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CAM Magazine October 2008 – Metals/Steel, Signage

CAM Magazine October 2008 – Metals/Steel, Signage

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Published by Matthew Austermann
Welcome to the October 2008 issue of CAM Magazine, featuring Metals/Steel and Signage.

FEATURES INCLUDE:
• On the Jobsite: Accommodating Big Needs on a Small Site
• MBT Credit Makes Brownfield Redevelopment More Attractive

METALS/STEEL
• Douglas Steel Fabricating Corporation's Project Grid Blankets Southern Michigan
• Unique Metals Products: A Portfolio of Exquisite Craftsmanship

SIGNAGE
• Greener Choices for Corporate Signage
• Greenprint for the Future: How Green are Your Signs?

CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
• Charter Township of Grand Blanc Police Station

• Industry News
• Safety Toolkit
• Product Showcase
• People in Construction
• and Much More!

CAM Magazine is published by the Construction Association of Michigan.
Welcome to the October 2008 issue of CAM Magazine, featuring Metals/Steel and Signage.

FEATURES INCLUDE:
• On the Jobsite: Accommodating Big Needs on a Small Site
• MBT Credit Makes Brownfield Redevelopment More Attractive

METALS/STEEL
• Douglas Steel Fabricating Corporation's Project Grid Blankets Southern Michigan
• Unique Metals Products: A Portfolio of Exquisite Craftsmanship

SIGNAGE
• Greener Choices for Corporate Signage
• Greenprint for the Future: How Green are Your Signs?

CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
• Charter Township of Grand Blanc Police Station

• Industry News
• Safety Toolkit
• Product Showcase
• People in Construction
• and Much More!

CAM Magazine is published by the Construction Association of Michigan.

More info:

Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Matthew Austermann on Feb 24, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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05/10/2014

Plus: AN ARRESTING BUILDING – Charter Township of Grand Blanc Police Station

OCTOBER 2008 VOL. 29 • NO. 10 • $4. 00
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
IN THIS ISSUE:
IN THIS ISSUE:
METALS/
STEEL
Rising Steel in
Southern Michigan
Exquisite Craftsmanship
and Unique Accents
Communication
Innovations
Showcased in
This Issue
METALS/
STEEL
Rising Steel in
Southern Michigan
Exquisite Craftsmanship
and Unique Accents

Large medical expenses can be financially devastating. That’s why your Association sponsors the
CAM Benefit Program for you and your employees.
By combining our responsive local claims service with our new medical insurance carrier, Madison
National Life, you now have an opportunity to select a full array of employee benefits:
Medical PPO • RX Drug Card • Dental PPO • Life
The CAM Benefit Program is underwritten by
AD#2
REDUCED Rates for 2008!
Call us today for pricing and further details
Rob Walters • CAM Administrative Services
Ph: 248.233.2114 • Fax: 248.827.2112
Email: rwalters@camads.com
Quality, Affordability
and Solid protection
Group Insurance
4 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
FEATURES
12 On the Jobsite
Accommodating Big Needs on a Small Site
14 MBT Update
Credit Makes Brownfield Redevelopment
More Attractive
METALS / STEEL
16 Heavy Metal
in Michigan
Douglas Steel Fabricating
Corporation’s Project
Grid Blankets
Southern Michigan
26 Unique Metal
Products:
APortfolio of
Exquisite
Craftsmanship
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
®
SIGNAGE
30 The Signs They
are A-Changin’
Greener Choices for
Corporate Signage
33 Greenprint for the Future
How Green are Your Signs?
34 Building the
Inverted Pyramid
New Standards Set
for Cantilever Signage
CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
40 An Arresting Building
Charter Township of Grand Blanc Police Station
DEPARTMENTS
8 Industry News
9 Safety Tool Kit
48 Product Showcase
54 People in Construction
60 CAMWelcomes New Members
61 Construction Calendar
62 Advertisers Index
See complete set of Details, Isometric drawings and Generic specifications by visiting
www.masonpro.com
1-800-659-4731
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LEAN: Tall, slim, strong and handsome with limitless design choices
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high rise performance
5 Great Reasons to
Choose Green:
Brick & Block:
• Brick: 100% recyclable or reusable
• Block: 100% recyclable
Brick Ties & Wall Anchors:
• Made from 100% recycled steel
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Your Lean, Green, Thermal Team:
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6 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
PUBLISHER Kevin N. Koehler
EDITOR Amanda M. Tackett
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR E. Dewey Little
ASSOCIATE EDITORS Mary E. Kremposky
David R. Miller
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Matthew J. Austermann
GRAPHIC DESIGN Marci L. Christian
DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Gregg A. Montowski
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Cathy A. Jones
DIRECTORS
OFFICERS
Chairman Jeffrey W. Cohee,
Frank Rewold & Son, Inc.
Vice Chairman Rick J. Cianek,
Fraco Products
Vice Chairman Ted C. McGinley,
Gutherie Lumber Co.
Treasurer Robert J. Michielutti Jr.,
Michielutti Bros., Inc.
President Kevin N. Koehler
DIRECTORS Stephen J. Auger,
Stephen Auger + Associates Architects
Brian J. Brunt,
Brunt Associates
James C. Capo,
DeMattia Group
Brian D. Kiley,
Edgewood Electric, Inc.
R. Andrew Martin,
F.H. Martin Constructors
John O'Neil, Sr.,
W.J. O'Neil Company
Glenn E. Parvin,
C.A.S.S.
Jacqueline LaDuke Walters,
LaDuke Roofing & Sheet Metal
Michigan Society of
Association Executives
2002, 2004, 2005 & 2007
Diamond Award
2003, 2006 Honorable Mention
Gallery of Fine Printing
2002 Bronze Award
MARCOM International
Creative Awards
2005 Gold Award
The Communicator
International
Print Media Competition
Overall Association Magazine
Magazine Writing
CAM Magazine (ISSN08837880) is published monthly by the Construction Association of Michigan, 43636 Woodward
Ave., P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 (248) 972-1000. $24.00 of annual membership dues is allocated to
a subscription to CAM Magazine. Additional subscriptions $40.00 annually. Periodical postage paid at Bloomfield Hills, MI
and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: CAM MAGAZINE, 43636 WOODWARD AVE.,
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI 48302-3204.
For editorial comment or more information: magazine@cam-online.com.
For reprints or to sell CAM Magazine: 248-972-1000.
Copyright © 2008 Construction Association of Michigan. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without
permission is prohibited. CAM Magazine is a registered trademark of the Construction Association of Michigan.
2006
GRAPHIC DESIGN USA
AMERICAN INHOUSE
DESIGN AWARD
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Detroit’s best known distributor/supplier of architectural
metal building products.
In-stock sheet items:
Mill, Anodized & Painted Aluminum, Copper, Galvanized, Stainless & Painted
Steel; also, Aluminum Extrusions in Mill & Anodized finish and available in
custom shapes. Custom fabricated sheet metal wall panel systems and acces-
sories; gutter & downspout, fascia & coping systems, all (FA) Factory Mutual
approved; brake forming, sawcutting, welding & shearing.
Distributors of PAC-CLAD Petersen Aluminum Building Products. Family-owned
and operated since 1948, serving the industry & customers in the masonry,
glass & glazing, roofing and display industries.
Recently named the 2007 Jeffery Butland Family-Owned Business of the
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Contact: Peter Cline
pcline@aluminumsupply.com
Visit our Website: www.aluminumsupply.com
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Del Valenti
Bob Trobec
Al Chandler
Mike Miller
Ian Donald
Rod Gawel
Tim O’Malley
Joe McIntyre
Kathy Irelan
Tom Skuza
Jason McLelland
Jeff Chandler
Jim Boland
Julie Rourke
Ken Boland
Teresa Casey
Gary J. Beggs
Ken Kelbert
REPRESENTING
8 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
NAWIC Sponsors MAGIC (Mentor a Girl in
Construction) Camp
The Detroit and Lansing Chapters of NAWIC (National
Association of Women in Construction), in collaboration with
Oakland Community College (OCC), conducted the first
Michigan MAGIC Camp in July 2008. Held in Farmington Hills,
thirteen girls attended the camp and learned carpentry, electrical
and plumbing skills. They were also given demonstrations on
drywall and masonry, and they had an opportunity to use a crane
simulator. On Friday evening the girls and their parents, along
with NAWIC, OCC and industry representatives, attended a
Completion Ceremony and dinner to mark the end of camp.
Representing NAWIC were Melanie Myers from the Lansing
Chapter # 177, Kathi Dobson and Carol Varga from the Detroit
Chapter # 183, and Arlene Frank, director of the OCC
WomenCenter. These women had the vision to make this a very
successful MAGIC Camp.
This event was the perfect opportunity to expose a group of
young women to new skills, and the chance to experience and
consider the construction industry as a career.
Steel Design Student Competition Awards Top
Innovators
For the second year in a row, Woodbury University students
were awarded top prizes in the eighth annual AISC/ACSA Steel
Design Student Competition. Approximately 320 students from
30 universities across the United States, Canada, and Mexico
competed this year. Sponsored by the American Institute of Steel
Construction and administered by the Association of Collegiate
Schools of Architecture, the program challenged students, work-
ing individually or in teams, to address various issues in different
design and construction projects with a special emphasis on inno-
vation in steel design.
A design jury awarded first, second, and third prizes, along
with two honorable mentions, in each category. Winning stu-
dents, their faculty sponsors and schools, will receive cash prizes
totaling $14,000. Prize-winning projects will be part of a traveling
exhibit at the 2009 ACSA Annual Meeting in Portland, Oregon
and the 2009 American Institute of Architects Convention in San
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
Crawler Cranes To 1,000 Ton
Hydraulic Cranes To 650 Ton
Peiner & Potain Tower Cranes
Rough Terrain Cranes To 130 Ton
Industrial Cranes To 35 Ton
Boom Trucks To 38 Ton
Aerial Work Platforms To 150 Ft
Industrial, Rough Terrain & Telescopic Forklifts
– 24 Hour Service –
With 28 Companies in 10 States and Canada.
Visit Us on the Internet http://www.allcrane.com
Crawler Cranes To 1,000 Ton
Hydraulic Cranes To 650 Ton
Peiner & Potain Tower Cranes
Rough Terrain Cranes To 130 Ton
Industrial Cranes To 35 Ton
Boom Trucks To 38 Ton
Aerial Work Platforms To 150 Ft
Industrial, Rough Terrain & Telescopic Forklifts
– 24 Hour Service –
With 28 Companies in 10 States and Canada.
Visit Us on the Internet http://www.allcrane.com
Toledo, Ohio
(419) 693-0421
Fax (419) 693-0210
Lima, Ohio
(419) 223-9010
Fax (419) 224-6982
Call us for a free crane library of load charts on CD or visit
www.allcraneloadcharts.com
Toledo, Ohio
(419) 693-0421
Fax (419) 693-0210
Lima, Ohio
(419) 223-9010
Fax (419) 224-6982
Call us for a free crane library of load charts on CD or visit
www.allcraneloadcharts.com
Detroit, Michigan
(248) 207-6944
Fax (248) 889-2673
Erection &
Crane Rental Corp.
Detroit, Michigan
(248) 207-6944
Fax (248) 889-2673
Crane Service
NOW OFFERING TOWER CRANES
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 9 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Francisco. In addition, a printed publica-
tion of the winning projects will be avail-
able from ACSAin fall 2008.
More than 200 student projects were
submitted this year. Teams from
Woodbury University took first place and
third place honors in two separate cate-
gories: Assembling Housing, the category
challenging architecture students to
design multi-family housing by investi-
gating diverse functional and aesthetic
uses for steel as a building material for
urban housing; and Open Competition,
the category giving students the
opportunity to select a site and a building
program with limited restrictions for
purposes of the contest.
Criteria for the judging of submissions
included creative use of structural steel in
the design solution, successful response of
the design to its surrounding context, and
successful response to basic architectural
parameters such as human activity needs,
structural integrity, and coherence of archi-
tectural vocabulary. For more information
on this year’s competition, the winners
and their projects, please visit
https://www.acsa-arch.org/competitions/0708aisc.aspx.
I
’m sure I’ve
mentioned many
times before that
falls are the leading
killer of construc-
tion workers in
Michigan, and they
are also the most
serious hazard
posed to steel work-
ers. Planning and
forethought can
provide employees with a safer work envi-
ronment, regardless of the hazard, but
especially when it comes to steel erection
and falls. MIOSHAPart 26, Steel Erection,
sets different standards for steel workers.
Rule 2645(1) requires fall protection for
employees engaged in steel erection activ-
ity, when they are exposed to a fall of more
than 15 feet above a lower level. Fall pro-
tection includes guardrail systems, safety
net systems, personal fall arrest systems,
positioning device systems, or fall restraint
systems. Some specific categories covered
by the standard include fall protection for
“connectors,” defined as an employee
who, working with hoisting equipment, is
placing and connecting structural mem-
bers or components. Hoisting equipment
includes, but is not limited to: commercial-
ly manufactured cranes, derricks, tower
cranes, barge mounted derricks or cranes,
gin poles, gantry hoist systems and fork
trucks. Specific requirements are also in
place for employees working in a “con-
trolled decking zone” doing “leading edge
work.” If you are involved in any aspect
of steel erection it would be in your best
interest to read over information provided
by MIOSHA; a very precise document can
be found at: www.michigan.gov/
documents/cis_wsh_constfact_steel_
erection_163281_7.htm.
If you have any questions about this or
any other safety issue, you can always find
me at the end of 248-972-1141 or
forgue@cam-online.com.
Joseph M. Forgue
Director of Education
& Safety Services
SAFETY TOOL KIT
Steel Erection and Fall Protection
10 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
The Michigan Office of Turner Construction
Company Holds National Safety Stand Down
In July, Turner held its fourth annual National Safety Stand
Down, an event demonstrating the company’s dedication to
promoting an injury-free environment. Part of Turner’s
Building L.I.F.E. (Living Injury Free Everyday) safety philoso-
phy, this year’s focus was designed to raise awareness about the
major safety issues on construction sites and to educate workers
on the importance of planning the work, working the plan or
knowing when to stop the work if it’s unsafe for themselves, co-
workers, or other contractors in the immediate area.
The stand down, delivered in English and Spanish, focused
on proper rigging for cranes, safe and unsafe use of ladders,
material handling, electrical hazards, and using proper fall pro-
tection equipment. In addition, a Q&Asession was held to give
the workforce an opportunity to ask questions and raise any
concerns. Hardhat decals and tee shirts specifically for Stand
Down 2008 were distributed to attendees to further promote
Turner’s safety program.
This year, more than 50,000 workers participated on Turner
project sites across the country. Over 400 workers from projects
currently underway in Michigan - such as Henry Ford West
Bloomfield Hospital in West Bloomfield and DeVos Children’s
Hospital in Grand Rapids - participated. In addition to subcon-
tractors, vendors and outside organizations like the AGC and
Quoin, Turner’s senior management and clients attended the
“Stand Down” to support the commitment to safety and to a
project’s success.
Stated President of Turner’s Michigan Office Steven R.
Berlage, “The Safety Stand Down has become an effective tool
for us to keep accidents from occurring and to enhance the
entire team’s understanding of safe construction practices. This
kind of collaboration with agencies, such as OSHA and others,
has a far-reaching effect on safety for the entire industry.”
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
When you have to swim with the sharks…
Don’t go it alone. At McAlpine & Associates,
we guide our clients through troubled waters with a
mixture of experience, tenacity and aggression.
We’re specialists in complex business and
construction litigation.
To schedule a
consultation,
contact us at…
248.373.3700
w
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m
.
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o
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372 contractors from 38 companies at Turner’s Henry Ford West
Bloomfield project site participated in the Turner-led Safety Stand
Down Seminar on safe construction practices. Statewide, 417
contractors representing 46 subcontracting firms participated in the
annual Turner safety event.
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 11 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Harley Ellis Devereaux Talks
BIM at National Engineering
Conference
National Design Firm’s Engineers Lead
BIM Educational Session at American
Council of Engineering Companies
Conference in Salt Lake City
Harley Ellis
Devereaux Principal
Kirk Pesta, PE and
Associate Timothy
Reamer, PE presented
an educational session
at the American
Council of Engineering
Companies’ national
conference in Salt Lake
City on June 20. The
conference, titled BIM:
The Promise and the
Reality for MEP
Professionals, exam-
ined the concept of
Building Information
Modeling (BIM),
reviewed the firm’s
process for selecting and implementing
BIM, and presented a case study in which
BIM was utilized by the mechanical, elec-
trical and plumbing (MEP) engineers
working on a pilot project. Pesta and
Reamer also shared Harley Ellis
Devereaux’s best practices for implement-
ing Autodesk’s state-of-the-art software
called Revit MEP. This new software is
transforming project planning and inte-
grated project delivery in the design and
construction industry.
Pesta and Reamer both work at Harley
Ellis Devereaux’s Detroit office. Pesta pos-
sesses over 15 years experience in mechan-
ical engineering and is a registered profes-
sional engineer in Michigan, Ohio and
Illinois. He is a member of the American
Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-
Conditioning Engineers, as well as the
Engineering Society of Detroit. Pesta
earned a Bachelor of Science degree in
mechanical engineering from Oakland
University.
Reamer possesses over 20 years experi-
ence in electrical engineering and is a reg-
istered engineer in Michigan. He served as
a board member for the Detroit chapter of
the Illuminating Engineering Society and
participates in Harley Ellis Devereaux’s
3D/BIM Development Committee.
Reamer earned a Bachelor of Science in
Engineering degree in electrical engineer-
ing from the University of Michigan.
Since 1952
1-800-693-1800
SALES RENTALS
ERECTIONS
SHORING
SWING STAGING
SCAFFOLD PLANKS
FALL PROTECTION
TRAINING
DELIVERY
SCAFFOLDING
TRASH CHUTES
EXPERT DESIGN
AND
SAFETY SERVICES
Reamer
Pesta
12 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
C
ommunities along I-275 in western Wayne
County, including the charter townships of
Canton, Northville and Plymouth, have
experienced rapid growth in recent years. Such
an influx of residents can quickly overtax existing
infrastructure, creating a need for new construc-
tion. The Western Townships Utilities Authority
(WTUA) is meeting changing needs by hiring con-
struction manager DeMaria Building Company,
Detroit, and engineer Wade Trim, Taylor, to design
and construct a new equalization basin and
pump station, which will be tied into an existing
equalization pump station in Canton. Finding
sufficient land in such a heavily populated region
was no easy task.
“The biggest challenge on this project is the
size of the site itself,” said Philips Vallakalil, CCM,
senior project manager for DeMaria Building
Company. “The site is surrounded by other prop-
erties, so there is no more available land around.”
Cast in place concrete is being used to build
the 5.5 million gallon equalization basin, which
ON A SMALL SITE
ACCOMMODATING
BIG NEEDS
By David R. Miller, Associate Editor
Photos courtesy of DeMaria Building Company and Wade Trim

CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 13 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
will measure 326 feet long, 106 feet wide and 24 feet deep, and will
feature an earth-covered top. In excess of 16,000 cubic yards of con-
crete will be needed for the project. Although this is a fairly typical
size for an equalization basin, these structures are not built every
day, and the 140,000 cubic yards of soil that will be moved by Sunset
Excavating, Inc., Livonia, represents a sizeable excavation project.
Since the construction site only measures 6.6 acres, this soil will be
transported and stored offsite until it is needed for backfilling.
Finding a contractor who could effectively manage the limited
space onsite was a key project concern.
“On this project, there are more challenges from the contractor’s
perspective than from the engineer’s,” admitted Chuck Lemont, PE,
resident engineer for Wade Trim. “The project wouldn’t be possible
without a good contractor, who could get materials to the site on
time and who could get the trades to work together.”
Fortunately the early stages of the project have demonstrated
DeMaria’s ability to do this, but the project holds significant engi-
neering challenges, as well. Since concrete is vital to the project,
inspection of this material is an ongoing process coordinated by
Wade Trim. Incoming concrete is tested for consistency, slump and
air content, among other variables, while test cylinders are also rou-
tinely being poured to confirm the concrete’s strength after curing
for a set time period. This concrete testing helps to ensure that the
equalization basin will function properly when it is completed.
Once the new basin is complete, waterwater flows will be equal-
ized after it is attached to an existing basin via a 54” force main.
Other aspects of the project, which is scheduled for completion in
December 2009, include construction of a new pump station with
three horizontal centrifugal wastewater pumps, replacement of six
vertical centrifugal wastewater pumps in the existing pump station
and odor control equipment, installation of screening and convey-
ing equipment, and the addition of major mechanical and electrical
support systems.
Finding enough land for this project was no easy task. The size
of the site was dictated by surrounding properties.
Although the size of this equalization basin is fairly typical, the
140,000 cubic yards of soil that will be moved represents a
sizeable excavation project.
Cast in place concrete is being used to build the 5.5 million
gallon equalization basin. In excess of 16,000 cubic yards of
concrete will be needed for this project.
Given the tight quarters on the 6.6-acre site, this project would
not be possible without a contractor who could get the trades to
work together.
14 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
A
variety of incentives have histori-
cally existed to promote
Brownfield redevelopment. A
recent Michigan Business Tax (MBT)
Credit statute has enhanced the program,
making urban redevelopment even more
attractive for the construction and real
estate industry. This article aims to (a)
define the eligibility requirements for a
Brownfield property and (b) discuss the
benefits of the MBT credit.
WHAT CONSTITUTES A “BROWNFIELD”?
Property eligible for Brownfield incen-
tives can be commercial, industrial, or res-
idential. However, it must be designated
by a local Brownfield Redevelopment
Financing Authority in an approved
Brownfield Plan and be either environ-
mentally contaminated, blighted, or func-
tionally obsolete.
“Blighted” includes the following char-
acteristics: public nuisance with local code;
an attractive nuisance to children; some-
thing that’s a fire hazard or poses other
dangers; or utilities, plumbing, heating, or
sewage that’s been permanently discon-
nected, destroyed, removed, or rendered
ineffective. “Functionally obsolete” means
that the property is unable to be used to
perform the function for which it was
intended as determined by a local assessor.
20% CREDIT FOR URBAN
REDEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Under the prior Brownfield rules, a
Brownfield redevelopment project was eli-
gible for a credit of 10%. For example, if
you purchased a building for $1 million
and put $10 million of qualifying costs into
the building, you’d receive a $1 million tax
credit.
However, when the MBT Brownfield
was improved, it brought with it a number
of even more attractive benefits for those
undertaking Brownfield redevelopment
projects - starting with a 20% credit for
urban area development projects. For the
next three years, an urban redevelopment
project is eligible for a credit of up to 20%
of the eligible investment for the project;
after three years, projects will still be eligi-
ble for a 15% credit.
Under the old rules, the 10% credit
would typically be sold in the open market
for whatever it would bear. Under the new
credit, you have an additional option:
receive a cash refund for $.85 of the credit
(which eliminates the headache of trying
to find a buyer, legal costs, etc. Note that it
may still make sense to sell the credit if
your tax filing date is months away so as
not to lose the time value of money.)
OTHER BENEFITS
• The tax credit is increased from 10% to
12.5% for all other projects. Why the
increase? To compensate for the fact that
certain “soft” costs, including developer
fees, no longer qualify for the credit.
• Michigan Economic Growth Authority
(MEGA) changes project completion man-
date from 5 to 10 years. Historically, proj-
ects had to be completed within 5 years
after MEGA issued the preapproval letter.
Since many projects simply can’t be com-
pleted within that time frame, MEGA has
often converted these projects into multi-
phased projects to allow projects addition-
al time to be completed. The new law elim-
inates the need for this phased approach
by changing the completion time frame to
10 years instead of 5.
• There’s a 90-day look-back for eligible
investment expenses. The new law creates
a 90-day look-back on eligible investments
made prior to the preapproval letter but
after the date that the Brownfield plan was
approved. Before the MBT changes, any
investments made prior to the preap-
proval letter were ineligible.
IN CONCLUSION
The MBT brings with it a variety of
exciting opportunities for anyone contem-
plating a Brownfield redevelopment proj-
ect. If you have any questions regarding
the legislation or how it affects your proj-
ect, please contact Jim Manning at Plante
& Moran, PLLC.
Jim Manning is a tax part-
ner in the real estate and
tax group of Plante &
Moran, PLLC. He can be
reached at 616-643-4054, or
by e-mail at Jim.man-
ning@plantemoran.com.
MBT Credit Makes Brownfield
Redevelopment More Attractive
MBT Credit Makes Brownfield
Redevelopment More Attractive
By Jim Manning, Plante & Moran, PLLC
16 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
quite a feat. The “wings” are arced rows of
steel girder beams composed of W27 x 84
wide flange members. Trying to keep this
bird from taking flight is a complex fabrica-
tion task. “The porte cochere’s wind load or
uplift is quite substantial, because the entire
structure is just like a sail,” said Soo
Thackthay, Douglas Steel project manager.
As a result, the “wingtips”or outriggers at the
end of each girder beam will have full pene-
tration welds designed to manage wind
load. “The full penetration welds to the gird-
er beams are essentially moment connec-
approaches to one of the most basic of met-
als in construction: steel.
MAKING CONNECTIONS AT THE NEW
FIREKEEPERS CASINO
Outstretched wings of steel will soon wel-
come visitors to the new Firekeepers Casino
near Battle Creek. Douglas Steel is fabricat-
ing a porte cochere in the shape of a bird’s
beak, head and curved wings as part of this
new 253,000-square-foot casino for the
Nottawaseppi Band of Huron Pottawatomi.
Translating avian anatomy into steel is
D
ouglas Steel Fabricating Corporation,
Lansing, has a full portfolio of steel
projects on the drawings boards, in
fabrication, and in production across the
southern tier of Michigan. The projects
range from the intricate to the swiftly
assembled, from casinos to hospitals, and
from new construction to the unusual task
of reconfiguring the existing framework of
an historic structure from the inside of the
building. Douglas Steel’s fabricating facility
and main office on Waverly Road in Lansing
is a hotbed of new projects and unique
Douglas Steel Fabricating Corporation’s Project Grid Blankets Southern Michigan
By Mary E. Kremposky, Associate Editor Photos Courtesy of Douglas Steel Fabricating, Corp.
Douglas Steel erected slightly over 2,400 tons
of steel in only three months for The University
of Michigan Stadium’s new west concourse.
Douglas Steel erected slightly over 2,400 tons
of steel in only three months for The University
of Michigan Stadium’s new west concourse.

CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 17 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
and a high roof servicing television and
media equipment. Douglas Steel erected
slightly over 2,400 tons of steel in only three
months, beginning April 1, 2008 and reach-
ing completion on July 1, 2008. “The project
was extremely fast track,” said James D.
Buzzie, Douglas Steel contract & quality
manager.
STEEL GRID RISES OVER THE GRIDIRON
OF MICHIGAN STADIUM
Speed is the name of the game on the
west end of the Maize and Blue’s storied
Michigan Stadium where Douglas Steel
recently completed steel fabrication and
erection for a new west concourse
composed of two suite levels, a press box
tions with stiffeners,” said Thackthay.
Vehicles will drive under the bird’s wings,
while an extension of this rare entrance
canopy will slope forward to form the bird’s
head and beak. Slated for use as a planter
area, the dip of the head and beak will be
formed on a compound roll and will be com-
posed of C-shaped steel channels. “It is much
easier to roll the channel steel to match this
challenging configuration than rolling a
wide-flange member,” said Thackthay. “The
long channels are C10s x 30s, and the outer
smaller ones are C10 x 15.3.”
While God has been making beautifully
cloaked birds for millions of years – and they
even sing – the Douglas Steel crew will have
to work a bit harder at perfecting the
appearance of this bird-like canopy’s archi-
tecturally exposed steel. “All the channels
will be welded together, and because it is
architecturally exposed steel, we will have to
grind the welds smooth and then touch up
the work,” said Thackthay. “We also will blast
the steel and prime paint it to prepare the
structure for the application of a finish,
epoxy-type paint.”
Shaping this canopy in the evocative
shape of a bird is a formidable task now
placed in the able hands of Douglas Steel.
“The difficulty of fabricating and erecting
such a structure is four times greater than
conventional stick framing,” said Thackthay.
“We are going to hand-pick our topnotch
ironworkers, because it is going to take skill
and patience.”
At press time in August, Douglas Steel
began fabrication of the 36 x 64-foot porte
cochere and will launch installation in mid-
September 2008. “I am anticipating that it
will take us a week or so to erect, and then
the field welding will take another two to
three weeks,” said Thackthay. “The installa-
tion will be basically a five-week process.”
Douglas Steel has already begun fabrica-
tion and erection of the casino’s main
expanse, beginning with the back-of-house
area that will house administration, support
services, and the casino’s information tech-
nology hub. Much of the casino is designed
with a slight arc and will be composed of
rolled joists with flat areas for placement of
air handling units.
Douglas Steel began hoisting steel in
early July 2008. Housing north and south
gaming areas, the Firekeepers Casino is slat-
ed for completion in August 2009. “It’s going
to be beautiful,” said Thackthay.
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18 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
tics for various design options,” said Buzzie.
After kickoff of the project, Douglas Steel met
weekly from August 2007 to April 2008 with
Southfield-based Barton Malow Company
and the Kansas City-based structural engi-
neer and architectural firm of HNTB.
opening day.
Douglas Steel was part of the design and
construction team almost three years prior to
actually arriving on site. “We were involved in
the very conceptual stages of the project,
providing budget support, pricing and logis-
A quick pace was mandatory for this pro-
ject sandwiched tightly between football
seasons and with a due date as unalterable
as death and taxes. The new concourse had
to be delivered on Aug. 30, 2008 in time for
the fabled Wolverines to take the field on
TECH DYNAMICS, INC.
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PERRYSBURG, OHIO 43551
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WWW.TECHDYNAMICS.US
(419) 666-1666 (419) 666-9922-fax
As shown in the rendering on the left, a porte cochere in the shape of a bird will soon greet visitors to the Nottawaseppi Band of Huron Pottawatomi’s
new casino. Steel erection has already begun on the main expanse of the casino (right). Clark Construction Co., Lansing, is the construction manager
and Perez, APC, New Orleans, is the architect.
The Trend Millwork Group of Companies
Union Manufacturers Since 1964
Lincoln Park, Michigan / Detroit, Michigan
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
“Manufacturing At The Speed Of Globalization — From Detroit to Dubai” “Manufacturing At The Speed Of Globalization — From Detroit to Dubai”
20 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
With steel fabrication already underway
before final design of architectural details
for brick relief and support of the glass, this
strong team effort allowed Douglas Steel to
maintain the swift pace of steel detailing
and fabrication. “We sometimes flew down
to Kansas City for all-day meetings to work
through structural and architectural details,”
said Buzzie. “Being part of a team effort
helped us to keep going on steel detailing,
allowing us to fabricate and meet the drop
dead date for steel erection in April.”
One valuable tool was the use of an SDS II
model. “We submitted all the shop drawings
through a SDS II model process,” said Buzzie.
“The model essentially cut time off of the
shop drawing approval process, allowing us
to quickly incorporate any changes and go
right into fabrication. It shortened a process
that normally takes months.”
The steel of the 500-feet-long by 102-feet-
high concourse is designed to follow the
curve of the stadium bowl and cantilever
over the top of the stadium at a splayed
angle “The higher the concourse, the farther
the cantilever,” said Buzzie. “The first column
is outside the bowl, but the 15- to 20-foot
cantilever creates an unusual condition on
the support steel.”
As part of its game plan in the field,
Douglas Steel used two cranes working the
north and south sections of the concourse in
a carefully calibrated sequence. “The first
crane began in the middle, working its way
north and getting a two to three week jump-
start on the second crane,” said Buzzie. “We
then placed the second crane at the same
central point, working to the south and fin-
ishing three weeks after the first crane.”
Steel installation continued at a fast pace
throughout April, May and June 2008. “We
worked five 10-hour days during the week
and 8-hour days on Saturday for three
months,” said Buzzie. “We didn’t lose any
time to weather delays. We kept pace with
the schedule, enabling us to maintain a con-
tinuous operation without shutting down
the cranes.” Davison-based Bristol Steel &
Conveyor Corporation holds the structural
steel contract for the east concourse. “The
contract was split, because of the swift
schedule,” said Buzzie. “
AN INSIDE JOB FOR DOUGLAS STEEL
Converting a former power plant into cor-
porate offices is a bold step in adaptive
reuse. Built in 1936 along a stretch of the
Grand River, the Lansing Board of Water &
Light’s Ottawa Street Station, along with a
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 21 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
that will not weaken the structure. “We will
use X bracing or angled bracing, and we will
also analyze the proper place to begin with-
in the structure,” said Morouss.
Ruby + Associates, Inc., a prominent struc-
tural engineering firm with offices in
Farmington Hills and Grand Rapids, is bring-
ing their formidable expertise to this
make way for properly spaced floor levels.
Obtaining accurate dimensions for steel
detailing is only the beginning of this chal-
lenging endeavor. Once measured, physical
access for the cranes and the steel will be
another point to consider. Plus, the building
will need to be stabilized while removing
the old and inserting the new in a sequence
new four-story office building and
connecting atrium, will soon become the
national headquarters of the Accident Fund
Insurance Company of America. The
Christman Company, Lansing, is tackling the
job of creating this new 330,000-square-foot
office complex for downtown Lansing’s
largest private-sector employer. Douglas
Steel Fabricating Corporation is already hard
at work planning the interior reconfigura-
tion of the structural frame of the entire
power station into an ordered grid capable
of housing nine levels of office space.
The massive brick-clad edifice is com-
posed of a tower rising from the middle of a
stout rectangular building. Because the sta-
tion was built to house massive equipment,
the structural steel frame is not a standard
grid of columns and beams with defined
floor levels. Along with atypical placement
of existing steel, large, open shafts through-
out the cavernous interior are a product of
selective demolition and equipment
removal undertaken as part of redevelop-
ment plans hatched over the course of the
years.
Douglas Steel is taking on the job, begin-
ning with such thorny problems as physical
access for accurate field measurement and
steel detailing. “I have been in this business
since 1958 and I have never seen such a
challenging building,” said George Morouss,
Douglas Steel project manager. Short of hir-
ing a trapeze artist, some areas of the cav-
ernous, 124-foot wide tower have no clear
access route to accurately measure from col-
umn to column.
As is often the case in older buildings, the
original drawings do not reflect actual field
conditions and cannot be relied on for accu-
rate dimensions, said Morouss. “The
columns are difficult to measure for several
other reasons,” added Michael Szostak,
Douglas Steel vice president of sales. “First,
the columns are not standard sizes. The old
columns are not even listed in the steel man-
ual any longer. Also, some of the columns
have been built up over time, meaning steel
plate sections have been added to some of
the columns.”
Measurement is not only difficult, but the
sheer number of connections to measure is
mind boggling, as well. “There will be thou-
sands of points of connection between our
new steel and the existing steel to measure,”
said Szostak. With the goal of producing
nine cohesive levels, Douglas Steel will have
to add floors where none existed and
demolish existing steel in other areas to
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22 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Douglas Steel is reconfiguring the interior of a former power plant’s structural frame into a steel grid, able to support new corporate offices for the
Accident Fund Insurance Company of America. The building has large, open shafts throughout the cavernous interior.
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 23 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
challenging structure. Ruby specializes in
structural steel and provides full-service
structural engineering to the design and
construction industry. Locally, they have
provided insightfully engineered solutions
on Detroit’s Ford Field and Motor City Casino
and Hotel, as well as prominent projects
across the country, including the Time
Warner Center in New York City. With
Douglas Steel and Ruby + Associates, some
of the best firms in the steel arena have been
assembled to bring this unique urban revi-
talization project to life.
According to an Accident Fund press
release, “Construction on Accident Fund’s
new seven-acre campus, including the devel-
opment of a 1,000-car parking structure, will
begin in 2009 and is expected to be com-
pleted by mid-2011. Upon completion of the
project, Accident Fund will pursue a listing
for its new headquarters on the National
Register of Historic Places and also LEED cer-
tification by the U.S. Green Building Council.
DOUGLAS STEEL PERFORMS A
“DELICATE” 2,380-TON OPERATION
Erecting structural steel on the campus of
an operational hospital is quite a delicate
operation, itself. The expanding grid of
structural steel blanketing Troy Beaumont’s
west campus will soon house an intercon-
nected series of buildings, including a
123,000-square-foot emergency center
expansion, a new six-story, 100,000-square-
foot critical care tower, and the vertical
expansion of the west bed tower. A new
connector will link all levels of both towers.
Working with surgical precision, Douglas
Steel employed an uncommonly used crane
assembly to reach over the wide expanse of
existing and rising buildings. “Only three to
four of these cranes are in operation right
now in the entire country,” said George
Morouss, Douglas Steel project manager.
“The one we are using is hot off the presses,
so to speak. All of the available ones were in
use, but luckily Manitowoc recently built this
particular one.”
The crane’s boom and two jibs stretch on
a diagonal 600 to 700 feet over a new pow-
erhouse, loading dock and an assortment of
other structures; the joints of the two jibs
moving with the ease of a human forearm
and wrist extending from the “boom” of the
upper arm. “We had to lay the whole assem-
bly down and use another crane to initially
lift the assembly into place,” said Morouss.
Douglas Steel rented the 2250 Manitowoc
crane from Laramie.
North American Dismantling Corp.
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Providence Steel
& Supply Inc.
“Building into the 21st Century”
www.providencesteel.com
Fabrication • Residential • Commercial • Building Supplies • Structural Steel-Rerod
1200 Victory Dr. • Howell, MI 48843
Ph (517) 545-4600 or (810) 229-3310 • Fax (517) 545-4933
www.providencesteel.com
Structural Steel
• I-Beams • Columns • Angle • Flats • Pipe • Channel • Fabrication
• Shop Drawings • Square Tube • Welding • Erection • Joist & Deck
• Bollards • Lintels • Styrofoam • Grouts • Visqueen • Styrofoam • Hand Tools
• Tire Wire • Expansion Joint • Redi-Mix Product • Floor Coat & Sealers
• Anchor Bolts & Straps • Patching Materials • Wire Mesh #6-#10 • Re-Bar #3-#11
• Mortar • Hand Tools • Lintels • Duplex Nails • T-Iron • Cut, Masonry Nails
• Culverts & Fittings • Fasteners • Plastic Pipe • Sump Well • Area Walls • Rosin Paper
Cement
Miscellaneous
24 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Working within the tight confines of an
expanding hospital campus is only one of
many logistical concerns. Douglas “hoisted
iron” over an occupied patient bed tower to
erect the West Bed Tower’s three-story,
137,000-square-foot vertical expansion.
Douglas detailed, fabricated and erected
1,284 tons of structural steel for this portion
of the project. The standard practice called
“Christmas treeing” - the crane hoists and
strings together several pieces of steel virtu-
ally at once – could not be used over a
patient bed tower. “We had to do it one at a
time for patient safety,” said Morouss.
Like a surgical team monitoring a patient’s
vital signs on the operating table, Douglas
Steel maintained a constant vigilance to
ensure the safety of patients, crew, and hos-
pital staff. Crane sensors monitor wind con-
ditions to ensure jobsite safety, while alter-
ing standard installation practices and work-
ing some off-peak hours smoothed the
interface between an operational hospital
and an active construction site.
Douglas Steel also works just as diligently
to aid an owner’s budget. Douglas Steel is
executing the job under a performance cost
management contract. Under this arrange-
ment, the steel contractor is involved in the
early project stages, developing and manag-
ing steel costs. Typically, this approach
yields cost savings to the owner that can be
used to fund items on the owner’s wish list,
said Morouss.
Altogether, Barton Malow/Skanska, the
joint venture building the $270 million dol-
lar project, “contracted with Douglas Steel to
cost manage and perform design assistance,
detailing, fabrication and erection of 2,380
tons of structural steel, stairs and metal
deck,” according to information supplied by
Douglas Steel. “BIM technology was utilized
to develop project efficiencies.”
Douglas Steel also fabricated and erected
940 tons of steel for the composite beam
structural steel frame of the three-story,
129,000-square-foot ambulatory care center
and atrium constructed on the east side of
Dequindre. Midwest Steel, Inc., Detroit,
holds the structural steel contract for the
main bridge structure that will span
Dequindre Road and link both the west and
east portions of the growing campus. Harley
Ellis Devereaux, Southfield, designed the
780,000-square-foot campus expansion.
“We are proud to be a part of t he
const ruct i on communi t y i n Mi chi gan. ”
1166 Benstein Road • P.O. Box 900
Walled Lake, Michigan 48390
248-624-5960
fax (248) 624-7030
Douglas Steel is fabricating and erecting 2,380
tons of structural steel, stairs and metal deck
for the William Beaumont Hospital expansion
in Troy and Sterling Heights.
Douglas Steel is fabricating and erecting 2,380
tons of structural steel, stairs and metal deck
for the William Beaumont Hospital expansion
in Troy and Sterling Heights.
26 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
UNIQUE METAL PRODUCTS ADDS LUSTER TO MOTOR CITY
CASINO’S VIP ENTRANCE
Visitors entering Motor City Casino’s Exterior VIP Entrance are
greeted in style with a decorative stainless steel Motor City
Casino logo with a polished mirror finish. The 140-lbs. stainless
steel logo is courtesy of the craftsmanship of Unique Metal
Products, Inc., Ferndale.
DESCRIPTION:
• Approximately 32” high x 52” wide, glass mounted with five
integral stands.
• Material: solid 3/4” x 1-1/2” 304 stainless steel bar stock.
• Fabricated from 12 individual pieces (six curved) with 17
welded joints and five stand offs.
PROCESS CHALLENGES:
• Rolling the curved “C” elements against the larger 1-1/2”
dimension (the hard way) while maintaining common
radiuses.
• Fitting and welding the 12 individual pieces in one accurate
flat bottom plane to facilitate glass mounting.
• Grinding the 17 joints in one accurate flat top plane to facili-
tate appearance of one-piece construction.
• Spending 25 hours grinding and polishing top and bottom
surfaces into a uniform mirror finish.
A P O R T F O L I O O F E X Q U I S I T E C R A F T S M A N S H I P
BY MARY E. KREMPOSKY, ASSOCI ATE EDI TOR • PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNI QUE METAL PRODUCTS
UNIQUE METAL PRODUCTS:
P
H
O
T
O

