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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 178
FAR FROM SIMPLE
NATION PAGE 6
CREATIVE TAKES
ON SODA BREAD
FOOD PAGE 19
APPLYING FOR BENEFITS UNDER OBAMA’S PLAN COULD BE
AS DAUNTING AS DOING YOUR TAXES
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
NOW OPEN!
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A grand opening celebration for
the Tom Lantos Tunnels at Devil’s
Slide is scheduled for Monday
morning, March 25, according to
Caltrans.
The first major tunnels built by
the California Department of
Transportation in 50 years, the proj-
ect will bypass the winding road
that stretches along the coast south
of Pacifica with twin 4,200-foot-
long tunnels.
The $439 million project is well
behind schedule and over budget but
coastsiders are looking forward to it
finally opening.
Half Moon Bay officials hope
tourists will find their way to the
coast with the project’s completion.
“This is a monumental opportuni-
ty to bring our friends to the coast-
side in a safe manner,” Half Moon
Bay Vice Mayor John Muller told
the Daily Journal yesterday.
Muller heard March 25 was set
for the grand opening yesterday.
Over the years, when Devil’s
Slide would close for emergency
repairs, Half Moon Bay’s economy
would suffer, he said.
“It’s taken a lot of years and lots
of dedication to get to this point.
They’ve done one beautiful job,”
Muller said about Caltrans.
Each of the two tunnels is about
45 feet tall and just under 30 feet
wide. The debris from the tunnels
filled a disposal site equivalent the
size of a football field, 150 feet deep
and Caltrans essentially constructed
a new mountain on the south side of
the tunnels with all the debris where
a maintenance center will be hidden
away from view.
When opened, the project will
officially be called the Tom Lantos
Tunnels at Devil’s Slide. Lantos, the
late congressman, secured about
$150 million in federal funding to
get the project off the ground.
Lantos had worked for three
decades to bring the project to light
Devil’s Slide tunnels to open
$439M project to connect San Mateo County coast to the north
PHOTO COURTESY OF CALTRANS
Workers pour the final paving layer for the Tom Lantos Tunnels at Devil’s
Slide project in September 2012. After years of construction, a grand
opening celebration will be held March 25.
See TUNNELS, Page 18
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sam’s Italian Sandwich Company
celebrated 41 years as a Burlingame
institution on Monday but the small
shop is struggling to keep up with
the costs of business.
Costs for improving the site it’s
called home since 2005 coupled
with chain stores moving to the area
have created a challenging environ-
ment for the locally-owned shop. An
effort to help has sprung up online.
The goal is simple: Raise $10,000 to
cover about five months rent, said
Councilwoman Cathy Baylock. This
week, former councilman Russ
Cohen set up a website to solicit
donations and also gather stories
about people who previously
worked at the hometown sandwich
shop.
The money would help get own-
ers Rino Betti and June Williams
ahead of the curve, said Cohen.
“Rino and June are the real sand-
wich artists, making them from
Effort launched to save Sam’s
Longtime Burlingame lunch spot faces financial challenge
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The county needs to significantly
restructure how it hires and retains
employees, according to County
Manager John Maltbie, who yester-
day recommended relying more on
contractors, volunteers and other
workers who don’t fall into the tra-
ditional workforce parameters.
Maltbie suggested the sweeping
overhaul of the county structure as a
way for San Mateo County to create
an “agile” organization more capa-
ble of responding to ever changing
and unpredictable economic condi-
tions like the
L e h m a n
Brothers bank-
ruptcy that
leeched $150
million from the
investment pool.
He also pointed
to a shifting of
responsibilities
to the local level
as with public safety realignment
and the Affordable Care Act.
“We can’t rely on Sacramento or
Washington, D.C., in the future to
assist us,” Maltbie told the Board of
County proposing a
workforce overhaul
Restructuring could mean new
and flexible worker categories
John Maltbie
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hillsborough is planning a third
town meeting in April to discuss
wireless communications facilities
and the town’s aesthetic character
before bringing a proposed ordi-
nance before the City Council.
In 2006, Hillsborough first adopt-
ed a wireless communications ordi-
nance to regulate the location of
wireless communications facilities
Hillsborough weighing
wireless facilities plan
Town seeking regulations that reflect its
aesthetics while complying with the law
See WIRELESS, Page 20
See OVERHAUL, Page 20
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Rino Betti looks on as June Williams makes a Sam’s Special at Sam’s Italian Sandwich Company in Burlingame
Tuesday afternoon.
See SAM’S, Page 18
SMITH TRADE
NOW OFFICIAL
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
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more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Rapper-actor
Common is 41.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1933
Banks in the U.S. began to reopen after
a “holiday” declared by President
Franklin D. Roosevelt.
“Work is something you can count on,a
trusted,lifelong friend who never deserts you.”
— Margaret Bourke-White, photojournalist (1904-1971)
Actor William H.
Macy is 63.
Actor Emile Hirsch
is 28.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Snorkelers swim next to a whale shark as it approaches a feeder boat off the beach of Tan-awan, Oslob, in the southern
Philippines island of Cebu.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Northeast winds around 5 mph...Becoming
northwest in the afternoon.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the mid 40s. Northwest winds around 5
mph...Becoming northeast after midnight.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid
60s. Light winds... Becoming west around 5
mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the mid 40s.
Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s.
Friday night through Monday: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
mid 40s. Highs in the lower 60s.
Monday night and Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 40s. Highs in the lower 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 02 Lucky
Star in first place; No. 01 Gold Rush in second
place; and No. 12 Lucky Charms in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:49.14.
(Answers tomorrow)
ABIDE TARDY PROFIT DEFECT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When he didn’t have enough money to pay
the taxi driver, he offered a — “FARE” TRADE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LAVEV
CONHA
SINTIS
CITDUN
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
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e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
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w
.
f
a
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b
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k
.
c
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/
ju
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Print answer here:
1 9 4
9 12 19 20 30 39
Mega number
March 12 Mega Millions
3 5 26 33 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 0 8 9
Daily Four
7 4 6
Daily three evening
In 1639, New College was renamed Harvard College for cler-
gyman John Harvard.
In 1781, the seventh planet of the solar system, Uranus, was
discovered by Sir William Herschel.
In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed a measure pro-
hibiting Union military officers from returning fugitive slaves
to their owners.
In 1901, the 23rd President of the United States, Benjamin
Harrison, died in Indianapolis at age 67.
In 1925, the Tennessee General Assembly approved a bill pro-
hibiting the teaching of the theory of evolution. (Gov. Austin
Peay signed the measure on March 21.)
In 1938, famed attorney Clarence S. Darrow died in Chicago.
In 1943, author-poet Stephen Vincent Benet, 44, died in New
York. Financier and philanthropist J.P. Morgan Jr., 75, died in
Boca Grande, Fla.
In 1964, bar manager Catherine “Kitty” Genovese, 28, was
stabbed to death near her Queens, N.Y. home; the case gener-
ated controversy over the supposed failure of Genovese’s
neighbors to respond to her cries for help.
In 1969, the Apollo 9 astronauts splashed down, ending a mis-
sion that included the successful testing of the Lunar Module.
In 1980, Ford Motor Chairman Henry Ford II announced he
was stepping down, the same day a jury in Winamac, Ind.,
found the company not guilty of reckless homicide in the fiery
deaths of three young women in a Ford Pinto.
In 1988, yielding to student protests, the board of trustees of
Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., a liberal arts college
for the hearing-impaired, chose I. King Jordan to become the
school’s first deaf president.
In 1996, a gunman burst into an elementary school in
Dunblane, Scotland, and opened fire, killing 16 children and
one teacher before killing himself.
Jazz musician Roy Haynes is 88. Country singer Jan Howard
is 83. Songwriter Mike Stoller is 80. Singer-songwriter Neil
Sedaka is 74. Opera singer Julia Migenes is 64. Comedian Robin
Duke is 59. Actress Glenne Headly is 58. Actress Dana Delany is
57. Rock musician Adam Clayton (U2) is 53. Jazz musician
Terence Blanchard is 51. Actor Christopher Collet is 45. Rock
musician Matt McDonough (Mudvayne) is 44. Actress Annabeth
Gish is 42. Actress Tracy Wells is 42. Rapper Khujo (Goodie
Mob, The Lumberjacks) is 41. Singer Glenn Lewis is 38. Actor
Danny Masterson is 37. Actor Noel Fisher is 29. Singers Natalie
and Nicole Albino (Nina Sky) are 27.
Middle English was spoken in England
in the late Middle Ages, from 1100 to
1500.
***
The word kilt comes from Middle
English. It means pleat.
***
Traditional kilts do not have pockets. A
purse, called a sporran, usually made
of leather or fur, hangs in front of the
kilt.
***
King James III (1451-1488), of
Scotland, was the first person to wear a
kilt. James was crowned at the age of
9, after his father was killed by a can-
non that exploded during inspection.
***
The last Scottish king to speak Gaelic
was King James IV (1473-1513).
***
The capital of Scotland is Edinburgh.
Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland.
***
The original phone number for
Scotland Yard was Whitehall 1212.
Today, most police stations in the
London area, including Scotland Yard,
have 1212 as the last four digits in their
phone number.
***
Scotland Yard often relied on detective
Sherlock Holmes to solve mysteries.
Do you know who wrote the Sherlock
Holmes novels? Do you know the title
of the first Sherlock Holmes novel?
The year? See answer at end.
***
Sherlock Holmes lived at 221B, Baker
St., London. The house at that address
was built in 1815. It is a Sherlock
Holmes museum, open year-round.
The house is kept exactly as it is
described in the stories.
***
In the nursery rhyme “Rub-a-Dub
Dub,” the three men in the tub were a
butcher, a baker and a candlestick
maker.
***
Alice’s boyfriend on “The Brady
Bunch” (1969-1974) was Sam the
butcher.
***
Actor Gene Hackman (born 1930) was
originally considered to play Mike
Brady, the father on the Brady Bunch.
Robert Reed (1932-1992) got the role.
***
Two of the most memorable television
shows created by producer and writer
Sherwood Schwartz (born 1916) are
“The Brady Bunch” (1969-1974) and
“Gilligan’s Island” (1964-1967).
***
In the first season of “Gilligan’s
Island,” the theme song named all of
the castaways except for the Professor
and Mary Ann. In the second season,
the characters were added into the song
because of their increased popularity.
