P. 1
Tourism Supply Chains: A Conceptual Framework Final

Tourism Supply Chains: A Conceptual Framework Final

|Views: 107|Likes:
tourism supply chain collaboration paper at the conference
tourism supply chain collaboration paper at the conference

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Pairach Piboonrungroj on Feb 27, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/16/2013

pdf

text

original

TOURISM
SUPPLY
CHAINS:
A
CONCEPTUAL
FRAMEWORK

 
 Pairach
Piboonrungroj1
and
Stephen
M.


Disney2
 Logistics
Systems
Dynamics
Group,

 Cardiff
Business
School,

 Aberconway
Building,

 Colum
Drive,

 Cardiff,
UK,
 CF10
3EU
 

Abstract
 The
 literature
 on
 tourism
 supply
 chain
 management
 (TSCM)
 is
 reviewed.
 We
 explore
 current
 TSCM
 research
 in
 academic
 databases,
 namely
 Scopus,
 ABI/INFORM
 Global
 (Proquest),
 ScienceDirect
 and
 EBSCO
 as
 well
 as
 Google
 Scholar.
 Accordingly,
 a
 systematic
 literature
 evaluation
 is
 conducted
 to
 obtain
 an
 overview
 of
 the
 current
 state
 of
 research
 on
 TSCM.
 We
 found
that
there
is
limited
amount
of
research
on
TSCM.
Furthermore,
the
finding
shows
that
 the
 existing
 research
 frameworks
 for
 TSCM
 do
 not
 yet
 provide
 a
 holistic
 view
 of
 TSCM.
 Moreover,
 we
 found
 that
 the
 current
 issues
 in
 TSCM
 are
 concerned
 with
 applying
 SCM
 to
 tourism
 management.
 Thus,
 we
 propose
 a
 new
 framework
 for
 research
 on
 TSCM.
 Then
 potential
research
questions
are
discussed
and
suitable
research
methods
are
identified.
 Keywords:
 tourism
management,
service
supply
chain
management,
literature
review.

 
 
 


1. Background

No matter what the economic climate, tourism has a significant impact on global and local  economies (UNWTO 2009, Antunes 2000). During economic booms, the tourism (especially  international  tourism)  sector  absorbs  wealth  from  people  on  trips  away  from  their  homes  (Kim  et  al.  2006;  Lee  and  Change  2008).  On  the  other  hand,  during  an  economics  crisis,  domestic  tourism  is  one  of  the  key  mechanisms  for  restoring  the  economy.  This  could  be  because many governments see that tourism can also create new jobs (Seckelmann 2002;  Page  2009).  Tourism  has  been  recognised  as  a  complex  system  (Jafari  1974;  McKercher  1999; Smith 1994; Véronneau and Roy 2009). Business management in the tourism industry  critically  needs  to  consider  supply  chain  perspectives  not  only  to  increase  their  efficiency  and  profitability  (Zhang  et  al.  2009;  Véronneau  and  Roy  2009)  but  also  to  ensure  sustainability (Schwartz et al. 2008).    Furthermore,  Tourism  Supply  Chain  Management  (TSCM)  is  currently  emerging  as  a  new  research  agenda  (Zhang  et  al.,  2009).  One  of  the  reasons  for  this  is  that  supply  chain  management  (SCM)  has  already  become  a  critical  source  of  an  organisations  competitive  advantage (Christopher 2005). Therefore SCM is considered to be a vital part of any kind of  business.  However,  research  on  TSCM  is  still  rather  immature  and  very  limited  at  the  moment  (Zhang  et  al.,  2009).  Consequently,  the  objective  of  this  study  is  to  provide  a  research  framework  for  TSCM  research.  The  potential  research  topics  in  TSCM  are  also  identified. 

1

2

  PhD candidate and corresponding author (Email: PiboonrungrojP@cardiff.ac.uk)    Senior Lecturer in Logistics and Operations Management, Cardiff Business School 