B
Y

M
A
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C
I

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CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 27 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
REST IN BEAUTY WITH UNIQUE METAL
PRODUCTS CUSTOM BENCHES
Unique Metal Products created eight decorative stainless steel
benches for an outdoor mausoleum at St. Hedwig Cemetery in
Dearborn Heights. The custom benches may comfort the
bereaved with the healing touch of the beautiful.
DESCRIPTION:
• Approximately 34” high x 96” wide.
• Material: Stainless Steel 304 tubing & rings.
• Fabricated from individual pieces of round and rectangular
tubing and solid 304 rings.
PROCESS CHALLENGES:
• Fitting and fine welding all the individual pieces without
distortions to assure the entire assembly was square in
three planes.
• Grinding and polishing all the welded joints to a uniform
satin finish.
U
M
P
UNIQUE METAL PRODUCTS, INC.
WHEN FINISH & APPEARANCE ARE PARAMOUNT
CUSTOM FABRICATOR
SPECIALIZING IN HIGHER END METALS
ARCHITECTURAL • RESIDENTIAL • SECURITY
IRON • BRASS • COPPER • BRONZE • ALUMINUM • STAINLESS STEEL
UNIQUE METAL PRODUCTS, INC.
WHEN FINISH & APPEARANCE ARE PARAMOUNT
CUSTOM FABRICATOR
SPECIALIZING IN HIGHER END METALS
ARCHITECTURAL • RESIDENTIAL • SECURITY
IRON • BRASS • COPPER • BRONZE • ALUMINUM • STAINLESS STEEL
1921 Hilton
Ferndale, Michigan 48220
(248) 545-4566
Fax (248) 545-2767
fzammit@uniquemetals.com
1921 Hilton
Ferndale, Michigan 48220
(248) 545-4566
Fax (248) 545-2767
fzammit@uniquemetals.com
POLISHED STAINLESS
COPPER COPPER
POLISHED BRASS SATIN STAINLESS
COPPER COPPER
SATIN STAINLESS POLISHED BRASS
Oakland Metal
Sales, Inc.
Distributors of:
COPPER
• Cold Rolled Copper Sheet and Coil in 12oz-.125
• Pre-Patinated Sheets 16 & 20 oz
• Revere FreedomGray, Evergreen & PatriotGreen
• Copper Bar
ALUMINUM
• Mill Finish .025-.125
• Anodized Aluminum .032-.125
• Pre-Finished Kynar 500 Painted Sheets .032-.063
KYNAR 500 PRE-PAINTED
STEEL SHEETS IN 50 COLORS
• Manufactured Roofing and Wall Systems
In many Profiles and Different Manufacturers
• Custom Fabricated Break Metal, Trim and
Flashing Available
AMERICAN & EUROPEAN
COPPER GUTTER SYSTEMS
ADDITIONAL STOCK ITEMS
• Rain Carrying Goods in Painted Steel
• Expansion Joints
• Snow Guards
• Duralink Sealant
• M-1 Structural Sealant
• Underlayment
• Solder - Flux - Irons
• Copper Roofing Nails
• Hot Dipped Galvanized Steel 10ga - 30ga
• Stainless Steel Sheets 10ga - 28ga
• Bonderized Steel Sheets
• Galvalume Sheets
• Galvannealed Sheet
• Lead Sheets & Pipe Covers
• For All Your Metal Needs
Call Us Today!
Oakland Metal Sales
2430 N. Opdyke Rd
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
www.OaklandMetalSales.com
Phone (248) 377-8847 • Fax (248) 377-4196
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984
Oakland Metal
Sales, Inc.
Distributors of:
COPPER
• Cold Rolled Copper Sheet and Coil in 12oz-.125
• Pre-Patinated Sheets 16 & 20 oz
• Revere FreedomGray, Evergreen & PatriotGreen
• Copper Bar
ALUMINUM
• Mill Finish .025-.125
• Anodized Aluminum .032-.125
• Pre-Finished Kynar 500 Painted Sheets .032-.063
KYNAR 500 PRE-PAINTED
STEEL SHEETS IN 50 COLORS
• Manufactured Roofing and Wall Systems
In many Profiles and Different Manufacturers
• Custom Fabricated Break Metal, Trim and
Flashing Available
AMERICAN & EUROPEAN
COPPER GUTTER SYSTEMS
ADDITIONAL STOCK ITEMS
• Rain Carrying Goods in Painted Steel
• Expansion Joints
• Snow Guards
• Duralink Sealant
• M-1 Structural Sealant
• Underlayment
• Solder - Flux - Irons
• Copper Roofing Nails
• Hot Dipped Galvanized Steel 10ga - 30ga
• Stainless Steel Sheets 10ga - 28ga
• Bonderized Steel Sheets
• Galvalume Sheets
• Galvannealed Sheet
• Lead Sheets & Pipe Covers
• For All Your Metal Needs
• Neogard Roof Coating Systems
• Rheinzink
Call Us Today!
Oakland Metal Sales
2430 N. Opdyke Rd
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
www.OaklandMetalSales.com
Phone (248) 377-8847 • Fax (248) 377-4196
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984
28 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ONE PEOPLE, ONE ALTAR: CUSTOM RAILINGS OFFER
HANDICAP ACCESS FOR COMMUNION
Thanks to the quality work of Unique Metal Products, the
disabled have easy access to Communion at the National Shrine
of the Little Flower in Royal Oak via decorative brass handicap
railings.
DESCRIPTION:
• Stair and ramp railings for handicap access to receive Holy
Communion.
• Material: Brass tubing and polished bronze components.
• Fabricated from individual pieces of tubing and component
details.
PROCESS CHALLENGES:
• Fitting and fine welding the individual pieces without
distortions to assure accurate fit at site installation.
• Grinding and polishing all the welded joints into a
uniform mirror finish.
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 29 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
STUNNING DECORATIVE METAL WORK
COMPLEMENTS STAINED GLASS AT
GRAYLING CHURCH
Unique Metal Products crafted a decora-
tive copper monstrance – a vessel in which
the consecrated Host is exposed for the
adoration of the faithful – for A.J. Bellomo
Studios, Mt. Clemens. The monstrance has
been placed within a larger stained-glass
window at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in
Grayling. The copper leaves also fit in
perfectly with the natural splendor sur-
rounding this northern Michigan church.
DESCRIPTION:
• Application is a 36” diameter metal
infill insert into a larger stained-glass
window.
• Material: Copper leaves and outer
copper ring with brass receptacle for
the Holy Eucharist.
PROCESS CHALLENGES:
• Cutting, forming, and fitting the indi-
vidual copper leaves into an integrated
art piece.
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Since 1968
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30 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
used to diminish electrical consumption.
LEDs are becoming a much more popular
choice for illuminated signs.
“LEDs not only provide energy usage ben-
efits, they also offer better lifetime manage-
ment costs,” said Ed Bezilla, president of
Visual Entities, Inc., Grand Rapids, exclusive
Michigan representative for APCO Graphics.
Bezilla consulted with one of his suppliers
to see just how long LEDs can last.
According to the manufacturer, red, amber
and orange LEDs can typically burn for up to
100,000 hours, or 11 years of constant usage,
while blue, green and white LEDs typically
burn for 30,000 to 50,000 hours. Of course,
these numbers can vary based on the appli-
cation, usage and environment, but they far
exceed other illumination systems.
Traditional neon lights are also more fragile,
so breakage can further reduce their effec-
tive life. Resources are expended every time
lights are manufactured and transported.
Natural illumination, which costs nothing
to operate, is even more efficient than LEDs.
new signs, and the carbon footprint associ-
ated with making those signs and transport-
ing them to the jobsite,” said Teresa Cox,
president of APCO Graphics, Atlanta, GA.
“When updates are required, it can just be a
matter of changing a paper insert, which can
be recycled.”
In addition to paper inserts, which can be
printed on a standard laser printer onsite,
aluminum and plastic can also be used to
create a desired look. Hidden mechanical
fasteners hold these more rigid materials in
place while eliminating another potential
environmental impact.
“VOCs can be a problem when tapes and
glues are used,” said Craig Breeden,
Michigan president for ASI – Modulex, Troy.
“Our modular signs fit onto a rail system, so
we don’t use any tapes or glues, and that
reduces the VOCs.”
Modular signs can make the process of
updating information much more sustain-
able, and they can also be made greener
with a number of approaches that can be
B
uildings reflect the people who live
and work in them. As more people
move toward a green lifestyle, facili-
ty owners are consequently pushed
into choosing environmentally friendly
options. Attention was first focused on
mechanical, electrical and structural sys-
tems, where the greatest environmental
benefits could be realized, but the process
rapidly evolved to consider every building
element, no matter how small. Sign manu-
facturers are meeting this burgeoning
demand with greener product offerings.
THE GREENEST CHOICES
No matter what fabrication techniques
are used, the greenest sign is the one that
never needs to be made, as all manufactur-
ing entails some ecological impact. Sign
manufacturers are constantly looking for
ways to enhance the lifecycle of their prod-
ucts.
“Modular signs can have pieces removed
and reused, thereby minimizing the need for
THE SIGNS
THEY ARE
A-CHANGIN’
BY DAVI D R. MI LLER, ASSOCI ATE EDI TOR
PHOTO COURTESY OF VISUAL ENTITIES, INC. PHOTO COURTESY OF ASI – MODULEX PHOTO COURTESY OF ASI – MODULEX

CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 31 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
the reflective ceiling, thereby minimizing or
eliminating the need for accent lights on
interior signs.
Using the natural illumination that is usual-
ly abundant in Earth-friendly buildings is one
simple way to make signs greener. As envi-
ronmental consciousness grows, major sign
manufacturers are making it even easier for
building owners to make green sign choices.
Daylighting is often an environmental goal
with new facilities. In fact, specific points for
achieving average footcandle levels through
natural illumination are available under the
U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC)
Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) rating system. Illuminating
signs with light from windows and skylights,
instead of electric fixtures, can significantly
contribute to environmental performance
goals.
Breeden cited the Harborside Office
Center in Port Huron, a LEED-CS (Core and
Shell) Silver-Certified building
designed by Albert Kahn
Associates, Inc., (AKA), Detroit,
and built by Clark Construction
Co., Lansing, as a good applica-
tion of naturally-illuminated sig-
nage. Extensive exterior glass
was used to bring in natural light
while offering clear views of the
picturesque riverfront. Light
shelves placed inside the win-
dows reflect light towards the
ceiling, where it can be evenly
diffused through the space by
P
H
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Extensive exterior glass at the Harborside
Office Center provides natural illumination
for signs while offering spectacular
riverfront views.
can materials that are shipped from within a
certain radius of the jobsite. APCO
signs were recently selected for two high-
profile green projects, one at USGBC’s
Washington, D.C. headquarters and another
at the Mutual Building, where Visual Entities
installed a custom sign system including
APCO signs when the structure was convert-
ed into the Christman Company’s new
Lansing headquarters. Under the direction
MAYBE IT IS EASY BEING GREEN
Building owners who are looking for
greener signs have one key factor in their
favor - the many other people who are seek-
ing the exact same thing. As with any other
type of product, increased demand leads to
more choices in the marketplace.
Environmental consciousness is also leading
to the introduction of improved paint prod-
ucts, a heavily used material in the sign
industry. Low-VOC paints are a better choice
from an environmental standpoint, but sol-
vents are also an important consideration.
“Binders and pigments in paint are very
heavy,” said Breeden. “We need to dissolve
them so they are thin enough to shoot
through the gun, by reducing zinc chro-
mates and VOCs in paint, they can make
paint that is almost ready to spread.”
Breeden remembers using paints where
1-1/2 cups of solvent were needed for every
cup of paint. With newer products, a single
cup of solvent is sufficient for three cups of
paint. Solvent usage was cut 40 percent from
1998 to 2004 at one ASI – Modulex, while
other innovations let the same plant cut
water consumption by 70 percent and chem-
ical waste by 52 percent from 1995 to 2004.
No specific LEED points are available for
signage, but VOC reductions factor into
overall air quality, which is a LEED considera-
tion. Sign manufacturers can help project
teams work towards these credits by using
low-VOC paints or by using powder-coated
or anodized finishes. Durable and recycled
materials can also factor into LEED points, as
32 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
of the Christman Company and architect
SmithGroup Incorporated, Detroit, the
Lansing project is the first building in the
world to achieve Platinum-Level LEED
Certification in two categories: LEED-CS and
LEED-CI (Commercial Interiors). Signage at
the Christman Building plays an important
educational role in calling attention to envi-
ronmentally friendly building features that
might escape the notice of visitors.
“Signs that identified various green fea-
tures were sprinkled around the building,”
said Bezilla. “They develop a general aware-
ness among the general population, who
may not know about these features.”
As with any green building, some of the
environmental features at the Christman
Headquarters are easy to spot, while others
are not as easy to see. As people become
more aware of the advantages of green
technologies around them, they may begin
to ask for their inclusion in other facilities.
The might even start asking questions about
the signs they see, but fortunately industry
leaders are already well aware that the signs
are a-changin’.
P
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.
Signage at the Christman Building plays
an important role in calling attention to
environmentally friendly building features
that might escape the notice of visitors.
to limit waste during manufacturing, re-use
packing materials, and plan for the eventual
fate of the manufactured object.
