P. 1
Faking Jesus

Faking Jesus

5.0

|Views: 38,863|Likes:
Published by Mogg Morgan

Robert Conner's review essay of Richard Carrier's book "Proving History, Bayes Theorem & the Quest for the historical Jesus" . Robert Conner is author of "Magic in the New Testament" & "Jesus the Sorcerer" both available from Mandrake.uk.net website and usual outlets

Robert Conner's review essay of Richard Carrier's book "Proving History, Bayes Theorem & the Quest for the historical Jesus" . Robert Conner is author of "Magic in the New Testament" & "Jesus the Sorcerer" both available from Mandrake.uk.net website and usual outlets

More info:

Categories:Types, Reviews
Published by: Mogg Morgan on Feb 18, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/20/2015

pdf

text

original

 

     

Faking Jesus
 

       

 

“And  that’s  not  even  a  complete  list.  We  also  have  Jesus  the  Folk  Wizard  (championed  most  famously  be  Morton  Smith  in  Jesus  the  Magician,  and  most  recently  by  Robert  Conner in Magic in the New Testament).”1   
                                                         1 Richard  Carrier, Proving History: Bayes’s Theorem and the Quest for the Historical  Jesus, 13.   

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

That  Jesus  Studies  is  rife  with  flawed  scholarship,  special  pleading,  fideism, rank speculation, manufactured relevance, careerism, homo‑ phobia  and  the  misogyny  that  homophobia  implies,  sectarian  alle‑ giances,  personal  agendas,  fraud  and  simple  incompetence  should  come  as  no  surprise  to  anyone  conversant  with  the  field.  Indeed,  whether  Jesus  Studies  is  even  an  academic  discipline  as  usually  understood is debatable, and that Jesus Studies has precious little to  do with history is certain.    Mainstream  scholars  have  understood  for  quite  some  time  that  the  gospels  are  not  history  by  any  modern  definition.  It  is  widely  con‑ ceded  that  the  gospel  authors  were  writing  decades  after  the  events  they purport to relate, that the writers were pseudonymous, that they  were  not  eyewitnesses,  that  both  the  provenance  and  intended  audience  of  each  gospel  is  a  matter  of  conjecture,  and  that  the  pri‑ mary  sources  on  which  the  gospels  are  ultimately  based  are  un‑ known  and  unknowable.  It  is  universally  conceded  that  no  original  exists  for  any  gospel  and  that  the  gospels  that  have  survived  are  copies of copies that preserve variant wording.     The  gospels  were  not  even  written  in  Palestine  where  the  events  of  Jesus’  life  took  place.  In  the  year  66  C.E.,  long‑standing  tensions  between  immiserated  Jews  and  pagan  gentiles  exploded  in  the  First  Jewish‑Roman  War,  one  of  three  such  conflicts.  From  the  Jewish  perspective  the  war  got  off  to  a  promising  start—Jewish  revolution‑ aries  initially  inflicted  heavy  casualties  on  Roman  troops.  However,  Vespasian invaded Galilee in 67 C.E., moving steadily south toward  Jerusalem after subjugating town after town, and after Vespasian was  recalled  to  Rome,  his  son  Titus  laid  siege  to  Jerusalem  and  utterly  destroyed  the  city  in  70  C.E.  The  war  smoldered  in  the  hills  to  the  south  for  three  additional  years  before  the  last  Jewish  garrison  at  Masada fell. All in all, over a million Jews were killed in the fighting  or  died  from  disease  and  starvation  and  according  to  the  historian  Josephus some 97,000 were captured and enslaved. In fact, it appears 
  2 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