  Spain  and  Finland  (4. We found that there are two stages of  TSCM  research.  3   These databases include over 14. “tourism supply
 chain”. It could be argued that empirical research on TSCM  tends to be conducted only on the most famous tourist destinations.     Most of TSCM literature has been published in 2008 and 2009 (29 papers or 66%).    ‐ Page 2 of 11 ‐  .  all  in  Canada. and social science  as well as trade publications.
 ABI/INFORM
 Global
 (Proquest).  On  the  other  hand  empirical  studies  on  TSCM  in  Asia  are  only  in  China  and  Thailand (4 and 2 studies respectively).  we  employed  a  content  analysis  to  identify  the  main  focus  of  each  paper. in this stage of TSCM  research.
 ScienceDirect
and
EBSCO
3 as well as
Google
Scholar using the keywords of. Moreover.  “travel
 supply
 chain”.  Surprisingly. Figure 1  highlights the quantity of TSCM research over time.  and  2  studies  respectively).  2.  there  are  only  12%  of  empirical  studies  were  found  in  the  Americas.  in  another  stage  since  2007.  Moreover.  Then  we  found  that  TSCM  research is currently very limited.000 scholarly journals in business. The findings show that a half of empirical studies were found in Europe  whereas  approximately  one‐third  of  empirical  studies  were  in  Asia.  and  “hospitality
 supply
 chain”. the number of TSCM research has rapidly increased. This  significant role of case study approach in TSCM research could be due to the advantage of  the case study that can gain depth and insights from the complex phenomenon. more empirical studies are published than conceptual framework papers.  Scopus.  Secondly.  we  conducted  a  systematic  literature  search  of  the  academic  databases. Details of  the previous literature on TSCM can be found in Appendix A.  the  result shows that all studies conducted in Europe employed the case study approach. Literature
review
 To  obtain  the  current  state  and  evolution  of  TSCM  research.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   2.         Considering  the  research  methodology.    Figure
1:
Trend
in
research
on
tourism
supply
chain
management      Furthermore.  Methodology  and  the  geographical  focus  of  the  research  will  be  classified  if  the  study  is  empirical research.  The  first  stage  is  the  era  before  2007  where  there  are  only  conceptual‐ framework  papers  and  no  empirical  studies  conducted. There were only 44 studies found in these databases.  Within  Europe.  There  are  only  three  works  using  quantitatively  approaches.  a  case  study  approach  is  a  dominant  choice   (14  studies).  most  empirical  studies  were  conducted  in  the  UK. management.

 Thus coordination in TSCs  is highly intensive.
 Source: Adapted from Pizam (2009). tourism is not a pure manufacturing or a pure service industry (Jafari 1974. Zhang et al. High volatility and sensitivity  to the disturbances of tourism demand requires an insightful knowledge to manage it.  Moreover. on the supply  side.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   3. Secondly.      (2) Specifying
special
characteristics
of
tourism

 There are two main distinctive characteristics of the tourism industry.  services  provided  by  the  hospitality  and  travel  industry  are  partly  for  tourism  purpose.  Precisely. tourism demand has been recognised as  a complication (Sigala 2008. Lafferty and van Fossen 2001)). Therefore. Firstly.  there  are  also  non‐tourist  customers  in  both  the  hospitality  industry  and  the  travel  industry. on the demand side. Tourism  is a very complex industry.  travel  and  hospitality  could  mis‐lead  researchers (Pizam 2009).  Zhang and Murphy 2009).
hospitality
and
travel
industries. it is critical to clarify the definition of tourism. Page 2009.       Travel trade  Clubs  Institutional  foodservice  Assisted  living facility  Lodging  Restaurants  Time share  Events  Attractions  Destination  marketing  Tourism  planning &  development  Trains  Ferries  Airlines  Bus & coach  Car rental  Commuters  Local travellers  Migrants  Students  Hospitality
Industry
 Tourism
Industry
 Travel
Industry
   Figure
2:
The
relationship
between
the
tourism. 2009).  Tourism supply chains (TSCs) consists of various parties that are  highly connected (March and Wilkinson 2009.    (1) Defining
tourism
industry
 The  confusion  of  the  terminologies  between  tourism.        ‐ Page 3 of 11 ‐  . It is a mixture of products combining services and goods.  we  can  identify  distinct  activities  in  the  tourism  industry  by  considering whether they serve tourists (Figure 2). What
are
the
tourism
supply
chains?  This study offers a four‐step approach to define the tourism supply chains. Firstly.