4. ENSURE ENERGY EFFICIENCY
LEED addresses energy efficiency in vari-
ous ways, including regulations for sourcing
local materials and installation, as well as
energy conservation during manufacturing.
Clients, meanwhile, are demanding informa-
tion about energy efficiency as part of audits
to spot potential cost savings. To optimize
lighting efficiency related to signs and
graphics, minimize light “bleeding” into the
air. Low-energy illumination systems for sig-
nage include light-emitting diodes (LEDs),
fiber optics, and photovoltaic-powered sys-
tems.
5. EDUCATE AND INTERPRET
LEED awards innovation points for provid-
ing interpretive or educational content
describing a building’s sustainability fea-
tures. The sustainable aspects of a project
are often not immediately apparent to the
average user, so providing an exhibit and/or
educational signs serves not only as a record
of accomplishment, but also as an advocacy
model to advance sustainability. Many build-
ing owners and clients want to promote
their sustainability efforts, so educational
program requirements are being written
into more and more requests for proposals
(RFPs).
SEGD is the international nonprofit educa-
tional foundation for professionals involved
with the design, creation, and installation of
communications in the built environment.
Environmental graphic design (EGD) focuses
on a wide range of 3D communications,
including architectural signage and graph-
ics, themed and branded environments,
mediatecture, wayfinding, museum exhibi-
tion design, tradeshow exhibit design, and
retail design.
SEGD continues to develop “green” educa-
tional programs and initiatives and has
developed a green audit process specific to
signage and graphics. For more information,
contact Craig Berger, director of education
and professional development, at
craig@segd.org.
M
aterial selection, transportation
methods, and energy-efficient
design can make today’s architec-
ture more environmentally friendly and
cost-effective than conventionally designed
buildings. While LEED criteria don’t specifi-
cally address signs and graphics, rethinking
the approaches to how they’re designed
and fabricated can add to overall project
sustainability.
A “Green Paper” recently published by the
Society for Environmental Graphic Design
(SEGD, http://www.segd.org) outlines green
strategies for signs and graphics.
1. MAXIMIZE LONGEVITY
Projects intended for long periods should
incorporate materials that will not weather
or degrade quickly. Frequent replacement of
materials can offset a project’s overall sus-
tainability. Short-term projects should incor-
porate materials that are easy to salvage,
recycle, or reuse. Modularity greatly
enhances a sign’s longevity by making it
changeable.
2. PROTECT AIR QUALITY
Choose low-VOC products and processes
for manufacturing and installing signs,
graphics, and exhibits. VOC-free paints and
stains and water-based adhesives are avail-
able. Eco-conscious printing processes
include dye sublimation inks (which use a
heat-transfer process instead of solvents),
ultraviolet-curable (UV-curable) inks, water-
based inks, and organic-based inks (e.g.,
based on corn, linseed, or soy oils).
3. MANAGE RESOURCES AND WASTE
Source local materials whenever possible,
specify materials with recycled content,
design within standard material dimensions
G R E E N P R I N T
FOR THE FUTURE
How Green are Your Signs?
How Green are Your Signs?
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 33 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
34 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
J
ournalists are taught to write in an “inverted pyramid” style, where they
put the most important elements at the top of the story and then fill in
the minor details. Fortunately, the Pyramids of Egypt were not built to
this model, as putting the widest point at the top would have resulted
in inefficient structures that would have been lost in the sands of time.
Sometimes, life mandates forms that are less than ideal from a structural
standpoint, but engineers have learned to compensate for this in modern
times. Freeway cantilever and truss-type signs are a classic example.
By David R. Miller,
Associate Editor
Photos Courtesy of MDOT
and Soil and Material
Engineers, Inc.
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 35 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Cantilever signs are supported on a single
foundation, but this foundation must be
placed off to the side instead of directly
below to accommodate traffic. This arrange-
ment stresses the foundation in ways that
would not occur if the foundation were
directly beneath the center of gravity. Soil
and Materials Engineers, Inc. (SME),
Plymouth, recently worked with MDOT to
design a new standard type of foundation to
support these large overhead cantilever and
truss-type signs, consistent with the 2001
American Association of State Highway and
Transportation Officials (AASHTO) “Standard
Specifications for Structural Supports for
Highway Signs, Luminaries, and Traffic
Signals,” while the Lansing office of Chicago-
based CTE re-designed the aboveground
structures.
UNDERSTANDING THE STRESSES
The first step in designing a foundation
for roadside signs is to determine what
structural loads the sign will face in its loca-
tion. The weight of a cantilevered sign, for
example, will place a vertical load directly
down on the foundation, while the weight
and the distance from the foundation com-
bine to form the lateral load. The twisting
load, which occurs when winds push the
signs forward and back, is the most difficult
to estimate. SME used data calculated by
CTE to design the foundations.
“The structural engineer estimated the
loads using the new AASHTO requirement,”
said Chris Byrum, PhD, PE, senior project
engineer for SME. “They simulate all the dif-
Cantilever signs, like this one, stress founda-
tions in ways that would not occur if the
foundation were directly beneath the center of
gravity.
36 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
five to ten percent of the sites in Michigan
require site-specific designs because of soil
conditions. Soil conditions vary widely across
the state.
“If you go into the Detroit area, for exam-
ple, you will see clay soil,” said Alonso
Uzcategui, engineering manager for MDOT’s
signing unit. “There are softer clays in the
Muskegon area, so you will need deeper
foundations. In northern Michigan, around
the Grayling area, you encounter a lot of sand.
In the U.P., you get a lot of rock and you can
hit bedrock within five or ten feet.”
No matter what type of soil is found at the
site, a fairly extensive foundation is needed to
support the 31,780 pounds of horizontal
force a 140-foot truss can place on a founda-
tion, but using standardized designs whenev-
er possible results in significant savings.
Necessary modifications for specific soil con-
ditions can include steel casings to prevent
holes from collapsing in sandy soils and cored
drilled shafts in shallow bedrock. Byrum also
worked with MDOT during the 1990s to
develop a specialized foundation where
three piles are driven down in a tripod pat-
tern for use in deep peat bogs.
Ancient clay beds, like those found around
Detroit, offer excellent stability. Installation is
usually a simple matter of drilling a shaft and
a constant lateral load, so having a value
assigned to this load allows for a more effi-
cient foundation design. The process of
accurately representing this load in a com-
puter simulation was not possible with the
technology that was available when the pre-
vious standard was written.
As state transportation departments
began to work on developing their own
designs to meet the new federal standard,
MDOT and Michigan Technological
University conducted research into how
other departments were meeting the stan-
dard. Florida emerged as having the best
approach, given its status as a hurricane
state and as the home of a renowned foun-
dation expert at the University of Florida
who conducted extensive research on twist-
ing loads. CTE and SME worked to adapt
some of Florida’s research findings for
Michigan conditions.
DESIGNING FOR THE STRESSES
Unlike Florida, which creates a site-specific
foundation design for every cantilevered and
truss-type sign, MDOT conducts soil borings
and a constructability evaluation at each site
and uses this data to determine which stan-
dard foundation design should be used in
most cases. Byrum estimates that only about
ferent loads and we take the worst one as
our foundation load. For example, the worst
load might be a combination of thick ice on
the structure during an 80-MPH windstorm,
with a semi-truck going by at 70 MPH.
Whatever the worst case combination is,
that is the foundation load we design for.”
Calculating the various loads is a crucial
step because it lets engineers design foun-
dations that will function in any conceivable
condition without adding the expense of
placing more extensive foundation systems
than will ever be needed. A better under-
standing of structural dynamics coupled
with current computer modeling techniques
makes this a much more exact process than
it was when the previous AASHTO standard
was developed in the 1980s.
“The first thing I do is make a foundation
model in the computer,” said Byrum. “I can
push on that foundation with the lateral
load that I got from the structural engineer.
I can use that lateral analysis as a basis for
the twisting load.”
Byrum cited the example of a peg in a
hole to explain the concept. The peg may
twist easily, but if constant lateral pressure is
placed on the side of the peg, resistance will
make it much more difficult to twist.
Cantilevered signs are similarly placed under
No matter what type of soil is found at the site, a fairly extensive foundation is needed to support
the horizontal force that a truss sign can place on a foundation, but using standardized designs
whenever possible results in significant savings.
38 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
pouring in concrete. This is also possible with
softer clays, but a deeper hole is needed.
Drilled shaft foundations typically range from
15 to 60 feet below grade, depending on con-
ditions. Foundations that consist of a single
drilled shaft, like those standardized by SME,
provide one significant benefit over their pre-
decessors.
“The old style foundations were more like
big blocks,” said Byrum. “They were more
shallow, but they required a larger excavation.
That is where some of the cost savings come
in. You don’t need as big of a hole for a drilled
shaft, and there were also a lot of collateral
costs associated with the old style footings.
You had to use shoring and bracing to hold
up the road while you set the formwork.
There were more steps with the old style foot-
ings and they were harder to wedge in
between utility lines.”
Installation usually stretched out a couple
of weeks because of the additional steps
involved with the older footings. On the
other hand, Byrum estimates that a contrac-
tor installing a single drilled shaft could shut
down freeway lanes after an afternoon rush
and have the job finished within a day or two.
Opening traffic lanes faster is a real economic
benefit that would have been appreciated
even back in the days of the Pharaohs, but
can only be realized with the application of
modern engineering techniques.
Installation of older footings usually required a couple of weeks, but single drilled shaft foundations
like this one can be done within a day or two.
40 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
T
he long arm of the law now has a
farther reach in the Charter
Township of Grand Blanc. Once con-
fined to 6,000 square feet of space in the
township’s municipal building, the new
police headquarters is a striking, 41,000-
square-foot structure with an expanded
number of holding cells and improved
security systems installed to help the
township’s finest protect this growing area
of Genesee County. Beyond pure function,
the building projects an image of strength
from its split-faced concrete block base to
its imposing gable and broad entablature
emblazoned with the word “POLICE” in
large, capital letters.
“The township wanted a building that
made a statement about the law – it’s com-
manding, solid and unwavering,” said
Stephen M. Lodge, project architect,
French Associates, Inc., the Rochester-
based firm responsible for the building’s
captivating design. “The scale of some of
the building details evokes this image.”
In form and material composition, this
brick and cast stone building translates the
idea of strength into a tangible reality. The
brick is utility-size, a slightly larger brick
selected for scale and for its cost-saving
benefits, said Scott Oswald, project engi-
neer for George W. Auch Company,
Pontiac, the construction management
firm for the $10.4 million dollar project.
The building is supported by a structural
steel frame and a cast-in-place concrete
foundation, which also forms the build-
ing’s basement,” said William Moy, project
manager, George W. Auch Company.
The building conveys both the strength
of the law and the spirit of traditional civic
buildings. A colonnade of brick columns
supports the large entrance gable and
stone entablature, while a row of arched
openings flank both sides of the imposing
main entry. “Because the township want-
ed a traditional civic building, we
employed iconic elements of those build-
ings, such as the colonnade, the prominent
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
By Mary E. Kremposky Photos by Steve Maylone Photography
Associate Editor for French Associates, Inc.
George W. Auch Company Delivers an Arresting Building
for the Charter Township of Grand Blanc Police
Building in the Name of the Law
George W. Auch Company Delivers an Arresting Building for the Charter Township of Grand Blanc Police
By Mary E. Kremposky
Associate Editor

CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 41 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
gable and entablature,” said Lodge. “The
building’s three-part division into a solid
stone base, a middle core, and a cornice
cap are also components of traditional
civic structures.”
LAUNCHING A NEW CIVIC CAMPUS
This striking police station marks the
official launch of the Charter Township of
Grand Blanc’s new civic campus. The 23-
acre site is immediately south of current
township offices, offering the ideal loca-
tion for the growing township’s new home
base. Formerly, a single, modest building
housed the police department, fire station,
township offices, and the Department of
Public Works (DPW). The master plan
calls for construction of a new township
hall, the renovation of the original town-
ship building into an upgraded fire station
and DPW, and the development of anoth-
er, as yet undefined, municipal building
on the site, said Lodge.
George W. Auch Company aided the
township in gaining site approvals for the
development, as well as obtaining a wet-
land permit from the Michigan
Department of Environmental Quality.
George W. Auch Company helped estab-
lish the foundation for the entire project,
participating in the architect interview
process, creating the budget estimates dur-
ing the design phase, and providing a host
of other preconstruction services.
George W. Auch Company provides
preconstruction services for the majority of
their client base in the municipal, school
and hospital arenas, said Moy. George W.
Auch Company joins the project either
shortly after architectural selection or, as in
the Charter Township of Grand Blanc
Police Headquarters, actually helped the
owner in the architectural selection
process.
Early project decisions and close cooper-
ation in the preconstruction phase yielded
a more productive project in the field.
“Joining a project in the preconstruction
With its exterior lighting and masonry columns, the township’s new police
headquarters projects an image of safety and strength to the community.
42 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
phase helps us to advise the team on con-
structability issues, scheduling, and on
managing construction and the budget in
the construction phase,” said Moy. “We
know the ramifications of every decision
with the budget and the schedule.”
At the new police headquarters, “the
George W. Auch Company, in working
with the township and the architect, had
value analyzed parts of the police head-
quarters building and realized a savings of
approximately $215,000 dollars for the
project,” said Moy. “Savings involved
material changes from limestone to cast
stone on the exterior, electrical fixture
alternates, wood panels, ceramic tile areas
and other finishes.” The savings realized
still provided a high-quality building, both
in appearance and function, for the
Charter Township of Grand Blanc.
A BEACON OF SAFETY
At night, exterior lighting washes over
the well-chosen brick and cast stone of this
new police facility, symbolizing the role of
the police force as beacons of safety in the
night. A companion lantern in the main
lobby and similar fixtures in the pedestri-
an plaza add to the effect. “The lanterns
express the whole idea of the police
department as a safe haven,” said Lodge.
“The lanterns shine like a lighthouse, sym-
bolizing the fact that the police are always
on guard and the station is always a shel-
ter of safety.”
Beyond the companion lantern, the sta-
tion interior mirrors the exterior in other
ways. In the main lobby, the exterior base
of split-faced concrete block with a stone
sill is translated into ground-faced con-
crete block for the lobby wainscot. The cast
stone arches ringing the building exterior
are translated into wood-trimmed arches
in the interior windows of the main lobby.
“We wanted to carry some exterior ele-
ments inside for continuity,” said Lodge.
The main corridor flowing into the heart
of the building from the lobby leads to a
circular commons area and into the admin-
istrative hub of the Charter Township of
Grand Blanc Police Department.
Workspaces for the patrol units and detec-
tive units are located on opposites sides of
the hub and central commons. A circular
skylight draws natural light into the com-
mons area or rotunda sequestered in the
building interior. The commons offers a
pleasant meeting ground for the entire
police force to interact on an informal
basis. “The police chief, Dave Stamm was
concerned about going from a small,
cramped space into a much larger facility,”
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
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The building’s division into a solid stone base, a middle core, and a cornice cap is a mark of a
traditional civic structure. French Associates delivered on the request of the township for such
a structure, while George W. Auch Company managed costs and maintained design intent by
changing exterior elements from limestone to cast stone.
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· Employment Practices Liability
· Business Umbrella (Excess Liability)
· Builders Risk / Installation Floater
· Plus Multi Policy Discounts
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and employees from Michigan’s most
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44 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
said Lodge. “He wanted to make sure
there would be opportunities for the patrol
unit, the detective unit, and other staff to
come in contact with each other and still
feel like one department.”
The main level also contains a multi-
purpose meeting room available for police
training sessions or public use. The lower
level houses locker rooms, property stor-
age, evidence processing, an exercise
room, and a future gun range, added
Lodge.
A CAPTIVATING INTERIOR
The core programming challenge was
the placement of the dispatch and holding
areas. In the Charter Township of Grand
Blanc, dispatchers have three core tasks:
dispatching officers to crime scenes or to
accidents, monitoring prisoners, and
receiving the public. “This meant that the
dispatch, holding, and public areas had to
be near each other,” said Lodge. “We had
to design the interior to give dispatchers
full visibility to both the public and the
holding area, but without the public seeing
into the holding area.”
Placing the dispatch and holding area in
a separate zone offside and on a skewed
angle away from the main flow blocked
the public’s view of the incarcerated. “We
installed one-way glass in the holding cells
to block prisoners from seeing into the dis-
patch or public areas,” added Lodge. The
interior plan also places dispatch on the
same side of the building as the patrol
units, allowing patrol officers to handle
problems in any of the seven holding cells,
while dispatchers remain at their post.
The holding area also proved to be the
core construction challenge of the project.
“The holding area is a specialty in itself,”
said Moy. “The rest of the building was
typical construction materials, but all the
specialty doorframes, hardware, security,
alarm, and communication systems in the
holding area must not only be coordinated
and integrated with each other, but also
with the masonry construction, as well. As
the block is installed, all these complex
mechanisms and systems must be inte-
grated with the frame. It is not something
that can just be inserted afterwards.”
The specialty doors in the holding area
interlock, ensuring only one door is open
at any given time. “As a police officer
enters, no other door can be opened so that
in case a prisoner escaped he could not run
through the entire building,” said Lodge.
“Feeding the electronics and latching
mechanisms of this system down into the
CONSTRUCTI ON HI GHLI GHT
Jackson Park Agency
7321 Park Avenue, Allen Park, MI 48101
Phone (313) 388-7000
Detroit Office:
3365 Michigan Ave.,
Detroit, 48216
e-mail: sales@xxpert.com
Shelby Township Office:
53081 Providence Drive,
Shelby Twp., 48316
ph: 586-405-2252 G fax: 586-580-3953
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Network Support Services
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Computer Room Design, Build and
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Voice Over IP Solutions
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Business Telephone & Voicemail
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Computer Data Networks
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Computer Room Design, Build and
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web: www.xxpert.com
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 45 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
General Contractors / Construction Managers
Since 1908
RELIABILITY
ACCOUNTABILITY
INTEGRITY
100 Years of Building Trust
2 4 8 . 3 3 4 . 2 0 0 0 • WWW. A U C H C O N S T R U C T I O N . C O M
Grand Blanc Police
52nd-3rd Oakland County Courthouse
Canton Fire Station
Canton Township Administration Building
The interior’s wood-trimmed arches mirror
the cast stone arches of the building exteri-
or. With its beautiful brick and wood trim,
this new police headquarters reflects well
on the image of this growing township.
46 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
CONSTRUCTI ON HI GHLI GHT
frame creates some of the challenges in
laying the block in place that is different
than typical block construction. Plus, the
doors and doorframes are heavy-gauge
metal, and the latching mechanisms are
completely different than a typical door.”
Outside the holding area, the interiors
finishes are captivating in another sense.
Visually appealing and durable ceramic
tile wainscoting with wood trim blankets
the main corridor. The ceramic tile pro-
tects the walls from possible damage from
daily police use and specialty law enforce-
ment gear. Porcelain tile flooring in the
main lobby and other areas is another
attractive and functional interior finish.
George W. Auch Company and French
Associates have delivered a showcase
police station with state-of-the-art security
systems and an attractive form and
material palette worthy of Grand Blanc’s
emerging civic campus. “One of our proj-
ect goals was to have local trade participa-
tion; 54 percent of the project’s trade con-
tractors were in Genesee and Northern
Oakland counties, with 48 percent of the
project cost awarded to these firms,” said
Moy. Added Oswald, “Many of the trades
on the job live and work in this communi-
ty and in the general area. They had a great
deal of buy-in and interest in the project.”
Grand Blanc Cement Products manufac-
tured the brick and block of the building
right in the city of Grand Blanc.
The Charter Township of Grand Blanc’s
new police headquarters celebrated its
grand opening on November 26, 2007 to
wide community accolades. “The commu-
nity was very supportive,” said Moy. “The
whole project was a team effort, which cre-
ates a workable, smooth and successful
project.” The Grand Opening is only the
beginning, for this new police headquar-
ters is already designed for expansion and
the campus is ready for future growth.
The following companies contributed their
skill and expertise to the project:
CONSULTANTS
• Landscape Architect -- Michael
J. Dul & Associates, Birmingham
• Structural Engineer – Penhale &
Yates, Inc., Southfield
• Mechanical/Electrical Engineer –
Peter Basso Associates, Inc., Troy
• Civil Engineer – Spalding DeDecker
Associates, Inc., Rochester Hills
313•531•2700
CONNELLY CRANE
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CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 47 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
SUBCONTRACTORS
• Flagpole – American Flag & Banner,
Clawson
• Glass and Aluminum –
Architectural Glazing Systems,
Mount Morris
• Paving – Asphalt Specialists, Inc.,
Pontiac
• Studs/Gypsum/Ceilings – Central
Interior, Inc., Flint
• Earthwork/Utilities – D & R
Earthmoving, LLC, Howell
• Fire Suppression – Detroit
Automatic Sprinkler Co., Warren
• Overhead Doors – Detroit Door &
Hardware Company, Flint
• Plumbing – Dickerson Mechanical,
Inc., Davison
• Masonry – Edgar Boettcher Mason
Contractors, Bay City
• Carpentry – Edrick M. Owen, Inc.,
Clinton Township
• Hardware – FBH Architectural
Products, Flint
• Concrete Flatwork – The Gilardone
Company, Novi
• Toilet Accessories – International
Building Products, Inc., Livonia
• Landscaping – Jetstream Landscape
& Irrigation, Grand Blanc
• Structural Steel – Kirby Steel, Burton
• Fencing – Michigan Fence Co.,
Harrison Township
• HVAC – Miller Sage, Inc., Holly
• Electrical – Moote Electrical, Inc.,
Pontiac
• Painting – Niles Construction
Services, Inc., Flint
• Ceramic Tile – Precision Ceramic
Tile, Burton
• Flooring – Quality Floor Covering
Company, Oak Park
• Foundations – R.L. Shekell, Inc.,
Wayne
• Roofing – Roofcon, Inc., Brighton
• Elevator – Schindler Elevator
Corporation, Morristown, NJ
• Caulking – State Wide Caulking Co.,
Milford
• Metal Panels – Stephenson Corp.,
Flint
The construction manager, architect or owner
identifies subcontractors and professional
consultants listed in the Construction
Highlight.
LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
MICHAEL J. DUL
& ASSOCIATES, INC.
212 DAINES STREET
BIRMINGHAM
MICHIGAN 48009
PHONE 248 644-3410
FAX 248 644-0819
The main corridor leads to a circular commons
sequestered in the building interior, but brightened
by natural light via an expansive skylight.
48 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
E-Z Drill Introduces Model 240B SRA “Combo”
Drill System
E-Z Drill introduces a new concept in concrete drills with the
Model 240B SRA“combo” drill system. Combining the standard
features of the Model 210B SRA with the capability of convert-
ing to a pneumatic core drill, the Model 240B SRAcaters to both
rock drilling and core drilling applications — eliminating the
need for a separate drill system. The conversion process
requires just a few simple tools and can be quickly conducted
while on the jobsite.
Featuring totally pneumatic operation, the core drill utilizes a
three-speed motor (400, 900 and 1,600 rpm) and requires a min-
imum of 77 CFM for operation, whereas the standard rock drill
configuration requires 100 CFM. The unit can core and drill
holes from 5/8-inch diameter up to 2-1/2 inches, and drill up to
18 inches deep.
The 240B SRA’s compact frame design allows the unit to oper-
ate in a 4-foot patch while drilling to within 6 inches of a corner.
Furthermore, it is adjustable to drill into the center of a concrete
slab, from 6 to 24 inches thick.
For increased production, the core drill system does not need
to be anchored to the concrete, virtually eliminating any set-up
time. The operator simply needs to roll the unit to the coring
location and begin drilling. The core drill configuration comes
standard with a water connection.
Slab-rider drills reference from the top of the concrete slab,
which provides for optimum accuracy and eliminates distur-
bance to the subgrade — a key requirement for many state con-
tracts. For added versatility, the 240B SRA can drill vertically
with either the rock drill or core drill configuration after just a
few adjustments.
Optional equipment includes a hole spacing guide for more
accurate repositioning.
For more information on E-Z Drill’s complete line of concrete
drilling and doweling equipment, contact E-Z Drill, P.O. Box
517, 4615 W. Lakeview, Stillwater, OK 74076; call 800-272-0121;
fax 405-372-1429; e-mail sales@ezdrill.com or visit the website
www.ezdrill.com.
Finn’s New Titan Hydroseeder® Increases
Productivity with More Power, Speed
Providing a significant productivity enhancement option for
the largest models in its full line of Hydroseeders, Finn
Corporation introduces the new Titan Hydroseeder. Available in
three tank sizes, the new Hydroseeder delivers more power and
speed, making the Titan well-suited for extremely large coverage
areas, steep slopes, and hard-to-reach areas of the jobsite.
Featuring a 170-horsepower, turbo diesel, Tier 3 compliant
Cummins QSB engine, the Titan provides 48-percent more horse-
power than standard Hydroseeder packages. The engine includes
a control panel with a digital information display, as well as an
ECU with self-diagnostics to monitor low oil pressure and initiate
high temperature shutoff.
The increased horsepower allows the Titan to achieve greater
spraying distances of up to 320 feet from the discharge tower,
compared to 230 feet on standard models. The engine also
enables a dual discharge boom system to run efficiently and
simultaneously. An optional second boom allows spraying from
both sides of tank to cover larger spray areas and provides opti-
mal positioning flexibility for logistically challenging sites.
Tank sizes for the Titan Hydroseeders range from working
capacities of 2,500 to 3,600 gallons. Material capacities for the
Titan 280, Titan 330 and Titan 400 are 8,000/1,250 pounds (granu-
lar solids/fiber mulch) 10,000/1,500 pounds, and 12,400/1,800
pounds, respectively.
The addition of a third mechanical paddle agitator, lets the
Titan can handle tougher material mixtures and heavier products,
such as bonded fiber mixtures, while also allowing for various
loading techniques. Additionally, the combination of a hydraulic
motor and gearbox drive for the lower agitators produces higher
torque to more thoroughly and efficiently mix materials. This also
results in less wasted product and faster cleanup.
For added operator convenience, the Titan features a 28.5- by
48-inch hatch opening with a dual pivoting stainless steel bag cut-
ter and safety bar. The larger hatch design makes loading easier
and less time-consuming, even allowing two workers to load at
the same time to further speed up the process. Alarger slide gate
and open-space design drastically increases the available space
for material storage on the top of the tank.
An optional remote control makes usage easier by allowing
adjustment of agitator speed, mixing direction and hose rewind.
Operators can maintain control of these functions at up to 200 feet
from the machine.
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 49 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Manufactured to be dependable as well
as powerful, the Titan is engineered to
prevent unnecessary wear and tear on its
hydraulic motors, and a protective tank
top coating helps ensure longer service
life for the tank. Its durable design makes
the Titan a well-suited solution for ero-
sion control contractors with larger
hydroseeding projects, as well for high-
way, dust control, landfill, golf course and
various commercial applications. The
Titan is backed by a 2-year limited manu-
facturer’s warranty.
For more information on the Titan and
Finn’s complete line of Hydroseeders, con-
tact Finn Corporation, 9281 LeSaint Drive,
Fairfield, OH 45014; call 800-543-7166; fax
513-874-2914; e-mail sales@finncorp.com
or visit the website www.finncorp.com.
FKI Logistex Launches New
Case Conveyor Product Family
FKI Logistex® has announced the
launch of Logistex Case Conveyor
Solutions, an advanced conveyor product
family for the global market. The new con-
veyor family combines superior perform-
ance, reliability, throughput and ease of
maintenance with the latest energy-saving
features, reducing operating costs and
increasing energy efficiency.
Logistex Case Conveyor Solutions han-
dle cases, totes and trays and are com-
prised of highly modular products that
can be tailored for a wide range of markets
and applications, such as apparel, automo-
