SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL

2007 SUMMER CONDITIONING MANUAL

“You are the way you are because that’s the way you want to be… If you really wanted to be any different, you would be in the process of changing right now! ”

Bearcats:

We had a good off-season and great Spring Practices. We have seen tremendous gains in the weight room and on the field as a team! The staff is extremely excited about the great potential you can bring to this program next season. We are building on the fact that we are a young team and focusing on the goal of a winning season. It is critical that you continue to prepare yourself for the demands of the 2007 Season. Do not let all of the hard work you put into this spring go to waste! Push yourself everyday to complete the lifting and conditioning with great effort and intensity. Your work ethic and mental focus for the next eleven weeks will lay the foundation for your success. Take advantage of every opportunity to improve. Make it your goal to report in the best condition of your life. We will test on all lifts and conditioning when we report to camp. Those who have not increased in all maxes or who fail the conditioning test will be required to extra lifting and conditioning and be reprimanded! DO NOT TAKE THIS SUMMER PROGRAM LIGHTLY- OUR SUCCESS AS A TEAM DEPENDS ON YOUR INDIVIDUAL COMMITMENT! Have a great summer and call us at (417) 328-1798 if you have any questions or concerns. Go Bearcats,

Jack Peavey

Head Football Coach

CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introductory Letter……….…………………………………………………. Table of Contents………………...…………………………………………… 2007 Schedule ………………...…………………………………………… i 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

Monthly Calendar………………………………….………………………… May……………………………………………………………………. June……………………………………………………………………. July…………………………………………………………………….. Flexibility……………………………………………...…………….…...…… Weight Percentage Chart……………………………………………………. Weekly Summer Lifting ……………………..……………..……………..…. Week 1…………………………………………………………………. Week 2…………………………………………………………………. Week 3…………………………………………………………………. Week 4…………………………………………………………………. Week 5…………………………………………………………………. Week 6…………………………………………………………………. Week 7…………………………………………………………………. Week 8…………………………………………………………………. Week 9…………………………………………………………………. Week 10..………………………………………………………………. Week 11..………………………………………………………………. Conditioning Notes………………………………………………………….… Weekly Summer Conditioning………………………………………………. Week 1…………………………………………………………………. Week 2…………………………………………………………………. Week 3…………………………………………………………………. Week 4…………………………………………………………………. Week 5…………………………………………………………………. Week 6…………………………………………………………………. Week 7…………………………………………………………………. Week 8…………………………………………………………………. Week 9…………………………………………………………………. Week 10..………………………………………………………………. Week 11..………………………………………………………………. Exercise Descriptors………………………………………………………….. Nutrition..………………………………………………………………. …….

34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 80 1

SOUTHWEST BAPTIST BEARCATS FOOTBALL 2007 SCHEDULE Date Sept 1 Sept 8 Sept 15 Sept 22 Sept 29 Oct 6 Oct 13 Oct 20 Oct 27 Nov 3 Nov 10 Opponent Time @ Harding @ Southeast Missouri State @ Emporia State Missouri Southern State @ Northwest Missouri State Truman State @ Missouri Western Pittsburg State Central Missouri @ Fort Hays State Washburn GO BEARCATS! 2 .

SUNDAY May 20 MONDAY MAY 21 TUESDAY MAY 22 WEDNESDAY MAY 23 THURSDAY MAY 24 FRIDAY MAY 25 SATURDAY MAY 26 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING MAY 27 MAY 28 MAY 29 MAY 30 MAY 31 JUNE 1 JUNE 2 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING MEMORIAL DAY CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JUNE 3 JUNE 4 JUNE 5 JUNE 6 JUNE 7 JUNE 8 JUNE 9 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JUNE 10 JUNE 11 JUNE 12 JUNE 13 JUNE 14 JUNE 15 JUNE 16 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING 3 .

SUNDAY JUNE 17 MONDAY JUNE 18 TUESDAY JUNE 19 WEDNESDAY JUNE 20 THURSDAY JUNE 21 FRIDAY JUNE 22 SATURDAY JUNE 23 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JUNE 24 JUNE 25 JUNE 26 JUNE 27 JUNE 28 JUNE 29 JUNE 30 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JULY 1 JULY 2 JULY 3 JULY 4 JULY 5 JULY 6 JULY 7 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS INDEPENDENCE DAY WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JULY 8 JULY 9 JULY 10 JULY 11 JULY 12 JULY 13 JULY 14 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING 4 .

SUNDAY JULY 15 MONDAY JULY 16 TUESDAY JULY 17 WEDNESDAY JULY 18 THURSDAY JULY 19 FRIDAY JULY 20 SATURDAY JULY 21 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JULY 22 JULY 23 JULY 24 JULY 25 JULY 26 JULY 27 JULY 28 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS WEIGHTS CONDITIONING JULY 29 JULY 30 JULY 31 AUGUST 1 AUGUST 2 AUGUST 3 AUGUST 4 WEIGHTS CONDITIONING WEIGHTS CONDITIONING REPORT AUGUST 5 AUGUST 6 AUGUST 7 AUGUST 8 AUGUST 9 AUGUST 10 AUGUST 11 5 .

FLEXIBILITY 6 .

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LBS 40% 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 375 380 385 390 395 400 405 410 415 420 425 430 435 440 445 450 455 460 465 470 475 480 485 490 495 500 505 510 515 520 525 530 535 540 545 550 555 560 565 570 575 580 585 590 595 600 605 610 615 620 625 630 635 640 645 140 140 140 145 145 150 150 150 155 155 160 160 160 165 165 170 170 170 175 175 180 180 180 185 185 190 190 190 195 195 200 200 200 205 205 210 210 210 215 215 220 220 220 225 225 230 230 230 235 235 240 240 240 245 245 250 250 250 255 255 260 260 45% 155 160 160 160 165 165 170 170 175 175 180 180 180 185 185 190 190 195 195 200 200 205 205 205 210 210 215 215 220 220 225 225 225 230 230 235 235 240 240 245 245 250 250 250 255 255 260 260 265 265 270 270 270 275 275 280 280 285 285 290 290 295 50% 170 175 175 180 180 185 185 190 190 195 195 200 200 205 205 210 210 215 215 220 220 225 225 230 230 235 235 240 240 245 245 250 250 255 255 260 260 265 265 270 270 275 275 280 280 285 285 290 290 295 295 300 300 305 305 310 310 315 315 320 320 325 55% 190 190 195 200 200 205 205 210 210 215 215 220 220 225 230 230 235 235 240 240 245 245 250 255 255 260 260 265 265 270 270 275 275 280 285 285 290 290 295 295 300 300 305 310 310 315 315 320 320 325 325 330 330 335 340 340 345 345 350 350 355 355 60% 205 210 210 215 220 220 225 225 230 235 235 240 240 245 250 250 255 255 260 265 265 270 270 275 280 280 285 285 290 295 295 300 300 305 310 310 315 315 320 325 325 330 330 335 340 340 345 345 350 355 355 360 360 365 370 370 375 375 380 385 385 390 65% 225 225 230 235 235 240 245 245 250 255 255 260 260 265 270 270 275 280 280 285 290 290 295 300 300 305 310 310 315 320 320 325 325 330 335 335 340 345 345 350 355 355 360 365 365 370 375 375 380 385 385 390 390 395 400 400 405 410 410 415 420 420 PERCENT 70% 240 245 245 250 255 260 260 265 270 270 275 280 280 285 290 295 295 300 305 305 310 315 315 320 325 330 330 335 340 340 345 350 350 355 360 365 365 370 375 375 380 385 385 390 395 400 400 405 410 410 415 420 420 425 430 435 435 440 445 445 450 455 75% 255 260 265 270 270 275 280 285 285 290 295 300 300 305 310 315 315 320 325 330 330 335 340 345 345 350 355 360 360 365 370 375 375 380 385 390 390 395 400 405 405 410 415 420 420 425 430 435 435 440 445 450 450 455 460 465 465 470 475 480 480 485 80% 275 280 280 285 290 295 300 300 305 310 315 320 320 325 330 335 340 340 345 350 355 360 360 365 370 375 380 380 385 390 395 400 400 405 410 415 420 420 425 430 435 440 440 445 450 455 460 460 465 470 475 480 480 485 490 495 500 500 505 510 515 520 85% 290 295 300 305 310 315 315 320 325 330 335 340 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 370 375 380 385 390 395 400 400 405 410 415 420 425 425 430 435 440 445 450 455 455 460 465 470 475 480 485 485 490 495 500 505 510 510 515 520 525 530 535 540 540 545 550 90% 310 315 315 320 325 330 335 340 345 350 355 360 360 365 370 375 380 385 390 395 400 405 405 410 415 420 425 430 435 440 445 450 450 455 460 465 470 475 480 485 490 495 495 500 505 510 515 520 525 530 535 540 540 545 550 555 560 565 570 575 580 585 95% 325 330 335 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 375 380 380 385 390 395 400 405 410 415 420 425 430 435 440 445 450 455 460 465 470 475 475 480 485 490 495 500 505 510 515 520 525 530 535 540 545 550 555 560 565 570 570 575 580 585 590 595 600 605 610 615 100% 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 375 380 385 390 395 400 405 410 415 420 425 430 435 440 445 450 455 460 465 470 475 480 485 490 495 500 505 510 515 520 525 530 535 540 545 550 555 560 565 570 575 580 585 590 595 600 605 610 615 620 625 630 635 640 645 105% 360 365 370 375 380 385 390 395 400 405 410 415 420 430 435 440 445 450 455 460 465 470 475 480 485 490 495 500 505 510 515 520 525 535 540 545 550 555 560 565 570 575 580 585 590 595 600 605 610 615 620 625 630 640 645 650 655 660 665 670 675 680 110% 375 380 385 395 400 405 410 415 420 425 430 435 440 450 455 460 465 470 475 480 485 490 495 505 510 515 520 525 530 535 540 545 550 560 565 570 575 580 585 590 595 600 605 615 620 625 630 635 640 645 650 655 660 670 675 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 16 .