 one of the important input  providers is the food suppliers or the food supply chain (Font et al. it could be more meaningful to use a correlation matrix approach  (Figure 3) that is derived from the tourism supply chain links (Tapper and Font 2004.  7. wholesalers. Waste recycling & disposal  10.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   (3) Identifying
tourism
supply
chain
components  A  generic  supply  chain  usually  comprises  of  raw  material  providers. Furniture and crafts  7. Tour operating  15.  suppliers.  12.    ‐ Page 4 of 11 ‐  . service &    resources of destinations  8.  satisfaction of the tourists is largely based on the performance of service providers (Yilmaz  and Bititci 2005). Marketing & sales   16. Zhang et al.    a) Input
providers
(sources)
 As the second tier supplier.  6. Energy and  water supplies  9.  Therefore. and retailers. distributors. 2008). However.  2009. Foods production  11. Excursions & attractions  5. Accommodations  14.  3. Ground transport  3.  14.  9. Customers  1. However. 2009).  retailers. social and sport events  6. foods and beverages  13. Cultural.  Firms  in  the  first  tier  suppliers  directly  contact  with  the  customers even though tour agencies or tour operators may manage the combination and  linkages  between  each  of  the  service  providers  (Véronneau  and  Roy  2009). Laundry  12. we may classify components in TSCs by their functions as followings. Ground operations  4. p. we found that TSCs consist of various components linking to each  other.  Tapper  and  Font  2004).  5. However.   Webster (2001)  discussed the scope and structure of food supply chain from the sources of primary inputs  (resources). input providers have a role of supplying resources and materials  for service operations in the first tier (Smith 1994.  Infrastructures. Therefore.       Tourism
supply
chain
components
 1.4).  13.  11.  manufacturers.  Transports to & from    destinations  2.        ∆  ∆                      Ο                                                        ∆  Ο                  Ο    ∆    ∆      Ο                                                                                              ∆  ∆                              ∆  Ο                              Ο  Ο                                Ο                                                                                                    Ο  Ο  ∆  Ο  Ο  Ο  ∆  Ο    Ο  Ο    Ο      ∆            Ο                    Ο  Ο  Ο        Ο        Ο  Ο  ∆      Ο        Figure
3:
 Correlations
matrix
of
components
in
the
tourism
supply
chains

 Source:  Extended from Tapper and Font (2004)  Note:        Supply chain link (Tapper and Font 2004.  and  final  customers  (Smith  1994).  10. p. it is not suitable to use this  approach  to  describe  the  TSCs  because  it  is  a  complex  system  that  consists  of  various  supply chains.  They  are  agriculture  sector.  16.  15. 4)  Ο  Critical correlation between TSC components (the authors)  ∆  Moderate correlation between TSC components (the authors)    According to the figure 3.  8.  2.  4. Caterings. We can classify input  providers into different types by materials they supply.  wholesalers. 
 
 b) Service
providers
(service
producers)
 Service providers (1st tier supplier) are considered to be the core facets of TSCs (Zhang et al.

    
   ‐ Page 5 of 11 ‐  . after the trip. which is derived from combining perspectives of both the demand  and the supply side. it is noteworthy to state that there are also other  important  components  i.    e) Passenger
transport
(customer
flow
enablers)
 Not only does freight transport play a significant role in TSCM but also passenger transport  play an important role.  It  composes  of  various supply chains (Tapper and Font 2004..PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   c) Intermediaries:
tour
agencies
and
tour
operators
(product
assemblers)
 Tour operators and tour agencies have a massive influence on TSCs (Schwartz et al. Duval 2007).  Another  tier  is  the  service  provider  that  contacts  customers (tourists) directly. Muhcina and Popovici 2008).  after  the  customers  decided  to  make  a  trip.     According  to  the  previous  discussion.  Firstly.  In  TSCM.  energy  and  waste  management  which  are  rarely  studied (Zhang et al.  The  second  part  is  a  combination  of  supply  chains  that  associate  to  tourism  such  as  lodging  (hotel).  information  inquiries  and  booking  procedures  with  tour  agencies  or  via  the  internet. 2009). acting as architects. freight transport is the integrator of the physical flow (McKinnon  2001). 2003) or factory gate pricing (Potter et al.  TSCs  are  considerably  complex. 2009. and customer flow  (Fawcett 2000). there may be some after sales services  or activities between tourists and service providers/ tour agencies.  Font et al. there are four major flows including physical flow (Zhang  et al. 2009).  and  passenger  transport  supply  chains.  and  then  the  transactions  between  the  tour  agencies/tour  operators  and  service  providers. information flow (Go and William 1993. Bignné et al. 2008.      (4) Outlining
flows
and
processes
 Finally  we  outline  flows  and  processes  of  the  TSCs  by  proposing  a  generic  tourism  supply  chains model (Figure 4).     This model represents components and flows in typical TSCs that can be divided into three  phrases. 2008).  freight  transport  still  has  an  important  role  to  ensure  the  seamless  transactions  between  input  providers  and  service  providers  (Véronneau  and  Roy  2009).e.  This critical role of passenger transport is to seamlessly move the  tourists along their trips (Fawcett 2000.     d) Freight
transport
(physical
flow
connectors)
 In a typical supply chain.  Considering  this  vital  role  of  tour  operators.  There  are  two  tiers  of  suppliers. could be also applicable for TSCM. Firstly. Thirdly. The critical role of the tour operators is controlling the flow of tourists and  partly managing the tourism supply chain (Zhang et al.  such as vendor managed inventory (Disney et al. In this model. Muhcina and Popovici 2008). 2008). Apart from the  components of TSCs discussed previously.  2007). designing the supply chain.  Various techniques for managing efficient transport operations in traditional supply chain.  they  may  be  considered  to  be  forth‐party  logistic service providers (4PLs).  catering  (restaurant)  supply  chain.  souvenirs. input providers who supply resources for service operations such as foods  and  beverages  (F&B)  or  equipments.