tive, consumer goods, postal and parcel
distribution, food, beverage, pharmaceuti-
cal and retail.
The new conveyor line sets a benchmark
for low installation and maintenance costs.
All Logistex Case Conveyor Solutions
share parts and controls, providing a solu-
tion that simplifies maintenance, reduces
spare parts inventories and makes recon-
figuration easy.
Apatent-pending band cartridge system
on the Logistex RT200 Right-Angle
Troy, MI: 248.680.0400
Brighton, MI: 810.224.4330
Chicago, IL: 847.353.8740
www.g2consultinggroup.com
PHASE IIS
PHASCINATE
US
G2 can’t wait to start digging for solutions to your most
challenging environmental issues, from phenols to
phosphorus.
GEOTECHNICAL
ENVIRONMENTAL
CONSTRUCTION
ENGINEERING
UNEARTHING POSSIBILITIES
G2_CAM_v3_06 7/12/06 1:47 PM Page 1
50 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Transfer conveyor allows maintenance technicians to replace a
damaged band in seconds instead of minutes. An innovative “lift
and turn” wheel assembly on the Logistex DV200 Diverter
includes only two moving parts — both of which are easy to
replace — reducing diverter conveyor maintenance. In addition,
the ZC200 Zone Control system features flexible operational
modes and pre-programmed functions for reduced commission-
ing time and simplified training. The ZC200 requires no tools for
installation, and is equipped with local hardware diagnostics and
easy switch settings for control configuration.
Logistex Case Conveyor Solutions feature the latest energy-
saving technologies, including all-electric design and run-on-
demand technology, and offer a variety of conveyor components
and options for accumulation, transportation, diverting, meter-
ing, merging and sorting. The full product line includes: Logistex
RT200 Right-Angle Transfer, Logistex DV200 Diverter, Logistex
MR200 Motorized Roller Conveyor, Logistex NB200 Narrow-Belt
Driven Roller Accumulation / Transportation Conveyor, Logistex
MB200 Modular Belt Conveyor, Logistex CP200 Chain & Pad
Driven Roller Accumulation / Transportation Conveyor, Logistex
VB200 V-Belt Driven Live Roller Conveyor, Logistex GR200
Gravity Conveyor and Logistex ZC200 Zone Control.
For sales and marketing information, contact Emily Smith,
marketing supervisor, FKI Logistex North America, by phone at
1-513-881-5239 or by e-mail at emily.smith@fkilogistex.com.
New Firestone
Ride-Rite™ Kit
Available for 2008
Ford® F-450®
Ride-Rite air helper
springs from Firestone
Industrial Products
Company, LLC are now
available in a no-drill kit
for the 2008 Ford F-450.
The new Ford F-450 Ride-Rite kit is specifically designed to
maximize the safe load carrying capacity, stability and ride
quality of the F-450. The system utilizes the truck’s factory
holes and includes all the components needed for a quick and
easy installation: brackets, air springs, hardware, air line and
separate valves for manual inflation.
By using air pressure to adjust Firestone’s air helper springs,
the Ride-Rite system helps maintain brake effectiveness, reduce
tire wear, level off-center loads - individual inflation valves
allow for separate side-to-side adjustment - and increase vehicle
stability.
The kit comes with a two-year limited warranty and typically
installs in less than one hour because there is no need to remove
the wheels or tires. The system’s reinforced double convoluted
air springs install between the frame and the axle.
A pair of Ride-Rite air springs can provide up to 5,000 pounds
of load leveling capacity. (Note: Air springs do not increase the
load-carrying capacity of the vehicle. The vehicle’s recommended
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating [GVWR] should not be exceeded.)
Firestone also offers the Air-Rite‘ air accessory system to com-
plement the Ford F-450 Ride-Rite kit, which enables drivers to
make air pressure adjustments with a push of a button installed
on the dashboard. In addition, Firestone offers a Coil-Rite‘ kit
for the F-450 to provide extra support in the front for snow-
plows, winches and more.
Trained technicians are available toll-free (800.888.0650) to
answer any product application, installation or warranty ques-
tions Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST.
For more information, visit www.ride-rite.com.
Food Prep and
Cleanup Made Easy
with Hands-Free
Kohler Crevasse
Rinsing Sink
Kohler Co. has introduced
the Crevasse™ rinsing sink, engineered to revolutionize food
preparation and cleanup by combining an integrated garbage
disposal and rinsing action into one easy step—all at the touch
of a button.
The Crevasse stainless steel rinsing sink utilizes
Cynchronus™ technology, which activates a rinsing action and
the garbage disposal at the touch of a button. A small stainless
steel plate, with two buttons, is mounted near the sink, provid-
ing the user with two options – a quick rinse down the drain, or
a wash-like flow of water that also activates the garbage dispos-
al to remove food waste properly. This technology allows for
hands-free operation of the disposal, making food preparation
and cleanup easier, cleaner and safer. The sink also includes a
Kohler silicon baffle, which is designed to significantly improve
the amount of waste sent down the drain without assistance
from the user.
The trough-like, sloped design of the rinsing sink provides
ample space for food waste to be easily brushed directly into the
basin, yet the 33-inch model size is likely to fit into any work
space in the kitchen, including alongside a primary sink or as a
stand-alone model in an island configuration. Installing the
Crevasse prep sink is just as easy as any other undermount sink,
with the addition of a cold water line attachment to activate the
rinsing device. The garbage disposal simply plugs into the
sink’s interface device; any standard size garbage disposal is
adaptable to fit the Crevasse sink.
For more information on the Crevasse rinsing sink or other
KOHLER products, individuals may visit the Kohler Co. website
at www.KOHLER.com, or call toll-free at 1-800-4-KOHLER.
Franklin Electric
Introduces the New
Little Giant Lightweight,
Heavy-Duty, Two-
Horsepower Grinder
Pump Series
Franklin Electric – Water
Transfer Systems (formerly Little
Giant Pump Company) has
announced the addition of its
patented, two-horsepower sub-
mersible grinder pump line, the
GP Series. The new pumps are
available in automatic and manu-
al versions for both 230-volt and
208-volt single-phase applica-
tions. They incorporate a heavy-
duty, capacitor-start, capacitor-
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 51 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
run motor with upper and lower single-row ball bearings, and a
short shaft design to minimize shaft deflection, improve grind-
ing, and help maintain the sharpness of the cutters. These fea-
tures make this robust centrifugal grinder pump series ideal for
light commercial applications, residential low-pressure sewer
systems, or applications sited in difficult soil or topography.
Key to the effectiveness of the new pumps is their patented
anti-roping design that features self-aligning cutters. These cut-
ters have been engineered with close cutter clearances, resulting
in better grinding, lower amps (13.9 amps), fewer start relay
engagements, and less chance of roping of stringy materials.
The GP grinders also offer easy field removal and replacement
of the reversible stationary cutter without removal of the volute.
Reversing the cutter provides a new cutting surface.
Additionally, by incorporating slots in the volute along with the
tight tolerances of the multi-vane impeller, material is expelled
that may have normally become clogged.
Little Giant GP Series Grinder Pumps are fully functional
from 10 to 120 feet of total dynamic head pressure and are non-
overloading at all points on the curve. With 34 GPM and the
ability to reach 130 feet of head, better pipe-scouring velocities
and high-head applications can be achieved with the use of one
pump.
For additional information, contact Franklin Electric – Water
Transfer Systems at 800-701-7894, or visit
www.LittleGiantPump.com.
New Gradall® XL 5100 III Excavator Has More
Power, Smaller Footprint
Gradall Industries, Inc., has introduced the XL 5100 III exca-
vator - the company’s largest production model for construction
markets, representing dramatic new Gradall-engineered advan-
tages over the model it replaces, the XL 5100.
The new XL 5100 III, weighing just over 55,000 pounds,
reflects a new Gradall design philosophy that delivers increased
performance, excellent cost containment benefits and a shorter
carrier for easier highway mobility and a shorter rear swing.
Unlike the XL 5100 that used two Cummins engines, the XL
5100 III uses just one Detroit Diesel Mercedes engine.
Conserving fuel while producing greater horsepower, the new
engine operates both the truck carrier and the upperstructure
and boom. Plus, the concept reduces maintenance costs with
only one electrical system, one radiator, one set of filters and
other non-redundant features.
Whether your project has
tight constraints
is a tall order to fill
let Assemblers, Inc. help you fit the pieces
into place with our professional staff.
- or-
Estimating & Phone (734) 429-1358
Engineering Fax: (734) 944-0710
52 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
While the old model required two fuel tanks - one with 86 gal-
lons and one with 50 gallons - the efficient new engine is paired
with a single 100-gallon tank. Also, the new engine has a longer
warranty with standard 600-hour service intervals rather than
the 250-hour intervals required by the engines it replaces.
In the chassis cab, the operator can drive the excavator at
highway speeds to one or more jobsites in a single day. And
from the upperstructure cab, the operator uses the same engine
to reposition the carrier and operate the powerful telescoping
and tilting Gradall boom that set the industry standard in con-
struction equipment versatility. New electronic joysticks replace
hydraulic controls, providing optimum reliability. Using a
switch in the cab, the operator can now select the Gradall, SAE
or Deere joystick pattern. Also, operators of the new model have
greater control over their carrier positioning speed using a two-
speed switch in the upper cab.
XL 5100 III models are available in 6 x 4 and 6 x 6 configura-
tions, painted in the new Gradall color scheme - gray with red
trim and dark gray cabs - similar to the XL 3000 and XL 4000
models. But the XL 5100 III carriers are 6 inches narrower than
the models they replace, so they now can be driven on highways
without an over-width permit.
Anewly designed counterweight is higher, without restricting
operator vision, and more compact, helping to reduce the swing
clearance by 18 inches and the total length of the undercarriage
by 6 inches. The shorter swing clearance enables the machines to
deliver greater performance in tighter quarters, reducing inter-
ference with moving traffic during highway demolition and
repair work.
The new upperstructure cab is located on the left side of the
machine, a familiar location for operators of Gradall XL 4100
and XL 3100 highway speed models. It has a large, adjustable
modular seat with joysticks built into armrests. Also standard
are AM/FM radio, air conditioning and a work light package.
The upperstructure swing speed has been increased by 33
percent, providing greater productivity for truck loading and
unloading, allowing the Gradall to compare favorably with high
performance conventional excavators. Bucket breakout force is
increased from 21,900 to 24,900 pounds, and boom crowd force
increases from 23,390 to 24,500 pounds.
The boom movement hydraulics system uses a single load-
sensing axial piston pump - an efficient load-sensing design that
automatically adjusts boom power for high productivity exca-
vating, ditching, loading and demolition or standard grading,
sloping and finishing. Not only is the load-sensing feature con-
venient and productive, it also allows for fuel savings.
Operators of the new model also have the option of reducing
engine RPMs from 1900 to 1700 using a new switch in the cab.
Versatility is apparent in the new XL 5100 III with boom
movements that extract full productivity from a wider range of
attachments. Unlike conventional booms that require significant
overhead clearance to operate, the Gradall boom benefits from a
telescoping action that allows it to work under bridges, trees,
signage, top down excavations and on the ground floors of
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 53 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
many multi-story construction projects.
Also unlike conventional booms, the tele-
scoping action delivers consistent power
throughout the entire digging cycle.
To capitalize on the versatility of the XL
5100 III, Gradall offers buckets designed
for excavating, pavement removal, dredg-
ing, ditching and trenching. Also available
are grapples, hammers, grading blades,
Telestick and standard boom extensions, a
tree limb shear and a live boom that can
reach over obstacles and dig straight
down. For the convenience of fleet man-
agers, attachments are interchangeable
with Gradall XL 4100 II models.
The XL 5100 III carrier is armed with an
Eaton Roadranger transmission with nine
speeds forward and two reverse.
Operation is much quieter thanks to a
series of advantages like a variable vis-
cous fan clutch system, while the new
chassis benefits from a stronger new axle,
standard low profile radial tires and hub
piloted disk wheels.
In the carrier cab, drivers can monitor
engine performance with new gauges for
oil pressure, coolant temperature, air tank
pressures, fuel level, volt meter,
speedometer with odometer and
tachometer with an hour meter. The cab
also has a new air suspension seat as well
as indicator lights and controls for front
axle engagement on 6 x 6 models and rear
axle differential lock.
To demo a new XL 5100 III model, con-
tact an authorized Gradall distributor or
call Gradall at 330-339-2211. For litera-
ture, write to Gradall Industries, Inc., 406
Mill Ave. SW, New Philadelphia, OH
44663; or visit www.gradall.com.
Speak
Up!
Do You Know of a Newsworthy
Project, Product or Event
Happening in Your Area?
Let Us Know and You
Might See it Right
Here in CAM Magazine!
Contact us at:
248.972.1000 or email us at
editor@cam-online.com
Speak
Up!
Do You Know of a Newsworthy
Project, Product or Event
Happening in Your Area?
Let Us Know and You
Might See it Right
Here in CAM Magazine!
Contact us at:
248.972.1000 or email us at
editor@cam-online.com
54 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
The George W. Auch Company, Pontiac,
announced that Vince DeLeonardis has
been promoted to company president from
vice president. Dave Hamilton remains as
company Chairman & CEO.
Walbridge, a Detroit-
based, multi-national, full-
service constructor, has
appointed Steve Helms as
general manager of
Walbridge SE, serving
southeastern part of the
U.S., headquartered in
Charlotte, North Carolina.
The Albert Kahn Family of Companies
(Kahn), Detroit, a leading provider of
architecture, engineering, planning, design
and management services, is proud to
announce that the following individuals
have been elected senior associates of the
firm. They are: Thomas Edwards; Blake
Elderkin, AIA; Lawrence Fill, CIPE, QCxP,
Manager of Commissioning Services;
Jeffrey Gaines, AIA, AICP, LEED AP,
Manager of Programming and Planning;
Theresa Harris, AIA, Manager of
Healthcare Planning; John Hrovat, OAA,
LEED AP, Manager of Architectural Design;
Mark S. Piotrowski, RA, LEED AP; Amy
Russeau, Director of Marketing/Public
Relations; Akram Siddiqi, PE; Michael
Stocker, PE; Lee Sun, PE, CPD, LEED AP;
Zebedee Tolbert, RA, LEED AP. Also, Kahn
is proud to announce the following indi-
viduals have been elected as associates of
the firm: Claudia Bello-Valbuena, AIA,
NCARB, LEED AP; Susan Buehler, ASID,
LEED AP; Judy Champagne; Kimberly
Cicchella, ASID; Anne Cox, AIA, LEED AP;
Jennifer Dickey, PE; Kevin Gurgel, PE;
Patricia Hagerty; Todd Herod, LEED AP;
Natasha Marsaw; Gregory Matherne, AIA;
Phillip Michniacki; Steve Panyek;
Riccardo Pappini, RLA, OALA, LEED AP;
Jarett Rogin; Kevin Vanwasshnova; Dug
Young LEED AP; Xin Zong, PE.
G2 Consulting Group, a Troy-based full-
service geotechnical, environmental and
construction services engineering firm, has
hired Michael Frolov as a staff engineer in
G2’s construction engineering services
group.
Anchorville-based Thompson-Phelan
Group, Inc. is happy to announce this
year’s recipients of the James W. Phelan
scholarship. The scholarship was
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
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248.852.9255
J. D. Candler
Roofing Co., Inc.
Livonia MI
313.899.2100
Christen/Detroit
Detroit MI
313.837.1420
Detroit Cornice & Slate Co.
Ferndale MI
248.398.7690
Fisher Roofing Co., Inc.
Dearborn Heights MI
313.292.8090
LaDuke Roofing &
Sheet Metal
Oak Park MI
248.414.6600
Lutz Roofing Co., Inc.
Shelby Twp. MI
586.739.1148
M.W. Morss Roofing, Inc.
Romulus MI
734.942.0840
Newton Crane Roofing, Inc.
Pontiac MI
248.332.3021
North Roofing Co.
Auburn Hills MI
248.373.1500
Dave Pomaville & Sons, Inc.
Warren MI
586.755.6030
Royal Roofing Co.
Orion MI
248.276.ROOF (7663)
Schena Roofing &
Sheet Metal Co., Inc.
Chesterfield MI
586.949.4777
Schreiber Corporation
Detroit MI
313.864.4900
SOUT HE AST E RN MI CHI GAN ROOF I NG CONT RACT ORS ASSOCI AT I ON ME MBE RS
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56 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
established to provide financial assistance
to Michigan residents in their junior or
senior year of college of a Michigan college
or university. The following four students
will each receive $750 scholarships: Kevin
Barton, Michigan State University;
Brandon Meyers, Grand Valley State
University; Anita Sara, University of
Michigan; Kevin Bouchey, Lawrence
Technological University.
Soil and Materials
Engineers, Inc. (SME),
Plymouth, recently
announced that Simon C.
Murley, PE, senior engi-
neer, became a registered
Professional Engineer (PE)
in Michigan. Also, the firm
has announced that
Schoolcraft College in
Livonia has appointed
Cheryl A. Kehres-Dietrich,
CGWP, senior consultant at
SME, to its newly formed
Environmental Studies
Advisory Committee.
Troy-based Peter Basso Associates is
pleased to announce that David A. Conrad,
Scott T. Peck and Joseph R. Seidl have
passed the final part of the Professional
Engineers (PE) exam and are now licensed
in Michigan. Also, the firm is pleased to
announce that Tracey Guzman has passed
the U.S. Green Building Council’s exami-
nation and is now a LEED Accredited
Professional (LEED AP). The LEED AP
credential represents the individual’s
knowledge of the LEED Rating System
and its application in practice.
Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber,
Inc. (FTC&H), Engineers/Scientists/
Architects/Constructors, is pleased to
announce that ten of their staff have
attained Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design Accredited
Professional (LEED AP) status, raising the
firm’s total to 27 LEED APs. They are:
Matt R. Brown; Chad R. Everts, LEED AP;
Susan D. Gollon, LEED AP; Brian L. Hire,
LEED AP, QCxP; Anthony R. Kuhtz, PE,
LEED AP; Ryan D. Musch, LEED AP; Patrick
M. O’Connor, LEED AP; E. Wendy Ogilvie,
CFM, LEED AP; Lee H. Sellenraad, LEED AP;
and Steven D. Teitsma, PE, LEED AP.
FTC&H has offices in Grand Rapids,
Lansing, Kalamazoo, Farmington Hills,
and Cincinnati, Ohio.
H o b b s + B l a c k
Associates, Inc., Ann