LBS 40% 630 635 640 645 650 655 660 665 670 675 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 715 720 725 730 735 740 745 750 755 760 765 770 775 780 785 790 795 800 805 810 815 820 825 830 835 840 845 850 855 860 865 870 875 880 885 890 895 900 905 910 915 920 925 930 935 255 255 260 260 260 265 265 270 270 270 275 275 280 280 280 285 285 290 290 290 295 295 300 300 300 305 305 310 310 310 315 315 320 320 320 325 325 330 330 330 335 335 340 340 340 345 345 350 350 350 355 355 360 360 360 365 365 370 370 370 375 375 45% 285 290 290 295 295 295 300 300 305 305 310 310 315 315 315 320 320 325 325 330 330 335 335 340 340 340 345 345 350 350 355 355 360 360 360 365 365 370 370 375 375 380 380 385 385 385 390 390 395 395 400 400 405 405 405 410 410 415 415 420 420 425 50% 315 320 320 325 325 330 330 335 335 340 340 345 345 350 350 355 355 360 360 365 365 370 370 375 375 380 380 385 385 390 390 395 395 400 400 405 405 410 410 415 415 420 420 425 425 430 430 435 435 440 440 445 445 450 450 455 455 460 460 465 465 470 55% 350 350 355 355 360 365 365 370 370 375 375 380 380 385 385 390 395 395 400 400 405 405 410 410 415 420 420 425 425 430 430 435 435 440 440 445 450 450 455 455 460 460 465 465 470 475 475 480 480 485 485 490 490 495 495 500 505 505 510 510 515 515 60% 380 385 385 390 390 395 400 400 405 405 410 415 415 420 420 425 430 430 435 435 440 445 445 450 450 455 460 460 465 465 470 475 475 480 480 485 490 490 495 495 500 505 505 510 510 515 520 520 525 525 530 535 535 540 540 545 550 550 555 555 560 565 65% 410 415 420 420 425 430 430 435 440 440 445 450 450 455 455 460 465 465 470 475 475 480 485 485 490 495 495 500 505 505 510 515 515 520 520 525 530 530 535 540 540 545 550 550 555 560 560 565 570 570 575 580 580 585 585 590 595 595 600 605 605 610 PERCENT 70% 445 445 450 455 455 460 465 470 470 475 480 480 485 490 490 495 500 505 505 510 515 515 520 525 525 530 535 540 540 545 550 550 555 560 560 565 570 575 575 580 585 585 590 595 595 600 605 610 610 615 620 620 625 630 630 635 640 645 645 650 655 655 75% 475 480 480 485 490 495 495 500 505 510 510 515 520 525 525 530 535 540 540 545 550 555 555 560 565 570 570 575 580 585 585 590 595 600 600 605 610 615 615 620 625 630 630 635 640 645 645 650 655 660 660 665 670 675 675 680 685 690 690 695 700 705 80% 505 510 515 520 520 525 530 535 540 540 545 550 555 560 560 565 570 575 580 580 585 590 595 600 600 605 610 615 620 620 625 630 635 640 640 645 650 655 660 660 665 670 675 680 680 685 690 695 700 700 705 710 715 720 720 725 730 735 740 740 745 750 85% 540 540 545 550 555 560 565 570 570 575 580 585 590 595 595 600 605 610 615 620 625 625 630 635 640 645 650 655 655 660 665 670 675 680 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 710 715 720 725 730 735 740 740 745 750 755 760 765 765 770 775 780 785 790 795 795 90% 570 575 580 585 585 590 595 600 605 610 615 620 625 630 630 635 640 645 650 655 660 665 670 675 675 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 715 720 720 725 730 735 740 745 750 755 760 765 765 770 775 780 785 790 795 800 805 810 810 815 820 825 830 835 840 845 95% 600 605 610 615 620 625 630 635 640 645 650 655 660 665 665 670 675 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 715 720 725 730 735 740 745 750 755 760 760 765 770 775 780 785 790 795 800 805 810 815 820 825 830 835 840 845 850 855 855 860 865 870 875 880 885 890 100% 630 635 640 645 650 655 660 665 670 675 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 715 720 725 730 735 740 745 750 755 760 765 770 775 780 785 790 795 800 805 810 815 820 825 830 835 840 845 850 855 860 865 870 875 880 885 890 895 900 905 910 915 920 925 930 935 105% 665 670 675 680 685 690 695 700 705 710 715 720 725 730 735 745 750 755 760 765 770 775 780 785 790 795 800 805 810 815 820 825 830 835 840 850 855 860 865 870 875 880 885 890 895 900 905 910 915 920 925 930 935 940 945 955 960 965 970 975 980 985 110% 695 700 705 710 715 725 730 735 740 745 750 755 760 765 770 780 785 790 795 800 805 810 815 820 825 835 840 845 850 855 860 865 870 875 880 890 895 900 905 910 915 920 925 930 935 945 950 955 960 965 970 975 980 985 990 1000 1005 1010 1015 1020 1025 1030 17 .

SUMMER STRENGTH PROGRAM 18 .

SUMMER 2007 – PHASE l WEEK #1 (5/21 – 5/25) Week 1 Monday 5/21 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Lunge Walk Leg Curl/Leg Ext. Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 5/22 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 12 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 30 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 5/24 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups Leg Curl Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 5/25 Warm Up 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 30 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls (Seated) DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev. Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 70 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 19 .SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT. Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.

SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT. Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.SUMMER 2007 – PHASE l WEEK #2 (5/28 – 5/31) Week 2 Monday 5/28 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Lunge Walk Leg Curl/Leg Ext. Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 5/29 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 12 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 30 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 5/31 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ OPTIONAL WORKOUT *MEMORIAL DAY BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups Leg Curl Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 6/1 Warm Up 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 30 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls (Seated) DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev. Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 70 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 20 .

Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT. Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 80 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 21 . Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 6/5 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 12 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 30 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (70%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 6/7 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 6 ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups Leg Curl Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 6/8 Warm Up 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 30 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls (Seated) DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev.SUMMER 2007 – PHASE l WEEK #3 (6/4 – 6/8) Week 3 Monday 6/4 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Lunge Walk Leg Curl/Leg Ext.

D.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT. Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.L Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 6/15 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 35 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 10 (60%) ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 1 XRPM (60%) _____/_____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls (Seated) DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev.SUMMER 2007 – PHASE II WEEK #4 (6/11 – 6/15) Week 4 Monday 6/11 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Lunge Walk Leg Curl/Leg Ext. Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 6/12 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 12 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 30 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (70%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 6/14 Warm Up 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 6 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 6 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 6 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups R. Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 80 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 22 .

L Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 6/22 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 35 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 10 (60%)____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 1 XRPM (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls (Seated) DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev. Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.SUMMER 2007 – PHASE II WEEK #5 (6/18 – 6/22) Week 5 Monday 6/18 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Squat Jumps 5 (70%) ____ 8 _____ 5 (70%) ____ 8 _____ 5 (70%) ____ 8 _____ 5 (70%) ____ Lunge Walk Leg Curl Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 6/19 Warm Up 5 ____ 8 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 35 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 ____ 8 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 10 (60%)____ 5 ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 6/21 Warm Up 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 6 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 6 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 6 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups R.D. Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 80 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 23 .SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT.

Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 80 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 24 .SUMMER 2007 – PHASE II WEEK #6 (6/25 – 6/29) Week 6 Monday 6/25 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Lunge Walk Leg Curl Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips/Push Ups Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 6/26 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 35 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 6/28 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 5 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups R.D.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT.L Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 6/29 Warm Up 10 (55%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 35 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 10 (55%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (55%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (55%) ____ 10 (55%) ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls (Seated) DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev. Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.

SUMMER 2007 – PHASE II WEEK #7 (7/2 – 7/6) Week 7 Monday 7/2 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Front Squat Lunge Walk Leg Curl/Leg Ext. Leg Raise 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 80 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 25 .D.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT. Incline Press Flat DB Press Dips/Push ups Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 7/3 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 35 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 (65%) ____ 10 ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Military Press Upright Rows Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) DB Shrugs Roman Chair Twist Thursday 7/5 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 5 (65%)____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 10 ____ 5 (65%)____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups R. Grip Lat Pulls Curls Lat.L Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Hanging Leg Raise Friday 7/6 Warm Up 10 (55%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 35 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 10 (55%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (55%) ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (55%) ____ 10 (55%) ____ 10 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 10 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Upright Row Lat Pulls DB Shoulder Press Pull Ups DB Shrugs Rev.

L Bench Press Incline DB Press Dips Lat.D. Leg Raise 8 (50%) ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 (50%) ____ 5 ____ 35 80 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 8 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SET 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SET 26 . Tuesday 7/10 Wednesday 7/11 Warm Up 8 (50%) ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 5 (50%) ____ 6 ____ 5 ____ 25 ____ 8 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 8 ____ 10 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 6 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 6 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SET 5 (80%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SET 5 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ Jump Rope 120 BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 10 Push-Ups 20 Hang Cleans Front Squats Push Press DB Shrugs Chin Ups Lat Pulls Hanging Leg Raise Thursday 7/12 Friday 7/13 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 70 ____ 5 (65%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 10 ____ 8 ____ 8 ____ 5 (75%) ____ Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Squat Box Jumps Step Ups R.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT.SUMMER 2007 – PHASE 3 WEEK #8 (7/9 – 7/13) Week 8 Monday 7/9 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Squat Squat Jumps Leg Curl Incline Press Push Ups (Clap) Close Grip Bench Press Dips Tricep Ext.

SUMMER 2007 – PHASE 3 WEEK #9 (7/16 – 7/20) Week 9 Monday 7/16 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Squat Vertical Jumps Lunge Walk Incline Press Push Ups Clap Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 7/17 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 8 ____ 35 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SETS 5 (80%) ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Front Squats Push Press DB Shrugs Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) Roman Chair Twist Thursday 7/19 Warm Up 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups R.D.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT.L Bench Press Incline DB Press 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 1 (100%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ Dips 25 Hanging Leg Raise 70 ____ Friday 7/20 CIRCUIT TRAINING: DO NOT REST BETWEEN EXERCISES Jump Rope 60 reps Squat Bar Only 20 reps Squat Jumps 10 Push Ups 20 reps Lat Pulls 10 Upright Row 20 Lunge 10 reps each leg Dips 12 reps DB Curls 12 reps REST 3 MINUTES / REPEAT 3x’s 27 .

D.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT.SUMMER 2007 – PHASE 3 WEEK #10 (7/23 – 7/27) Week 10 Monday 7/23 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Squat Vertical Jumps Lunge Walk Incline Press Push Ups Clap Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 7/24 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 8 ____ 35 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SETS 5 (85%) ____ 5 (85%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Front Squats Push Press DB Shrugs Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) Roman Chair Twist Thursday 7/26 Warm Up 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 70 _____ Jump Rope 300 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Squat Step Ups R.L Bench Press Inline DB Press 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 5 (85%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 (80%) ____ 5 ____ 3 (90%) ____ 1 (100%) ____ Dips 25 Hanging Leg Raise 70 ____ Friday 7/27 CIRCUIT TRAINING: DO NOT REST BETWEEN EXERCISES Jump Rope 60 reps Squat Bar Only 20 reps Squat Jumps 10 Push Ups 20 reps Lat Pulls 10 Upright Row 20 Lunge 10 reps each leg Dips 12 reps DB Curls 12 reps REST 3 MINUTES / REPEAT 3x”s 28 .

SUMMER 2007 – PHASE 3 WEEK #11 (7/30 – 7/31) Week 11 Monday 7/30 Warm Up Jump Rope 300 BWT Squats 20 Push-Ups 20 Set 1 RPxWT Set 2 RPxWT Set 3 RPxWT Set 4 RPxWT Set 5 RPxWT Set 6 RPxWT Squat Vertical Jumps Lunge Walk Incline Press Push Ups Clap Dips Weighted Sit-ups Tuesday 7/31 Warm Up 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 8 ____ 35 ____ 70 ____ Jump Rope 120 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (60%) ____ 10 ____ 5 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 5 (60%) ____ SPEED SETS 5 (85%) ____ 5 (85%) ____ 5 (60%) ____ BWT Squats 20 Squat Jumps 20 Hang Clean Front Squats Push Press DB Shrugs Chin Ups Lat Pulls Curls (Straight Bar) Roman Chair Twist 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 70 _____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 5 (75%) ____ 5 (70%) ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 5 ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ 5 (80%) ____ 8 ____ 6 ____ THIS IS YOUR LAST WEEK OF LIFTING.SBU BEARCATS FOOTBALL WORKOUT. REST TO PREPARE FOR REPORT DAY! 29 .

SUMMER CONDITIONING PROGRAM 30 .

try to force knees to ground) 6. Shuffle Step (step laterally. On all fours. open. hold each stretch 15 seconds: 1. slide back foot) 5. keeping right leg straight) 11.cross right knee over left leg and squat down (bring crotch to left heel. bend in knees. Cross left foot over right. Saigon Squat (feet together. Same position. do not bounce) 2.cross front.heel to butt) Stretch Routine. touch toes. arms 90*) 2. :20 time to complete (skill.touch toe 7. bring feet in to crotch. Heel Kicks (heel to butt) 4. Cross right foot over left. Flip it. forward lean) 3.right over left 3. High Knees (Knee up/ Toe up. linemen) (:30) rest time 31 . open. Toe Touch. turn to the left (right elbow past left knee) 10. Toe Touch (feet together. etc) 6. Flip it.touch toe 9.left over right 4. turn to the right (left elbow past right knee 8. Toe Touch.Left foot out. Back straight. cross left knee over right leg and squat down (bring crotch to right heel. Backwards Run (not a back pedal. Butterfly (sit on butt. keeping left leg straight) COMPLETE WARM-UP BEFORE EACH SESSION COMPLETE STRETCH ROUTINE AFTER EACH SESSION HOW TO READ THE CONDITIONING WORKOUT: 6 x # of reps 110 distance :18. Lunge Walk (Head Up.Right foot out. 2x20 yards each: 1. Carioca (steps.DIRECTIONS FOR CONDITIONING DRILLS: Warm-Up drills. cross back.squat down and grab ankles) 5.

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:45sec REST BY WALKING 120 STRETCH 34 . STRETCH FRIDAY 5/25 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 4 X 240yds. (END LINE TO END LINE AND BACK) :40sec.BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONINGPHASE I SUMMER 2007 WEEK #: 1 (5/21 – 5/25) MONDAY 5/21 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 8 X 60yd. GEARS (STRIDE 20/ SPRINT 20/ STRIDE 20) REST :45 STRETCH WEDNESDAY 5/23 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 10 X 1/2 GASERS (across field and back) :18sec. :22sec REST BY WALKING ACROSS FIELD.

GEARS (STRIDE 20/ SPRINT 20/ STRIDE 20) REST BY WALKING 60 STRETCH WEDNESDAY 5/30 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 10 X 1/2 GASERS (across field and back) :18sec. :45sec REST BY WALKING 120 STRETCH 35 .BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONINGPHASE I SUMMER 2007 WEEK #: 2 (5/28 – 6/1) MONDAY 5/28 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 8 X 60yd. STRETCH FRIDAY 6/1 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 4 X 240yds. (END LINE TO END LINE AND BACK) :40sec. :22sec REST BY WALKING ACROSS FIELD.