  After  the  trip 
 Figure
4:

A
Generic
Tourism
Supply
Chains
Model
   ‐ Page 6 of 11 ‐  .e.  Furniture  Water   & Energy  Hotels  supply   chains  
 Passenger  
 transport  
 supply   
 chains  
 
 
 Service
providers
i... Before  the trip Passenger  Transport (air)  Passenger  Transport (land)  II.e. During the trip Passenger  Transport (air)  III.
 (2nd
Tier
suppliers)
 F&B   Equipment  Waste  mgmt.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   Upstream       I  n  Freight
transports
&

 f  Distribution
systems
 o  r  m  Information
flows a  t  i  Via
 o  tour

 operators n     F  Direct   Via
 l  contact   travel

 o via   agencies websites  w  s Trip  Arrangement Input
providers
i.
 st 
 (1 
Tier
suppliers) 
 Service
 opera‐ tions
 Attraction  supply   chains  
 
 
 
 Service
 opera‐ tions
 
 
 
 
 Service
 opera‐ tions
       P  h  y  s  i  c  a  l     F  l  o w  s Downstream 
 Services
 delivery
 
 Services
 delivery
 
 Services
 delivery
 Customer
flow
 Customer   (Tourist)  I.

 and performance measurements) under the concept of SCOR model that consists  of plan.
Financial
 ‐
Margin
 ‐
Profitability
 3.  There  are  three  major  focuses  in  the  framework  (designs. and return (Supply‐Chain Council 2009).  operational.
 1st
tier

 suppliers
 ‐
Lodging
 ‐
Travel
 ‐
Etc.    Secondly.
Operational
 ‐
Effectiveness
 ‐
Efficiency
 ‐
Responsiveness
 ‐
Reliability

 ‐
Resilience
 ‐
Value
added
 ‐
Wastes
(Muda)
 
 4. Conceptual
framework
for
TSCM
research
 After  we  have  a  generic  form  of  TSCs. source. make.  In  TSCM. Firstly.  relations.  supply  chain  should  be  designed  preliminarily  based  on  what  the  targeted  tourists  want.  the  core  of  TSCM  is  relationship  among  stakeholders.  in  TSCM  they  are  those  correlations  between  TSC  quartets  that  are  first‐tier  and  second‐tier  suppliers.    Supply
chain
redesign
 
 I.
Development
 Sustainability
 Intermediaries
 ‐
Tour
agencies
 ‐
Tour
operators
 Collaborations

 within/between
 
the
tourism
supply
chains
 


Plan
 



Source
 



Make
 



Deliver
 



Return
 Figure
5:
A
research
framework
of
tourism
supply
chain
management
     ‐ Page 7 of 11 ‐  .PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   4.  The  other  aspects  of  the  design  process  such  as  strategy.  Thirdly.
Designs
 
 II.  tour  agencies/tour  operators. supply chain  design  is  a  critical  starting  point  of  TSCM.  financial.
External
 Customer
 satisfaction
 2.  distribution  or  pricing  could  also  be  considered  (Chopra  and  Meindl  2007).  performance  measurement  covers  four  aspects  including  external.  and  development  that  are  considered  in  the balance score card (Johnston and Clark 2008).  then  we  can  illustrate  the  research  framework  for  research  on  TSCM  (Figure  5). deliver.
 Customer s
 (Tourists)
 1.
Performance
 measurements
 Customer
 value Competitive
 advantage
 Strategies Processes Distribution Inventory
 Transport
 Sourcing
 Facilities
 Pricing
 Quartet
relationships

 of
the
tourism
supply
chains
 2nd
tier

 suppliers
 ‐
Foods

 ‐
Energy
 ‐
Etc.  Unlike  typical  SCM  that  considers  only  buyer‐seller  relationship.
Relationships
 III.  and  tourists.

