 Montpelier 65, Sherwood Fairview 48 Oak Harbor 59, Kansas Lakota 25 Oberlin Firelands 70, New London 35 Ontario 70, Lucas 20 Pandora-Gilboa 57, Ada 42 Pataskala Watkins Memorial 49, Mt. Vernon 47 Paulding 42, Defiance 30 Pettisville 60, Liberty Center 37 Pioneer N. Central 46, Hicksville 41 Port Clinton 47, Fremont Ross 32 Sandusky 58, Huron 53 Shekinah Christian 59, Marysville 45 Shelby 73, Mansfield Madison 65 Smithville 64, Jeromesville Hillsdale 29 Spring. Greenon 42, Arcanum 27 Sunbury Big Walnut 56, Worthington Kilbourne 47 Sycamore Mohawk 65, N. Baltimore 40 Upper Sandusky 56, N. Robinson Col. Crawford 45 Ursuline Academy 57, Kettering Alter 45 W. Salem NW 57, Apple Creek Waynedale 53 W. Unity Hilltop 52, Antwerp 40 Wauseon 55, Rossford 36 Wood County Christian, W.Va. 76, OVC 35

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Business

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Herald — 9

General Electric gets out of the TV business
By SCOTT MAYEROWITZ The Associated Press airs everything from “Law & Order” to “The Office” and “The Biggest Loser.” The company also owns cable networks Bravo, CNBC, Telemundo, USA and the Golf Channel. There’s also Universal Pictures, which over its 100 years has offered movies including “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “The Sting,” “Jurassic Park” and “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial.” GE’s capital unit will also sell the floors NBCUniversal occupies in the iconic 30 Rockefeller Center building in New York as well as property in Englewood Cliffs, N.J., for $1.4 billion. GE will retain two floors at 30 Rock, spokesman Seth Martin said. The sale of the Rockefeller Center floors includes naming rights to the building, which has featured giant red “GE” letters at its top since 1988, a prominent part of the New York skyline. A spokesman for Philadelphia-based Comcast said the company had no comment on its plans for the 1933 Art Deco building. GE’s history with NBC goes back to 1919, when it co-founded the Radio Corporation of America, or RCA. The company pioneered commercial radio broadcasting. In 1926, RCA launched a television arm: the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC. Within two years, it had started the first regularly scheduled U.S. minimum hourly wage from the current $7.25 to $9 by the end of 2015. In his bid to boost manufacturing, Obama is launching three “manufacturing innovation institutes” — partnerships among the private sector, the federal government and colleges “to develop and build manufacturing technologies and capabilities that will help U.S.-based manufacturers and workers create good jobs,” according to a White House fact sheet. He is asking Congress to create 15 more institutes. The proposal is a central element of Obama’s plan to spur manufacturing, which has been a bright spot in the U.S. economy. Manufacturing

Cooper Farms receives Jesse Jewell Innovation Award
Information submitted AT L A N TA — C o o p e r Farms’ Gary Cooper received Meatingplace magazine’s industry leadership award, The Jewell, at the International Production and Processing Expo in Atlanta on Jan. 30. The Jewell award, named for poultry industry pioneer Jesse Jewell, was established to recognize a company that truly exhibits innovation in poultry processing. “Cooper Farms represents everything that the Jewell award stands for. The company is a constant innovator whose products, processes and overall approach to business have raised the standard of excellence for the entire poultry industry,” said Bill McDowell, editorial director of Meatingplace and its sister publications. “We look forward to the innovations that Cooper Farms will bring to the industry in the coming years.” In recent years, Cooper Farms has embraced many new technologies. Their most recent additions stand 279 feet tall and are located north of the company’s Cooked Meats location in Van Wert. The three wind turbines, added in 2011 and 2012, provide up to 75 percent of the plants electricity. Cooper Farms became one of the first companies in the country to install Clean Room Slicing, a system which filters air to surgical standards within a slicing room to provide better quality and food safety. Since 2002, three more slic-

Cooper Farms Director of Corporate Development Eric Ludwig, left, Director of Live Production Terry Wehrkamp, COO Gary Cooper and Director of Food Processing Dale Hart show off the company’s The Jewell Award. (Submitted photo)

DEAR BRUCE: When my parents died, some coins were passed on to me. I’ve just held on to them, not really having any interest in them. I saw in the paper that an antique show is coming to one of the local hotels in a few months; the dealers are looking for antique furniture, accessories, gems and coins. I am thinking about taking in my coins to see what they are worth and maybe even selling them. They look to be in good condition, so I’m hoping they are worth something. Do you think this is a good place to get an idea of their value? I don’t know if I should hold on to them or sell them. -- S.T. in New Mexico DEAR S.T.: One thing you should know about coins is that they are rated -- and their value is determined -- by their condition. Unfortunately, your idea of “good condition” may not be the same as a dealer’s. In fact, what looks like good condition to you is likely a low grade. You can get an idea of your coins’ value, if any, before going to the antique show by visiting any bookstore that has a variety of coin books and magazines. Of course, there’s always the Internet. These coins are nice things to hang on to, but as an investment, I wouldn’t get my hopes up too much. DEAR BRUCE: I have heard you talk about umbrella policies and would like to get one. I’m not sure if it’s a problem or not, but I have my car insurance with one company and my homeowners insurance with another. Should they both be with the same company to

Inherited coins unlikely to be a bonanza
BRUCE WILLIAMS

ing lines have been added. As a part of the CRS expansion, Cooper Farms also added the technology of High Pressure Pasteurization. HPP is a process which applies an equal water pressure of 87,000 psi on packaged food products to destroy any possible pathogenic microorganisms. To help with this process, the Cooper Farms team designed a patent-pending method to transport the HPP vessels more efficiently. “We are very proud to have the honor of being recognized as a pioneer in our industry,” said Gary Cooper, COO of Cooper Farms. “We have always worked to continuously improve our company and its processes. We know it’s the right thing to do for many reasons.”