many  thousands  of  those  slaves  were  put  the  work  quarrying  the  stone  for  the  Flavian  Ampitheater,  generally  known  today  as  the  Colosseum.    In  short,  the  cities  of  Jewish  Palestine  were  defeated,  the  capitol  de‑ stroyed, and the population decimated and dispersed before the first  canonical  gospel  was  written.  It  is  conjectured  that  the  gospel  of  Mark was composed in Rome, Matthew in Syria, and John perhaps in  Asia  Minor.  Given  that  an  average  lifespan  in  the  1st  century  likely  amounted  to  less  than  fifty  years,  that  decades  had  passed  since  Jesus’ crucifixion, and that a devastating war had supervened, where  were the eyewitnesses to Jesus’ life and career? Dead, quite likely, or  enslaved and scattered abroad.     Confabulation is a compensatory mechanism observed in subjects with  essentially  intact  mentation  but  with  serious  gaps  in  memory.  Con‑ fabulators  fill  in  missing  memory  with  invented  narrative  that  changes with each retelling, thereby revealing the lacunose nature of  their  memory,  and  interrogation  of  the  gospel  accounts  reveals  that  they are confabulations in this technical sense. The writers of the gos‑ pels  were  basically  faking  it,  but  lacking  eyewitnesses,  what  choice  did they have?    The  early  communities  of  believers  for  whom  the  gospels  were  composed  had  a  very  imperfect  memory  of  Jesus  of  Nazareth.  The  gospels  contain  no  account  of  Jesus’  physical  appearance,  a  scant,  almost certainly apocryphal, record of his early life, and no coherent  explanation of his thinking, assuming, of course, that Jesus’ thinking  was coherent to begin with.    The  incompatible  infancy  narratives  of  Matthew  and  Luke  are  clear  examples  of  confabulation;  the  inconsistencies  large  and  small  be‑ tween the gospel accounts also betray defective institutional memory.  The  fact  that  Mark  is  quoted  nearly  in  its  entirety  by  Matthew  and 
  3 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

Luke—Matthew quotes or paraphrases some 600 of the 661 verses in  Mark—and  that  another  primitive  gospel,  Q,  appears  to  have  sup‑ plied the bulk of the narrative not derived from Mark, indicates that  the  authors  of  Matthew  and  Luke  were  not  eyewitnesses,  nor  did  they have access to firsthand accounts. In fact, it is nearly certain that  “the  greatest  story  ever  told”  contains  no  direct  eyewitness  testimony  from  any  contemporary  of  Jesus.  Eusebius  says  of  Mark,  the  putative  author of the earliest gospel, “he had not heard the Lord, nor had he  followed him…”2     Although  the  teachings  of  Jesus  are  the  supposed  core  of  Christian  belief, there are multiple, incompatible, differences of opinion among  the  experts  about  what,  exactly,  Jesus  taught.  The  lack  of  consensus  among  Jesus  scholars  about  what  Jesus  taught,  or  even  about  what  Jesus actually said, is a well‑known intellectual scandal. More on that  issue in a bit.    The dates of Jesus’ birth and death can only be estimated, the length  of his career is unknown—it may have been as short as a year—and  the  earliest  gospel,  Mark,  ends  with  an  empty  tomb  but  no  trace  of  the resurrected Jesus. I have suggested elsewhere that the post mor‑ tem appearances of Jesus in the gospels of Luke and John read suspi‑ ciously  like  ancient  ghost  stories3 and  I  am  not  the  only  person  to  have  commented  on  that  amazing  coincidence.4 Although  I  believe  that  Jesus  was  a  real  person  about  whom  we  actually  know  very  little,  the  claim  that  Jesus  and  his  career  are  pure  invention  persists  and  however  unlikely  we  may  regard  it,  there  is  no  way  to  defini‑ tively overturn that claim. 
                                                         2 Ecclesiastical History III, 39.  3 Jesus  the  Sorcerer:  Exorcist  and  Prophet  of  the  Apocalypse,  63‑72;  Magic  in  the  New  Testament: A Survey and Appraisal of the Evidence, 106‑123.  4 Deborah Thompson Prince, “The ‘Ghost’ of Jesus: Luke 24 in Light of Ancient  Narratives  of  Post‑Mortem  Apparitions,”  Journal  for  the  Study  of  the  New  Testa‑ ment 29: 287‑301.    4 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