GEARS (STRIDE 20/ SPRINT 20/ STRIDE 20) REST BY WALKING 60 6 X 50yd. BACKWARDS RUN (REST BY WALKING 50) STRETCH WEDNESDAY 6/6 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 10 X 1/2 GASERS (across field and back) :18sec. STRETCH FRIDAY 6/8 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 5 X 240yds. :22sec REST BY WALKING ACROSS FIELD.BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONINGPHASE I SUMMER 2007 WEEK #: 3 (6/4 – 6/8) MONDAY 6/4 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 6 X 60yd. (END LINE TO END LINE AND BACK) :40sec. :45sec REST BY WALKING 120 STRETCH 36 .

SPRINTS (across field) REST BY WALKING 50 (REST 2 MINUTES BETWEEN SETS) STRETCH WEDNESDAY WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 12 X 110yds.BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONINGPHASE II SUMMER 2007 WEEK #: 4 (6/11 – 6/15) MONDAY 6/11 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 3 SETS OF 5 X 50 yd. STRETCH 6/13 FRIDAY 6/15 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 5 X 175yds (OUTSIDE EDGE OF FOOTBALL FIELD) :28sec.. :32sec (WALK 175) STRETCH 37 . 18sec. : 16sec.

0:22 (REST BY WALKING 110) 6 X 50 BACKWARD RUN (REST BY WALKING 50) STRETCH FRIDAY 6/22 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 5 X 175yds (OUTSIDE EDGE OF FOOTBALL FIELD) :28. :32 (REST BY WALKING 175) STRETCH 38 .BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONINGPHASE II SUMMER 2007 WEEK #: 5 (6/18 – 6/22) MONDAY 6/18 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 8 X 40 SPRINT (STOMACH STARTS) REST BY WALKING 60 6 X 50 BACKWARD RUN (REST BY WALKING 50) STRETCH WEDNESDAY 6/20 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 12 X 110 SPRINT 0:18.

BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONINGPHASE II SUMMER 2007 WEEK #: 6 (6/25 – 6/29) MONDAY 6/25 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 8 X 40 SPRINT (STOMACH STARTS) REST 1:00 6 X 50 BACKWARD RUN / WALK BACK TO LINE STRETCH WEDNESDAY 6/27 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 15 X 110 :18. :22 (REST :45) 6 X 50yd BACKWARD RUN (REST :30) STRETCH FRIDAY 6/29 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 5 X GASERS (ACROSS FIELD AND BACK 2X’s) :40. :45 (REST WALK 1/2 GASER) STRETCH 39 .

FROG HOPS (REST 30sec) 4 X 20yd SPRINT (STOMACH START) REST BY WALKING 50 4 X 40yd SPRINT (3-POINT STANCE) REST BY WALKING 40 STRETCH WEDNESDAY 7/4 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 12 X 110yds :16. :18 (REST :45) 6 X 50yd BACKWARDS RUN (WALK 50) STRETCH FRIDAY 7/6 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 4 X 350 (outside edge of FB field) :55.PHASE II WEEK #: 7 (7/2 – 7/6) MONDAY 7/2 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 4 X 20yd. :65 (REST WALK 175) STRETCH 40 .BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONING- SUMMER 2007 .

:22 (REST :45) 6 X 50 BACKWARDS RUN (WALK 50) STRETCH FRIDAY 7/13 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 2 SETS OF 3 X 240 :36. :14 (REST :40) 2 X 60yd SPRINT :09. :40 (WALK 120) (REST 5 MINUTES BETWEEN SETS) STRETCH 41 .BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONING- SUMMER 2007 .PHASE III WEEK #: 8 (7/9 – 7/13) MONDAY 7/9 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 2 X 80yd SPRINT :11. :12 (REST :35) 2 X 40yd SPRINT (3-POINT STANCE) REST :35 2 X 20yd SPRINT (STOMACH START) REST :35 STRETCH WEDNESDAY 7/11 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 12 X 110 :18.

:65 (WALK 175) STRETCH 42 . :18 (REST :45) 4 X 50yd BACKWARDS RUN (WALK 50) STRETCH FRIDAY 7/20 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 4 X 350 (OUTSIDE EDGE OF FB FIELD) :55.PHASE III WEEK #: 9 (7/16 – 7/20) MONDAY 7/16 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 4 X 20yd FROG HOPS (REST :30) 4 X 20yd SPRINT (STOMACH START) REST BY WALKING 50 8 X 40yd SPRINT (3-POINT STANCE) REST 1 MINUTE STRETCH WEDNESDAY 7/18 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 15 X 110yds :16.BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONING- SUMMER 2007 .

:45 (WALK 1/2 GASER) STRETCH 43 .PHASE III WEEK #: 10 (7/23 – 7/27) MONDAY 7/23 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 4 X 20 FORG HOPS REST :30 4 X 20 SPRINT (STOMACH STARTS) REST 1:00 8 X 40 SPRINT (3-POINT STANCE) REST 1:00 STRETCH WEDNESDAY WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 16 X 110yds :16.BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONING- SUMMER 2007 . :18 (REST :45) STRETCH 7/25 FRIDAY 7/27 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 5 X GASER :38.

:22 (REST :45) 6 X 50yd BACKWARDS RUN (WALK 50) STRETCH FRIDAY 8/3 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 4 CONE DRILL (REST :30) 4 X GASER :36. :42 (WALK 1/2 GASER) STRETCH 44 .BEARCATS FOOTBALL CONDITIONING-SUMMER 2007 – PHASE III WEEK #: 11 (7/30 – 8/3) MONDAY 7/30 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X 5-10-5 SHUTTLE (REST :30) 8 X 30yd SPRINT (STOMACH START) REST :45 4 X 30 yd CARIOCA or (OL/DL) 4 X 20 SLIDE SHUFFLE STRETCH WEDNESDAY 8/1 WARM UP DRILLS 4 X W-DRILL (REST :30) 12 X 110yd :18.

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NUTRITION 80 .

Exercise or training may increase calorie needs by as much as 1. 55-70% of your body weight is water. But. Are there certain dietary guidelines athletes should follow? Health and nutrition professionals recommend that 55-60% of the calories in our diet come from carbohydrate. When you sweat.000 to 1. Whether you drink water or a sports drink is a matter of choice. during and after all workouts and events. Drinks with higher carbohydrate content will delay the absorption of water and may cause dehydration. the 50-plus nutrients the body needs and adequate water. There are a variety of sports drinks on the market. if your workout or event lasts for more than 90 minutes. Eating a variety of foods to meet increased calorie needs helps to ensure that the athlete's diet contains appropriate amounts of carbohydrate. there is more than one way to follow a nutritious diet. you lose water. some athletes have higher calorie and fluid requirements. nausea or diarrhea. sport and training program. these guidelines will promote health and serve as the basis for a diet that will maximize performance. protein. cramps. because of the intensity of their sport or training program. which must be replaced if you want to pet-form your best. However. Which is better for replacing fluids-water or sports drinks? Depending on how muscular you are. Being "hydrated" means maintaining your body's fluid level. A variety of foods are needed every day. Do the nutritional needs of athletes differ from non-athletes? Competitive athletes. The best way to determine if you're getting too few or too many calories is to monitor your weight. a 250-pound weight lifter needs more calories than a 98-pound gymnast. What are electrolytes? 81 . For example.What diet is best for athletes? It's important that an athlete's diet provides the right amount of energy.500 calories a day. you may benefit from the carbohydrates provided by sports drinks. just as there is more than one way to achieve a goal. Keeping within your ideal competitive weight range means that you are getting the right amount of calories. However. How many calories do I need a day? This depends on your age. Be sure to experiment with sports drinks during practice instead of trying them for the first time the day of an event. No single food or supplement can do this. vitamins and minerals. A sports drink that contains 15-18 grams of carbohydrate in every 8 ounces of fluid should be used. body size. no more than 30% from fat and the remaining 10-15% from protein. While the exact percentages may vary slightly for some athletes based on their sport or training program. sedentary individuals and people who exercise for health and fitness all need the same nutrients. You need to drink fluids before.