NEW YORK — General Electric is saying goodbye to 30 Rock — the building and the TV business born there. It’s another step in GE’s efforts to focus on less glamorous — but theoretically more profitable — ventures such as manufacturing medical imaging equipment, airplane engines and electrical generators. The Fairfield, Conn., company announced Tuesday that it is selling its 49 percent stake in NBCUniversal to Comcast Corp., the nation’s largest cable TV operator, for $16.7 billion. Comcast had bought a majority stake in the television and movie company in January 2011 and was expected to buy out GE’s remaining stake over the next several years. General Electric will use the money to accelerate its share repurchase program to approximately $10 billion in 2013. “This transaction allows us to significantly increase the cash we plan to return to shareholders in 2013, to approximately $18 billion, and to continue to invest in our industrial business,” GE CEO Jeff Immelt said in a statement. GE is giving up its stake in one of America’s best-known brands. The sale includes the NBC broadcast network, which By JOSH LEDERMAN The Associated Press

Obama travels to NC to rally support for jobs plan
WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is kicking off three days of travel to rally support for the job-creation and economic proposals he unveiled in his State of the Union address. Obama will launch the effort today in Asheville, N.C., with a visit to Linamar Corp., a supplier of engine and transmission components that has expanded its manufacturing operations. Linamar produces heavy-duty engine and driveline components. In 2011, the company announced that its fourth U.S. manufacturing facility would be at the site of a shuttered Volvo Construction Equipment plant in Asheville. The company has hired 160 workers and will hire 40 more by the end of the year, the White House said. Obama will make stops in Atlanta on Thursday and Chicago on Friday. In his speech before a joint session of Congress Tuesday night, Obama called job creation his “North Star.” He asked Congress to focus on attracting jobs to the U.S., training American workers and boosting investments in infrastructure, manufacturing and clean energy. Obama also says he wants to raise the

television programming in Schenectady, N.Y., then the site of GE headquarters. GE sold its stake in RCA in 1932. But in 1986, GE ended up acquiring RCA, selling off its record label and televisionmanufacturing business. All that remained was NBC. During the GE years, NBC was home to a number of hits including “Friends,” “Seinfeld,” “ER,” “Frasier,” and the “West Wing.” Millions of American tuned in each night to watch the network’s lineup, which was sold as “Must See TV.” In 2011, GE sold its majority ownership of NBCUniversal to Comcast for $8 billion in cash and reduced its ownership share from 80 percent to 49 percent. Tuesday’s sale of the remaining stake gives GE cash to focus on its industrial businesses, such as building train locomotives, wind turbines and lights. In 2007, just before the financial crisis hit with full force, GE’s finance arm accounted for about 55 percent of the company’s earnings, according to Martin. NBCUniversal contributed about $3 billion of the company’s $22 billion in operating profit. In 2012, GE’s industrial segment — including a growing energy-infrastructure business — had a profit of $15.49 billion, compared with $7.4 billion from GE Capital. expanded at a much faster pace in January compared with December. The White House outlined other steps the administration says it will take to continue improvements in manufacturing, which it says added 500,000 jobs the last three years after shedding jobs for more than 10 years. Among the steps: — Reforming the business tax code to end tax breaks to ship jobs overseas. — Expanding a program to help governors and mayors bring in business investment from around the world. — Strengthening enforcement of trade laws and taking new steps to open markets in Europe and Asia.

Smart Money
have an umbrella policy? -- Reader, via email DEAR READER: As you know, I am very much in favor of an umbrella policy, which in general raises your liability insurance from the paltry amount most people carry on their cars and homes to a respectable several million dollars. That may sound like a lot of money, but it’s not difficult to incur that kind of damage in today’s world. Although it is not necessary to have your auto and homeowners policies with the same company, it does make the umbrella underwriting and claims procedures much easier. Unless there is a significant reason why you have your auto and homeowners policies with different companies, I would choose one company and have it write all three policies. (Send questions to bruce@brucewilliams. com or to Smart Money, P.O. Box 7150, Hudson, FL 34674. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided.) Distributed for Universal UClick for UFS