***
Cast members from “Gilligan’s Island”
received a “pop culture” award at the
TV Land Awards in 2004. TV Land,
created in 1996, is a cable station that
airs classic television shows.
***
Don Cornelius (born 1936), the origi-
nal host of “Soul Train,” received TV
Land’s “Pop Culture” award in 2005.
***
Answer: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
(1859-1930) created Sherlock Holmes
and his assistant Dr. Watson. The first
Sherlock Holmes novel was “A Study
in Scarlet” published in 1887.
Originally the main characters were
going to be named Sheridan Hope and
Ormond Sacker, and the first novel was
going to be titled “A Tangled Skein.”
Doyle was knighted in 1902 for his
non-fiction writings about the war.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
3 11 21 36 47 7
Mega number
March 9 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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595 Industrial Road, San Carlos 94070
(Mid-Peninsula at Hwy 101 & Holly Street)
BELMONT
Burglary. A home was broken into through a
garage door on Paloma Avenue before 4:04
p.m. on Sunday, March 10.
Burglary. A work van was broken into on
Arbor Avenue before 9:57 a.m. on Sunday,
March 10.
Threats. A person was threatened by their
neighbor on Old County Road before 10:38
a.m. on Saturday, March 9.
Burglary. A storage unit was broken into on
Dairy Lane before 9:51 a.m. on Saturday,
March 9.
Arrest. A man was arrested for drugs on Old
County Road before 6:04 a.m. on Saturday,
March 9.
Arrest. A man was arrested for being drunk in
public on Shoreway Road before 9:44 p.m. on
Friday, March 8.
Fraud. Unauthorized charges were made on a
credit card on Ridgewood Court before 3:02
p.m. on Friday, March 8.
Recovered property. A stolen vehicle was
recovered on O’Neill Avenue and Judson
Street before 4:29 a.m. on Friday, March 8.
FOSTER CITY
Grand theft. A man left his apartment door
open and a family member told him his 60-
inch flatscreen television was stolen on
Catamaran Street before 12:14 p.m. Monday,
March 11.
Disturbance. A man yelled at people inside a
store on East Hillsdale Boulevard before 12:29
p.m. on Sunday, March 10.
Arrest. A man was arrested for driving under
the influence on Triton Drive before 1:45 p.m.
on Saturday, March 9.
Arrest. A man was arrested for public intoxi-
cation on East Hillsdale Boulevard before 9:15
p.m. on Friday, March 8.
SAN CARLOS
Vandalism. A report was taken for vandalism
on the 100 block of Fairmont Avenue before
5:50 p.m. Monday, March 11.
Arrest. A man was arrested for being in pos-
session of a controlled substance on Old
County Road and Northwood Drive before
7:57 a.m. on Sunday, March 10.
Burglary. A vehicle was burglarized on the
1600 block of Industrial Road before 1:20
p.m. on Saturday, March 9.
Burglary. A burglary occurred on the 200
block of Edgehill Drive before 3:37 p.m. on
Friday, March 8.
Police reports
No one wants a water bed
A person threw a mattress into the lagoon
on Bowfin Street in Foster City before
10:44 a.m. on Friday, March 8.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
By a narrow margin, the Redwood City
Council overruled an earlier approval of 16
gas pumps at the Costco on Middlefield
Road, instead siding with the business in
pushing the expansion to 20 fueling stations.
The council voted 4-3, with councilmem-
bers Ian Bain, Rosanne Foust and Barbara
Pierce preferring instead to keep the plan at
16 pumps in large part over traffic concerns.
The decision Monday night was the result
of dual appeals, one by Costco for more
pumps and another by a nearby business
owner for less. In the end, after hearing from
Costco representatives who said the increase
would improve the customer experience and
residents who worried about greater traffic
jams, the City Council favored the request by
the warehouse store rather than keeping it at
the current 12 pumps as asked by the Saberi
family, who owns the Gas & Shop on
Woodside Road, in its appeal.
Foust, in particular, told Costco Wholesale
representative David Rogers she was con-
fused how the company is aware of existing
traffic problems but only suggests fixes when
asking the city for something.
“You want your 20 pumps yet there are
issues in the neighborhood that have been
ongoing since the warehouse was there
before,” Foust said. “My thought to you was
however this vote goes tonight I’m going to
really encourage you ... to work with the
neighborhood.”
The decision follows the staff recommen-
dation which was based on the conclusion
that the 20-pump project would not magnify
the existing issues and that the Planning
Commission’s discussion of them, particular-
ly the traffic concerns, was based on anec-
dotes rather than substantial evidence. The
Planning Commission voted 6-1 in favor of
the 16-pump amendment with Commissioner
Randy Tabing dissenting.
The council decision also came after
Costco amended its original proposal based
on feedback from the Planning Commission
hearing. The approved plan reconfigures the
main driveway for a stop sign at the exit and
reduces the number of parking spaces.
Prior to the vote, Tom Saberi of Gas &
Shop asked the council to help small busi-
nesses compete on a level playing field and
hoped it would be as generous with his future
expansion application which he said was
forthcoming. Saberi’s appeal also cited air
quality and traffic problems as reason to
approve that request while denying Costco.
Rogers and an attorney for Costco said the
expansion would only cut idling times and
queuing lines of customers. The three dis-
senting councilmembers were not so sure and
called the Planning Commission’s decision
an acceptable compromise.
The adopted compromise size is what the
company suggested in spring 2005 when it
proposed a plan to demolish the existing
warehouse to build a larger store, tire
sales/installation center and parking lot. In
June 2007, after environmental impact
reports on two possibilities identified signifi-
cant although mitigated impacts, the Planning
Commission certified the 16-pump option.
However, the city’s zoning administrator
approved the second smaller option with 12
pumps.
The Redwood Village Neighborhood
Association, which also appealed the deci-
sion, questioned the city’s review process, the
environmental process and the city’s sense of
social justice. The group claimed the environ-
mental impact report underestimated the
number of trips the store would generate,
bringing with it pollution, noise and an
increase of cars cutting through their residen-
tial community.
However, that August, the City Council
upheld the plan and the 160,000-square-foot
store and 12-pump station opened in 2009. A
court also favored the city when the oppo-
nents challenged the adequacy of the EIR in
court.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Costco allowed to expand its gas pumps
Redwood City Council votes to allow 20 pumps at warehouse store
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In an effort to re-open Martin’s Beach, a
lawsuit was filed Tuesday asserting that gates
restricting access to coastal property in Half
Moon Bay violate the California Coastal Act.
Martin’s Beach is a crescent-shaped stretch
of sandy beach surrounded by high cliffs.
Several years ago, a limited liability corpora-
tion purchased the property and closed the
road. On Tuesday, former congressman Pete
McCloskey, Eric Buescher of Cotchett, Pitre
& McCarthy and surfing attorney Mark
Massara of the Surfrider Foundation, filed a
lawsuit against Martin’s Beach 1 and 2 LLC,
the owners of Martin’s Beach Road, for vio-
lation of the Coastal Act. The lawsuit claims
the owners failed to obtain a coastal develop-
ment permit for the new gates and restrictive
signs imposed over the access road to
Martin’s Beach.
“This lawsuit represents an opportunity to
give back to the San Mateo community and
to ensure that everybody, no matter how
wealthy or well connected, follows the laws
in California which protect the coast and
ensure access to California’s beaches,” said
Buescher.
The petitioners claim the situation is sim-
ple: Legal permits were not obtained to close
off public access open for nearly 100 years,
according to a press release.
“Given a century of access by families,
fishermen and surfers to this unique sandy
jewel on the San Mateo Coast, we believe the
closure of Martin’s Beach is not only disre-
spectful but illegal,” Michael Wallace,
Surfrider Foundation San Mateo Chapter
representative, wrote in a prepared statement.
“The access road is the only way in and out,
the new owner’s defiance not only blocks off
the beach to the public, but deprives visitors,
former cabin owners and families of access
to fond memories of idyllic life there, and the
joy of sharing that with the next generation.”
Calls for comment to Martin’s Beach LLC
and its attorney were not immediately
returned. Joan Gallo, an attorney for the
landowner, told the Associated Press her
client hopes the courts will help decide what
the financial and other obligations associated
with restoring public access are.
In February, the San Mateo County District
Attorney’s Office dropped trespassing
charges against five surfers who had crossed
the locked gate onto Martin’s Beach.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Lawsuit filed to re-open Martin’s Beach
4
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Gas in San Mateo
up 17 cents a gallon
The average price of a gallon of
gas in San Mateo is $4.20, up 17
cents from the last month and just
three cents higher than the average
price in the state, according to AAA
Northern California, which tracks
fuel prices as a community service.
Northern California gas prices are
now averaging $4.11, a change of
16 cents in price from last month’s
report. In the San Francisco Bay
Area, motorists can expect to pay an
average price of $4.23, which is up
20 cents from last month, according
to AAA.
Gas prices today are 19 cents
more expensive than California’s
average price on this date last year.
Among all 50 states, California has
the second highest state average
price for regular, unleaded gasoline.
Hawaii is the highest at $4.40,
according to AAA.
Today’s national average price for
a gallon of regular unleaded gaso-
line is $3.70. This price is four cents
more expensive than one week ago,
12 cents more than one month ago
and 10 cents more than the average
price one year ago, according to
AAA.
The recent spike in pump prices
was a product of refinery mainte-
nance and concerns, rather than
more expensive crude oil. These
refinery issues pressured both
wholesale and futures prices higher
for gasoline, while crude oil prices
only increased slightly during the
same period. The least expensive
average price in Northern California
can be found in Modesto,
Marysville and Tracy where regular
unleaded gasoline is $3.98 per gal-
lon, according to AAA.
Menlo Park police increase
patrols around schools
Menlo Park police are searching
for a man related to an indecent
exposure incident last month who
may have approached three girls
Monday morning near Belle Haven
Elementary School, according to
police.
A man driving a white work van
approached the juvenile females at
about 8 a.m. Monday on the 1200
block of Almanor Avenue, accord-
ing to police.
The suspect asked the girls in
Spanish whether they knew the jan-
itor at the
school. The girls
did not respond,
however, and
continued walk-
ing to school
where they
reported the
incident to
school officials.
The suspect is described as
Hispanic, between 30 and 40 years
old, wearing a green and yellow
Oakland A’s baseball cap, green
jacket and blue jeans. The suspect
matches the description of a male
from an indecent exposure case in
the same area Feb. 1, according to
police.