  Furthermore. Thus.  Undertaking  this  model. the generic tourism supply chain  in this present study may be a robust model for future research on TSCM.  TSCM  research  could  employ  either  qualitative  or  quantitative  research  methods  or  both  (Piboonrungroj  2009). considering the immaturity of the TSCM concept. To an extent.  Nevertheless.  concerning  the  level  of  generalisation  of  the  research. we found some emerging topics in the literatures that are  still  the  gaps.  
 6.  We  outline  five  potential  research  agendas  with  specific  research  questions  that should be answered.  tourism  is  also  a  business  that  inevitably  has  to  consider  SCM.  because  SCM  is  a  study  of  the  relationships  between  each  player  along  the  supply  chain.  The  proposed  research  framework  could  also  enable  researchers  in  both  tourism  and  SCM  areas  to  comprehensively  explore  and  examine  the  phenomenon  in  the  TSCs. Conclusions
 There is a growing consensus that a single company no longer competes in the marketplace  but  rather  its  supply  chain  that  competes  (Christopher  2005).  However.  therefore  another  vital  research  agenda  could  be  the  collaborations of the TSCs.  
 Acknowledgements
 The  authors  are  grateful  to  the  Royal  Thai  Government  through  the  Commission  on  Higher  Education for financial support of Mr.  There  are  various  research  methods the selection of research method should be based on types of research questions  and research objectives (Yin 2003).  it  was  found  that  most  of  the  empirical studies have employed the case study approach to provide an in‐depth analysis. drivers and impacts of collaboration in TSCs can  be the focal consideration. Research
opportunities  The  potential  research  agendas  which  could  enable  the  better  understanding  of  the  TSCs  have  been  identified.  survey‐based  research  using  advance  statistical  methods  such  as  structural  equation  modelling  or  econometrics  could offer a better reliable model of the TSCM.  Therefore. Examples of methodological selection in TSCM research  can  be  obtained  in  Piboonrungroj  (2009).    (1) TSC
design   What is the right tourism supply chain to a particular situation?    How can we identify it?  (2) Collaboration
in
tourism
supply
chain
  What type of collaborations existing in TSCs?   What are the antecedents and the benefits of collaboration in TSCs?  (3) Performance
measurement
  Which aspect that we should consider when measuring TSCM performance?   How can we measure supply chain performance in tourism?  (4) Managing
risk
and
uncertainty
in
Tourism
Supply
Chain
  What are risks and uncertainties of TSCs?   How can we measure and mitigate risks in TSCs?  (5) ICT
and
E‐tourism
supply
chains
  How can we design ICT systems in TSCs?   How can we identify the right E‐business model for a particular TSC?    In  terms  of  research  methodology.  Various  research  topics  suggested  in  this  paper  could  extend  the  scope  of  the  existing  SCM  research.  Finally.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   5. Piboonrungroj’s study in Cardiff University.     ‐ Page 8 of 11 ‐  .  the  research  employed  in  other  industries  could  be  applied  in  TSCM  research.