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SEALED BIDS will be reTHANKS TO ST. two children, newborn--JUDE: Runs 1 day at the price of $3.00. GARAGE the age-3. References, SALES: Each e i v e d per b y low c day is $.20 Mobile Homes word. $8.00 minimum charge. 105 Announcements 325 “I WILL NOT BE Safety/Service Director rates, non-smoking, beRESPONSIBLE FOR DEBTS”: Ad must placed in person by For Rent the will appear in City the Regumeals provided. person whose nameofplacing ad.the ad. of Delphos, Must Prefer when show ID & pay We accept lar rates apply RENT OR Rent to Own. full-time but part-time Ohio, at the office of said ADVERTISERS: YOU Director until can place a 25 word 2 bedroom, 1 bath mo- okay. Hours 6am-5pm. 12:00 O’CLOCK NOON, classified ad in more bile home. 419-692-3951 Close to Landeck. Call LOCAL TIME, MARCH 419-692-1753 or than 100 newspapers 7, 2013, Pets and 419-296-7740 with over one and a half 583 for the following comSupplies million total circulation modities: across Ohio for $295. It’s ALL ABOUT PUPPIES! 640 Financial 1. Purchase of Chemieasy...you place one orMore Havanese, cals der and pay with one Shih-tese. Also IS IT A SCAM? The Del- 2. Purchase of Stone check through Ohio Maltese/Chihuahua, phos Herald urges our Aggregate Scan-Ohio Advertising Poodle, Maltese. Garreaders to contact The 3. Purchase of BitumiNetwork. The Delphos wick’s the Pet People. Better Business Bureau, nous Materials Herald advertising dept. 419-795-5711. (419) 223-7010 or 4. Purchase of Water can set this up for you. garwicksthepetpeople.com 1-800-462-0468, before Meters No other classified ad entering into any agree- All according to specifiFREE: CALICO Kitten. buy is simpler or more ment involving financing, cations of file in the ofVery playful, cost effective. Call business opportunities, fice of said Director loVet checked. 419-695-0015 ext. 138 or work at home oppor- cated at 608 North Canal Call 419-692-7261 tunities. The BBB will as- Street, Delphos, OH sist in the investigation 45833. 592 Wanted to Buy 235 General of these businesses. You may obtain a copy (This notice provided as of the bid specs at a customer service by www.cityofdelphos.com INTERESTED IN a or by calling the MuniciThe Delphos Herald.) part-time job that is chalpal Building at lenging, interesting and 419-695-4010. varies day to day? Want 670 Miscellaneous Each bid must be on the early hours so your days bid form contained in the Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, are free? Times Bulletin specifications and must LAMP REPAIR Silver coins, Silverware, Media is in search of a contain full name of Table or Floor. Pocket Watches, Diamonds. distribution clerk for an every person or comCome to our store. immediate opening for 2330 Shawnee Rd. pany interested in the Hohenbrink TV. early morning hours. ApLima same and shall be ac419-695-1229 proximately 20 hours per (419) 229-2899 companied by a certified week, five days a week or cashier’s check on (M-W-Th-F-Sa). E-Mail some solvent bank or a 805 Auto mmarchek@timesbulleproposal bond, satisfactin.com or contact Mike 1991 CHEVY Blazer with tory to the Director in the @ (419) 238-2285 Ext. Meyer S n o w p l o w , amount of $300.00, as a 204. D $2250. Knippen Chrys- guarantee that if the bid SOL In the Classifieds ler, 800 W. Fifth , Del- is accepted a contract will be entered into and Mobile Homes phos. 419-695-4976. 325 its performance properly Call For Rent secured. Should any bid Auto Parts and The Daily Herald be rejected, such check 810 Accessories 1 BEDROOM mobile will be forthwith returned home for rent. Ph. to the bidder, and should 419-692-3951 any bid accepted such check will be returned upon the proper execution of the contract. The City of Delphos reserves the right to reject any Windshields Installed, New and all bids and to waive Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors, any irregularities in any Hoods, Radiators bid and to determine the 4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima lowest and best bidder. 1-800-589-6830 No bid may be withdrawn for a period of forty (40) days after the date of the bid opening. 930 Legals By order of the Mayor of Do you love the fast-moving media the City of Delphos, business? Join our team! Ohio. THE ANNUAL Financial Gregory C. Berquist State report has been 2/6/13 dhi Media is seeking completed and is available at the Washington Township Office of Van This position requires an individual to sell Wert County. For further multi-media products including print, information contact Jim Mox clerk at interactive and specialty publications. 419-692-0881 for apThe right candidate will sell our products to pointment. a diverse group of businesses in a defined James M. Mox, Clerk geographical territory. 2/13/13
Minimum Charge: 15 words, 2 times - $9.00 Each word is $.30 2-5 days $.25 6-9 days $.20 10+ days Each word is $.10 for 3 months or more prepaid Deadlines: 11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue. Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1 ad per month. BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to send them to you. CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base charge + $.10 for each word.

Classifieds
www.delphosherald.com

10 – The Herald

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
930 Legals 620 Child Care DELPHOS HERALD
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

www.delphosherald.com
080 Help Wanted
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT needed for Corporate Office support to manage spreadsheets and tracking reports. Candidates must have Intermediate level Excel skills; 12 years general education or equivalent; ability to prioritize and organize effectively. Full-time 8am-4:30pm Mon-Fri. Please send work experience to: K&M Tire, 965 Spencerville Road, PO Box 279, Delphos, OH 45833. RachelM@kmtire.com Fax 419-695-7991

080 Help Wanted
RESIDENT ADVOCATES WEEKEND The YWCA is accepting applications for part-time, weekend resident advocates for the transitional housing and domestic violence programs. These individuals will be fielding phone calls from the 24 hour hotline and performing intakes on emergency referrals. Shift times vary. Experience or college courses in social services preferred. Please send resumes to: 408 E. Main St., Van Wert, OH 45891. Deadline for applications is February 20, 2013 LEAD CASE MANAGER The YWCA is accepting applications for a full-time lead case manager for the transitional housing and domestic violence programs. This individual will be working one on one with those in crisis situations. Candidates must have 3-5 years experience in social services and program planning. BA/BS in social services preferred. Please send resumes to: 408 E. Main St., Van Wert, OH 45891. Deadline for applications is February 20, 2013.

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122 NOTICE LEGAL OPENING FOR one to