Police have increased patrols
around neighborhood schools fol-
lowing the incidents.
Anyone with information on the
case should call police at (650) 330-
6300.
Belmont police to hold
sober graduation event
The Belmont Police Department,
in cooperation with the Belmont
Fire Department, American Medical
Response and the San Mateo
County Coroner’s Office, will be
conducting a two-day “sober gradu-
ation” event this week at Notre
Dame High School in Belmont. The
program is designed to raise the
awareness of teens to the dangers of
driving under the influence of alco-
hol and/or other controlled sub-
stances. A major part of the program
is a simulation of an alcohol-related
accident scene, which will occur in
the front parking lot of Notre Dame
High School at approximately 1:45
p.m., Thursday. The program will
continue Friday with a special
assembly presentation on the devas-
tating effects of losing a loved one
due to a dangerous decision.
String of break-ins
reported at Foster
City apartment complex
Police in Foster City are asking
residents to remove all valuables
from their cars after six vehicles
parked at an apartment complex had
their windows smashed last week.
The string of break-ins occurred
in the parking lot of a complex on
Meridian Bay Lane sometime
between Thursday evening and
Friday morning, Foster City police
Capt. Joe Pierucci said.
In each case, windows were bro-
ken to gain entry to the vehicles, he
said.
The items that were stolen includ-
ed GPS units, prescription glasses,
an iPhone charger and Prada sun-
glasses, according to police.
“It’s best if folks store those
things out of sight, or better yet,
remove them from their vehicles
altogether,” Pierucci said.
Pierucci advised residents to
always lock their cars, whether they
are parked in public lots, driveways,
carports or secured parking areas.
Police also advised residents to be
on the lookout for suspicious activi-
ty in shared parking lots at apart-
ment buildings.
“We know these suspects are near
walking areas where there are high
concentrations of vehicles,” Pierucci
said.
Anyone who witnesses suspicious
activity is asked to get a description
of any suspects or associated vehi-
cles, including a license place num-
ber.
Two Half Moon Bay
businesses burglarized
Two businesses in Half Moon Bay
were broken into over the weekend,
according to the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office.
On Saturday morning, deputies
responded to the Strawflower
Shopping Center on Highway 1,
where a merchant said his business
had been burglarized overnight and
a cash register had been stolen.
The register did not have any
money in it, sheriff’s officials said.
At about 9:20 p.m. Saturday, a
second commercial burglary was
reported at a business in the 300
block of Main Street.
Sometime that evening, a burglar
had broken in and forced open a
cash register, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
The register was empty, but some
keys were stolen.
The Sheriff’s Office reminded
business owners to secure all doors
and windows overnight, and to
empty cash registers to minimize
potential losses.
Anyone with information about
the break-ins is asked to contact the
San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office
at (650) 363-4911.
Local briefs
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Prosecutors charged an intoxicat-
ed driver who caused a triple fatal
crash in Daly City over the weekend
and left another woman hospitalized
with gross vehicular manslaughter
although he was originally arrested
on multiple counts of murder.
Denis Pereirade-Macedo, 28, of
Sunnyvale, was charged with three
counts of vehicular homicide plus
felony driving while intoxicated in
the death of a mother and two sons
and the injuring of one son’s girl-
friend.
“To make it murder, there has to
have some sort of malice, either
expressed or implied, to take it up to
that next step. There has to be a con-
scious disregard for human life,”
said Assistant District Attorney Al
Serrato.
Pereirade-Macedo’s blood alco-
hol level was .15 several hours after
the March 2 crash and was ulti-
mately pinpointed at .18 so extra
allegations based on the level of
impairment were also lodged,
Serrato said.
Pereirade-Macedo asked for a
court-appointed attorney yesterday
but delayed a plea until March 14
because he
requires a
Portuguese inter-
preter.
P e r e i r a d e -
Macedo was
leaving the scene
of a hit-and-run
a block away
when he pulled
his BMW into
oncoming traffic
to maneuver
around the driver he had rear-ended,
accelerated and collided with a red
Toyota Tercel pulling away from the
curb to make a U-turn on the 100
block of Eastmoor, Serrato said.
Three people inside the car died
— Josefa Osorio Acevedo, 50, and
her sons Amado Osorio Acevedo,
23, and Josue Osorio, 14, all of Daly
City. Amado Acevedo’s girlfriend
was critically hurt and was sched-
uled for surgery all day Tuesday.
Pereirade-Macedo was not injured
and remained at the scene where he
was arrested.
Pereirade-Macedo remains in cus-
tody without bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Driver pleads not guilty to
triple fatal crash in Daly City
DA charges vehicular manslaughter, not murder
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Carlos City Council voted 4-1 in
favor of banning single-use bags. At its second
reading of the ordinance Monday night, some ques-
tions were raised about the town of Woodside’s dis-
cussion over not requiring retailers to charge 10
cents per bag. Councilwoman Karen Clapper
suggested looking at the fee and the record keeping
requirements for retailers after the ordinance has been in effect a year or
two.
• The Redwood City Council had its first reading of a single-use bag
ban based on the county’s template. The city estimates the ordinance will
potentially reduce its annual use of plastic bags by 95 percent to about 2
million annually. If approved at the March 25 second reading, the ban
would begin Oct. 1.
• The city of Half Moon Bay is hosting a public meeting tonight to
review the various options to pay down the city’s bond debts. The purpose
of the special meeting is to determine the most effective use of the $13.15
million in insurance proceeds awarded to the city. The meeting is 6 p.m.,
tonight, 537 Kelly Ave., Half Moon Bay.
Denis
Pereirade-
Macedo
5
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Plans for a temporary fire station in
Burlingame will return to the Planning
Commission Monday, March 25 for approval
— a step toward testing shared fire services
among four cities.
San Bruno, Millbrae, Burlingame and
Hillsborough gave the go-ahead to continue
exploring shared administrative services in
2011. One of the first steps was creating a
temporary station, which is expected to open
this summer. Under the proposal, stations on
Hillside Drive in Burlingame and Crestview
Drive in Millbrae would be closed. A new sta-
tion would then be placed somewhere within
the three-mile distance between the two sta-
tions. Plans to build such a station at 1675
Skyline Blvd. in Burlingame were reviewed
by the Planning Commission Monday and will
return for approval March 25.
Since the 2011 go-ahead, the plan has been
to run the temporary station for about a year to
collect data that would be shared with city
councils, at which point further consolidation
could be considered.
The project, which will be built on
Burlingame-owned land located within the
county jurisdiction, includes a 1,440-square-
foot fire house building, 576 square feet of
office space and a 2,730-square-foot apparatus
building to house two full-size fire trucks with
drive-through capacities, according to a staff
report. A special permit will be required for
the apparatus building which will be 32 feet
tall, two feet higher than the 30 foot height
limit in the area. The structure would be there
for no more than seven years. It would have to
come back for approval to become permanent,
according to the staff report.
The land is currently undeveloped with 107
trees. Building the temporary fire station will
call for the removal of 28 trees, including 16
that are of a protected size that will need to be
replaced with 24 inch box size plants.
Fire station advances for approval
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A would-be rapper who shot a YouTube
music video dancing atop a Daly City police
cruiser pleaded no contest to misdemeanor
vandalism for causing $3,000 worth of dam-
age to the car with his moves.
Marvin Carter, 18, of San Francisco,
changed his plea in return for prosecutors
dropping another count of trespassing. He
received two days jail followed by a year of
probation. He must also repay the Daly City
Police Department for the damage by June 21.
Meanwhile, the 16-year-old boy who shot
the footage is making his way separately
through juvenile court on similar charges.
Carter is scheduled for trial April 2.
Carter and the boy were
arrested on New Year’s
Day after they were found
filming the rap routine
inside the fenced lot of the
Daly City Police
Department on 90th Street.
The pair apparently
climbed over the fence and
picked out a car to act as a
stage. They were mid-rou-
tine when caught just after 6 p.m. Jan. 1, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
The car’s roof and hood was damaged from
Carter’s dancing and jumping up and down,
according to the prosecution. Carter was free
from custody on his own recognizance.
Rapper hopeful facing music
for vandalism of police car
Marvin Carter
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Applying for benefits
under President Barack Obama’s health care
overhaul could be as daunting as doing your
taxes.
The government’s draft application runs 15
pages for a three-person family. An outline of
the online version has 21 steps, some with
additional questions.
Seven months before the Oct. 1 start of
enrollment season for millions of uninsured
Americans, the idea that getting health insur-
ance could be as easy as shopping online at
Amazon or Travelocity is starting to look like
wishful thinking.
At least three major federal agencies,
including the IRS, will scrutinize your appli-
cation. Checking your
identity, income and citi-
zenship is supposed to
happen in real time, if you
apply online.
That’s just the first part
of the process, which lets
you know if you qualify
for financial help. The
government asks to see
what you’re making
because Obama’s Affordable Care Act is
means-tested, with lower-income people get-
ting the most generous help to pay premiums.
Once you’re finished with the money part,
actually picking a health plan will require
additional steps, plus a basic understanding of
insurance jargon.
And it’s a mandate, not a suggestion. The
law says virtually all Americans must carry
health insurance starting next year, although
most will just keep the coverage they now
have through their jobs, Medicare or
Medicaid.
Some are concerned that a lot of uninsured
people will be overwhelmed and simply give
up.
“This lengthy draft application will take a
considerable amount of time to fill out and
will be difficult for many people to be able to
complete,” said Ron Pollack, executive direc-
tor of Families USA, an advocacy group sup-
porting the health care law. “It does not get
you to the selection of a plan.”
“When you combine those two processes, it
is enormously time consuming and complex,”
added Pollack. He’s calling for the govern-
ment to simplify the form and, more impor-
tant, for an army of counselors to help unin-
sured people navigate the new system. It’s
unclear who would pay for these navigators.
Drafts of the paper application and a 60-
page description of the online version were
quietly posted online by the Health and
Human Services Department, seeking feed-
back from industry and consumer groups.
Those materials, along with a recent HHS
presentation to insurers, run counter to the
vision of simplicity promoted by administra-
tion officials.
“We are not just signing up for a dating
service here,” said Sam Karp, a vice president
of the California HealthCare Foundation, who
nonetheless gives the administration high
marks for distilling it all into a workable form.
Karp was part of an independent group that
separately designed a model application.
