P. 1
The Witness Within Insights on Sufism ( Essays) by E. L. Levi (Musa Muhaiyaddeen)

The Witness Within Insights on Sufism ( Essays) by E. L. Levi (Musa Muhaiyaddeen)

|Views: 37|Likes:
Published by scparco
In the name of God the most merciful and the most compassionate.

Sufism is a state of being – not a philosophy. One studies Sufism to change from insan (man) to insan kamel(perfected man). It is about leaving the illusory world and entering reality. It is about becoming peaceful, tranquil and loving. It is about understanding the qualities that are related to reality and differentiating them from the ones that bind us to the illusory world.

To become a perfected man, one must know the portions of the self that are capable of merging with reality and differentiate them from the rest. Man must learn to identify himself with that which he actually is as opposed to identification with his temporary, illusory nature.
The intent of the material on this website is to aid in the process of coming to know the true self. Each talk is a meditation on a specific aspect that assists in gaining knowledge of the true self. They are about the difference between reality and this illusory world in which we live.
The talks are not scripted. They are meant to be listened to in their entirety in one sitting which is the way they were presented. The essays are edited talks. They were spoken and then worked on by an editor to put them into appropriate form for the written page.
Each one of these talks usually covers one point of understanding, and their effect is cumulative. It takes listening to many of these talks and reading many of the essays in order to get the thrust of what is being conveyed.
The talks are downloadable, and the essays are printable. They are meant to be used in whatever format is most convenient for you.
In the name of God the most merciful and the most compassionate.

Sufism is a state of being – not a philosophy. One studies Sufism to change from insan (man) to insan kamel(perfected man). It is about leaving the illusory world and entering reality. It is about becoming peaceful, tranquil and loving. It is about understanding the qualities that are related to reality and differentiating them from the ones that bind us to the illusory world.

To become a perfected man, one must know the portions of the self that are capable of merging with reality and differentiate them from the rest. Man must learn to identify himself with that which he actually is as opposed to identification with his temporary, illusory nature.
The intent of the material on this website is to aid in the process of coming to know the true self. Each talk is a meditation on a specific aspect that assists in gaining knowledge of the true self. They are about the difference between reality and this illusory world in which we live.
The talks are not scripted. They are meant to be listened to in their entirety in one sitting which is the way they were presented. The essays are edited talks. They were spoken and then worked on by an editor to put them into appropriate form for the written page.
Each one of these talks usually covers one point of understanding, and their effect is cumulative. It takes listening to many of these talks and reading many of the essays in order to get the thrust of what is being conveyed.
The talks are downloadable, and the essays are printable. They are meant to be used in whatever format is most convenient for you.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: scparco on Mar 10, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/02/2013

pdf

text

original

Different people look at the same things but have different perceptions, colorblindness for example. Even without physical
disabilities we perceive things in different ways, we draw different conclusions from similar perceptions. Perception or the ability
to be aware of things, to see things clearly is worth examining. It should be evident that something about the perceiving
individuals makes them perceive things as they do. The colorblind example is an obvious physical problem, but our perceptions
are also related to our mental and emotional state, we perceive things, both examples suggesting we perceive things because of
the way we are. If we do not examine the way we are we will not understand why we perceive things as we do, we will not
understand our perceptions are inherently prejudiced. In other words, our motives color the way we perceive things. If I wanted

Insights on Sufism by E. L. Levi

MIA

March 10, 2013

95

the Yankees to win the World Series and they swept it in four games, it was a great World Series, but if I was rooting for the
other team which lost in four straight games, it was one of the worst in history.

Yet it is much more subtle than that, more subtle than merely understanding what colors our perceptions in every situation. As we
become clear, as we begin to let go of the motivating self and stop identifying ourself with teams, and there are many teams in
this world besides baseball teams, as we stop identifying ourself as part of a specific team, a specific club, a specific race, a
specific language, a specific culture or a specific way of being who we are, our perceptions change, suddenly they are not
clouded by our attachment to our team. We do have to be careful about forming teams, the teams we choose to be part of.