  eds. pp.F.  Kim.  and  Kornilaki. 180‐192.  Journal
 of
 Revenue
 and
 Pricing
 Management 7 (3).  Bigné.
Development
Southern
Africa  24(3). pp. 133‐140. pp. 363‐380. London: Pergamon.  and  Sai.
 Jafari.
 pp.  Tourism
Management 27 (5). pp.M.  Business
Strategy
and
the
Environment 17(4). 2009.  Managing
 Passenger
 Logistics:
 The
 Comprehensive
 Guide
 to
 People
 and
 Transport.  Handbook
 of
 Logistics
and
Supply‐Chain
Management.  Conceptual tools for evaluating tourism partnerships.  V.122‐132. Tourism development and economic growth: A closer look at panels.  Journal  of  Service Marketing.  and Williams..  March.C. Brazil. 2007..  S. 2001. 2008. L. and Meindl. 469‐493.  Lafferty.  S. 137‐142. Q.  Integrated  logistics  strategies. pp. pp.
Networks
and
Flows. Service
Operations
Management:
improving
Service
Delivery.  Chopra. International
Journal
of
 Contemporary
Hospitality
Management 12(7).  S.J.  The  key  capabilities  required  for  managing  tourism  business  networks. pp. A chaos approach to tourism.  Chen. 2005. 11‐19.  Christopher.  Fawcett. F.  Logistics  and  Supply  Chain  Management  in  Tourism.
177‐180. and Lima Jr. J.E.  2008. and Faal. C. 1993.125‐136.P. Chiang Mai University. 2008.  2001. 1999. pp.L. T. pp.  Keating.T. 260‐271.  G. 1974. A case study of the hospitality network relationship in the  Campinas Region. 2007. All under one roof. F.M.M.  Scale  to  measure  and  benchmark  service  quality  in  tourism  industry.  A.  Lemmetyinen. 2008. pp.  McKinnon.  M.  Murphy. WIT
Transactions
on
Ecology
and
the
Environment 115. pp.  Tourism
Management 30(1).  Dye.. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. J. Tales of two cities’ collaborative tourism marketing: Toward a theory of destination  stakeholder assessment. and Wilkinson.
73‐89. 454‐464.  Button. Tourism
and
Hospitality
Research
3(2). 3rd ed.  Tourism
 Management 22(1).  King. 212‐220. J. H. Competing and cooperating in the changing tourism channel system.  and  van  Fossen. G.  Duval. 27‐29.   Almeida.  2008.
 Johnston.  Integrating  the  tourism  industry:  problems  and  strategies. pp.. pp. pp. 157‐170. pp. P. R. Editor.
Annals
 of
Tourism
Research
1
(3). pp. 455‐462. pp.  B. T.  M.  Lee.M.  Aldás. Supply
Management 17 January.  P.  J.  Logistics
 and
 Supply
 Chain
 Management:
 Creating
 Value‐Adding
 Network  3rd  ed.  L. Managing Ethics in the Tourism Supply Chain: The Case Study of Chinese Travel to Australia. and Clark.  A. 1‐6. 181‐184. 429‐440.  J.  2008.  A. Clevedon: Channel View Publications.  and  Smith.  A. 925‐933.  A. Transportation
Research
Part
E 39.  Chiang  Mai:  Social  Research  Institute.. 431‐433.  B.  Narayan.  R.. pp.  Mitchell.  Harlow:  Prentice‐Hall.  2005.  and  Andreu. O. F.  D.  2009. pp. International
Journal
of
Hospitality
Management 28(2).  2006. A framework for mapping and evaluating business process costs in the tourism industry supply  chain.  2009.  2008. P. A.  Coordinating  the  tourism  supply  chain  using  bid  prices.  Go.  M.
pp.  Potter.  Tourism  expansion  and  economics  development:  The  case  of  Taiwan. Tourism
and
Hospitality
Research 3(2). 425‐434. Supply
Chain
Management.  Chefs  and  suppliers:  An  exploratory  look  at  supply  chain  issues  in  an  upscale  restaurant alliance. R. C. 2008. Benchmarking:
An
International
Journal 15(4).   Antunes.  2003. 2001.P.  and  Suriya. B. Inflight catering. 2008.  Kaosa‐ard..  2008.  In  Brewer. 11. Frew.  Disney. S. 31‐40. Algrave: the tourism chain and the new management of the territory. F.P. Vienna: Springer Verlag.  and  Go.  Schwartz.  F.P.. Information
and
communication
technologies
in
tourism.  K.  Rajendran. Tourism
and
Transport:
Modes.  London:  Kogan Page..  The  impact  of  vendor  managed  inventory  on  transport  operations.  The
 logistics
 of
 merchandise 10(24).  Jang.A.  J.  d’Angella.. Logistics in onboard services (inflight services) of airlines.M. 229–248. 2000.  An  analysis  of  tourism  logistics  in  tourism  city:  In  Kaosa‐ard  et  al.  X. and Change. Holiday package tourism and the poor in the Gambia.  K. One game analysis of tour package fare and related phenomena in tourism supply chain in China.  and  Popovici.    ‐ Page 9 of 11 ‐  . and Go.  McKercher. The components and nature of tourism.  Municină. P.  Guo. London: Prentice  Hall. 445‐464.  Proceeding
of
the
International
Conference
on
risk
Management
and
Engineering
Management.  B2B  service:  IT  adoption  in  travel  agency  supply  chains. 22(6). Tourism Management 20 (4).PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   References

 Alford.  Harewood.  K.  Sustainable  Supply  Chain  Management  in  Tourism.  pp. Tourism
Management  30(3). In: A. pp. The tourism market basket of goods and services.  S.  Tapper.D. pp.H.  and  Gardner. pp. pp. D. B.266‐280.  M.  International
Journal
of
Tourism
Research.  S.  H. 2007.J. J.  C.  and  Hensher. 2009.  Hovara. Journal
 of
Travel
&
Tourism
Marketing 2 (2‐3).T. Tourism
Management 30(3).   Font.  2000.  Integrated
 Development
 of
 Sustainable
 of
 Tourism
 in
 the
 Mekong
 Region
 3.J.  2008. Tourism
 Management 29(1). Boaretto Jr.  2001.