Applying for Obama plan not easy
Barack Obama
STATE/NATION 7
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — House
Republicans redoubled their efforts
to roll back signature accomplish-
ments of President Barack Obama
on Tuesday, offering a slashing
budget plan that would repeal new
health care subsidies and cut spend-
ing across a wide swath of programs
dear to Obama and his Democratic
allies.
The GOP plan was immediately
rejected by the White House as an
approach that “just doesn’t add up”
and would harm America’s middle
class. Obama said the plan would
“slash deeply” into programs such
as Medicaid.
Obama has rebuffed similar GOP
plans two years in a row and ran
strongly against the ideas when win-
ning re-election last year — when
its chief author, Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., was
on the Republican ticket.
Ryan’s budget illustrates the stark
differences in the visions of Tea
Party-backed Republicans and
Obama and his Democratic allies
about the size and role of govern-
ment — with no obvious avenues
for compromise.
Obama, in an ABC-TV interview
Tuesday, said he would not seek to
balance the federal budget in 10
years, as Ryan’s plan attempts to do,
when he submits his fiscal blueprint
to Congress next month.
“My goal is not to chase a bal-
anced budget just for the sake of
balance,” he said. “My goal is how
do we grow the economy, put people
back to work, and if we do that we
are going to be bringing in more
revenue.”
Senate Democrats are responding
with a plan that would repeal auto-
matic spending cuts that began to
take effect earlier this month while
offering $100 billion in new spend-
ing for infrastructure and job train-
ing. The Democratic counter won’t
be officially unveiled until
Wednesday, but its rough outlines
were described by aides. They spoke
only on condition of anonymity
because they weren’t authorized to
describe it publicly.
That plan by Senate Budget
Committee Chairwoman Patty
Murray, D-Wash., would raise taxes
by almost $1 trillion over a decade
and cut spending by almost $1 tril-
lion over the same period. But more
than half of the combined deficit
savings would be used to repeal the
automatic, across-the-board spend-
ing cuts that began to hit the econo-
my earlier this month and are slated
to continue through the decade.
Ryan’s budget: GOP takes
aim at Dem spending plans
REUTERS
House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, right, holds a news
conference to unveil the House Republicans’ FY2014 budget resolution.
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A divided
Senate Judiciary Committee
approved a Democratic bill Tuesday
expanding required federal back-
ground checks to nearly all gun pur-
chases, giving President Barack
Obama an early victory on curbing
gun violence in a fight that still
faces difficult odds.
The vote was 10-8, with all
Democrats supporting the measure
and every Republican opposing it.
As expected, the panel delayed
voting on a plan by Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, D-Calif., to ban assault
weapons and high capacity ammu-
nition magazines. The committee
was expected to approve that meas-
ure Thursday. Feinstein was chair-
ing a separate intelligence hearing.
The background check measure
would expand the requirement to
firearms sales between private indi-
viduals, such as those that occur at
gun shows. Currently, the checks are
required only for sales by federally
licensed firearms dealers.
“This isn’t going to be a perfect
bill. But it will sure reduce crimes,”
said Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.,
the bill’s sponsor.
Schumer said he hopes he can
strike a compromise on the measure
with Republicans, which would
enhance its chances of passing in
the full Senate. The chamber is
expected to consider gun legislation
next month, and GOP lawmakers
have shown little enthusiasm for
expanding the requirement to pri-
vate firearms transactions.
Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa,
top Republican on the Judiciary
panel, said he believes the measure
will ultimately lead to a federal reg-
istry of gun owners — which is ille-
gal. He also said that requiring addi-
tional law-abiding citizens to face
background checks would have lim-
ited impact on public safety.
“Mass shootings would continue
to occur despite universal back-
ground checks,” Grassley said.
“Criminals will continue to steal
guns.”
The committee also approved a
measure by Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-
Calif., providing $40 million a year
for school safety programs. The
vote was 14-4, with four
Republicans joining Democrats in
supporting the bill
Senate panel OKs Dems
gun background check bill
“This isn’t going
to be a perfect bill. But
it will sure reduce crimes.”
— Sen. Charles Schumer
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Labor and
environmental groups on Tuesday
joined some of the more liberal
Democrats in the state Legislature
in announcing a coalition to oppose
reforms sought by Gov. Jerry Brown
to the California Environmental
Quality Act.
Overhauling the law to prevent
abuse is one of the governor’s top
priorities this year, but opponents
say the act has served a vital role in
protecting the state’s air and water
over its four-decade history.
Signed into law by then-Gov.
Ronald Reagan in 1970, the law
requires public agencies to weigh
the potential environmental effects
of proposed development.
Critics say it has drifted from that
purpose, instead being used to delay
projects, seek labor concessions and
undermine competing developers.
Common Ground, the new coalition
group opposing reforms, commis-
sioned a report as part of its effort to
emphasize the importance of the law.
The study by Peter Philips, a
University of Utah economics pro-
fessor, points to the state’s record in
building alternative-energy projects
and maintaining construction jobs
as evidence that the law is working.
“Has CEQA actually hindered
construction? Far from it,” said Bob
Balgenorth, chairman of the
California Construction Industry
Labor Management Cooperation
Trust. “If anything, it’s facilitated
greater construction, a cleaner envi-
ronment and a better quality of life
for Californians.”
Coalition forms to defend state environmental law
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Primaries for
two open state Senate seats carry con-
sequences that could be more signifi-
cant than in a typical legislative race.
Democrats won two-thirds majori-
ties in both legislative houses last fall,
but there is a chance at least one
chamber will lack a supermajority the
rest of the year. The uncertainty is
caused by three open Senate seats —
and possibly a fourth — and musical
chairs among Assembly members.
Democrats in the 40-member
Senate are currently one seat short of
the 27 needed to raise taxes and pass
emergency legislation.
They would regain that margin if
Democratic Assemblyman Ben
Hueso of San Diego wins a majority
Tuesday in the 40th Senate District. A
May runoff is likely in the 32nd dis-
trict, although Democratic
Assemblywoman Norma Torres of
Pomona is favored.
Democrats hope to retain supermajority in Senate races
NATION/WORLD 8
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New cyber medal production
stopped, being reviewed
WASHINGTON — The military has
stopped production of a new medal for remote
warfare troops — drone operators and cyber
warfighters — as it considers complaints from
veterans and lawmakers over the award, which
was ranked higher than traditional combat
medals like the Purple Heart and Bronze Star.
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered
a review of the Distinguished Warfare Medal,
which was to be awarded to troops who oper-
ate drones and use other technological skills to
fight America’s wars from afar.
Around the nation
By Rachel Zoll
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VATICAN CITY — The archbishop of
Boston, dressed more often in the humble
brown robe of his religious order than a cardi-
nal’s regalia, has emerged as an unlikely star
amid the drama unfolding in Rome.
Vatican analysts for the leading Italian news-
papers have repeatedly listed Cardinal Sean
O’Malley as one of the favorite contenders in
the conclave starting Tuesday.
As recently as two weeks ago, O’Malley
hadn’t appeared on the lists of papabili, or car-
dinals with papal potential, that church watch-
ers pore over each morning like sports scores,
even though only the cardinal-electors know
how they will vote. Vatican observers said no
American cardinal could win: A superpower
pope risked mixing church and U.S. interests.
O’Malley is also a Capuchin Franciscan, and
few members of religious orders have led the
church.
But O’Malley arrived to a country in an anti-
establishment mood.
A comedian, Beppe Grillo, had grabbed a
quarter of the parliamentary vote, leaving the
political leadership of Italy in limbo.
The Vatican central administration, or Curia,
had been weathering a string of scandals.
Benedict XVI’s own butler had leaked the for-
mer pontiff’s private papers, revealing feuding,
corruption and cronyism at the highest levels of
the bureaucracy. The secretive Vatican bank
had recently ousted a president for incompe-
tence and is under pressure for greater financial
transparency.
In the cardinal, Italians saw a white knight.
The 68-year-old O’Malley has spent his career
as a bishop cleaning up dioceses shattered by
child sex abuse. From O’Malley’s lengthy
track record, one story seems to have captured
the most attention: after he arrived in Boston in
2003, then the epicenter of the church scandal,
O’Malley decided to sell
the Italian Renaissance
mansion that had been
home to the previous four
Boston archbishops. The
millions of dollars from the
sale would help pay settle-
ments to victims.
The bearded, soft-spo-
ken cardinal has even
earned a nickname — the
cappuccino priest — a play on the Italian name
for his order, the same word for the coffee
drink.
“Give me the cappuccino priest, not the
Italians,” said Giuliana Piaella, 57, a waitress
serving lunch at a Rome restaurant. “He’s a
clean-looking guy, perfect age, and has a seri-
ous face. He has a calm face, full of self-confi-
dence. He wears open sandals, which show his
humility. Catholics don’t do that anymore. We
need someone who’s close to the people.”
It took O’Malley just six weeks from the
time he was installed in Boston to settle hun-
dreds of sex abuse claims that had kept the
archdiocese in crisis. His predecessor, Cardinal
Bernard Law, had resigned as archbishop in
December 2002, after a Massachusetts judge
unsealed the files of one predator priest kept in
parish assignments by church officials without
warning parents or police. The revelations
sparked a crisis that spread through every
American diocese and beyond.
The day after he took over in Boston, he
revamped the legal team representing the arch-
diocese, hiring an attorney who had helped him
settle abuse claims when he led the Diocese of
Fall River, Mass., a decade ago. O’Malley was
personally involved in the Boston negotiations,
spending hours with victims’ attorneys to reach
the $85 million deal for 552 plaintiffs.
Attorneys for victims credited him with show-
ing compassion that other church officials had
not.
O’Malley, the ‘cappuccino priest,’ a hit in Rome
By Nicole Winfield
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
VATICAN CITY — This time there was
no doubt. There was no new pope yet, and
the mystery of who — and when — was as
thick as the unmistakable heavy black smoke
billowing from the Sistine Chapel chimney.
As thousands waited in a cold night rain in
St. Peter’s Square, the cardinals signaled
Tuesday they had failed on their first attempt
to find a leader for the world’s 1.2 billion
Catholics and their troubled church.
“It’s black, it’s black, it’s waaay black!”
screamed Eliza Nagle, a 21-year-old Notre
Dame theology major on an exchange pro-
gram in Rome, as the smoke poured from the
6-foot-high copper chimney at 7:41 p.m.