  In any case, we do not have anything that remotely approaches more  than a sketch of Jesus. That is not an opinion, it is a fact, and it is true  at least in part because other sources of possible evidence, other gos‑ pels, were lost or destroyed. It is not commonly appreciated to what  extent this happened, but the list of early lost, “apocryphal,” gospels  is  impressive.  Such  a  list  would  include  the  lost  sayings  gospel  Q,  partially  preserved  in  the  form  of  quotations  in  Matthew  and  Luke,  the gospel of signs that forms the basis of parts of the gospel of John,  the fragmentary gospel of Peter, the Coptic gospel of Thomas, fragments  of  which  also  exist  in  Greek,  the  highly  fragmentary  Oxyrhynchus  gospel(s),  the  gospel  of  the  Egyptians,  and  the  gospel  of  the  Ebionites,  to  name  but  a  few.  There  are  also  a  number  of  later,  clearly  fanciful,  gospels  that  are  widely  considered  to  contain  nothing  of  actual  his‑ torical relevance, but the assumption that no gospel outside the New  Testament canon contained anything of historical value is only an as‑ sumption and nothing more.     It is particularly noteworthy, I believe, that early gospels presumably  written by Jews for Jews who accepted Jesus, such as the lost gospel of  the  Hebrews,  are  conspicuously  absent.  I  would  assume  that  a  gospel  most apt to bring us closer to the elusive “historical” Jesus, who was,  after all, a Jew, would be one composed for the use of Jewish Chris‑ tians. The historian Eusebius mentions that some in his day (the early  4th  century)  accepted  the  gospel  of  the  Hebrews  as  one  of  the  “Recog‑ nized Books” and preferred it above the other gospels.5    The  canonical  gospels  as  well  as  the  whole  New  Testament  corpus  show  us  not  only  a  thoroughly  theologized  Jesus,  but  also  a  steadily  evolving Jesus theology—the pseudo‑Pauline letters borrow vocabulary  willy‑nilly  from  gnosticism6 and  mystery  cult  alike.  The  exorcisms 
                                                         5 Ecclesiastical History, III, 25, 28.  6 Elaine Pagels’ The Gnostic Paul: Gnostic Exegesis of the Pauline Letters remains the  definitive work on the topic.    5 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

given pride of place in Mark are completely missing from John, as are  the  intensely  apocalyptic  vocabulary  and  imagery  of  the  Synoptics.  To  an  extent  modern  interpreters  of  Jesus’  career  might  be  forgiven  some  level  of  confusion  and  inconsistency;  the  gospels  themselves  present a confused and inconsistent picture of Jesus.     Indeed Jesusgate is hardly a new phenomenon. The early Christians,  nearly two millennia closer to the source than we, hardly knew what  to  make  of  Jesus.  The  orthodox  trinitarian  position  was  not  ham‑ mered  out  until  the  early  4th  century  and  even  then  it  was  not  uni‑ versally  accepted.  Before  christology  finally  gelled  in  the  orthodox  mold,  the  Jewish  Ebionites  claimed  Jesus  was  merely  human,  the  Docetists,  at  the  other  extreme,  claimed  Jesus  was  completely  spirit  and only appeared to be human. Arianism fell between the extremes,  claiming  that  the  Son  was  divine  but  created,  had  a  beginning,  and  did  not  share  the  essence  of  the  Father.  Arianism  persisted  for  centuries  after  the  triumph  of  the  orthodox  position.  For  the  Adop‑ tionists, Jesus was a man who only received the ‘Christ spirit’ at his  baptism, a notion common to Gnosticism, to the Apollonarians, Jesus  consisted of a human body inhabited by the pre‑existent ‘Word’ that  replaced  the  normal  rational  soul.  The  Nestorians,  attempting  to  explicate the mystery of the incarnation, argued about whether or not  God had entered Mary’s uterus, and patripassionists (“father suffer‑ ers”) argued that since the divine nature was indivisible, Jesus was an  aspect of God the Father Himself. Several of these heresies survived  into the Middle Ages.    As  mentioned  above,  modern  interpretations  of  the  evidence  fare  scarcely better. Jesus has been cast in a bewildering number of roles,  from  prophet  to  philosopher  to  social  reformer,  to  say  nothing  of  having  been  co‑opted  by  social  movements  ranging  from  the  white  supremacy gospel of Christian Identity to the to racial equality gospel  of  abolitionists  and  desegregationists.  The  American  evangelical  WWJD (“What Would Jesus Do?”) craze of the 1990’s quickly became 
  6 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

