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A Collection of Poetry

1 2 3 4 You have completed a series of poems. Your job is to choose what you think are your five best poems. Peer assess your poems, referring to the criteria (below). Redraft the poems based on the feedback Make a PowerPoint presentation, including (in this order) a a title page, b table of contents, c page numbers, d about the author page (including biographical information and your poetic inspirations), e appropriate images, colours and fonts for each poem, f citations for the images on the final page. Publish to a PDF file, and upload to Issuu.com Upload a link to your new poetry magazine to your blog. Tag it for English. Write a brief blog post about your creative process.

5 6

Literary elements you must use in at least one poem:
Simile – comparison using like or as Personification – human characteristics to non-human things Imagery – description that helps to create a picture in your head Metaphor – a comparison between 2 things stated as if it is true.

Literary elements you should consider:
Repetition – repeated words or lines to add emphasis or effect (optional) Onomatopoeia (optional) Alliteration (Lovely Lucy Loves Lollipops) (optional)

Phase 5 criterion D: Writing
Maximum: 8 Achievement Level descriptor level The student does not reach a standard described by any 0 1–2

3–4

5–6

7–8

of the descriptors below. The student: • has difficulty writing complex texts to express ideas and opinions in social and some academic situations. Shows little depth in understanding of the topic. Ideas are irrelevant and repetitive; opinions have little or no relevant support • has difficulty organizing information and ideas into a well-structured text; uses a limited range of cohesive devices; lapses in structure interfere with the development of the text • has difficulty using vocabulary, grammatical structures and conventions; frequent errors interfere with communication • writes with little sense of register, purpose or style. The student: • writes complex texts to express some ideas and opinions in social and some academic situations. Shows some depth in understanding of the topic, though some of the message remains superficial; ideas are not always relevant and opinions are insufficiently supported • organizes some information and ideas effectively; text is structured appropriately and allows for the development of some ideas; uses a variety of cohesive devices • uses a range of vocabulary, complex grammatical structures and conventions; some errors and inappropriate word choice occasionally interfere with communication • writes with some sense of register, purpose and style. The student: • writes complex texts to express clearly a range of ideas and opinions in social and some academic situations. Shows satisfactory depth in understanding of the topic; ideas and opinions are relevant and generally supported • usually organizes information and ideas effectively into a well-structured text; makes good use of a variety of cohesive devices to develop ideas • makes good use of a range of vocabulary, complex grammatical structures and conventions; errors do not affect comprehensibility • writes effectively with a sense of register, purpose and style. The student: • writes complex texts effectively to express a wide range of ideas and opinions in social and some academic situations; shows good depth in understanding of the topic; ideas and opinions are relevant, focused and supported by examples and illustrations • organizes information and ideas into a clear and effective structure; uses a wide range of cohesive devices that enhance the development of ideas • makes excellent use of a range of vocabulary, complex grammatical structures and conventions to write effectively and accurately • writes effectively with a clear sense of register, purpose and style.

The student: - Uses a little variety of poem structures, usually using stanzas, lines and syllables - Rarely uses descriptive language and makes word choices that occasionally contribute to the intention of the poem - Grammar and syntax errors often interfere with understanding the poem - Poems have little purpose

The student: - Uses a variety of poem structures, usually using stanzas, lines and syllables - Uses occasional descriptive language and makes word choices that sometimes contribute to the intention of the poem - Grammar and syntax errors interfere with understanding the poem - Poems have some purpose

The student: - Uses a variety of poem structures, using stanzas, lines and syllables clearly - Uses some descriptive language and makes word choices that contribute to the intention of the poem - Occasional grammar errors, the poems make sense - Poems are clearly written and have purpose The student: - Uses a variety of poem structures well, using stanzas, lines and syllables effectively - Uses descriptive language and makes word choices that contribute well to the intention of the poem - Very few grammar errors, the poems make sense - Poems are well written and have a clear purpose