“They definitely got the color right this
time,” agreed Father Andrew Gawrych, an
American priest based in Rome, referring to
the confusion over the smoke during the
2005 conclave that elected Pope Benedict
XVI.
That was thanks to special smoke flares —
akin to those used in soccer matches or
protests — lit in the chapel ovens to make the
burned ballots black, the sign that cardinals
must come back for another day of voting
Wednesday.
No pope yet: Black smoke
seen from chapel chimney
REUTERS
People crowd Saint Peter’s Square to await the sight of smoke from the chimney above the
Sistine Chapel, at the Vatican.
Sean O’Malley
OPINION 9
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coastside Fire
Protection District recall
Editor,
The Coastside Fire Protection
recallees continue to feed the public
misinformation and hide the real
costs of their stand-alone proposal (in
response to Bill Silverfarb’s article,
“Fire recall election under way” in
the March 12 edition of the Daily
Journal). Their total costs may be
“floating,” but we do know that costs
will be at least $1.4 to $2 million
more a year than our Cal Fire con-
tract for the same services. This does
not include a health benefit incentive
package that is estimated to cost up
to $4 million more, overtime costs,
another $200,000 to re-open our
CalPERS account for new employees
and a special, shortened fire academy.
The long-term liability for health
benefits and pensions will be many
millions of dollars. The proposal calls
for five fewer personnel working
fewer days a week than we currently
have with Cal Fire, which sounds
inadequate to fully staff all services
without significant, expensive over-
time.
The present board majority wants
to train new recruits in a special
shortened fire academy that would
not include the emergency medical
training nor the extra training
required even to drive and operate
fire equipment. They would get limit-
ed actual firefighting experience here
with only about six to seven structure
fires a year.
The claim of 250 personnel being
rotated through the district is total-
ly untrue. In our small district, this
would have resulted in at least
eight to 10 complete staff
turnovers, which never occurred.
Cal Fire does occasionally rotate
certain personnel to give them criti-
cal firefighting experience — a
huge benefit for the coastside.
Peggy Emrey
Montara
Plastic bags
Editor,
I would advise all grocery shoppers
to stop and consider before paying 10
cents or a quarter for a plastic or
paper bag. What stops a shopper from
packing their cars with their groceries
as we do when we shop at Costco?
We don’t require a bag there; not
only do they not charge for a bag,
they don’t even have them.
Besides, grocery stores have those
nice “do you need help?” workers
ready to assist you to you car. Let’s
put more people to work.
Irene Ansell
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
T
he Coastside Fire Protection
District recall election to be
decided April 9 comes down to
a simple question: Should it keep its
contract with the California Department
of Forestry for fire protection and para-
medic services or should it move
toward creating its own stand-alone
department. Though this newspaper is a
proponent of shared services and city
contracts for services because of their
economies of scale, we only support
such ventures when service levels meet
community standards and it makes
sense for those within its jurisdiction.
There is a certain amount of local con-
trol that must be maintained with any
shared or contracted service agreement
and the evidence has mounted that the
contract with Cal Fire is not to the level
that the coastside deserves.
For those reasons, we recommend
keeping Mike Alifano, Douglas
Mackintosh and Gary Riddell on the
Coastside Fire Protection District board
and supporting their vote for moving
toward a stand-alone fire department.
Alifano, Mackintosh and Riddell were
the three of five votes on the board to
move toward the stand-alone depart-
ment when the contract with Cal Fire
ends June 30. They are being chal-
lenged by four candidates who seek to
replace them on the board and maintain
the current contract with Cal Fire.
There is a serious matter of cost asso-
ciated with the change. This fiscal year,
the district will collect $8.7 million and
the Cal Fire contract is significantly
less than that. However, the three con-
tend they also receive a lower level of
service for that amount and that the dis-
trict can afford the additional expense
to have more control over its fire
department. That is true. There are sev-
eral estimates that indicate a new stand-
alone department will come in under
budget. But the additional expense is no
small matter. So what will the residents
within the district get with that extra
expense?
For one, there will be more control of
the elected board over staffing. That
means there will be full staffing of fire
marshal and fire inspection services,
which is important in drawing and
maintaining businesses. There won’t be
firefighters rotating out of the district
because of needs elsewhere in the
region or the state. This is a key point
in that firefighters’ knowledge of an
area is critical in emergencies, particu-
larly in unique areas such as the coast.
Opponents argue that firefighters who
are rotated out of the area receive train-
ing in other types of firefighting experi-
ences, but nothing beats local knowl-
edge of a particular area.
Cal Fire is a well-run organization
that focuses on wildland fires, critical
for many areas in the state. However,
municipal services is not its specialty
though its firefighters are professionals
able to work in any situation. Cal Fire
is also an organization of last resort for
municipalities and special districts. It
provides a template service from which
there is to be little to no variation. The
three members of the Coastside Fire
Protection District board who voted to
create a stand-alone department did so
after several years of frustration from
control over fire services in the area and
the need to not only go beyond the con-
tract for unique needs such as cliff res-
cue training but to even have the con-
tract met. The decision to move to a
stand-alone department was not taken
lightly and was made with the residents
of the district in mind.
There may be a time in which a
shared services model might be
broached again, but let it be a regional
approach in which administration is
shared with another local department
— North County Fire, which focuses
on Brisbane, Daly City and Pacifica,
may be a likely candidate; or perhaps
even San Mateo Fire Department,
which currently shares services with
Foster City. A regional approach to
shared services works better in that
there is some local knowledge of the
area and a contract can be negotiated to
include specific needs and requests. Cal
Fire is not the right organization to pro-
vide long-term fire services in this
county, and the board made the right
choice in moving toward its own stand-
alone department to best meet its dis-
trict’s needs.
No on Coastside Fire Protection District recall
Facing reality?
“E
ducation is in danger of becoming a religion
based on fear; its doctrine is to compete. The
majority of our children are being led to
believe that they are doomed to failure in a world which
has room only for those at the top.” — Eda LeShan.
Ms. LeShan, my longtime favorite advocate for children,
wrote a book titled, “The Conspiracy Against Childhood,”
from which I’ve quoted. It was first published in 1967. She
wrote about how the deplorable ways our culture was
shortchanging our children
and what could be done. I
wonder what she would think
today?
A few weeks ago, we read
about how the California
education hierarchy finally
reluctantly faced reality and
joined with other states in
offering a choice that will
allow eighth graders to take
Algebra 1 or an alternate
course that includes some
algebra. For 15 years, they
were obsessed with requiring
Algebra 1 for all eighth
graders. It took them all these years to figure out that not
all kids are able to make it in eighth grade Algebra 1. But,
still, if they don’t take it in eighth grade, they’ll be required
to take it in ninth grade. And they wonder why so many
drop out of high school.
It has been argued that “the change is controversial
because success in Algebra 1 is the single best predictor of
college graduation.” But, wait! Maybe the fact that a child
can grasp algebraic concepts is an indication that he/she is
more likely to have the mental ability to do college work.
Does the hierarchy think that all kids have the same mental
potential (like there’s no difference in IQ) or individual
abilities? You wonder just how much time they have spent
in classrooms. Do they not realize that some kids are good
at math, but others may be gifted at language arts, science,
music, art, etc.? Those whose mental capabilities do not
cover the education hierarchy’s circumscribed educational
experience should not be disparaged by algebra fanatics
who seem to be stuck in overdrive.
Mention algebra and Granddaughter No. 1 always comes
to mind. For her, Algebra 1 in eighth grade was a night-
mare. She has many well-educated relatives, excels in lan-
guage arts and social sciences, has a grandmother who
tutored her in algebra, yet she never really got it. She spent
three years in community college trying to pass the algebra
requirement for college and finally, thanks to one or two
helpful teachers, she was able to transfer to San Jose State
University where she graduated two years later. If you were
to bring up algebra to her now you would likely get a blank
stare. You might say she’s mathematically challenged, but
she stuck it out, excelled at what she’s good at and learned
many essential life skills along the way.
But how many kids who need help have it available?
How many have the incentive to stay in school while being
employed 20 hours a week (as she did) and see it through?
How many more will drop out of high school because such
requirements for graduation have no relevance for them?
Instead of (or along with) algebra, teens are much more in
need of good reading and writing skills, a concept of histo-
ry, geography, civics and current events. They can also ben-
efit from practical science, a practical understanding of
basic math and a lot of health, family life and sex educa-
tion (many need to become more familiar with Planned
Parenthood than with Pythagoras). And there are those who
need to learn how to apply themselves to a project and who
need skills to help them find and keep employment after
high school.
You still wonder if the members of the hierarchy are
familiar with the average teenage student including those
who come from very disadvantaged backgrounds. Do they
have any clue as to how many kids would benefit most
from an alternative like vocational school? As Ms. LeShan
wrote: “The most undernourished part of our entire school
system is in the area of vocational training. If we want our
young people to stay in school, all we have to do is make
that schooling relevant and meaningful to their own indi-
vidual capabilities and goals.” What our Education
Hierarchy can’t seem to fathom is the fact that there are
many kids who will not be able to, or want to, attend col-
lege because of limited intellectual ability, a lack of family
resources and/or because of other goals. Algebraic equa-
tions are fine and dandy, if a child is so inclined, but let’s
emphasize schools that work for all students.
“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of
a fire.” — William Butler Yeats.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 650
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,450.06 +0.02% 10-Yr Bond 2,023 -1.61%
Nasdaq3,242.32 -0.32% Oil (per barrel) 92.59
S&P 500 1,552.48 -0.24% Gold 1,592.00
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Cabela’s Inc., up $6.75 at $60.65
The outdoors gear and sporting goods retailer said it had a strong start
to the year and boosted its first-quarter outlook.
VeriFone Systems Inc., up $1.22 at $21.68
The maker of credit-card terminals said that its chief executive of 12
years, Douglas Bergeron, is stepping down.
Heckmann Corp., up 43 cents at $4.14
The drilling services company posted a fourth-quarter profit after buying
Power Fuels and predicted strong revenue this year.
Dick’s Sporting Goods Inc., up $2.21 at $47.32
A Citi analyst reiterated her “Buy”rating on the sporting goods retailer,
saying investors should snap up the discounted shares.
Nasdaq
Bon-Ton Stores Inc., up 59 cents at $12.50
The retailer said that its fourth-quarter net income fell 5 percent from a
year-ago, but its results still beat expectations.,
Tandy Leather Factory Inc., up 97 cents at $7.14
The leather retailer said that its fourth-quarter net income rose 29 percent
as it continues to expand the size of its stores.
Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores Inc., down $5.50 at $37.50
The retailer, which sells home appliances, hardware, tools and lawn and
garden equipment, said its fourth-quarter results rose.
Diamond Foods Inc., down $1.71 at $15.89
The snack foods maker said it turned a profit in its second quarter, but
its results missed Wall Street expectations.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The Dow Jones
industrial average logged its longest
winning streak in two years — barely.
A tiny gain gave the Dow its eighth
straight increase Tuesday, long enough
to match its longest series of gains since
February 2011.
The Dow rose 2.77 points, or 0.02
percent, to 14,450.06, having wavered
between small gains and losses for most
of the day.
The broader Standard & Poor’s 500
ended down 3.74 points, or 0.2 percent,
at 1,552.48. The Nasdaq composite
dropped 10.55 points, or 0.32 percent,
to 3,242.32
Stocks have surged this year as
investors became encouraged by a
recovery in the housing market and a
pickup in hiring. Strong corporate earn-
ings and continuing economic stimulus
from the Federal Reserve are also sup-
porting demand for stocks.
The Dow has gained 10.3 percent so
far in 2013, and last week it surpassed
its previous all-time high of 14,164.53.
The S&P 500 has risen 8.9 percent this
year and is less than 1 percentage point
away from its record close of 1,565.15
set in October 2007.
David Bianco, chief U.S. equity
strategist at Deutsche Bank, said the
S&P 500 index will likely maintain its
momentum in the coming weeks and
surpass its all-time high. Strong first-
quarter corporate earnings reports could
also push the market higher.
“I wouldn’t be surprised if the market
has a typical 5 percent pullback in the
summer,” said Bianco. “But I think we
go higher before that happens.”
The last significant downturn for
stocks started before the presidential
elections in November, when the Dow
fell 8 percent between Oct. 5 and Nov.
15 on concern that a divided govern-
ment wouldn’t be able to reach a budget
deal to stop the U.S. going over the “fis-
cal cliff” of sweeping tax hikes and deep
spending cuts.
Stocks haven’t had a correction, typi-
cally defined as a decline of between 10
and 20 percent, since November 2011.
That sell-off came after talks on cutting
the U.S. deficit broke down in
Washington.
Merck was the biggest gainer in the
Dow, advancing $1.38, or 3.2 percent, to
$45.04 after the drugmaker said a data
safety monitoring board recommended
that a study of its cholesterol drug
Vytorin should continue.
Peter Cardillo, chief market econo-
mist at Rockwell Global Capital, was
also among those saying investors
should expect a pause in the market’s
advance.
“Nothing goes up forever,” Cardillo
said. “We will be headed for a correc-
tion somewhere along the line.”
Markets were mixed in Europe. Italy
easily sold (euro) 7.75 billion ($10 bil-
lion) in 12-month bonds, though at
slightly higher interest rates. It was the
first test of market sentiment since Fitch
downgraded the country’s credit rating
on Friday due to political uncertainty
there.
The Dow’s biggest wobble this year
came on Feb. 25, when it lost 1.6 per-
cent after inconclusive results from
Italian elections pushed the country
toward political gridlock, threatening
its ability to follow through on unpopu-
lar budget cuts demanded by its
European neighbors. That gave
investors a flashback to last spring,
when a flare-up in Europe’s debt crisis
sent markets spiraling lower in the U.S.
and Europe.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note, which moves inversely to its price,
fell to 2.02 percent from 2.06 percent.
Dow ekes out eighth straight advance
“Nothing goes up forever. ...We will be
headed for a correction somewhere along the line.”
—Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital
By Marcy Gordon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Mary Jo White vowed
Tuesday to make “bold and unrelenting”
enforcement of Wall Street a high priority if
she is confirmed chairman of the Securities
and Exchange Commission.
The former federal prosecutor told a
Senate panel that investors need to know the
playing field is level and that wrongdoers
will be “aggressively and successfully” pur-
sued.
White also pledged to avoid potential con-
flicts of interest from her
work over the past decade
as a corporate litigator.
“Strong enforcement is
necessary for investor
confidence and is essen-
tial to the integrity of our
financial markets,” White,
65, said during a two-
hour confirmation hear-
ing before the Senate
Banking Committee.
She is expected win confirmation from the
panel and the full Senate, becoming the first
prosecutor to lead the SEC. She would
replace Elisse Walter, who has been interim
chairman since Mary Schapiro resigned in
December.
Senators also questioned Richard Cordray,
who was re-nominated by Obama to head the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. His
confirmation is less certain. Many
Republicans opposed the creation of the
agency in 2010 and want to limit his power.
Chairman Tim Johnson, D-S.D., said after
the hearing that the panel would vote on both
nominations “as soon as possible.” Still, he
noted that Republican objections to the con-
sumer agency could hold up the vote.
White served as the U.S. attorney in
Manhattan from 1993 through 2002. By
nominating her to the post, President Barack
Obama sent a signal that he wants the gov-
ernment to get tougher with Wall Street.
Critics have complained that the SEC has
failed to act aggressively to charge top exec-
utives at the biggest U.S. banks who may
have contributed to the 2008 financial crisis.
White said enforcement would be a priori-
ty and that she would pursue “all wrongdoers
— individual and institutional, of whatever
position or size.”
White promises ‘unrelenting’ enforcement at SEC
Mary Jo White
Google pays $7M fine to settle Wi-Fi privacy case
SAN FRANCISCO — Google will pay a $7 million fine
to settle a multistate investigation into a snoopy software
program that enabled the Internet search leader to intercept
emails, passwords and other sensitive information sent sev-
eral years ago over unprotected wireless networks in neigh-
borhoods across the world.
The agreement announced Tuesday covers 38 states and
the District of Columbia, part of the area where households
and local merchants unwittingly had some of their commu-
nications on Wi-Fi networks snatched by Google Inc. from
early 2008 until the spring 0f 2010.
Google stopped the data collection in May 2010, shortly
before the company revealed cars taking street-level photos
for its online mapping service also had been grabbing infor-
mation transmitted over Wi-Fi networks that had been set up
in homes and businesses without requiring a password to
gain access.
The company blamed the intrusion on a rogue engineer
who rigged a data-collection program into equipment that
was supposed to only detect basic information about local
Wi-Fi networks to help plot the locations of people using its
mapping service and other products.
Pentagon forming cyber
teams to prevent attacks
WASHINGTON — The Defense Department is establish-
ing a series of cyber teams charged with carrying out offen-
sive operations to combat the threat of an electronic assault
on the United States that could cause major damage and dis-
ruption to the country’s vital infrastructure, a senior military
official said Tuesday.
Gen. Keith Alexander, the top officer at U.S. Cyber
Command, warned during testimony that the threat of an
electronic assault against the nation’s electric grid and other
essential systems is real and more aggressive steps need to
be taken by the federal government and the private sector in
order to improve digital defenses.
Business briefs
<< Wright leads charge for U.S., page 12
• Sharks lose 4-2 to St. Louis Blues, page 12
Wednesday, March 13, 2013
CUTTING TIES: HEYWARD-BEY AND HUFF ARE CUT BY THE RAIDERS >>> PAGE 16
REUTERS
Barcelona FC superstar forward Lionel Messi celebrates his second goal of the first half in a 4-0 UEFA Champions League over ACMilan.
The Barcelona man scored in the fifth and 40th minutes to help pace the team.With the win, and a 4-2 aggregate victory, the spanish
La Liga leaders advance to another Champions League quarterfinals — becoming the first in tournament history to do so after a 2-0
loss in the first leg. For more on the game, visit SPORTS, page 14
A LITTLE BARÇA MAGIC
Burlingame rallies for softball win
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When you’re a young softball team trying to
form some sort of identity in the early part of
a season, it doesn’t matter how you get a win.
Sometimes it’s a hot-hitting afternoon, and
another it’ll be solid pitching and defense.
Or sometimes, as was the case on Tuesday
afternoon for Burlingame High School, the
win is hiding in that inch between bad hop and
an infielder’s glove.
The Panthers defeated Notre Dame-
Belmont 3-1 in non-league action thanks in
large part to a Tigers error in the bottom of the
sixth that brought home a couple of runs. The
swing off the bat of Kacy Edward came with
runners on second and third and two outs and
it was hit just tricky enough to sneak under the
glove of a charging Notre Dame second base-
man.
Nicki Lungi scored easily from third and
Dana Lenardon hustled all the way from sec-
ond for the insurance run.
“It’s always better to be lucky than good,”
said Burlingame head coach Douglas
McKeever. “This season, we could easily be
4-2. The problem is, we haven’t got that key
hit. We have a young team and the transition
from JV to varsity isn’t easy. These girls are
learning that and we’re relying on our seniors
to produce right now and hopefully it keeps
going.”
Lungi, a senior, got the rally going with a
lead-off triple in the sixth. Lenardon found her
way onto first with a bunt.
But then it looked for a minute that Notre
Dame starter Lindsey Mifsud would get her-
self out of the jam when she got Kristin
Chaney to line out on a rope back to the pitch-
er and then Megan Ailand to strike out look-
ing.
But just as brilliantly as Mifsud danced out
of trouble, the softball gods evened things out.
‘We were one hit away, one out away from
busting open that game, getting ahead,” said
Notre Dame head coach Tara Van Meter. “It
came down to one error, basically. It was a
tough one.
“She’s awesome,” Van Meter said of
Mifsud. “She’s been throwing really great.
She was ahead all day. She was throwing hard.
It’s probably the best I’ve seen her throw all
year. It’s exciting.”
It was a well-played game from innings one
through four. Up until then, the only run was
earned on a shot by Ailand to the left center-
See PANTHERS, Page 14
Free agency opens, Niners active
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY — The Kansas City Chiefs
finally have their new quarterback.
The Chiefs officially
traded for Alex Smith on
Tuesday, the first day of
the new league year —
and nearly two weeks
after the San Francisco
49ers agreed to the deal.
All that’s left is for Smith
to pass a physical and the
paperwork to be filed with
the league.
That business is expected to be finished
Wednesday.
The 49ers will receive the Chiefs’ second-
round pick, 34th overall, in this year’s draft
and a conditional pick in next year’s draft, a
person familiar with the terms told The
Associated Press.
The person spoke on condition of anonymi-
ty because the terms were not disclosed.