“What Would  Jesus Buy?” and “Who Would  Jesus Kill?” Obviously  Jesus can mean nearly anything to anyone, but an icon that can stand  for  anything  ultimately  stands  for  nothing.  “Who  do  men  say  that  I  am?”7 could be amended to “What haven’t men said that I am?”    However, I strongly suspect the historical truth of the matter is pro‑ saic  in  the  extreme,  to  say  nothing  of  depressing.  Based  on  the  evi‑ dence  of  the  gospels,  and possibly more  importantly the writings of  the era, I believe Jesus of Nazareth was a person of scant importance  from  a  village  of  no  importance,  a  man  of  humble  beginnings  who  achieved  a  brief  regional  reputation  as  an  apocalyptic  preacher  and  exorcist‑cum‑healer.  He  became  a  disciple  of  John  the  Baptist,  and  like  John  he  drew  excited  crowds  as  well  as  the  surveillance  of  the  Jewish authorities. At Passover he went to Jerusalem, raised a ruckus  in a potentially explosive atmosphere, and being marked as a trouble‑ maker,  got  himself  arrested,  handed  over  to  the  Romans  and  executed.  Literally  that  simple,  but  hardly  the  end  of  story  in  Jesus’  particular case.     Pace  Richard  Carrier,  who  is  quoted  at  the  beginning  of  this  essay,  there is a substantial body of evidence—most of it pointedly ignored  by  hard‑  and  soft‑core  Christian  apologists—that  securely  places  Jesus  within  a  well‑documented  type  of  historical  figure,  multiply  attested:  the  Kingdom‑of‑God  preacher  who  authenticated  his  mes‑ sage by dramatic charismatic performance. Given the history of con‑ flict  between  Jews  and  Romans,  it  comes  as  little  surprise  that  such  preachers  were  also  in  the  main  stern  Jewish  nationalists  who  ad‑ vocated  violent  overthrow  of  gentile  authority  and  were  therefore  carefully watched.     The  historian  Josephus  reports  several  rabble‑rousers  of  this  type,  among  them  Theudas,  described  as  a  “sorcerer”  or  “impostor”  as 
                                                         7 Mark 8:27.    7 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