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D E A R DOCTOR K: Dr. Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D. My husband CASE WORKER & and I have WEEK DAY RESIDENT been trying to ADVOCATE 1 get pregnant The YWCA is accepting for a few applications for full-time months without case worker and resisuccess. Could dent advocate for the changing my transitional housing and PART-TIME RURAL diet help? domestic violence pro- Route Driver needed. DEAR READER: Yes, diet could be a factor. With grams. These individuals Hours vary, Monday-Sat- one surprising exception, foods that are healthy for urday. Valid driver’s liwill be fielding phone most people also seem to improve fertility. calls for the 24 hour hot- cense and reliable transYou and your husband are not alone. It’s estimated line and facilitating pro- portation with insurance that about 6 million couples in the United States are required. Applications gramming. Must have having trouble conceiving. For one thing, couples are experience in social available at The Delphos delaying having kids until they are older and their own services. Shift times Herald office 405 N. lives are more secure. However, older age reduces vary. Experience or col- Main St., Delphos. somewhat the chance of a pregnancy. Obesity and lege courses in social diabetes, both of which are epidemics, also decrease services preferred. HIRING DRIVERS fertility at any age. Please send resumes to: with 5+years OTR expeA healthy diet can improve both your health and 408 E. Main St., Van rience! Our drivers aver- your fertility, whether or not you’re experiencing Wert, OH 45891. Dead- age 42cents per mile & fertility problems. Boosting your health before line for applications is higher! Home every pregnancy will make it easier for you to conceive, February 20, 2013. weekend! reduce pregnancy complications and improve your $55,000-$60,000 annu- baby’s health. ally. Benefits available. The following recommendations can help increase TRUCK DRIVER wanted 99% no touch freight! your chances of conceiving: Home weekends. Newer We will treat you with re-- Include high-quality carbohydrates in your equipment. Call DK spect! PLEASE CALL daily diet. Good carbohydrates are less processed Trucking 419-549-0668 419-222-1630 and don’t cause a sudden spike in your blood sugar. They include whole grains, beans and legumes, and fruits and vegetables. They are better for fertility than refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta or rice, soda, fruit juice and candy. Good carbohydrates also have more fiber, vitamins, minerals and protein than their refined counterparts. Ottawa, Ohio Ottawa, Ohio -- Pick plant proteins. Replace many animal proteins MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN (particularly red meat) with plant proteins. Aim for at least half of your protein to come from nuts and nut This position provides mechanical mainteThis position provides mechanical maintenance butters, beans and legumes, edamame, tofu and eggs. nance services, primarily involving line and services, primarily involving line and machine -- Choose fertility-friendly fats. Avoid unhealthy machine breakdowns as well as routine breakdowns as well as routine mechanical trans fats. These fats include hydrogenated oils found mechanical maintenance. Hydraulic and maintenance. Hydraulic and electrical in many baked goods, crackers and cookies. Replace electrical experience is a plus. Candidates experience is a plus. Candidates must have a trans fats with mono- and polyunsaturated fats (such must have a minimum of two years industrial minimum of two experience or an maintenance as olive or canola oils). Avocados and nut butters are maintenance years industrial Industrial experience or an Industrial Maintenance another source of healthy fats. Maintenance Degree. -- Skip the skim. One kind of fat, saturated fat, is This job requires Degree. the applicant to work any unhealthy for most people. I generally recommend This job hours shifts, Holidays and Weekends shift, 12 requires the applicant to work any shift, 12 hours shifts, Holidays and Weekends that most people avoid whole milk and whole-fat Starting wage is $15.50 per Hour dairy products. Startingexcellent benefits that include We offer wage is $15.50 per Hour However, for women seeking to get pregnant, We offer dental, life, disability insurance, medical, excellent benefits that include research studies from Harvard have shown that medical, dental, life, disability insurance, incentive and attendance bonuses, women who drink one serving of whole milk a day and a 401k retirement plan. incentive and attendance bonuses, and a 401k have an easier time getting pregnant than those who retirement plan. Apply in person to: do not drink milk or who choose low-fat dairy foods. Apply in person to: Steel Technologies, Inc. Just don’t overdo it. Whole milk has almost double Steel Technologies, Inc. the calories of skim milk. 740 Williamstown Road 740 Williamstown Road -- Take a multivitamin. You need extra folic acid Ottawa, Ohio 45875 Ottawa, Ohio 45875 and iron to conceive. Folic acid is also essential to EOE EOE prevent birth defects of the brain and spinal cord in the baby. Choose a prenatal vitamin that contains nonheme iron (from plant sources), which appears AAP St. Marys Corp. is a leader in the design and manufacture of cast to help fertility more than aluminum wheels for OEM automakers. As a subsidiary of Hitachi Metals heme iron. America, our reputation for high quality products and customer satisfaction I’ve posted two has helped us continue to grow and provide our associates with over 24 years recipes on my website of steady employment. We now have an opportunity for a Quality Assurance ( A s k D o c t o r K . c o m ) that fit the fertility diet Engineer to assume the following responsibilities: recommended by expert • Performs analyses, inspection, design, and testing functions to nutritionists here at ensure quality of raw materials and finished products Harvard. • Conducts quality engineering reviews of design documentation to
OTR SEMI DRIVER NEEDED Benefits: Vacation, Holiday pay, 401k. Home weekends, & most nights. Call Ulm’s Inc. 419-692-3951

CARRIERS WANTED DELPHOS ROUTES AVAILABLE NOW Route 1 Carolyn Dr. Route 31 Ricker St. Marsh St. Hedrick St Pamela Circle Rozelle Route 37 S. Bredeick St. W. Clime St. Skinner St. Erie St. No Collecting Call the Delphos Herald Circulation Department at 419-695-0015 ext 126

Local Driver wanted for round trip dedicated run
• Home daily • Must have 4 years OTR experience • Clean MVR a must

ACROSS 1 Blend 4 Winged god 8 Impractical 11 Census info 12 Castle who danced 13 First-rate 14 Money, in slang (2 wds.) 16 Fabric meas. 17 Fell behind 18 Lax 20 Retina cell 21 Grassy field 22 Zest 25 Moves restlessly 29 Foot part 30 Not talking 31 Chimp abode 32 Rx overseer 33 Mil. branch 34 Plumbing problem 35 Yowlers 38 Ice floe dwellers 39 Behind, at sea 40 Jiffy 41 Hushed 44 Fierce fish 48 Rapper Tone - 49 Floods 51 Pilot’s sighting 52 Buenos --, Argentina 53 Deli bread 54 Rev the engine 55 Prom attender 56 Stiff -- -- board

DOWN 1 Shake alternative 2 Mr. Stravinksy 3 Warrior princess 4 Got wrong 5 Cattail 6 Small number 7 Had a hunch 8 Yucatan native 9 H e a v y - m e t a l band 10 Dorm room item 12 Snow shelter 15 Waist size 19 Dawdle 21 Make a sketch 22 Talent 23 Disconnect 24 Con game 25 Fret and fume 26 “Rabbi Ben --” 27 Elbow grease 28 Kickbacks 30 Mixed breed 34 Colorful transfer 36 Ariz. neighbor 37 Like a raft 38 Feudal underlings 40 Tornado warning 41 Garden pest 42 Soybean food 43 Click-on item 44 Marquette’s title 45 Mrs. Charles 46 AAA recommendations 47 On a cruise 50 Compete for