.  Song.  The  scope  and  structure  of  the  food  supply  chain  management  in  global  food  industry.F. International
Journal
of
Contemporary
Hospitality
Management 19(4).  Environment  Business  &  Development  Group.  Piboonrungroj.  U.  China. Tourism
Management. International
Journal
of
Retail
and
Distribution
Management 35 (10). and  Xiao. S.  and  Liang. 1141‐4452. and Ball.  Piboonrungroj.
Tourism
Management 30(2).  Y.  Available  at:  http://www. What is the hospitality industry and how does it differ from the tourism and travel industries?. M.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   Novelli. 2003.Q..  Sigala.uk/lsif/the/Tourism‐Supply‐Chains.  2006. pp.lmu. pp. A Model of Strategic Evaluation of a Tourism Destination  Based on Internal and Relational Capabilities.  B.  T.org/fileadmin/docs/publications/  SupplyChainEngagement. and Carbone.  2009.toinitiative.  The  Appliance  of  Supply  Chain  Management  Theory  to  Tourism  Development. pp. 3rd ed.  K. pp. pp.  X.  G.  Leeds  Metropolitan  University.  P..  Mason. International
Journal
of
Tourism
Research 11(1). How do supplier relationships contribute to success in conference and  events management?. 2009.   Schott. K. S.  Yin. 2007. 183–184. Tourism
supply
chains. 3rd ed.  2001. pp. 2008. pp.  Ogden.pdf [Accessed: 8 June 2009].  and  Lawani.  2008.edamba.P.425‐439. pp. International
Journal
of
Tourism
 Research 9(4).  and  Spencer. 2008. pp.  Rusko.eu/userfiles/file/Piboonrungroj%20Pairach.  Available  at:  http://www.L. E. London: Elsevier.278‐287. Selling Adventure Tourism: a Distribution Channel Perspective. A sustainable supply chain management for tour operators. J. and Yongli.M. T.  2005. June 8‐10.  L. A. 151‐162. London: Butterworth Heinemann.  Tapper.  C. R. Annals
of
Tourism
Research 2(3). 2004.  Song.  MSc  Dissertation.  2007.  Methodological  implications  of  the  research  design  in  tourism  supply  chain  collaboration. R.  J.  and  Bititci. Sorèze. Journal of Travel Research 47(4). 821‐834.  Tourism
Management 27(6). and Font.pdf [Accessed: 8 August 2008]  Tapper.  2009.  S. X. 4‐5. The tourism product.  and  Murphy.  Performance  measurement  in  the  value  chain:  manufacturing  v.  M. and Saari. Food
Supply
Chain
Management:
Issues
for
the
hospitality
and
 retail
sectors. Tourism
Management 30(1). G.Case
Study
Research:
Design
and
Methods.  L. pp.  Seckelmann. pp.  UNWTO.  Proceeding
of
the
International
Conference
on
Management
of
e‐Commerce
and
e‐Government. pp. Proceeding
of
the
IEEE
International
Conference
Neural
Network
&
Signal
Processing.  2006. pp.  Available  at:  http://www.  Pizam. A.  Supply‐chain  considerations  in  marketing  underdeveloped  regional  destinations: A case study of Chinese to Goldfields region of Victoria.     ‐ Page 10 of 11 ‐  .  Supply‐Chain
 Operations
 Reference‐Model
 Version
 9. 2009. and Espino‐Rodríguez.  Supply‐Chain  Council.  Potter. R. 1994.   Schwartz.  Huang.  Yang. Report of a desk research project for the travel foundation  [Online]. pp.ac... pp. 582‐595.  UNTWO  news:  Magazine
 of
 the
 World
 Tourism
Organization XXIII (1). R.   Walle.  Yilmaz.  Zhang. X.  Tourism
Management 30(3).  T.  Cardiff University. Journal  of Sustainable Tourism 16(3). Domestic tourism – a chance for regional development in Turkey?. 257‐274. pp.  and  Steenberghen. Tourism
Management  23(1).V. pp.org/filemanager/active?fid=185 [Accessed: 14 February 2009].  2009. 1589‐1599.  cluster  and  innovation  in  tourism:  A  UK  experience. Proceeding
of
18th
EDAMBA
Summer
Academy.  Webster.  Schmitz.  P.  Networks.  Y.J.  Game‐Theoretic  Approach  to  Competition  Dynamics  in  Tourism Supply Chains. T. pp.  tourism. Tapper. pp. 371‐389.  and  Huang.  Wei.  G.  International
Journal
of
Hospitality
Management 28 (2).  2009.  Tourism:  Creating  Opportunities  in  Challenging  Times. 2001. pp.. 2009. 71‐87. S.  R.T. 289‐299. Transportation
Research
Part
A 40(2).368‐380. H. 2007.  and  Roy.supply‐chain.  S. and Font.  Analysis  of  factory  gate  pricing  in  the  UK  grocery  supply  chain.  International
Journal
of
Productivity
and
Performance
Management 55(5). and McCorriston. H. R.  and  Lu. Sharples. C. Journal
of
Travel
Research 46(4). 37‐54. 298‐314.  Smith.  Global  service  supply  chains:  An  empirical  study  of  current  practice  and  challenges of a cruise line corporation. M.0[Online]. Supply Chain in Tourism Destinations: The Case of Levi Resort in  Finnish Lapland. Zhenchen. Tour Operators’ Initiative for Sustainable Tourism development and the Center for Environmental  Leadership  in  business. S. 85‐92.  In:  Eastham. Journal
of
Cleaner
Production 16(15). S.  Smith.  H.  Developing
 Quick
 Scan
 Audit
 Methodology
 for
 the
 Service
 Industry.Q. Culinary Tourism Supply Chains: A Preliminary Examination.  P. pp.  Rodríguez‐Díaz. Available at:  http://www.  H. 278‐ 287. 128‐139.  2009.  2008. 644‐646.  M.  A  supply  chain  management  approach  for  investigating  the  role  of  tour  operators  on  sustainable tourism: the case of TUI.  S.319‐327.  Tourism  Supply  Chain  Management:  A  new  research  agenda. 2004.  Véronneau.  Xinyue.14‐17.  2009.F. R. Supply
Chain
engagement
for
Tour
operators:
Three
Steps
toward
Sustainability
 [Online]..  Zhang. Kylänen. pp. Journal
of
Travel
 Research 46(3).  2008. London: Sage. 2008. Integrated Tourism Service Supply Chain Management: Concept and Operations  Processes. 2008.  Space  and  time  related  determinants  of  public  transport  use  in  trip  chains. 2002.  2009..  Page. 23‐29 July 2009 [Online].pdf [Accessed: 8 August 2008].  K. L.  A.