well  as  a  “prophet,”8 and  another  man,  “a  magician,”  who  led  a  throng of followers into the wilderness,9 and yet another, the “Egyp‑ tian false prophet,” also described as a “magician,” who gathered an  immense  mob  and  led  an  unsuccessful  attack  on  Jerusalem.10 Jose‑ phus also reveals the Roman response to such magican‑prophets: kill  them.     Regarding  the  Jewish  rebel  Bar  Kokhba  who  led  the  third  and  final  Jewish revolt against Roman occupation—Bar Kokhba means “son of  a star” a probable reference to Numbers 24:17, “A star will come out  of Jacob; a scepter will rise out of Israel”—Eusebius says he “claimed  to be a luminary who had come down to them from heaven and was  magically  enlightening  those  who  were  in  misery.” 11  Perhaps  the  main  reason  Bar  Kokhba  is  not  today  regarded  as  the  martyred  founder of a world religion is that he didn’t have a Saul of Tarsus to  litigate his case.    Following  three  years  of  war  (132‑136  C.E.),  which  were  marked  by  particularly heavy Roman casualties, the Romans retaliated, expelled  most  of  the  Jewish  population,  renamed  Judea  Syria  Palaestina,  and  built  a  new  capitol,  Aelia  Capitolina,  on  the  ruins  of  Jerusalem.  The  catastrophic  Bar  Kokhba  war  relegated  messianism  to  the  fringes  of  Jewish religious thought.    John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth both fall quite neatly into the  mold  of  the  wonder‑working  apocalyptic  prophet. 12  The  gospels  mention the surveillance of both men—“the scribes who came down 
                                                         8 Jewish Antiquities XX, 97. Theudas is also mentioned in Acts 5:36.  9 Ibid XX, 188.  10 Jewish  War  II,  259.  According  to  Acts  21:38,  Paul  was  once  mistaken  for  the  “Egyptian.”  11 Ecclesiastical History IV, 7.  12 Bart  Ehrman’s  Jesus:  Apocalyptic  Prophet  of  the  New  Millennium  makes  a  clear,  persuasive argument for this interpretation.     8 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

from  Jerusalem,”13 who  accused  Jesus  of  performing  magic  by  con‑ trolling the prince of demons, likely did not make the trip to Galilee  out of mere curiosity. That Jesus and John drew large crowds as well  as  the  attention  of  the  authorities  and  that  those  same  authorities  executed both men fits a dreary, predictable pattern. End Times pro‑ phets and revolutionaries in Roman Palestine were likely as thick on  the ground as Baptists in Texas, and if historians of the period are to  be believed, the Romans must have nailed them up by the hundreds  without trial or compunction.14    Doctor  Richard  Carrier,  who  has  made  a  career  out  of  debunking  Christianity,  cites  my  work,  as  well  as  the  more  scholarly  work  of  Morton  Smith,  as  one  of  many  examples  of  failed  textual  and  his‑ torical  interrogation.  However,  that  Jesus’  career  and  the  rituals  of  the  primitive  church  supply  many  examples  of  magical  praxis  has  been  noted  by  Hull,15 Kee,16 Kraeling,17 de  Vos,18 Daniel  and  Malto‑ mini, 19  Arnold, 20  Klauck, 21  Meyer  and  Smith, 22  Neyrey, 23  Strelan, 24 
                                                         13 Mark 3:22.  14 Eusebius  again  on  the  Roman  response  to  the  Bar  Kokba  revolt:  “Rufus,  the  governor of Judaea, when military aid had been sent him by the Emperor, moved  out against them, treating their madness without mercy. He destroyed in heaps  thousands  of  men,  women,  and  children,  and,  under  the  law,  enslaved  their  land.” Ecclesiastical History IV, 6.  15 John Hull, Hellenistic Magic and the Synoptic Tradition.  16 Howard Clark Kee, Medicine, Miracle and Magic in New Testament Times.  17 Carl Kraeling, Journal of Biblical Literature 59: 147‑157.  18 Craig de Vos, Journal for the Study of the New Testament 74: 51‑63.  19  Robert  Daniel  and  Franco  Maltomini,  Supplementum  Magicum  (in  two  vol‑ umes).  20 Clinton Arnold, Ephesians: Power and Magic.  21 Hans‑Josef  Klauck,  Magic  and  Paganism  in  Early  Christianity:  The  World  of  the  Acts of the Apostles.  22 Marvin Meyer and Richard Smith, Ancient Christian Magic: Coptic Texts of Ritual  Power.  23 Jerome Neyrey, Catholic Biblical Quarterly 50: 72‑100.  24 Rick Strelan, Strange Acts: Studies in the Cultural World of the Acts of the Apostles.    9 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