Call 419-707-0537

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Ask Doctor K

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ensure that results meet/exceed customer requirements • Identifies potential quality issues and recommends changes in process, procedure, work methods, and other corrective/ preventive actions to support continuous quality improvement • Prepares various reports for management and customer representatives Candidates must have at least three (3) years of related quality assurance engineering experience, including ISO/TS 16949 quality management systems, root cause analysis tools, SPC, FMEA, and APQP/ PPAP processes. Experience should also include gauging, inspection processes, blueprint reading, geometric dimensioning/tolerancing, and excellent computer skills. A related Associate degree is required. A related Bachelor degree and ASQ certification is preferred. In return for your expertise, we offer a competitive starting salary, profit-sharing, and excellent fringe benefits, including medical, dental, life, vision, and disability insurance, 401(k) retirement savings plan with Company matching, paid vacation, paid holidays, and more. If you’re looking for a career opportunity with a growing company, please forward your qualifications and salary history to:

(Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.) Distributed by Universal UCLick or UFS

Answer to Puzzle

5745 Redd Rd., Delphos

Larry McClure

Bill Teman 419-302-2981 Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

419-692-7261

AAP St. Marys Corporation 1100 McKinley Road St. Marys, Ohio 45885 Attention: Human Resource-DH

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

The Herald – 11

Brother’s demands concerning daughter unreasonable

Tomorrow’s Horoscope
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 It looks like a greater amount of travel is probable for you in the year ahead, though it might not be to faraway places. Regardless of the distance, your trips will provide you with a wealth of memories. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You always require a degree of independence and freedom in life, so don’t hem yourself in with a tight itinerary. Leave plenty of room for impromptu developments. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -There is a good possibility that you will collect payment on an old loan that you had completely written off. If this should occur, be appreciative without overdoing it. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Challenging conditions are more likely to stimulate your positive qualities than negative ones. Success makes you feel like a winner. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- A friend for whom you did a favor will find an opportunity to repay you. Your pal will step to the plate without being asked. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- It’s to your benefit to study the successful procedures of an associate. You’re likely to discover some new tactics that you could put to good use. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Resistance you are facing on a major project can be alleviated if you just make a few tweaks. Once these are implemented, you can go forward with alacrity and aplomb. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Be sure that what you do at work also produces benefits for your co-workers. They, in turn, will be more responsive to your needs and requests. Remember, one hand washes the other. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Work on an endeavor that can either be updated or transformed into something far more useful. The rewards for doing so will be larger than you think. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -What cannot be accomplished on your own can be achieved through a strong team effort. The secret is picking the right helpers who’ll stay with the project until the end. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- In order to feel gratified, you need to get involved in something that you can see through to its completion. Only then will you feel like you’re putting your time to good use. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Participating in some kind of activity that is unrelated to your workaday world could do wonders to refurbish your outlook on life. Find something different to do that you’ll enjoy. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Don’t be afraid to spend a little of your funds in hopes of future gain, because in order to make more of anything, including money, it is necessary to prime the pump. COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

HI AND LOIS

By Bernice Bede Osol

Dear Annie: My brother, on the price, and it does not “Jay,” and his wife have an flatter her figure. My wife adopted daughter, “Anna,” and I would like to offer to who is now 3 years old. We purchase a more attractive gown, but we don’t know adore her. Jay and I recently got into how to approach the subject. an argument. He said they Any suggestions? — North were angry that we didn’t Carolina Dear North Carolina: call Anna on her birthday. I was surprised by this, as Are you certain that your we had already wished her daughter selected this design a happy birthday in person, solely because of the price? with a gift and a card at her Your financial assistance might only serve party a few days to purchase an prior to her actual equally unflatterbirthday. When ing gown in a more Jay and I were expensive fabric. kids, we were alKeep in mind that ways happy to realterations can ceive a card and work wonders, a gift from our and Mom could aunts and uncles. enlist the help of We never expectthe seamstress to ed them to call, as ascertain whether well. your daughter is In addition, unhappy with her Jay said that they Annie’s Mailbox gown. If so, it’s were angry that perfectly fine to my husband and I didn’t take time off of work say you want her to have to be at the courthouse to something closer to the dress celebrate the “official” adop- of her dreams. Otherwise, tion six months after Anna please repeat the old saying was born. We told him at the that “all brides are beautitime that we couldn’t take ful.” Dear Annie: This is for time off of work and would celebrate with them at their “Tired in Nebraska,” whose home, which we did. At that husband has sleep apnea and time, Jay said it was fine, but refuses to wear a CPAP. I’m an orthodontist who now, it apparently wasn’t good enough. When my has successfully fit many pahusband and I adopted our tients with a dental sleep apoldest child, we never de- pliance that is very comfortmanded that anyone take the able to wear. Sleep centers day off of work to be at the do not always mention their courthouse, nor to be at the availability, but it should not hospital when our younger be difficult to find an orthodontist or general dentist who kids were born. Annie, we celebrated An- will fit her husband. These na’s adoption multiple times appliances are covered by — right after her birth, at insurance with a prescription her baptism, when we gave from a physician and are the them a baby shower and next best treatment to CPAP then at their home after the devices, which many people courthouse. I reminded Jay cannot tolerate. — Sympaof these things and told him thetic Orthodontist Dear Sympathetic: we love Anna and don’t like his implication that we don’t Many readers recommended care. My brother used to be a dental appliance that can easygoing until he married help with apnea and is easier his wife. Now they expect to wear. Thanks to all who a parade every time Anna suggested it. opens her eyes. Are Jay’s expectations reasonable? Should we call Anna on her birthday even when we’ve already celebrated with her? They act as if the world revolves around them. — Can’t Keep Up Dear Can’t: Attending Anna’s birthday party and giving her a gift was sufficient. It’s also lovely to call on the actual birthday, but it is not an obligation. The rest of Jay’s complaints are irrational and self-centered. We don’t recommend arguing with him. He won’t see things your way. Placate and ignore. Dear Annie: Our daughter is getting married in July. We decided to give her a lump sum for the wedding, and she created a budget to handle all aspects of the event. Unfortunately, she selected a wedding gown based

