Michael Yoo 10/4/12 Brian Rabern The problem of evil argument is a possible suggestion on why god may not exist

. It states that if God exists, then God is known as being all powerful, all-knowing, and all-good. And if God is all powerful, then God would have the power to eliminate all evil, and if God is allknowing, then God knows when evil exists. Lastly, if God is all-good, then God will want to eliminate all evil. Evil exists in the world, and it is believed that God exists, so either God doesn’t have the power to eliminate evil or he doesn’t know or wants to eliminate all evil. Thus, God does not exist. One counter response to this argument is that evil is here to balance out the good or to make the good seem better than it actually is. If life was filled with all good, then there would be neither lessons to be learned nor no morals to be formed. For example if a student cannot help but be late to class because of a distance and time issue and eventually receives some sort of punishment for doing so, this does not do anything else but help the student learn that he needs to move quicker or find a resolution to the problem instead of letting it happen. There is still good in this situation that the teacher may still like him and that he does well in the class, but the punishment is only to state that evil is there to reinforce some efforts to resolve an issue. On another note, an argument against the previous response is that morals and lessons don’t need to be learned. If all is good in the world, then everything will be perfect and no problems will exist in the world. Shall everyone be good-hearted and meaningful towards each, there would be nothing to fix since everyone already knows how to be good. God would exist in this situation however.

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