Twelftree,25 Yarbro  Collins,26 and  Aune27 to  cite  a  very  abbreviated  and  necessarily  incomplete  list.  It  is  not  my  purpose  to  re‑rehearse  the  evidence  for  magic  in  early  Christianity,  which  is  so  extensive  that only a partial survey allowed me to produce some 350 pages of  text and nearly 1700 footnotes.28    More to the point, however, is the evaluation of Jesus by the writers  of  his  age,  not  of  ours,  and  that  evaluation  should  begin  with  the  Jews. Peter Schäfer’s work29 is the best summary of the Jewish opin‑ ion that Jesus was a false prophet and magician, and I have attempt‑ ed  to  make  the  case  that  sorcery  was  the  actual  charge  brought  against  Jesus  at  his  trial.30 Samson  Eitrem  noted,  “common  Jewish  people  considered  Jesus  a  μαγος  (magician,  my  note),”31 an  assess‑ ment confirmed by the Christian apologist Justin Martyr.32    When Marcus Aurelius spoke of “miracle‑mongers” and “sorcerers”  it  is  widely  believed  he  had  Christian  exorcists  in  mind,33 which  is  likely true since under Marcus the persecution of Christians as inim‑ ical  to  the  state  markedly  increased.  The  Emperor  Julian,  who  con‑ verted  from  Christianity  to  a  theurgic  form  of  paganism,  described  both Jesus and Paul as sorcerers and tricksters,34 Celsus likewise des‑ cribes  Jesus  as  “a  worthless  sorcerer,  hated  by  God.”35 As  Morton 
                                                         25 Graham  Twelftree,  A Kind of Magic: Understanding Magic in the New Testament  and its Religious Environment.  26  Adela Yarbro Collins, Harvard Theological Review 73, 2: 251‑263.  27 David Aune, Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity.  28 Robert  Conner,  Magic  in  the  New  Testament:  A  Survey  and  Appraisal  of  the  Evi‑ dence.  29 Jesus in the Talmud.  30 Magic in the New Testament, 97‑103.  31 Some Notes on the Demonology in the New Testament, 41.  32 Dialogue with Trypho, LXIX, 6.  33 Meditations, I, 6.  34 Against the Galileans I, 100.  35 Contra Celsum 1, 71.    10 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

Smith pointed out, Christians charged each other with magical prac‑ tice36 as this brief quote from Eusebius makes clear:    Formerly [the Devil] had used persecutions from without  as his weapon against [the church], but now that he was  excluded from this he employed wicked men and sorcer‑ ers,  like  baleful  weapons  and  ministers  of  destruction  against  the  soul,  and  conducted  his  campaign  by  other  measures, plotting by every means that sorcerers and de‑ ceivers might assume the same name as our religion…”37    The interpenetration of apocalypticism and magic has been explored  in  great  detail  by  David  Aune38 and  more  recently  by  Rodney  Law‑ rence Thomas.39 Far from overturning Smith’s appraisal of Jesus, sub‑ sequent study has supported it from multiple directions. In fact, such  a  wealth  of  evidence  has  accumulated  that  Smith’s  work  on  early  Christianity  seems  remarkably  lacking  in  controversial  content.  Currently, evidence drawn from multiple sources—in fact many more  sources  than  I  used  for  my  popular  work—prove  that  1st  century  Mediterranean societies were immersed in curses and magical spells,  amulets and words of power, teemed with witches and ghosts, angels  and demons, sorcerers and exorcists. I doubt that any work that did  complete justice to the totality of the surviving evidence for magical  praxis,  vocabulary,  and  thought  in  the  career  of  Jesus  and  the  early  church could be fit into any less than a thousand pages.    The miracles of Jesus are the most completely attested feature of his  career.  Powerful  works—which  were  understood  by  Jewish  and  pagan  outsiders  alike  as  magic—were  the  calling  card  of  early  Christianity.  The  apocryphal  Acts  of  the  4th  century  are  nearly  nothing  but  ac‑
                                                         36 Clement of Alexandria and a Secret Gospel of Mark, 234.  37 Ecclesiastical History IV, 7.  38 Apocalypticism, Prophecy, and Magic in Early Christianity.  39 Magical Motifs in the Book of Revelation.    11 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

