Lesson 5-1 Example 1 Find the GCF by Listing Factors Find the GCF of 48 and 64 by making a list.

First, list the factors by pairs. Factors of 48 1, 48 2, 24 3, 16 4, 12 6, 8 Factors of 64 1, 64 2, 32 4, 16 8, 8

The common factors are 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16. The greatest common factor or GCF of 48 and 64 is 16. Use a Venn diagram to show the factors. Notice that the factors 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 are the common factors of 48 and 64, and the GCF is 16.

Example 2 Find the GCF by Using Prime Factors Find the GCF of 24 and 42 by using prime factors. Method 1 Write the prime factorization.

Method 2 Divide by prime numbers.
47 3 1221 2 2442

Divide both 24 and 42 by 2. Then divide the quotients by 3.

Using either method, the common prime factors are 2 and 3. So, the GCF of 24 and 42 is 2 × 3 or 6.

Example 3 Use the GCF to Solve a Problem MONEY Mrs. Eakin recorded the amount of money collected from her first grade class for a field trip. Each student paid the same amount. What is the most the field trip could cost per student if Mrs. Eakin collected $32 on Monday, $24 on Tuesday, and $48 on Wednesday? factors of 32: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 factors of 24: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 factors of 48: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 48 The GCF of 32, 24, and 48 is 8. So, the most the field trip could cost is $8 per student.

Example 4 Use the GCF to Solve a Problem How many students have paid to attend the field trip if the cost of a ticket was $8? There is a total of $32 + $24 + $48 or $104. So, the number of students that have paid to attend the field trip is $104  $8 or 13.

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