Kansas City also agreed Tuesday to a four-
year, $16 million deal with former Dolphins
tight end Anthony Fasano, a three-year, $12.6
million contract with defensive tackle Mike
DeVito, and a three-year deal with former
Saints backup quarterback Chase Daniel.
The moves continue what’s been a busy off-
season for the Chiefs under new general man-
ager John Dorsey and coach Andy Reid. Last
week, they signed wide receiver Dwayne
By John Marshall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — Hoping to boost the Pac-
12 tournament’s appeal, conference
Commissioner Larry Scott pushed to move it
from Los Angeles to a more exciting destina-
tion that would draw from all over the West.
The bright lights of The Strip in Las Vegas
should be a good fit.
“We wanted there to be vibrancy and ener-
gy to the venue and we felt with Vegas, fans
can enjoy going there,” Scott said.
The Pac-12 will open its first tournament in
Las Vegas with four games on Wednesday at
the MGM Grand Garden Arena and continue
until Saturday’s championship game with an
automatic NCAA tournament berth on the
line.
The Pac-12 tournament had been held at the
Staples Center for 11 years and one of the big
complaints was all the empty seats that could
be seen on TV, particularly if UCLA got
knocked out.
The Grand Garden has primarily been used
for boxing events, but did have a test run of
See SMITH, Page 14
See PAC-12, Page 14
Alex Smith officially dealt for two picks, Boldin now a Forty-Niner
Pac-12 tourney
kicks off in Vegas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Outfielder Yoenis Cespedes
rejoined the Oakland Athletics on Tuesday
after briefly leaving spring training to be
reunited with his family for the first time in
about a year.
The Cuban defector surprised family mem-
bers in Miami after they arrived over the
weekend from the Turks and Caicos, where
they had been detained as illegal immigrants.
The relatives, including Cespedes’ mother,
Estela Milanes, were released Jan. 21.
Cespedes was back in the A’s lineup
Tuesday against the Royals, playing left field
and batting cleanup.
Cespedes had a 24-hour window before he
had to return to camp, but his family under-
stood. He said he hopes his mother and many
of the others will be able to attend the A’s sea-
son opener in Oakland on April 1 against
Seattle.
“I am happy,” Cespedes said at his locker
through interpreter Ariel Prieto before the
game at Phoenix Municipal Stadium.
Cespedes acknowledged at the start of
spring training that he worried constantly late
last season about his family’s safety in the
Dominican Republic. He wasn’t sure whether
they might be targeted because of his legal
See CESPEDES, Page 13
Cespedes back
with A’s camp
See BOLDIN, Page 14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco
49ers landed another playmaking wide
receiver to catch those deep passes from
Colin Kaepernick.
San Francisco agreed Tuesday to acquire
Anquan Boldin from the Super Bowl cham-
pion Baltimore Ravens for a sixth-round
draft pick.
The deal, announced by the team shortly
after the start of the free agency period
Tuesday, is pending a physical. Boldin
expressed surprise at the trade and thanked
the Ravens’ supporters in a series of posts on
Twitter.
Alex Smith
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Active Independent Senior Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
•Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments with full kitchens
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — Rookie Jake Allen
made 39 saves, Chris Stewart led a bal-
anced attack with two goals, and the St.
Louis Blues beat San Jose 4-2 on
Tuesday for their second win over the
Sharks in three nights.
Brent Burns scored his first in his sea-
son debut at forward and Dan Boyle had
a late power-play goal for the Sharks,
who have lost four in a row and have
dropped 10 of 12 to the Blues, including
the first round of the playoffs last sea-
son.
The Blues overcame a two-goal deficit
in a 4-3 overtime victory Saturday night
in San Jose and clinched this one on
Stewart’s empty-netter with 1:16 to go,
four seconds after goalie Antti Niemi
was pulled.
Allen has won six of his first seven
career NHL starts, also besting the
Sharks in San Jose.
Allen has made the most of his chance
with a team that had appeared set at
goalie. Brian Elliott has been benched
with a 3.65 goals-against average, and
Jaroslav Halak has been inconsistent and
has missed time due to injury.
The shot total was by far the highest
faced this season by the Blues, topping
the 32 in a 5-2 win at Calgary on Feb. 13
with Allen in goal.
Blues forward T.J. Oshie (upper body)
didn’t return after getting injured while
checking Burns midway through the
second period. Oshie got medical atten-
tion in the tunnel behind the bench
before heading to the dressing room, and
was credited with one hit in 5:33.
Burns returned from a leg injury that
landed him on the injured list with his
first point of the season in seven games.
The Sharks moved Burns up from
defense to forward after he totaled 12
goals in the previous six games.
San Jose, which entered next-to-last in
the NHL with 56 goals, has just two reg-
ulation victories in 20 games.
Seven St. Louis players had a point to
boost an offense minus its second line of
Alex Steen, Andy McDonald and rookie
Vladimir Tarasenko, and help the Blues
move above .500 (6-5-1) at home.
Stewart beat Niemi on a break-in for
the lone goal of the first period, giving
him three goals and five assists in five
games.
David Perron deflected an off-target
pass from Patrik Berglund with his left
skate to make it 2-0 midway through the
second. Burns answered 1:02 later on a
shot from high slot.
Barret Jackman, usually a stay-at-
home defenseman, has five points in five
games after joining the rush. He hand-
cuffed Niemi with a backhander that left
Porter with an open net for the rebound
with 6.8 seconds left in the second.
Boyle scored with a one-timer only
four seconds into a two-man advantage
with 6:28 to go after Jackman (boarding)
joined Scott Nichol (holding) in the
penalty box.
NOTES: Boyle’s fourth of the season
ended a 1-for-38, power-play slump the
last nine games for the Sharks. The goal
was just the second allowed by Blues
penalty killers in eight home games. ...
Berglund has a five-game point streak
with four goals and two assists.
Allen makes 39 saves, Blues beat Sharks
By Steven Wine
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Gio Gonzalez gave Team
USA its best start yet, and David Wright
provided a big finish.
Gonzalez pitched
five scoreless
innings and the
Americans beat
Puerto Rico 7-1 in
the World Baseball
Classic on Tuesday
night.
Wright drove in
five runs, the last
three with a bases-
loaded double in the eighth. That
prompted chants of “U-S-A! U-S-A!”
from the crowd of 32,872.
The United States fell behind in all
three games in the opening round, but
led from the first inning against Puerto
Rico. The Americans will play Thursday
night against the Dominican Republic,
which remained unbeaten in the WBC
by rallying past Italy 5-4 on Tuesday.
Puerto Rico plays Italy in an elimina-
tion game Wednesday.
Gonzalez (1-0), who grew up in near-
by Hialeah, struck out five for the home-
town team and departed with a 3-0 lead.
Manager Joe Torre then went to his
bullpen, and five relievers combined to
allow one run over the final four innings.
Gonzalez lowered the ERA of the U.S.
rotation to 4.00.
Wright had an RBI groundout in the
third and a run-scoring single in the
fifth. He’s 7 for 16 (.438) with 10 RBIs
in four games.
Joe Mauer’s two-out RBI double
scored Ryan Braun with the first U.S.
run in the opening inning. The
Americans added a run in the third on
singles by Brandon Phillips and Braun
and Wright’s RBI groundout.
Adam Jones had a two-run RBI single
in the seventh.
Marlins right fielder Giancarlo
Stanton earned a big cheer from the
Miami crowd when he made a running
catch at the warning track to rob Martin
Maldonado of a two-out, two-RBI hit in
the fourth inning. Stanton also singled
twice and walked.
Braun and Mauer each reached base
four times.
Puerto Rico starter Mario Santiago (0-
1) allowed three runs in 4 1-3 innings.
Angel Pagan’s drove in Puerto Rico’s
run in the eighth.
U.S. beats Puerto Rico 7-1 at WB Classic
By Steven Wine
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Robinson Cano pumped his fist. Jose Reyes and
Hanley Ramirez danced together near home plate. Fernando
Rodney pointed to the sky after the final out.
The Dominican Republic is unbeaten and having fun in the
World Baseball Classic.
Nelson Cruz’s two-out, RBI single broke a seventh-inning
tie, and the Dominicans overcame an early four-run deficit
Tuesday to beat Italy 5-4.
Cano had three hits, including his second home run in the
WBC. He led a comeback that had his teammates laughing and
celebrating every hit in front of their dugout.
“That’s something you never see in the big leagues,” Cano
said. “Here we get a chance to come out and give high-fives to
the guys. We can jump around. Nobody sees you trying to
show somebody up. It’s more about the chemistry on the team.
We’re all excited to be here, and we’ve all got a mission to
win.”
Italy hitting coach Mike Piazza said his team noted the
Dominicans’ demeanor.
“Some enhanced theatrics,” Piazza said. “It’s not what we’re
used to, but hey, you have to go to with it and have fun. It’s
unorthodox for me. Obviously in a 162-game season you’re
not going to be seeing that, so you have to just let it roll off
your back.”
The Dominicans (4-0) advanced to a winner’s-bracket game
Thursday night in the double-elimination second round.
Cano’s homer off the upper-deck facade in right field made
the score 2-all in the sixth. Reyes also homered, and celebrat-
ed with Ramirez after crossing the plate.
Dominican Republic
rallies past Italy 5-4
David Wright
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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issues stemming from a former
agent who claims the outfielder
owes him money.
Cespedes has a 3-year-old son,
Yoenis Jr., still living in Cuba with
the boy’s mother. He has not seen
the child in two years, but first told
the San Francisco Chronicle of his
struggles in late January and that he
hopes they soon will have a visit
thanks to new laws in Cuba that
allow citizens to travel and return.
Cespedes said he kept most of his
frustrations inside as he wondered
about the fate of his family, whose
journey began in the Dominican
Republic. He spoke occasionally
with his mother over the computer.
His mother was a left-handed pitch-
er for the Cuban Olympic softball
team.
A’s manager Bob Melvin could
tell the situation was weighing on
Cespedes, who despite his worries
and several injuries went on to hit
.292 with 23 home runs and 82 RBIs
in 129 games, finishing second to
the Angels’ Mike Trout for AL
Rookie of the Year.
Melvin wanted to give Cespedes a
mental break down the stretch last
season, except Cespedes wouldn’t
go for it. He predicted at the start the
A’s would make the playoffs in
2012, and they rallied over the final
10 games to stun the Texas Rangers
on the regular season’s final day to
capture the AL West.