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Rhode Island struggles with highest unemployment
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Mark Simmons began dialing Rhode Island’s unemployment call center at 8 a.m. on a recent Monday. He got a busy signal. He tried 67 more times before the automated system picked up and told him that because of heavy call volume, he should try back another time. People applying for unemployment benefits in this state with the nation’s highest jobless rate must wait on hold an average of 51 minutes. Not only that, but some of those interviewed by The Associated Press say that their benefits are often weeks late and that when they try to speak to a human about the problem, they’re referred to a computer. “This is about whether I can buy groceries or whether I’m going to be evicted,” said Simmons, a 42-year-old Army veteran who has gotten by on part-time wages and unemployment since losing his job at a Providence bookstore in 2011. “I sit in my apartment, dialing the number again and again, when I’m supposed to be looking for jobs. It’s like, what do I pay taxes for?” While many states are well on the way to recovery 2 1/2 years after the end of the Great Recession, financially ailing Rhode Island stands apart. And it inadvertently made things more difficult for its unemployed with an automated system that can’t handle the demand, and a remarkably ill-timed decision to lay off scores of workers at the call center. State officials acknowledge the problems and say they are rehiring staff and have upgraded the automated system. But the mess has illustrated how slowly and painfully recovery has come to Rhode Island. With a population of just over 1 million, Rhode Island has 57,800 jobless people and is tied with Nevada for the highest unemployment in the nation, at 10.2 percent, as it seeks to reverse a long, slow decline in business that began well before the recession. Once home to a robust manufacturing economy that produced jewelry, heavy machinery and other goods, Rhode Island has struggled for decades to attract the kind of jobs in health care and high tech that have helped its New England neighbors make the transition into the 21st century. Unemployment in Rhode Island peaked during the recent downturn at 11.9 percent, and the state is projecting a $69 million budget shortfall this year. During the 2007-09 recession, the federal government gave states extra money to beef up unemployment-office staffing, but the dollars have dried up as the jobs picture has improved across the country. Last summer, faced with a $3 million cut in federal aid, Rhode Island’s labor department laid off 67 workers, including about one-third of the 150 people at the call center. Telephone wait times jumped to more than two hours, according to the union representing the laid-off workers. Then Congress voted to extend emergency unemployment assistance, heaping more work on an already overstretched Rhode Island system that now handles 28,000 claims a week. While the automated phone and online system takes claim information from people filing for benefits, it’s up to state workers to process and approve the claims. When too many people call in at once, the phone system becomes overwhelmed. Rhode Island has since secured federal money to refill 33 positions at the call center, and officials hope to move to a mostly Webbased system by the end of the year. “We lost a third of our staff,” said Charles Fogarty, director of the state Department of Labor and Training. “We are doing everything humanly possible. We understand it’s not where it should be, and we’re taking every measure possible to get it there.” Other states with outsized unemployment figures face similar struggles. Michigan laid off 400 unemployment workers last year, prompting complaints about benefit delays and long phone waiting times. Leaders there hope a new computer and telephone system scheduled to go