Does God have a team? Right now, each of us has in some way joined a team on God’s behalf, a choice which leads to confusion,
leads to perceptions about the nature of God’s response, His favoritism, His relation to the team we joined, the team we consider
ourself part of. It is almost as though we have no choice if we do not detach ourself from association with the team. This is
similar to tribalism, except that the tribes we are talking about now have become larger and larger—one tribe might consist of
twenty-five percent of the world, the next of another twenty-five percent. Within the larger tribes, within the larger teams, there
are subdivisions, and while these subdivisions often fight among themselves, when they face a completely different team they
come together, the similarities are more evident. We group ourselves into sets of people whom we define as we define ourself,
with whom we see certain similarities.

To understand the difference between a religion which is named with a capital letter and religion which uses the lower case is a
leap of understanding. When religion forms a team it is religion with a capital letter, when religion is the path to God it is merely
religion. Our path is certainly religious, it is thought of as religion, but it is religion based on tolerance, on the knowledge that
there is one God. If there is one God, is it possible that you and I have a different God? Is it possible that other people who
proclaim there is one God can worship a God who is different from our God? Can Christians say Allah is different from their
God, can Muslims say their God is different from the Christian God, can Jews say the Christian God and the Muslim God are
different from their God?

Do we have the understanding that God exists, do we worship? If the way we worship is more important than God, what has
happened to us, who have we become, what is the point of our worship, our understanding of God? This has to do with
attachment, it has to do with the self. As long as the self needs praise, needs the comfort that it is right and others are wrong, an
understanding which makes the self more important, more worthy, as long as we believe that, we are in trouble. Once we are free
of attachment, when we worship God as we have chosen to without being concerned about what others do, without insisting they
choose our way, then we can enter a relationship with God, enter the reality which is God.

This does not mean we should give up our governing principles, nor does it mean we should change the way we do things, but it
does mean we should be tolerant of others, it does mean we do not impose our way on others. Our way should be the way of
example, revealing the conversion to God, revealing a melting in the presence of God, we should be that example.

There is no room for anger in religion, there is no room for anger in the worship of God, no room for extremes, yet we engage in
anger, extremes and finger pointing, even though there is no place for comparisons in our worship of God. The command in
scripture is simple and right to the point, it says you go your way and I go mine, you believe what you believe and I believe what
I believe. This is not complicated, we do not need to discuss it or argue about it, we do not need to fight about it or be angry, and
we do not need to be emotionally disturbed. We need to learn how to leave each other alone. Imagine people leaving each other
alone; the world focuses on what happens when people do not leave each other alone.

Insights on Sufism by E. L. Levi

MIA

March 10, 2013

96

We need to enter that open space where our attachments do not force us to bother someone else, where we are not bothered by
someone else. Not only do unto others as you would have them do unto you, do not bother others and do not be bothered by
them. We should understand this kind of relationship on both an individual and a global basis. If this understanding were self-
evident, people would have a much easier time.

There was a step in this direction at the founding of the United States with the separation of religion and government. It was a big
step, one of the big things this country did, allowing people to form their own relationship to God, something we need to allow,
we need to encourage within ourself and others. We are here to assist, to help, but not to compel. We need to act of our own
volition whose truth lies in alignment with God’s volition. If we are aligned with attachments to the world, we act with worldly
volition, we act against our own best interests, not knowing who we are. This is something we can know only when we drop the
attachments, when we make it critical to let go of things, critical not to tie ourself to movements, religions or groups which cloud
the sense of who we are.

In the obliteration of selfhood, the relationship to the world is over, the relationship to attachment is over; it is only in this
obliteration that reality can be seen, that truth can be seen. Let us allow ourself a glimpse of this self-annihilation, allow ourself
release, take off the chains of karma and birth, of everything we were born into, everything we did with self-interest, the things
we thought would push us ahead, monetarily, romantically, wherever we wanted to move. Let us drop these things; once we drop
them clarity will emerge, the ability to see without being blinded by things other than God will emerge. Then a new life begins, a
life of freedom untethered by attachments as we stop dragging all that baggage with us everywhere we go.
May God release each of us, may we be free, may we understand the great joy of freedom, understand the nature of burdens. Too
often we think these burdens are the gifts we have been given, when the truth is they are our chains. May God release us from
false understanding, from false perceptions, may we see the truth which is His alone.

Insights on Sufism by E. L. Levi

MIA

March 10, 2013

97

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->