Arbor, is pleased to
announce that Kristen A.G.
Schleick, AIA, AICP, has
recently earned LEED
Accreditation with the U.S.
Green Building Council.
Schleick’s accreditation proves her com-
mitment to responsible and sustainable
design. Schleick, recently named 2008
Young Architect of the Year by AIA
Michigan, is an associate and project
architect / planner with Hobbs+Black
Associates.
Detroit-based Detroit Ready Mix
Concrete, Inc. has appointed Jack Pounds to
the position of sales manager. Pounds will
also continue to lead the company’s precast
and building supply divisions. He is a
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
800-910-1123
Local 517-468-7677
Fax 517-468-4836
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Schleick
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 57 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
graduate of the University of Miami and
has worked in various capacities for
Detroit Ready Mix since 1998.
Jonathon W. French,
from the Southfield office
of DiClemente Siegel
Design Inc., has successful-
ly completed Part II of the
professional engineering
exam and has earned his
Professional Engineering
(PE) registration. DiClemente Siegel
Design Inc. is headquartered in Southfield
with a branch office in Burton, Michigan.
The firm offers mechanical and electrical
engineering, architectural and interior
design master planning, facility audits and
building condition analyses.
SOMAT Engineering,
Inc., a southeast Michigan
infrastructure engineering
and consulting firm head-
quartered in Detroit, has
announced the promotions
of two employees.
Moideen Mathari, PE, has
been promoted to princi-
pal engineer, and Corey
Switanowski, PE, LEED AP
has been promoted to sen-
ior project engineer.
The Barton Malow
Company recently
announced that Jim
Nahrgang, PHR, has joined
the firm as vice president
of human resources. He is
based at the company’s
corporate headquarters in
Southfield. Also, Debi
Patrick has been hired as
business development
manager for Barton
Malow’s Specialty
Contracting division locat-
ed in Oak Park. Her
responsibilities will focus
on new business opportu-
nities within the concrete,
interiors and rigging markets. Barton
Malow Company provides construction
management, design/build, program
management, general contracting, technol-
ogy and rigging services throughout
North America.
Warren-based SMRCA recently
announced the winning recipients of their
scholarship grants. The Governors for the
Scholarship Grant Committee awarded the
scholarships to four college-bound stu-
dents at a July meeting held at the Roofers
Union Local #149 office in Detroit. This
year’s winning students were: Falesha
Crawford of Detroit; Christopher Gagnon
of Troy; Brett Marquardt of Northville;
French
Mathari
Switanowski
Nahrgang
Patrick
Christopher Gagnon and Falesha Crawford
58 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
and Amber Trombley of Lapeer. Applicants were asked to sub-
mit an essay on the importance of the roofing industry to the
joint union/contractor scholarship committee. Winners
received scholarships in the amount of $1,000 contributed by the
SMRCA, Roofers Union Local #149, and the Contractor
Employer.
Wigen Tincknell Meyer and
Associates, a Saginaw-based archi-
tectural and sustainable-design
firm, has announced the following
promotions to associate within the
firm: Kenneth Lemiesz, AIA; Kim
Stevens-Len, LEED AP; David
Tagget, AIA; and Paul Haselhuhn,
AIA, LEED AP.
Prein&Newhof is pleased to
announce the promotion of James
Cook, PE, to the office of president.
He succeeds Thomas Newhof, PE,
who will now serve the firm as
chairman of the Board of Directors. In addition to its offices in
Grand Rapids, Holland, Byron Center, Muskegon and
Kalamazoo, the firm also maintains its own environmental lab-
oratory adjacent to its headquarters in Grand Rapids.
C O R P O R A T E N E W S
Van Dyke Public Schools in Macomb County has chosen
Barton Malow Company, Southfield, as construction manager for
its $62.6 million bond program. The construction program calls
for remodeling and additions to several schools, a career center at
the high school, renovating athletic fields and playgrounds,
revamping technology systems and related improvements.
Partners In Architecture, Mt. Clemens, is project architect.
Plymouth-based Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc. recently
announced that KIRCO Construction has awarded them a contract
to provide construction materials services for Village Lakes, the
newest commercial development in White Lake Township.
Redevelopment of the 39-acre site will encompass 165,000 square-
feet of retail, including a new prototype JC Penny store, and an
80,000-square-foot medical office building.
Controlled Power Company, Troy, a global manufacturer of
complete commercial, industrial, and medical electrical power
solutions, has announced the completion and launch of its new
extranet site. Designed specifically for the company’s network of
North American manufacturer’s reps, this password-protected
“rep login” site allows secure access to the company’s submittal
forms, pricebooks, product drawings, and other proprietary doc-
umentation required for product quoting and sales. As an excit-
ing addition to the Controlled Power Company’s website, this
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
888 West Big Beaver Road, Suite 1200, Troy, Michigan 48084
www.oaklandcompanies.net
Our Primary Client Goals:
Protect Your Assets • Control Your Costs • Provide Exceptional Service
ISO 9001:2000
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OAKLAND COMPANIES
INTEGRITY • COMMITMENT • SECURITY
Ph (248) 647-2500 • Fax (248) 647-4689
INSURANCE BONDING
Hastings Mutual Insurance Company
Hastings, Michigan G www.hastingsmutual.com
Lemiesz Stevens-Len
Tagget Haselhuhn
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 59 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
new extranet enables the company’s sales representatives to have
“anytime-access” to all of its representative-specific sales docu-
ments, from one convenient online location.
Troy-based design firm Ford & Earl Design Studios is pleased to
announce their move into fractional ownership and residential
architecture at Tullymore Golf Course in Stanwood. For decades,
Ford & Earl Design Studios have been known for their work in
commercial interior design. Over the past two years under new
ownership, and with studio head Brian Gregorich, AIA, vice pres-
ident, they have worked to grow their new full-service architec-
ture studio. The result is a series of home and condominium
designs to be built along the award winning golf course at
Tullymore.
Leonard Valve Company, a quality leader in the manufacture of
thermostatic water mixing valves, has updated its website
(www.leonardvalve.com) to offer a variety of interactive features
including the latest product information and a new online
resource called My Leonard Valve, designed to help engineers
specify Leonard Valve products. To view the new online resource,
visit www.leonardvalve.com and then select My Leonard Valve.
NSF International, based in Ann Arbor, recently announced
that Plum Market Corporation, Inc. has received NSF Shop
Fresh™ certification. Plum Market Corporation, specializing in
natural, organic, local, and specialty products, has exceeded
standard Food Code requirements to improve the quality of its
perishable products. Obtaining NSF Shop Fresh certification
demonstrates Plum Market’s overall dedication to food safety
and its customers.
BMW Manufacturing Co. has commissioned the Albert Kahn
Family of Companies (Kahn), a leading provider of architecture,
engineering, planning, design and management services based in
Detroit, to serve as Architect/Engineer of Record for a 426,000-
square-foot paint shop addition at its Spartanburg, SC assembly
plant. BMW’s new facility will be located adjacent to its existing
assembly plant, originally designed by Kahn in 1992.
Hobbs+Black Architects, Ann Arbor, is pleased to announce
that design and construction is complete for Oakwood Healthcare
System’s Southshore Medical Center in Trenton. The ribbon cut-
ting ceremony for the new 146,400-square-foot replacement hos-
pital took place in early summer.
WITH -ONLINE’S
NEW SOFTWARE!
CAM-ONLINE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT NEWS -
View, sort, track and print projects
instantly, for less than printed versions.
CAM-ONLINE PLANROOM -
Featuring Online Construction Project News
PLUS - Online plans, specs, addenda and
bid documents.
BIDDING
MADE
EASY!
OR
CALL THE CAM MARKETING DEPT. & SUBSCRIBE NOW!
(248) 972-1000 or (616) 771-0009
FALL 2008
SPECIAL ISSUE
November
Electrical • Ceilings
December
Demolition
Winter Construction Products
Michigan Construction Outlook 2009
C O M I N G U P
“ V O I C E O F T H E
C O N S T R U C T I O N
I N D U S T R Y ”
WE L C OME N E W ME MB E R S
60 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ACCURATE RECYCLING CO
OXFORD
ALL PURPOSE INSULATION, INC.
WARREN
AMERICAN LAWN CORPORATION
DETROIT
BARKERS LIGHTING CREATIONS
GROSSE POINTE WOODS
CAREMOR, .INC
BRIGHTON
CHOICE WINDOWS & SIDING, INC.
GARDEN CITY
CONCRETE REPAIR SPECIALIST, LLC
SHELBY TWP
CORRIGAN OIL COMPANY
BRIGHTON
DISTINCTIVE INNOVATIONS
CHESTERFIELD TWP
DYMARQ PROPERTIES, LLC, WBE
ST CLAIR SHORES
DUNN’S BUSINESS SOLUTIONS
GAYLORD
EASTERN MICHIGAN DISTRIBUTORS
DETROIT
FOX AUTOMOTIVE
ROCHESTER HILLS
NICHOLSON CONSTRUCTION, INC.,
DBA THE NICHOLSON COMPANY
CANTON
NOLAN CONSTRUCTION
WALES
OYK ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION
SOUTHFIELD
PARKWAY CONTRACT GROUP
LIVONIA
PRECISION LAWNSCAPE, LLC
SHELBY TWP
R W CONTRACTING
ORION
RAY M TOMA PC
BLOOMFIELD HILLS
T & L PAINTING SERVICES
ROSEVILLE
TIME CAPITAL, LLC
ST CLAIR SHORES
TROY CORNERS DOOR CO
OAKLAND
TYGER EXCAVATING INC
NEW HAVEN
VINYL TECH WINDOW SYSTEMS, INC.
HOLLY
V-SYSTEMS OF MICHIGAN
PITTSBURGH
WORTMAN LLC ALAN S
SOUTHFIELD
N E W M E M B E R S
&
WE L C OME N E W ME MB E R S
CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 61 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Industry Events
Oct. 13-17 – Fourth Annual Careers in
Construction Week
The National Center for Construction
Education and Research (NCCER)
announced this event, designed to increase
public awareness of the hard work and
contributions of our nation’s craft profes-
sionals.
For more information, visit
www.nccer.org or call 888-622-3720.
Oct. 15-17 – Foundation Conferences
The Deep Foundations Institute (DFI)
has announced that the 33rd Annual
Conference on Deep Foundations and the
11th International Conference on Piling &
Deep Foundations will be held at the
Hilton New York.
Call 973-423-4030 or visit www.dfi.org
for more information.
Oct. 19 – Show Us Your Style Contest
Deadline
Moen Incorporated is accepting entries
highlighting a kitchen or bath remodeling
story. The company will select finalists,
who will receive cash prizes, before
letting website visitors vote on a grand-
prize winner.
Visit www.showusyourstyle.com or call
1-800-BUY-MOEN (1-800-289-6626) for
more information.
Nov. 9-16 – Decorative Concrete Cruise
This annual seminar and networking
event will start in Long Beach, CA before
traveling to Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and
Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.
Call 916-220-6913 or visit
www.decorativeconcretecruise.com for
more information.
Training Calendar
CAMTEC, the training & education cen-
ter of the Construction Association of
Michigan, has announced its fall/winter
class schedule. For registration informa-
tion, or to obtain a catalog, call (248) 972-
1133.
Oct. 2 – Accounts Receivable -
Mgmt./Collections
Oct. 9 – AIAContracts
Oct. 22 – Scheduling and Planning
Oct. 28 – Contracts and Subcontracts
Oct. 29 – Estimating I – Basic
Nov. 4 – OSHA30 Hr.
Nov. 5 – First Aid, CPR and
AED Combined
Nov. 11 – Blueprint Reading II
Intermediate
Nov. 13 – Blueprint Reading I
Basic
Nov. 18 – Delay Claims for Subcontractors
SOURCE EDUCATIONAL CLASSES
Cooper Lighting’s SOURCE will offer
the following educational classes in 2008:
Oct. Lighting
Fundamentals/Lighting Basics
Healthcare Lighting Solutions
Workshop
Exterior Lighting Design
Solutions
Nov. Energy Solutions for
Commercial & Industrial
Lighting Design II
Fundamentals & Lighting
Basics for Distributors &
Contractors
Dec. Lighting
Fundamentals/Lighting Basics
The SOURCE is located in Peachtree
City, GA. Visit www.cooperlighting.com
or call 770-486-4680 for more information.
C O N S T R U C T I O N C A L E N D A R
Please submit all calendar items no less than six weeks prior to the event to:
Calendar Editor, CAM Magazine, P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204.
CONSTRUCTION
CALENDAR
CONSTRUCTION
CALENDAR
62 CAM MAGAZI NE OCTOBER 2008 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ASI-Modulex..................................................................BC
Acme Maintenance Service......................................29
Aluminum Supply Company -
Marshall Sales......................................................6, 61
American Fireplace & Barbeque Dist.....................21
Architectural Glazing Systems.................................42
Assemblers Inc..............................................................51
Auch Company, The ....................................................45
Bryan Equipment Sales - STIHL Dealers ...............15
CAM Administrative Services .....................................3
CAM - Affinity..............................................................IBC
CAM - ECPN...................................................................59
CAM - EXPO...................................................................39
CAM - Membership.....................................................55
C.A.S.S. .............................................................................17
Connelly Crane Rental................................................46
Creative Designs & Signs...........................................35
Danboise Mechanical .................................................61
Davis Iron Works ..........................................................24
Doeren Mayhew...........................................................38
Dul & Associates, Michael J. .....................................47
Engineered Buildings, Inc..........................................53
G2 Consulting Group..................................................49
Glass and Mirror Craft ................................................49
Great Lakes Fabricators &
Erectors Association ..............................................25
Gutherie Lumber Company......................................22
Hartland Insurance Group........................................43
Hilti Inc. ...........................................................................60
Jackson Park Agency ..................................................44
Jeffers Crane Service ..............................................8, 37
Kem-Tec ..........................................................................29
Laramie Crane ..............................................................20
Lifting Gear Hire Corporation ....................................9
MasonPro, Inc. .................................................................5
McAlpine & Associates, P.C........................................10
Metro Detroit Signs.....................................................31
Navigant Consulting...................................................62
Nicholson Construction.............................................35
North American Dismantling Group.....................23
Oakland Community College ..................................11
Oakland Companies ...................................................58
Oakland Metal Sales, Inc............................................28
Osborne Trucking & Osborne Concrete,
John D. .......................................................................52
Penhale & Yates, Inc.....................................................42
Plante & Moran, PLLC..................................................57
Professional Concepts Insurance Agency, Inc. ...46
Providence Steel & Supply Inc.................................23
Rick's Portables Sanitation, LLC...............................56
SMRCA.............................................................................54
Scaffolding Inc. .............................................................11
SignGraphix..................................................................IFC
Spalding DeDecker Associates, Inc. .......................47
State Building Products.............................................56
Sunset Excavating .......................................................53
Tech Dynamics, Inc. .....................................................18
Trend Millwork..............................................................19
Unique Metal Products, Inc. .....................................27
Universal Glass & Metals, Inc. ...................................20
Valenti Trobec Chandler, Inc. ......................................7
Visual Entities................................................................33
Wayne Bolt & Nut Co. .................................................27
Xpert Technologies .....................................................44
A D V E R T I S E R I N D E X
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offered winter, spring & fall,
taught by industry professionals.
.¹.:i.:. |.!¶¦..|
Call James M. Finn at (248) 358-4140
Full service credit union, created to
serve you with 22 Michigan locations,
visit them at www.cfcuonline.com.
Banking Made Better.
.:.:..:.:. ':¹:i
.:¹. !.:.
A CAM Membership benefit for union
contractors employing Carpenters,
Cement Masons, Laborers or
Operating Engineers in Southeast
Michigan.
Call Forrest Henry at (248) 972-1000
.!¶ .i:: !:i.:.: I:::::
Design & Construction Exposition
in Novi attracts almost 10,000 people
annually. Opportunity to showcase
construction products & services
to key markets.
.!¶ .s.::.:.
Call Ron Riegel at (248) 972-1000
Call Dee Macy at (586) 790-7810
.!¶ ":s:: .:s.:.:i.:.
Group self-funded workers’
compensation insurance program
designed for & operated by
the construction industry.
Call Rob Walters at (248) 233-2114
.!¶ ¶:s:: '.:.i.::
CAM-sponsored employee benefit
program provides local claim &
administrative services for group, life,
health, dental & long term disability,
at competitive rates.
Web design, content management
hosting, e-mail & domain setup,
marketing strategies & consulting.
Visit us at: www.eliquid.com
¹:ª::¹ '..:.:. I:..:.:
Call Steve Guadette at (800) 954-0423
!:::... ï:::
!i.i : '..:.:. I::::
Call Ron Kozak at (248) 530-2155
T-Mobile has calling plans for the
on-the-go professional... at home,
at the office, on the road.
Call Chris Bageris at (248) 722-9134
High-performance business
communications solutions: CAM
Members receive free consultation and
15% off your communications solutions.
!:::... '.:.] ¹:]is
Call Tom Farnham at (989) 615-2736
Speedway SuperAmerica SuperFleet
fueling program can save your
company 4 cents per gallon
of fuel $ 15% off at Valvoline
Instant Oil Change locations.
!:::... .i : ¦.:s
î.¡.] I::::
Call Amy Elliot at (586) 757-7100
New car & truck purchasing & lease
program helps Members get the
lowest possible price.
.!¶ î.¡:: I.¹:
More than 16,000 copies of this
comprehensive construction industry
directory are distrubuted. Marketing
opportunity through special classified
section. Offered online and in print.

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