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ENC1102 Project Two: Elements of a Rogerian Argument at the Paragraph Level

I. Paragraph One: Introduction

The purpose of this paragraph is to introduce the reader to the topic, the two opposing views on the issue, and the problem. Present and define key terms in this paragraph. (The thesis statement is presented in the concluding paragraph.) II. Paragraph Two: Summary of the Opposing Views Position

The purpose of this paragraph is to present the main points of the opposing view on the issue in an objective, non-biased, and informed manner. Information obtained from thorough research, which makes use of credible sources, is used to support the mains points. A respectful, academic tone must be maintained. III. Paragraph Three: Statement of Validity

The purpose of this paragraph is to present a context or circumstance in which the opposing view may be valid, not to continue to describe the points of the opposing view or to criticize that view. IV. Paragraph Four: Summary of the Writers Position

The purpose of this paragraph is to present the main points of the side of the issue on which the writer is taking a position in an objective, non-biased, and informed manner. Information obtained from thorough research, using credible sources, is used to support the mains points. A respectful, academic tone must be maintained. V. Paragraph Five: Statement of Validity

The purpose of this paragraph is to present a context or circumstance in which the side of the issue on which the writer is taking a position may be valid, not to continue to describe the points of this position or to criticize the opposing view. Remember: Up to this point in the paper, the reader should not be able to discern which position on the issue the writer is taking. The goal should be to present both sides of the issue from a neutral, objective stance, using the 3rd person point of view. Avoid the insertion of personal bias, loaded superlatives (such as best, perfect, most, etc.) strong adverbs (perfectly, extremely, incredibly, greatly, very, etc.), and comparative words (better, cheaper, more effective, etc.).

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VI.

Paragraph Six: Statement of Benefit(s)

The purpose of this paragraph is to describe the potential benefit(s) of accepting the position the writer is taking without showing obvious bias. In this paragraph, an attempt is to be made to describe how the opposing view may be strengthened by accepting some aspects of the position the writer is taking on the issue. Remember: At this point in the paper, the writer will be presenting the position he or she is taking, using logic and reason (logos) and credible, authoritative integrity (ethos). However, the tone is to remain respectful and nonthreatening. Do not bring in criticisms of the opposing view or discuss what may be seen as negative aspects of the opposing view. Previously in the paper, the main points of both sides of the issue have been presented. In this paragraph, the potential benefit of accepting the position that is being taken by the writer is addressed. VII. Paragraph Seven: Conclusion

The purpose of this paragraph is to summarize the topic, the two sides of the issue, and the problem. Common ground should be discussed, and areas of realistic and feasible compromise may be presented. Novel ideas for a proposed solution to the problem may be proposed here. A clear, strong thesis statement is made in this paragraph. The paper is then concluded on a hopeful, positive note.

Important note: The content of a well-written Rogerian argument essay must demonstrate evidence of significant critical thought. In a paper composed in this style, it should be evident to the reader that: the writer has done careful research to inform their thinking on both sides of the issue. The better informed the writer is, the stronger the argument he or she can construct. the writer has been able to recognize and state valid contexts and specific circumstances where each position may be valid. the writer has given considerable thought to generating a proposed solution to the problem stated in the introduction (think outside the box; exercise creative critical thought to construct and propose a novel solution). the writer has put forth considerable effort to construct a clear, strong thesis statement. It is the responsibility of the writer to demonstrate that he or she has invested considerable effort in the successful completion of this project. Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration. ~Thomas A. Edison
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