Is it true that athletes should eat a lot of carbohydrates? When you are training or competing. Will eating sugary foods before an event hurt my performance? 82 . For many athletes. vegetables. pasta. carbohydrate-rich diet you are in good standing and probably have ample glycogen stores to fuel activity. your glycogen stores become depleted. Regardless of origin. However. the body uses more fat for energy. which can result in fatigue. milk. fruits. The purpose of the pre-competition meal is to prevent hunger and to provide the water and additional energy the athlete will need during competition. Your body cannot differentiate between glucose that comes from starches or sugars. Water. How hard and how long you work out. Carbohydrates are the preferred source of energy for your body. your muscles need energy to perform. in combination with a well. However. will restore normal fluid and electrolyte levels in the body. Generally. especially in a hot environment. your level of fitness and your diet will affect the type of fuel your body uses. some athletes perform their best if they eat a small amount 30 minutes before competing. carbohydrate-rich foods serve as the basis of the meal. there is no magic pre-event diet. replacing electrolytes may be beneficial during continuous activity of longer than 2 hours. During low-intensity exercises like walking. electrolyte replacement is not needed during short bursts of exercise since sweat is approximately 99% water and less than 1% electrolytes.Electrolytes are nutrients that affect fluid balance in the body and are necessary for our nerves and muscles to function. When and what should I eat before I compete? Performance depends largely on the foods consumed during the days and weeks leading up to an event. What do muscles use for energy during exercise? Most activities use a combination of fat and carbohydrate as energy sources. For short-term. Most athletes eat 2 to 4 hours before their event. Glucose from either source provides energy for working muscles. Experiment during the weeks before an event to see which foods work best for you. If you regularly eat a varied. However. athletes rely mostly on carbohydrate for energy. which is made from carbohydrates and stored in your muscles. while others eat nothing for 6 hours beforehand.balanced diet. Simply choose foods and beverages that you enjoy and that don't bother your stomach. syrups and table sugar. Every time you work out. high-intensity activities like sprinting. while fat provides 9 calories per gram. Sodium and potassium are the two electrolytes most often added to sports drinks. Both sugars and starches are effective in replenishing glycogen stores. honey. cereals. Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram. One source of energy for working muscles is glycogen. you use some of your glycogen. If you don't consume enough carbohydrates. your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose that your blood carries to cells to be used for energy. What are carbohydrates? Carbohydrates are sugars and starches found in foods like breads.

most American diets provide more than enough protein. the athlete rests and eats the same high-carbohydrate diet. A multivitamin-mineral pill that supplies 100% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) will provide the nutrients needed.0 and 1. What is carbohydrate loading? Carbohydrate loading is a technique used to increase the amount of glycogen in muscles. that represents 68-102 grams of protein a day. In fact. An athlete who frequently cuts back on calories. do I need to take extra vitamins and minerals? Athletes need to eat about 1. if you have low iron levels in your blood. Symptoms of iron deficiency 83 . which require 90 minutes or more of non-stop effort. are told that eating a ton of protein or taking protein supplements will help them gain muscle weight.5 grams of protein per kilogram body weight per day is sufficient if your calorie intake is adequate and you're eating a variety of foods. evidence suggests that a sugar-containing pre-competition beverage or snack may improve performance during endurance workouts and events. Will extra protein help build muscle mass? Many athletes. While some extra protein is needed to build muscle.In the past. Simply eating a diet that derives more than half of its calories from carbohydrates will do. As an athlete. the true secret to building muscle is training hard and consuming enough calories. Since most athletes eat more than this amount. Between 1. For five to seven days before an event. Since vitamins and minerals do not provide energy. vitamin and mineral supplements are needed only in special situations. athletes were warned that eating sugary foods before exercise could hurt performance by causing a drop in blood glucose levels. but also may not be getting enough carbohydrate. most athletes needn't worry about carbohydrate loading.800 calorie level. Athletes who follow vegetarian diets or who avoid an entire group of foods (for example.2. Although carbohydrate loading may be beneficial for athletes participating in endurance sports. especially below the 1.) The day before the event. (To find out how much you weigh in kilograms. never drink milk) may need a supplement to make up for the vitamins and minerals not being supplied by food.800 calories a day to get the vitamins and minerals they need for good health and optimal performance. is not only at risk for inadequate vitamin and mineral intake. especially those on strength-training programs or who participate in power sports. they cannot replace the energy provided by carbohydrates. simply divide your weight in pounds by 2. For a 150-pound athlete. is the part of red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to all parts of the body. however. the athlete eats 10-12 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram body weight and gradually reduces the intensity of the workouts. However. including muscles. which contains iron. Since your muscles need oxygen to produce energy. Recent studies. have shown that consuming sugar up to 30 minutes before an event does not diminish performance. you may tire quickly. Why is iron so important? Hemoglobin.

but fish and poultry also are good sources. dizziness. The best diet is one that keeps you well hydrated. After age 25. No single food or supplement can do this. osteoporosis. Strength can be gained only after a period of progressive resistance weight training. Too much iron can cause constipation. train harder and be in better condition. Unless you have major difficulties in your diet. This is best achieved by consuming a wide variety of food on a daily basis. diarrhea. Female athletes who don't get enough calcium may be at risk for stress fractures and. provides adequate calories. How does nutrition affect my performance? Nutrition can impact performance in a variety of ways. What should I eat to increase my strength? The most important factor in increasing your strength is not what you eat.strong bones and proper muscle function. Our bodies absorb the iron found in animal products best. beans and green leafy vegetables also contain iron. irritability. iron supplements should not be taken without proper medical supervision. By staying healthy and decreasing “down time” you will feel better. There are over 50 nutrients that your body needs on a daily basis. the recommended intake is 800 milligrams. Why is calcium so important? Calcium is needed for. It is recommended that athletes have their hemoglobin levels checked once a year.200 milligrams of calcium a day. but rather how you train. However. nausea and may interfere with the absorption of other nutrients such as copper and zinc. when they're older. Over a period of time.include fatigue. and supplies the 50-plus nutrients in the needed amounts. Young women between the ages of 11 and 24 need about 1. Dairy foods are the best source of calcium. Many times. nutrition will not work overnight miracles such as shaving half a second off your 100-meter dash times. What is the best diet for an athlete? There is no one perfect diet. studies show that many female athletes who are trying to lose weight cut back on dairy products. How much strength you actually gain depends on the intensity and type of weight training. Low-fat dairy products are a rich source of calcium and also are low in fat and calories. a 98-pound gymnast. Each is different and has individualized needs. there are no symptoms at all. for example. Should I take an iron supplement? Taking iron supplements will not improve performance unless an athlete is truly iron deficient. Red meat is the richest source of iron. The RDA for iron is 15 milligrams a day for women and 10 milligrams a day for men. Therefore. Fortified breakfast cereals. inadequate intake or omission of any of these nutrients can have a negative affect on you health and athletic performance. It is commonly thought that large amounts of protein or amino acids are necessary to add muscle 84 . however. but optimal nutrition throughout the year will make a difference. headaches and lack of appetite. A blood test is the best way to find out if your iron level is low. This could mean the difference between winning and losing. should eat differently than a 250-pound weightlifter.

the more water you should drink. water is excellent for fluid replacement. Is it true that athletes should drink lots of water and juice when flying? Why? Yes. per hour. it is important to weigh yourself nude. this is important. you should drink plenty of water and juice before. drink 2 cups of fluid before exercising again. You can go weeks and even months without certain vitamins or minerals before noticing an effect. For each pound lost. An adequate protein intake is certainly important in gaining strength and muscle. but so is your intake of other nutrients including carbohydrate and various vitamins. This is especially important during overseas flights.water! Why is water so important? Because your body is approximately 60-70% water. and how well acclimated you are. during and after air travel. but won’t be able to increase or even maintain muscle mass. Athletes sometimes choose sport drinks because they like the taste and feel it makes them drink 85 . For this reason. How much water is enough? If you wait until you’re thirsty to drink. athletes can sweat off 6 lbs. if your calorie intake isn’t adequate. developing muscles. the most important nutrient is the one most often overlooked. you have waited to long. Small un-replaced fluid losses can impair performance. performance can be affected in less than an hour. The most reliable indicator of how much water you need is your weight. during and after workouts and events. Avoid alcohol and caffeine-containing beverages (such as coffee or cola). because they increase your water loss. the protein you eat will be used for energy instead of building muscle tissue. Are there any nutrients that are more important than others for an athlete? Yes. During intense exercise the body’s thirst mechanism lags behind actual need. and increasing endurance and strength. If you routinely lose more than 2% of your body weight. the intensity of your workout or event. and large un-replaced losses can cause heat stroke and even death. It is important to make a conscious effort to drink water before you ever get thirsty. Your actual requirement will vary depending on the temperature and humidity. Although protein is a component of muscle. Each pound of weight lost as sweat is equal to 2 cups of water. or in minimal clothing before and after exercising. What about using sport drinks for fluid replacement? For workouts or events lasting less than 2 hours.mass. The athlete who cuts back on food to lose weight and then takes vitamins and mineral pills may be getting more than the needed amounts of vitamins and minerals. Additionally. All athletes should drink water before. muscle is mostly water and only 20-22% protein. You cannot lose that much fat in a short period of time. The air in the plane’s passenger compartment is very dry so your body can lose a lot of fluid from evaporation during your flight. Dehydration can cause your body to overheat. An adequate diet is essential to maintaining energy levels. The longer the flight. but without adequate water. It also transports nutrients throughout your tissues and maintains adequate blood volume. drink more water immediately before and during your workouts or event. In hot and humid weather. Water is necessary for your body’s cooling system. Therefore.