   Silaga   Smith and Xioa   Wei and Lu   Xinyue and Yongli   Year:
2007
 Mitchell and Faal   Ogden and McCorriston  Main
focus
   Collaborative tourism marketing  Tourism business network  Ethics in TSCs  Tourism partnership evaluation  TSC relationship  Overall TSCM  Methodological implications in TSCM  research  SCM in tourism destination  TSCM practices  Competition dynamics  SCM and tourist destination  marketing  Overall TSCM    TSC relationship  IT adoption in travel agency supply  chains  SC Collaboration  Sustainable SCM  Competition &    relationship in TSCs  Coordination in supply chain  Holiday supply chains   Tourism Logistics  Overall TSCM  Service quality measurement in TSCs  Paper
type
   Empirical  Empirical  Empirical  Conceptual  Empirical  Conceptual  Conceptual  Empirical  Empirical  Analytical  Empirical  Conceptual     Empirical  Empirical  Descriptive   Empirical  Empirical  Analytical   Conceptual  Empirical  Conceptual   Empirical  Empirical  Empirical  Conceptual  Empirical  Empirical  Empirical  Conceptual    Empirical  Empirical  Empirical    Empirical  Empirical    Conceptual  Conceptual    Conceptual  Conceptual    Conceptual  Conceptual  Conceptual    Conceptual  Conceptual  Conceptual  Methods
 Countries
     Case study  Spain & Austria  Case study  Finland  Case study  China  ‐  ‐  Survey   France  (Descriptive statistics)  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Case study  Case study  Quantitative  (Game‐theoretic)  Case study  ‐    Case study  Quantitative  (Structural Equation  Modelling)  Case study  Exploratory  Quantitative  (Stackelburg games)  Simulation  ‐  Case study  ‐  Quantitative  (Factor analysis)  Case study  Case study  ‐  Case study  Case study  Case study  ‐    Case study  Survey  Qualitative    Case study  Quantitative  (Regression)    ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐  ‐  Finland  Canada  ‐  China  ‐    Brazil  UK  UK  UK & EU  China    ‐  Thailand  ‐  India  Thailand  Spain  ‐  Greece  Canada  China  ‐    Gambia  UK  New Zealand    UK  Belgium    ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐  ‐    ‐  ‐  ‐  Supply Chain Audit Method  Tourist destination competitiveness  &benchmarking  Sustainable SCM   SCM & sustainable tourism  Overall TSCs (Culinary)  TSCM and tourism development  TSC operations     TSCM and tourism development  Supplier relationships in conference  and event mgmt.   Véronneau and Roy   Yang et al.  Bignné et al.  Schott   Distribution channels    Year:
2006
 Novelli et al.   Year:
2008
 Almeida et al.   Guo   Harewood  Johnston and Clark   Kaosa‐ard and Suriya   Municină and Popovici   Narayan et al.   Tourism network and cluster  Walle and Steenberghen  Public transport and trip chains  Year:
2005
 Alford   Yilmaz and Bititci   Year:
2004  Tapper and Carbone   Tapper and Font   Year:
2001  Hovara  King  Lafferty and Fossen  Year:
Before
2001
 Antunes (2000)  Smith (1994)  Go and William (1993)    Business Process   Re‐engineering  Performance measurement    Sustainable SCM   Overall TSCM    Logistics of airline service   Logistics of airline service   Integration in tourism    Overall TSCM  Tourism production process  Information technology      ‐ Page 11 of 11 ‐  .  Zhang and Murphy   Zhang et al.   Piboonrungroj  Rodríguez‐Díaz and  Espino‐Rodríguez   Schwartz et al.  Dye   Font et al.PhD Networking Conference  Exploring Tourism III: Issue in PhD research    Piboonrungroj and Disney   Appendix
A:
Summary
of
TSCM
literature
 
 Authors
 Year:
2009
 d’Angella and Go  Lemmetyinen and Go  Keating   March and Wilkinson  Murphy and Smith   Page   Piboonrungroj  Rusko et al.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->