12 – The Herald

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

www.delphosherald.com

Comcast doubles down on Study questions kidney cancer treatment in elderly The improve cancer imaging tests. TV in $16.7B deal for NBCU In a stunningAssociatedofPress treatment “If the treatment doesn’t consider leaving odicAfter five years, 1,536 had died, including example when outcomes, then we should
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Comcast’s $16.7 billion deal to buy the remaining half of NBCUniversal ahead of schedule represents a resounding vote of confidence in the future of TV, even as the growth of Internet video reshapes the entertainment landscape. The decision was driven largely by Comcast Corp.’s belief that it would end up paying substantially more for General Electric Co.’s remaining 49 percent stake if it had waited until 2018, as had been envisioned in 2011 when the cable TV provider acquired majority control of NBCUniversal. The flagship NBC network, once seen as the deal’s albatross, has been on the turnaround. Broadcast TV revenue rose 7 percent last year, even after excluding the Super Bowl and the Olympics. Theme parks, the Universal Pictures movie studio and pay TV networks such as USA and SyFy have grown, too. As the advertising market has rebounded with the economy, so have the fortunes of NBCUniversal and other media companies such as CBS Corp. and ABC owner The Walt Disney Co. That made the latest transaction, announced Tuesday, seem like a savvy one at a relatively modest price. “I think the television business has turned out to be much more powerful as an advertising medium than people were thinking five years ago,” said Jonathan Taplin, a professor specializing in digital media at the University of Southern California. “Comcast made a really smart move in believing that TV would continue to be a really important part of the advertising picture for years to come.” When the deal was first announced in late 2009, NBC’s audience ratings were sagging badly, raising doubts about the future of the broadcast pioneer that once boasted stars such as Johnny Carson, Jerry Seinfeld, Bob Hope, Milton Berle and Tom Brokaw. More recently, though, NBC has bounced back with a new hit in “The Voice” and has a consistent ratings leader in “Sunday Night Football” during the fall and early winter. By last fall, NBC could boast for the first time in a decade that it was drawing the most viewers in the 18-to-49-year-old demographic prized by advertisers. Overall, NBC still ranked behind CBS and ABC, but at least it was no longer bringing up the rear in fourth place, as had been the case for several years. Higher ratings translate into more advertising revenue, even though Comcast gets two-thirds of its revenue as a cable-TV and Internet access provider. NBC’s improved success from TV shows also figures to bring in higher licensing fees from the Internet video services run by Netflix Inc. and Amazon. com Inc. NBC’s turnaround is one of the main reasons Comcast CEO Brian Roberts wanted to take complete ownership of NBCUniversal now. “We thought that we would have to pay more later,” Roberts said in an interview with The Associated Press. “We really have known we wanted to buy 100 percent from the beginning of the transaction. We wanted to learn the business,” he added. “We feel that now is an opportune time.” The deal, expected to be completed by the end of March, values NBCUniversal at $34 billion, not including $5 billion in debt. That’s about 13 percent higher than two years ago, when Comcast’s investment valued the company at about $30 billion, also excluding debt. might be worse than the disease, a large review of Medicare records finds that older people with small kidney tumors were much less likely to die over the next five years if doctors monitored them instead of operating right away. Even though nearly all of these tumors turned out to be cancer, they rarely proved fatal. And surgery roughly doubled patients’ risk of developing heart problems or dying of other causes, doctors found. After five years, 24 percent of those who had surgery had died, compared to only 13 percent of those who chose monitoring. Just 3 percent of people in each group died of kidney cancer. The study only involved people 66 and older, but half of all kidney cancers occur in this age group. Younger people with longer life expectancies should still be offered surgery, doctors stressed. The study also was observational — not an experiment where some people were given surgery and others were monitored, so it cannot prove which approach is best. Yet it offers a real-world look at how more than 7,000 Medicare patients with kidney tumors fared. Surgery is the standard treatment now. “I think it should change care” and that older patients should be told “that they don’t necessarily need to have the kidney tumor removed,” said Dr. William Huang of New York University Langone Medical Center. them alone.” He led the study and will give results at a medical meeting in Orlando, Fla., later this week. The research was discussed Tuesday in a telephone news conference sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and two other cancer groups. In the United States, about 65,000 new cases of kidney cancer and 13,700 deaths from the disease are expected this year. Twothirds of cases are diagnosed at the local stage, when five-year survival is more than 90 percent. However, most kidney tumors these days are found not because they cause symptoms, but are spotted by accident when people are having an X-ray or other imaging test for something else, like back trouble or chest pain. Cancer experts increasingly question the need to treat certain slow-growing cancers that are not causing symptoms — prostate cancer in particular. Researchers wanted to know how life-threatening small kidney tumors were, especially in older people most likely to suffer complications from surgery. They used federal cancer registries and Medicare records from 2000 to 2007 to find 8,317 people 66 and older with kidney tumors less than 1.5 inches wide. Cancer was confirmed in 7,148 of them. About three-quarters of them had surgery and the rest chose to be monitored with peri-

into operation in several months will help. Overall, 23 states planned to eliminate more than 1,200 full-time unemployment agency positions last fall, according to a survey by the National Association of State Workforce Agencies. But on average, the cuts were far smaller proportionally than those in Rhode Island. Nevada also lost federal funding but did not lay off any call center workers. In Rhode Island, Jonathan Jacobs was rehired by the department this year after being laid off. He said his overworked colleagues are “trying to bail out the ocean with little plastic pail.” “It’s a flawed system,” he said. “I’d love to take it back to the way it was when FDR set it up, but it’s not that way.” Once, Rhode Island offered walk-in services for the unemployed, but that was eliminated a decade ago to make the system more efficient. That hasn’t happened, according to unemployed bus driver John Gallagher. The Providence man filed for unemployment after losing his job last month. The online system told him he would receive a response within eight business days. He is still waiting a month later. He tried to call into the center but got a recording. “It said, ‘We cannot process your call. Call again tomorrow,”’ he said. “It’s like an iron curtain. You can’t call a real person. It’s not how a democracy is supposed to work.”

Police: 3 killed in shooting at Utah drug house

Grammy gatecrasher: stunt was ‘spontaneous’

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The man who was arrested after attempting to upstage Adele at Sunday’s Grammy Awards has a new message for the singer: “help me.” Vitalii Sediuk says his appearance onstage at the Grammys was a spontaneous event and that he is only now realizing that it might have legal consequences for him. The Ukrainian journalist, who did not have a ticket to the awards show, spent several hours in police custody before being released with a trespassing citation and a March 4 court date. Sediuk briefly took the microphone Sunday night before Adele accepted her award. He only got a few words out before Jennifer Lopez shooed him away. “It was spontaneous,” Sediuk said in a telephone interview Tuesday. “It was not planned of course” He said he realizes now that he may be banned from covering award shows, which would be problematic for a reporter who’s already got a reputation for awkward celebrity encounters. Last year, Will Smith slapped Sediuk, 24, after he tried to kiss him on a red carpet, and he drew Madonna’s ire a year earlier by presenting her a bouquet of flowers she hated. He said he hopes that Adele, who called Lopez her “good luck charm” at Sunday’s show, will help him out of his latest mess. “Oh Adele. Help me not to go to jail,” Sediuk said. He said he arrived at the show in a car that had access to the red carpet, and he did a few interviews before attempting to follow Nicole Kidman into the show. She stopped to talk to reporters and he then followed in Katy Perry — all without a guard ever stopping him to ask for a ticket. Once inside, he got a seat near the stage, apparently taking Adam Levine’s seat. “I didn’t really think about the fact that I didn’t have the ticket,” he said. Sediuk said that he was initially excited about the whole incident, but he is now more apprehensive about the prospect of going to court. He still thinks the stunt was worth it. “I don’t regret doing anything,” he said.