There are approximately 10 grams of protein in one ounce of meet. 100mile bicycle rides or long triathlons.0-1. For a 150-pound (68 kg) athlete. Do athletes have to worry about getting enough sodium. After exercise. During exercise. The drinks should be between 4-8% carbohydrate (15-18 grams per 8 ounces of fluid). Studies have found that most athletes eat far more protein than they need. Potassium replacement is equally important.. as well as juices such as orange and grapefruit are excellent sources of potassium. are on vegetarian diets or avoid an entire group of foods (i. 1 ounce of cheese or 4 slices of bread. nausea and diarrhea. However. Bananas and citrus fruits. Getting enough sodium is not a problem for most athletes. meat and milk.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight will meet most athletes’ needs.e. Be sure to experiment with these drinks during practice instead of trying for the first time during competition. do I need more vitamins and minerals than a non-athlete? Research supports the fact that when the diet is adequate. it only takes a few extra shakes form the saltshaker. which means the protein isn’t available for maintaining muscle mass. If the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrate to use for energy. However. tomatoes. If an event last longer than 2 hours. A more common problem for athletes on a heavy training program is not eating enough carbohydrate calories. 1 egg. you need not worry about replacement until after exercise is over. As an athlete. If you are taking an over-the-counter dietary supplement or are thinking about taking one. who cut back on calories. The one exception is during ultra-endurance events such as 50-mile runs. never eat meat or drink milk) may need a supplement to make up for the vitamins or minerals not supplied by food. Recent studies suggest that the protein intake for endurance athletes may be as high as 1. potassium and other electrolytes that are lost in sweat? Replacement of these electrolytes is important because they are involved in fluid balance. Athletes. the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) represents the best guideline for safe and adequate intakes for supplementation.more fluid. water replacement is the main concern. it appears that 1. an athlete may benefit from carbohydrate and electrolytes provided by fluid-replacement type drinks. Sweat contains small amounts of the electrolytes and is actually less concentrated with electrolytes that your body fluids. When you sweat. possibly causing cramps. as long as they are getting enough calories and not eating a vegetarian diet.5 grams per kilogram of body weight. electrolyte replacement is easily achieved by normal diet. as are potatoes. vitamin and mineral supplements do not improve performance. I’m on a heavy training program. Drinks with a higher carbohydrate can delay the absorption of water. then protein is used. that is 68-102 grams of protein. how much protein do I need? Based on current research. a vitamin/mineral supplement cannot provide energy an athlete gets from consuming the calories in food. Athletes need to consume approximately 1800 calories daily from a variety of foods in order to meet their need for vitamins and minerals. A multi-vitamin/mineral pill that supplies 100% of the RDA for each nutrient (check the label) will provide the needed nutrients. Protein supplements offer no advantage over protein available from 86 . nerve conduction and muscle contraction. 1 glass of milk. your body loses a lot more water than electrolytes. At most.

fruits. therefore. Between 5060% of your calories should come from carbohydrate. pastas. milk. dried beans and peas. It doesn’t hurt to eat extra protein just to make sure. There is no scientific evidence to show that amino acids taken either individually or in groups are any more effective at adding muscle or weight than protein from food. can be toxic to the body in excess amounts. the protein quality of many so-called high protein supplements is variable and often inferior to milk and egg protein. Ornithine is formed in the body as arginine is metabolized. Large amounts of protein can lead to dehydration.. The earliest method of glycogen loading included a carbohydrate depletion phase followed by a 3-day carbohydrate loading phase. are similar to those of protein supplements. One of the most important factors affecting protein/amino acid needs of strength athletes is energy intake (calories).foods such as meat. Glycogen is a form of carbohydrate. One example is a combination of arginine and ornithine. increase the amount of calcium you lose in your urine and cause “gout-like” symptoms in your joints. If you eat more protein than your body can use. which is solid as a “natural steroid. Inadequate or lowprotein intake by athletes is usually due to not eating enough calories. What about amino acid supplementation? Amino acids are the individual units of protein. or cause weight loss. rice. But what if I’m lifting weights to build up my muscles? You will need a little more protein than if you weren’t lifting weights. which can result from use of amino acid supplements. In fact. Foods high in carbohydrate include breads. They have become popular among strength-training athletes and are often taken because the athlete has been told they will stimulate an anabolic effect. Problems. cheese. and eggs. much like the individual links of a chain link fence. The other part. corn. in effect delaying the musclebuilding process. does it? The body cannot store extra protein. and fruit juices. Current research has shown 87 . The most efficient way to obtain these amino acids is from the protein you get from foods. potatoes. What is carbohydrate loading? Carbohydrate or glycogen loading is a technique of diet and exercise manipulation. but that doesn’t mean you will need more than you are already eating.” Another formula containing arginine and lysine is sold to cause weight loss. They can be taken individually or in various combinations. cereals. it must use it or lose it. the protein is broken down and part of it is either used as energy or stored as body fat. The body cannot tell the difference between amino acids in pills or powders and the amino acids to synthesize tissue proteins: 9 of these must be obtained in the diet. the nitrogen part. including disruption of normal training. stress your kidneys and liver. Additionally. increase the rate of muscle gain. too much of one amino acid may hinder the absorption of another. Arginine and lysine are amino acids found in foods. Your body makes glycogen from the carbohydrate you eat. The depletion phase of this diet is very difficult to follow and often has negative side effects. including dehydration and calcium losses. I read that athletes should eat a lot of carbohydrates? When your muscles are working they use fat and glycogen for the energy they need.

high-carbohydrate diet every day during training. provide energy and meet your fluid needs. such as bread. Athletes taking part in stop – start sports. should eat a precompetition meal that is moderately high in carbohydrate foods. which are moderately high in carbohydrates and low in fat. and it can take up to 48 hours for depleted glycogen levels to be restored. rice and pasta. dieting or omitting carbohydrate-rich foods while training daily. The physical stress of competing in an all-day meet or tournament can also leave you little time or inclination to eat. What types of food should I eat just before competition? The precompetition meal should consist of foods and drinks the athlete likes. will have a relatively low carbohydrate requirement – around 4-5 grams per kilogram of body weight. Although there are exceptions.that eating a high-carbohydrate diet every day during training. 88 . potatoes. Whether it’s physical or mental stress. some athletes either by fasting. your performance and comfort level can be upset. Fuids – water. swimming. This time frame usually ensures that you will have an empty stomach at the time of competition. The gastrointestinal tract reacts to stress in one of two extremes – it speeds up or it slows down. This will help ease hunger pangs. The mental stress that accompanies the “big” game or an important match may influence your stomach. The right time to eat. An athlete whose training is primarily sprint work or involves short bursts of power. Therefore. you can almost triple the amount of carbohydrate your muscle can store by simply maintaining a balanced. tolerates well and thinks will help them win. you still need to maintain energy and fluid balance to perform your best. Practically every set of guidelines for precompetition meals also recommends a time to eat. Athletes who train continuously for 60 minutes daily will probably require 5-6 grams per kilogram of body weight and endurance athletes who train aerobically for more than 90 minutes daily may need 10-12 grams of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight to replace glycogen day after day. However. but low in fat. low-fat/skim milk. too. Low levels of glycogen can result in early fatigue and weakness.” The day before the event requires complete rest while maintaining the same high-carbohydrate diet. Remember – What you eat during training has the greatest impact on your success as an athlete. followed by a gradual reduction in training intensity 5-7 days before an event will result in “carbohydrate loading. the food choices and content of the meal is an individual matter. be sure to drink plenty of water and eat small carbohydrate-rich snacks. it is important to eat an adequate amount of carbohydrate on a daily basis. Even if you don’t feel “hungry”. basketball. Training increases the ability of your muscles to store carbohydrate. Either way. and volleyball. may reduce their glycogen stores to inadequate levels. such as football. or juice – should also be a part of the meal. a common suggestion is to eat two to four hours before an event. How much carbohydrate should I each day? The athletes’ carbohydrate requirements depend on your body size and training routines. As long as the meal contains adequate fluids and calories.