counts  of  wonder‑working  Christians;  without  magic  there  would  have  been  no  Jesus  and  certainly  no  Christianity.  Morton  Smith’s  great  sin  against  Jesus  Studies  was  to  look  behind  the  theologized  Jesus, to situate him in the popular culture of his time, to contextual‑ ize  his  actions,  even  his  reported  vocabulary,  and  reveal  that  the  clothes had no Emperor, that there was no there there, that the Jesus  of  the  gospels  had  embarrassingly  little  of  substance  to  say  to  those  who struggled against the surge of the crowd to touch the hem of his  garment.  In  short,  if  Smith’s  evaluation  of  Jesus  were  true,  it  meant  the academy would have to come to grips with the evidence and stop  faking Jesus.    As readers of Magic in the New Testament are aware, I am certainly no  apologist  for  Christianity.  In  my  opinion  any  two  pages  chosen  at  random from Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations contain more insight than  the  entire  New  Testament.  Be  that  as  it  may,  it  appears  that  some  who  formerly  believed  but  are  now  disabused  have  reacted  with  Romantic  intensity  to  their  disappointment.  They—and  I  am  not  claiming  that  Richard  Carrier  is  among  their  number—seem  to  be  suffering from a sort of theological post‑traumatic stress disorder that  compels  them  to  pursue  Jesus  of  Nazareth  with  the  single‑minded  focus of a jilted lover stalking his ex. Not even the Romans who exe‑ cuted Jesus paid him that much attention.    Given the sheer ordinariness of Jesus in the 1st century, I can offer no  more reason for why Christianity should today be at least nominally  believed upon by a billion people than to quote the 19th century folk‑ lorist Cheales: “Unlooked for often comes to pass.” In fact, I can think  of  few  topics  under  general  discussion  that  are  of  less  relevance  in  this, Anno Domini 2013, than the life and career of Jesus. In my view,  the Jesus of the gospels has nothing much to say to us, and the theo‑ logical permutations of Jesus that have followed, even less. Of course  no  person  who  aspires  to  understand  the  course  of  history  would 

 

12 

FAKING JESUS   

 

Robert Conner 

claim that Jesus is unworthy of notice, but it bears pointing out that  Christian theology is not Jesus and Jesus is not Christianity.     The true believers who still imagine they are daily celebrating the life  and sacrifice of their Lord and the skeptics who ridicule them and rail  against them are in a sense two sides of the same coin, radical belief  and radical unbelief screaming past each other. The skeptics may be  truing Jesus, but, it seems to me, they are faking his importance. Let  me  close  this  response  in  the  same  way,  with  the  same  plea,  that  I  concluded Magic in the New Testament:    The study of the Life of Jesus has had a curious history. It  set out in quest of the historical Jesus, believing that when  it  had  found  Him  it  could  bring  Him  straight  into  our  time  as  a  Teacher  and  Saviour.  It  loosed  the  bands  by  which  He  had  been  riveted  for  centuries  to  the  stony  rocks of ecclesiastical doctrine, and rejoiced to see life and  movement coming into the figure once more, and the his‑ torical  Jesus  advancing,  as  it  seemed,  to  meet  it.  But  He  does  not  stay;  He  passes  by  our  time  and  returns  to  His  own.  What  surprised  and  dismayed  the  theology  of  the  past forty years was that, despite all forced and arbitrary  interpretations,  it  could  not  keep  Him  in  our  time,  not  owing  to  the  application  of  any  historical  ingenuity,  but  by  the  same  inevitable  necessity  by  which  the  liberated  pendulum returns to its original position.40    It is time we let Jesus of Nazareth, liberated from theology, return to  his era at last and there remain.       
                                                         40 Albert Schweitzer, The Quest of the Historical Jesus, 399.    13 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->