UK royals condemn plans to publish Kate photos

MIDVALE, Utah (AP) — A suspect was on the run Tuesday after three people were shot to death and one was wounded at a known drug house in suburban Salt Lake City, causing temporary lockdowns at several area schools. Police left three bodies inside the house for much of Tuesday as they searched Midvale for ex-convict David Fresques, 25, who left his car at a nearby Motel 6. “He is a suspect at large, and we want to get him caught,” Unified Police Department Lt. Justin Hoyal said Tuesday afternoon. Fresques has a lengthy criminal record and was paroled in November on a robbery conviction, court records show. His involvement or motive in the shooting was unknown. Detectives, meanwhile, were interviewing two adults and a child left unharmed at the house during the shooting, Hoyal said. The shooting was reported around 8 a.m. at a house that backs up to a sound barrier for Interstate-15, about a dozen miles south of Salt Lake City. Hoyal said a search warrant had been served at the residence in recent weeks for drug activity. “It was a known narcotics house,” he said. Several elementary schools were locked down to keep children safe as dozens of officers began a search for Fresques, who police believe left the home after the shooting. The school lockdowns were later lifted, but police kept the schools under guard for much of the day. At first, police called Fresques a “person of interest” in the case. But by late Tuesday Hoyal left no doubt that he was being considered a suspect, together with a second man who has yet to be identified. Investigators and a medical examiner were preparing to enter the house late Tuesday to recover the bodies and evidence. The fourth shooting victim, a woman, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. Her condition improved later Tuesday to serious, Hoyal said. Court records show the owner of the house was trying to evict tenants for nonpayment of rent, but the landlord’s daughter told The Associated Press the shooting had nothing to do with the dispute in court.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are helping search for evidence of alien life not by looking into outer space, but by studying some rocks right here on Earth. Some of the rocks are up to 3.5 billion years old. The scientists are looking for crucial information to understand how life might have arisen elsewhere in the universe and guide the search for life on Mars one day. “There’s a story always hidden in rocks,” said geoscientist Clark Johnson, the lead investigator for the Wisconsin Astrobiology Research Consortium. “… It’s up to (geologists) to be clever enough to find the tools that we need to interrogate those rocks to find what story they preserve.” The project is funded through NASA, which provided a $7 million, five-year grant that started in January. It was the group’s second five-year, $7 million grant. The consortium includes about 50 staff, students and postdoctoral fellows from 24 institutions in five countries. About 25 of the participants are at UW-Madison. The consortium has been tasked with finding footprints of biological activity, or biosignatures, which are substances such as elements or isotopes that show evidence of ancient life. The scientists are looking for microscopic signs of life, including microbes, which are bacteria, and other tiny, one-celled organisms that are much more adaptable than more complex organisms. The team is also sending microbes into Earth’s orbit on the International Space Station to see how they react to radiation and a space environment.

Wisconsin scientists help search for alien life

191 of kidney cancer. For every 100 patients who chose monitoring, 11 more were alive at the five-year mark compared to the surgery group. Only 6 percent of those who chose monitoring eventually had surgery. Furthermore, 27 percent of the surgery group but only 13 percent of the monitoring group developed a cardiovascular problem such as a heart attack, heart disease or stroke. These problems were more likely if doctors removed the entire kidney instead of just a part of it. The results may help doctors persuade more patients to give monitoring a chance, said a cancer specialist with no role in the research, Dr. Bruce Roth of Washington University in St. Louis. Some patients with any abnormality “can’t sleep at night until something’s done about it,” he said. Doctors need to say, “We’re not sticking our head in the sand, we’re going to follow this” and can operate if it gets worse. One of Huang’s patients — 81-year-old Rhona Landorf, who lives in New York City — needed little persuasion. “I was very happy not to have to be operated on,” she said. “He said it’s very slow growing and that having an operation would be worse for me than the cancer.” Landorf said her father had been a doctor, and she trusts her doctors’ advice. Does she think about her tumor? “Not at all,” she said.

LONDON (AP) — An Italian magazine that published topless photos of Prince William’s wife last year is reportedly printing new pictures of the pregnant duchess on a beach holiday in the Caribbean, provoking condemnation from royal officials. St. James’s Palace expressed disappointment Tuesday that the pictures may be published, saying it would amount to a “clear breach of the couple’s right to privacy.” It did not say whether officials would be prepared to take legal action against the gossip magazine. The magazine, Chi, is said to be planning to publish the pictures today. The photos reportedly show the Duchess of Cambridge — the former Kate Middleton — wearing a bikini and strolling on a beach with William on the island of Mustique. Last September, the magazine — owned by former Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi — published a 26-page special featuring topless photos of the duchess while she and William vacationed in the south of France. The royal couple took legal action to halt the use of those intimate photos, but had only limited success. Although a French court ordered gossip magazine Closer to stop further publication of the pictures, they went on to be published in Chi, other publications across Europe, and on the Internet.

Answers to Monday’s questions: Sixty permanent crew members live aboard the 414foot megayacht Octopus, owned by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Some are former Navy Seals, which is no doubt comes in handy since the yacht also houses two submarines, two helicopters and eight boats. The first names of Mammy and Pappy Yokum in the Li’l Abner comic strip were Pansy and Lucifer. Today’s questions: Which state is the only state whose official fossil is of an animal that is still alive? Paintings — one real, one imagined — by what famous artist inspired the 1999 historical novels The Girl with a Pearl Earring and Girl in Hyacinth Blue? Answers in Thursday’s Herald. Today’s joke: Little Billy wanted $100 badly and prayed for two weeks but nothing happened. Then he decided to write God a letter requesting the $100. When the postal authorities received the letter addressed to God, USA, they decided to send it to President Bush. The president was so impressed, touched, and amused that he instructed his secretary to send Billy a $5 bill. President Bush thought this would appear to be a lot of money to a little boy. Billy was delighted with the $5 and sat down to write a thank you note to God, which read: Dear God, Thank you very much for sending the money, however, I noticed that for some reason you had to send it through Washington, D.C. and, as usual, those crooks deducted $95. Thanks, Billy

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