Once a pattern is determined. What they have discovered is that consuming a liquid or solid meal as close as 30 minutes before an event may cause stomach distention but. apparently. Wouldn’t a full stomach slow an athlete down? Not necessarily. report nutritionists. keeping a diary may prove to be helpful. the recipe for “your” perfect precompetition meal can be devised. the precompetition meal should be moderately high in carbohydrates and low in fat. Of course. precompetition eating really becomes an individual matter. Although most athletes find that eating two to three hours before competing works best for them.yet won’t be feeling hungry or weak. You may be confused by accounts of athletes who ate huge meals just minutes before breaking a world record or winning a gold medal. Just remember that the timing of the precompetition meal really is an individual matter. Recipe for Success In general. the size and content of the meal also influences how quickly the stomach empties. It should also provide enough fluid so that you enter competition well hydrated. has no negative impact on performance. others may need to allow as much as six hours between the meal and the competition. Simply record the types and amounts of foods you eat. during and after competition. 89 . when they are consumed and how they felt before. If you are concerned about how food consumption enhances or hinders performance. After this formula is followed.

Check with the host team. mayonnaise and special sauces on sandwiches Ordering salads without bacon bits or olives Using lemon juice. Also. low-fat nutritious foods when you need without eating too many calories. Some low-fat terms are: • • • • • Steamed Broiled Roasted Poached In its own juice It is easy to get bored while traveling. 90 . It can be hard to get the variety of high-carbohydrate. but it is possible to eat right while on the road. the tournament sponsors. some things you can do to lower the fat in your diet include: • • • • • Avoiding cheese. Whether eating at a sit-down or quick-service restaurant. By contacting these restaurants ahead of time.EATING ON THE ROAD Studies have shown that even athletes who have fantastic diets when at home don’t eat as well when they travel. Finding out what type of foods restaurants serve. low-calorie dressing. you will be able to find out which ones: • • • Serve foods high in carbohydrate and low in fat Will make special meals (substituting menu items) Will prepare foods especially for you (broiling instead of frying). sauces and fried items Drinking low fat or skim milk instead of whole milk. knowing which terms mean that food has been prepared by a low-fat method is important. however. knowing what to but at “quick stop” stores and knowing what to order at quick-service and sit-down restaurants can help you get the higher-performance diet you need. It won’t just happen. Eating right while traveling. takes planning. But snacking on high-fat. or smaller amounts of regular dressing Skipping gravies. packing meals and snacks to take along. high-calorie foods can defeat a high-performance diet. If you will eating in restaurants. call ahead and find the ones that will meet your needs. or other you know in the area to find out which restaurants are close by. and it’s common to relieve the boredom by eating.

High-carbohydrate. oatmeal cookies. low-fat items that are easy to pack include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches Muffins with jelly or jam Cereals or cereal bars Bagel.Bringing your own food along can guarantee you’ll have the foods you need or can simply serve as an emergency backup. pita or pocket bread Fig bars. animal crackers Pretzels Celery and carrot sticks Bottled or canned fruit juices Fresh fruit Banana bread Pumpkin bread Wheat cakes Rice cakes Popcorn – no butter Dried fruits (raisins. banana chips) Yogurt Pudding cups 91 .

the bottom line is to balance calories. What is the best way to lose weight? Eating less and exercising more is the best way to lose weight. Although being overweight will hinder performance. imagine these possible scenarios: • A wrestler has lost 12 lbs. When you lose weight rapidly. This results in a decreased oxygen-tolerance. Charts and books are not good guides for athletes’ body weights because athletes are typically more muscular than average people. Midway through his second match. the night before weigh-in and is knocked out in the third round. you lose mostly water. It’s the same as balancing your checkbook. • • These are all good illustrations of how not to lose weight and the negative consequences that can result. Your ideal weight. she eats little else besides popcorn and diet pop for two weeks. he gets dizzy and weak. A gymnast is told she needs to compete at a weight 10 lbs. Research has shown that fluid loss in excess of 23% body weight can hinder your performance by reducing your blood volume. A boxer with a 20-win/no-loss record loses 5 lbs. In some sports low body fat my be desirable. below her normal weight. so withdrawal of fat can be difficult and takes time. Determining your ideal competitive weight can be difficult. protein. you need to consider several important questions: 1) What is your ideal competitive weight? 2) Do you weigh more than you should? How many pounds do you need to lose? 3) Do you need to lose weight? And 4) How are you going to do it? While it is true that excess body fat may hinder performance in many sports. and electrolytes – not fat. Although athletes have used many techniques and diets to lose weight. How much should you weigh? Your body weight is largely determined by genetics and depends on your body frame and sex. During practice she feels weak and tired and just goes through ht motions of her routine. while in others it may be a disadvantage. during the last two days by eating only salads and by sitting in a sauna. Dehydration and fasting should be avoided. body composition – (amount of fat and amount of muscle) – also depends on your sport. A muscular athlete will weigh more than a less muscular non-athlete of the same age and height. They may feel comfortable and perform well weighing more or less than you do. One pound of fat is equal to approximately 3500 calories.Weight Loss and Sports Performance Are you trying to lose weight? Before attempting to lose weight. For example. Avoid comparing yourself to others even in your own sport. 92 . To achieve this. the effects of dehydration on performance can be far worse. or more correctly. it is equally true that excessive weight loss and radical methods can also keep you from performing your best. Weight loss results only when you withdraw calories either by eating less or exercising more.

For others. and sour cream are almost all fat. assess your diet. arm. If you are having problems losing weight or even deciding if you should lose weight. 2. can be detrimental to performance and is not recommended for a variety of reasons. your personal or team physician can give you direction. The following guidelines should help you in achieving your ideal competitive weight: 1. Some people can lose weight easily and don’t need any help. losing weight is very difficult. margarine. two pats of margarine or butter on a baked potato will more than double the calories. a person trained to take them must do skin fold measurements. Learn to stop easting before you are full. For example. and the time the food is eaten. avoiding weight seesaws. Fasting or food restriction. perhaps 30 minutes or more. The number of calories. etc. as well as the types of food eaten while losing weight will vary from person to person. Before beginning a weight loss program. for your brain to get the message that your stomach is full. 93 . Keep your carbohydrate intake on a daily basis. Optimal performance is best achieved when you body is healthy and well nourished. leg. Often. This can best be done by keeping a food diary of everything you eat and drink. Many times it will take a while. if you are on a strength and conditioning program you may maintain or even gain weight while decreasing your percent of body fat because muscle tissue weighs more than fat tissue for the same volume. For optimal performance. depletes these glycogen stores. Know the source of your calories. Salad dressing.) as well as weight. butter. To do accurate. with or without exercise. Monitor changes in your body composition through skin folds and girth measurements (distance around waist. Fat has over twice as many calories as the same amount of protein and carbohydrate. numbers of meals snacks.Fasting or severe foods restriction. achieve your desired weight well before the competition season and maintain it. One of the body’s main fuel sources for sports activity is carbohydrate. 3. 4. Eating a large carbohydraterich meal several hours before competition will not help a glycogen-depleted body because it can take up to 48 hours for these stores to be thought back to normal. Carbohydrate is stored in the body as muscle and liver glycogen. even on a short-term basis. Watch out for the fat in your diet. Your body will sputter like a car running out of gas if these stores get too low.

more often if you can. Being consistent with your meals and snacks is essential to your success in gaining muscle weight. As a starting point. work. monitor your body composition and increase or decrease food intake accordingly. cheese to a baked potato. the main focus needs to be eating more calories from a variety of foods in order to support the muscle growth. When it becomes easy to lift a certain weight.not just every other day or a few times a week. The nutritional foundation for weight gain is a well-balanced diet. you must increase that weight to stimulate further growth. or school. Weight Training Program: Muscles are stimulated to grow only when progressive resistance is provided. instead of eating just a sandwich and milk. This means you need to keep your calorie intake at an optimum level every day. it requires at least 2. For example. Increase the calories in the foods you already eat. peanut butter to carrot sticks or dried fruit or nuts to yogurt. It can become even more difficult when you’re trying to time your eating so you don’t have to eat too much before training. a muscle won’t grow unless it is challenged to lift more weight. This means you need to add at least 300-400 extra calories each day to the amount you now eat to achieve steady weight gain. Although not directly related to weight training and dietary intake. Consult a certified strength/conditioning professional for specific recommendations for you appropriate weight training program and the rate of growth that’s reasonalble for you. car or locker. Try not to skip breakfast. You can make it easier by planning ahead so you always have a snack handy. not fat. 94 . In fact. 2. (See chart for snack ideas) 3. cheese or jelly to a bagel. increase your calories slightly. Nutrition Program: No nutrient. getting enough sleep can be an important factor in your program to increase muscle weight. Eat at least four times a day. Once this is achieved. It is impossible to determine how many extra calories you’ll need to gain muscle. and eating snacks between meals each day. the goal in gaining weight is to gain muscle.500 calories over your basal calorie requirement for every pound of muscle you gain. Adding extra calories can be hard when you’re busy with training. Simply put. raisins or sugar to cereal. add chocolate to milk. Two things you must do to gain muscle are: a) lift weights regularly and b) take in enough calories to support the muscle growth. Most athletes achieve weight gain by making sure they don’t skip meals. For example. You can get these extra calories in several ways: 1.Weight Gain--For Athletes In most instances. All the foods you eat provide calories. Increase your meal size by: • • Taking extra helpings Eating more food items. supplement or individual food is a “magic bullet” for increasing muscle mass. whether its in your gym bag. add a few side dishes and dessert.

during a weight gain phase may require about 150 grams of protein (77kg x 2 gm protein) per day. then slows down. On the other hand. you should include protein rich foods in your weight gain diet. A reasonable goal for muscle gain is ½ to 1 pound per week. in most instances.Protein requirements usually increase during a weight gain phase. For example. amount and location of added muscle mass is influenced by gender. 95 . body type and other genetic factors. remember that the rate of weight gain.8 gm/km of body weight per day. Although gaining muscle mass is largely dependent on your training program. muscle is being gained.5-2. (See table on Protein Content of Foods. Your protein needs during weight gain will. To get enough protein. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for protein is .) Body Composition: The best method for monitoring whether the weight you are adding is fat or muscle is to measure percentage of body fat. a 170 pound (77kg) athlete. If your percentage of body fat remains stable while your scale weight increases. be met by consuming approximately 1. You may find your rate of weight gain occurs more rapidly initially.0 gm of protein per kilogram of body weight per day. age. if percentage of body fat increases. Hydrostatic (underwater) weighing is a reliable and accurate option for determining body composition. it is likely that both fat and muscle are being gained.

Snacks Fruit. Nuts Trail Mix (1/2 cup) Pretzel. Juice Banana (1) Apple (1) Grapes. soft Mixed nuts (1/2 cup) Cereal. reg 10% fat (1/2 cup) Yogurt. 2% fat (1 cup) Yogurt. American (1 cup) Avocado (1 medium) Raisins (1/2 cup) Fruit Juice (8 ounces) Bread. ready to eat (1 ounce) Bagel. Cereal. 2 slices combined with: Peanut butter and Jelly (2 tbsp each) Cheese. plain Banana bread (1 slice) Calories (Approx) 105 80 60 305 217 115-155 ___________________________ 347 145 438 90-140 160 190 Dairy Products_______________________________________________________________ Milk. sliced (3 ounces) 404 340 202 277 Miscellaneous_________________________________________________________________ 96 . lowfat (1 cup) 122 250 130 200 Sandwiches _________________________________________________________________ Bread. cheddar (2 ounces) Turkey breast (3 ounces) Ham. lowfat (1 cup) Ice Cream. frozen.

Sustacal (8 ounces) Ensure. high calories (8 ounces) Gator pro (11 ounces) Power Bar (1) Nutri-Grain bar (1) Rice Krispie bar (1) Fig Newton (6 cookies) 240 240 340 360 225 109 226 360 97 . ready to use (8 ounces) Ensure-plus.

5 12 4. noodles. lowfat (8 ounces) Almonds (1/2 cup) Beans. black (1/2 cup) Mixed nuts (1/2 cup) Peanut Butter (1 tbsp) Refried beans (1/2 cup) Baked potato. lowfat (1 cup) Yogurt. wheat (2 slices) Corn (1/2 cup) Rice (1/2 cup) Spaghetti.PROTEIN CONTENT OF FOODS Food American Cheese (1 ounce) Cheddar Cheese (1 ounce) Milk.5 8 4 5 2. lean (3 ounces) Egg (1) Poultry (3 ounces) Tuna (3 ounces) Protein (gms) 6 7 8 9 16 7. flour (1) Beef.5 3 7 3 24 6 21 24 Stimulants 98 . cooked (1 cup) Tortilla. with skin (1) Bread.

highly addictive. TN I. Ergogencity at 250-350 mg Banned levels in urine Research o Theories and enzyme effects o Pioneering work by Costill-metabolic theory o Conflicts and difficulties: caffeine taken up by all tissues. *Used by athletes due to positive effects on energy levels and ability to delay or mask fatigue *Stimulants exert both CNS and PNS effect *Athletes claim euphoria. esp. and herbal supplements such as ma haung and ginseng. cocaine. exerts both CNS and PNS effects • Appears to have effects to spare glycogen utilization by increased lipolysis as well as to affect muscle contractility due to increased calcium permeability in the sarcoplasmic reticulum CNS effect at 85-200 mg. OTC cold meds. caffeine and its metabolites present simultaneously. amphetamines. Stricker. individual variability in response • • • 99 . from OTC meds or supplements. Introduction *Stimulant use very common among athletes *Examples include: caffeine. decreased fatigue *proof is limited II. MD Vanderbilt Sports Medicine Center Nashville. *High potential for abuse *Education Necessary to prevent unnecessary positive drug testing result.Paul R. increased aggression and confidence. Caffeine *Easily obtained.

double blind. • Ginseng Americans spend over $6 billion on herbal products but only about 5% have actually been studied in scientific manner. 1996: randomized. NO significant difference found for max work performance. 1996 radomized. 2 doses of American Ginseng used but for only one week. or shift in CHP/ lipid metabolism • Riley et al.*Recent research Increased endurance vs. respiratory exchange ratio.S • • • • Research * Yarnell. Ginseng is second only to Gingko in purchases Popular with athletes because of ease of purchase Risk for positive drug testing due to its chemical structure being similar to pseudoephedrine Independent organizations such as the American botanical council. peak aerobic power. blood lactic acid levels. but only tablet form is ergogenic Short term exercise (<20 min) positively affected. Bicycle ergometry was used. placebo. and perceived exertion. and the ABC has been involved in large study of ginseng to evaluated products for quality The Herb Research Foundation provided only professional safety review program available in the U. are involved in nonprofit education and research. but sparing limited to first 15-20 Tablet form and coffee produce equal levels. minute ventilation. crossover study 8 subjects. running and cycling at 80-90 % Muscle glycogen utilization decreased. No significant difference for time to exhaustion rate of perceived exertion. not glycogen sparing Sprints (<90 sec) have inconclusive results Diuretic effect: caffeine appears to not have significant effect on hydration status III. but more related to electrolyte balance and glucose availability effects from caffeine. 100 . placebo controlled study using American ginseng for 8 weeks. Bicycle ergometry used. resting/exercise/recovery oxygen intake. placebo at various doses. heart rate.

• Cautions include : small sample sizes. No symptoms occurred. Statistically significant rise in heart rate. but scant research exists White et al. 101 . various preparations of ginseng have different effects. More longitudinal study with more subjects are necessary. variations in individual response IV. Cautions for use of this substance with stimulants. • • • • Ma Haung active ingredients in this herb: ephedrine and pseudoephedrine Risk for positive drug testing results Very popular with athletes. but not blood pressure. 1997 : 12 subjects ingested ma haung twice a day and vital signs monitored.