“You try to put yourself in that sit-
uation, what it would be like for
you, but you just can’t do it,”
Melvin said. “He is a very hard
worker. If you watched him, you
would see his workouts are pretty
intense.”
Cespedes learned to make adjust-
ments last season and Melvin is
confident he will make more.
“He is a smart hitter. He got better
as the season went along,” Melvin
said.
Continued from page 11
CESPEDES
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Tommy Milone had
a successful rookie season, and then
started off spring training with five
scoreless innings in two starts. Still,
he’s treating camp as if he needs to
earn a spot in the Athletics’ rotation.
Milone allowed six hits and three
runs in 3 2-3 innings, but the bullpen
shut down the hot-hitting Kansas
City Royals on Tuesday for a 6-3 vic-
tory.
“I was trying to get ready for the
season (last year), regardless of my
spot, and I’m doing the same thing
this year,” he said.
Milone’s spot on the A’s staff is
secure after going 13-10 in a team-
leading 31 starts as a rookie last year.
Milone’s scoreless streak ended
when the Royals’ Alex Gordon
homered to lead off the game.
Gordon had two hits to raise his
average to .536 for spring training.
The homer was his third.
“It was all right. I didn’t think it
was that bad, but it could have gone
better. You have to be ready for situ-
ations like that,” Milone said. “The
Royals are a good-hitting team, every
aggressive. I throw a lot of strikes
and they know that.”
Oakland, however, rallied against
James Shields, who had a scoreless
streak of his own snapped. Shields
hadn’t allowed a run in his first two
starts with the Royals — four innings
— but he was touched up for six hits
and four runs in 4 2-3 innings. He did
strike out six without walking a bat-
ter.
Eric Sogard had a tiebreaking dou-
ble in the fifth inning off Shields.
“The first few innings were really
good. I was putting the ball where I
wanted,” Shields said. “Then I start-
ed to get tired at the end and left the
ball up. You can’t do that during the
regular season.”
But he feels he is developing a nice
working rhythm with catcher
Salvador Perez.
“It’s good to have him back there,”
Shields said. “He is getting a better
idea of what I want to throw in cer-
tain situations.”
Outfielder Yoenis Cespedes had an
RBI and a double in his return to the
A’s after briefly leaving spring train-
ing to be reunited with his family for
the first time in about a year.
The Cuban defector surprised fam-
ily members in Miami after they
arrived over the weekend from the
Turks and Caicos, where they had
been detained as illegal immigrants.
The relatives, including Cespedes’
mother, Estela Milanes, were
released Jan. 21.
A’s slow Royals in 6-3 win
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
field gap that the outfield and pitcher turned
into a home run by turning on the jets and
absolutely burning rubber on the bases.
Other than that mistake, Mifsud was solid.
And for Burlingame, McKeever took a two-
pitcher approach. He had Raine Armanino
start and pitch for two innings, then brought in
Ailand who pitched another pair, then sent
Armanino out for innings five and six before
ending the seventh off with Ailand.
“I’m really trying to build competition at
every position,” McKeever said. “I just want
them to push each other and keep going as we
get closer to league. We’ve been trying differ-
ent strategies to see how we can get more pro-
duction out of them.
“The key, when you can keep a batter off-
balanced with that change-up. Some games
we don’t have it, but it’s starting to come
around and you can see how effective it is.”
It was effective — up until the fifth, the
Tigers only had two hits.
But Burlingame’s defense let them down in
the fifth. After a strikeout to start the frame for
Armanino, a routine fly ball to right center-
field was dropped, opening the door for Notre
Dame. The Tigers took full advantage and
threatened to break the game wide open. Two
batters later, another error, this one at first,
allowed Lorin Hom to race around third and
score the tying run.
Notre Dame went on to load the bases, but
could not cash in.
“It’s something we’ve been working on —
staying tough in the game and staying up the
whole time,” Van Meter said. “I talked to the
girls before the game and said we’re not giv-
ing up any inning of this game. I’m glad that
I saw that.”
Burlingame’s defense tightened up after
that, thanks in large part to the play of Lungi
at shortstop. Five of the next six outs were 6-
3 putouts as Lungi demonstrated great range
and a strong arm at the 6 position.
“Nicki Lungi is one of our captains,”
McKeever said. “One of things we stress this
year is for our seniors to finish their high
school career strong and they’ve really
stepped up — pulling the younger players
together. When you play like that all day, it
turns things around.”
The loss drops Notre Dame to 7-4.
Burlingame is now 2-4.
Continued from page 11
PANTHERS
sorts when Oregon State played San Diego
there earlier this season.
While the capacity of the Grand Garden is
only a few thousand less, it isn’t nearly as cav-
ernous as the Staples Center and has the allure
of Vegas as an added attraction for fans.
“Las Vegas is such a destination city and so
many people enjoy going there whether
there’s a sporting event going on or not,”
Arizona coach Sean Miller said. “You com-
bine that with the fact you have this competi-
tive tournament and it’s the first basketball
games ever played at the MGM Grand, and to
me, it’s exciting and it’s going to be exciting
for years to come.”
Las Vegas has been a destination for confer-
ence tournaments.
The West Coast Conference concluded its
tournament Monday night at Orleans Arena,
where the Western Athletic Conference start-
ed its tournament on Tuesday. The Mountain
West is also playing this week at the Thomas
& Mack Center, UNLV’s home arena.
Now, with the Pac-12 in town, Vegas is even
more of a basketball mecca this week.
“I’m thrilled to be moving to somewhat of a
basketball haven when you consider all the
tournaments that are being played there,”
Utah coach Larry Krystkowiak said.
For all the fun available outside in
Vegas, it could be just as good on the
court the way things have gone in the
conference this season.
No. 21 UCLA won the regular-season title,
but may not even be the favorite to win the
tournament.
No. 18 Arizona has the highest ranking, yet
is the fourth seed after struggling late in the
season.
Oregon, California and possibly Colorado
could be headed to the NCAA tournament, so
clearly there’s some talent there.
Even the teams at the bottom half of the
bracket pulled off some upsets during the reg-
ular season. Three of those came on the final
weekend, when Washington State beat
UCLA, Utah knocked off Oregon and Oregon
State beat Colorado.
Colorado pulled off an upset of sorts by
winning last year’s Pac-12 tournament and it
wouldn’t be much of a surprise if there’s
another this season the way the regular season
played out.
“Everybody wants to be able to make the
NCAA tournament. It’s so coveted,” Miller
said. “There are so many teams that are
close.”
For the teams that don’t get there, it would
obviously be a disappointment for them and
their fans. But, at least for the fans, they’ll be
in a place that has plenty of other options to
take their mind off it.
“In talking to our fans, they know they can
go there for three or four days, and it’s a win-
win situation,” Krystkowiak said. “They can
enjoy watching basketball, but if their team
(goes out), it’s still a fun place to be. It’s not
like in Las Vegas you’ve got to figure out what
to do with your time.”
Continued from page 11
PAC-12
Bowe to a five-year, $54 million deal, punter
Dustin Colquitt to a five-year, $18.75 million
deal, and placed the franchise tag on left tack-
le Branden Albert, promising him $9.83 mil-
lion for the 2013 season.
Dorsey and Reid were not available to com-
ment on Tuesday’s moves.
“Part of this movement was from a philo-
sophical belief that has been ingrained in me,”
Dorsey told AP in an interview last week,
when asked about how quickly he’s hit the
ground running.
“Winning organizations,” he said, “do
moves like this.”
Under the three-year contract he signed last
March, Smith is guaranteed $8.5 million for
the 2013 season, though it’s possible the
Chiefs will attempt to sign him to a new deal.
The Chiefs’ big spending was made possi-
ble by carving out space under the salary cap.
The new regime has released right tackle
Eric Winston, wide receiver Steve Breaston
and tight end Kevin Boss, and restructured the
mammoth contract of defensive end Tyson
Jackson. The Chiefs are also expected to
release incumbent quarterback Matt Cassel in
the coming days.
The poor play of Cassel, who has two years
left on a six-year, $63 million deal, is one of
the reasons the Chiefs went 2-14 last year and
have the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft, and why
the new front office targeted Smith in the days
and weeks after their arrival.
Smith had eight up-and-down years with
the 49ers, but thrived under coach Jim
Harbaugh. He went 13-3 as the starter two
years ago, and was 6-2 at the midway point
this past season, completing 18 of 19 passes
with three TDs in a Monday night win over
Arizona on Oct. 29.
He then sustained a concussion in the sec-
ond quarter of a 24-24 tie against St. Louis on
Nov. 11, saying later he threw a touchdown
pass with blurry vision. Smith sat out the next
game, Colin Kaepernick dazzled in his debut
as an NFL starter — and Smith never started
again.
Kaepernick led the 49ers to the Super Bowl
and Smith became expendable.
Smith approached the delicate situation
with grace, and said in response to questions
about it, “I feel like the only thing I did to lose
my job was get a concussion.”
“We would like to thank Alex for his contri-
butions to the 49ers organization over the past
eight years,” 49ers GM Trent Baalke said.
“I would like to thank the Ravens fans for
their incredible support for myself and my
family throughout my
years in Baltimore,” he
said Tuesday. “I am grate-
ful in getting to know you
and will miss what I call
home. I thought this was
the last stop of my career
but regardless of the cir-
cumstances I came here to
win a Championship ...
and in February we came
home Champions. For my future in San
Francisco, I will leave that in God’s hands.”
He was a big key in Baltimore’s 34-31
Super Bowl victory against the 49ers on Feb.
3 in New Orleans. Boldin made six catches
for 104 yards and the game’s first touch-
down, and also had five receptions for 60
yards and two TDs in a victory over New
England in the AFC title game.
The 32-year-old Boldin had 65 catches for
921 yards and four touchdowns for the
Ravens. Now, he will switch from playing for
John Harbaugh to younger brother and 49ers
coach Jim Harbaugh as the receiver begins
his 11th NFL season.
“We are excited to add Anquan to our ros-
ter,” 49ers general manager Trent Baalke said
in a statement. “He is a highly competitive
and productive player with strong leadership
qualities that will be a welcome addition to
our team and community.”
Last spring, the 49ers did something simi-
lar when they signed wideout Mario
Manningham and running back Brandon
Jacobs, both from the New York Giants —
the team that beat the 49ers in overtime of
the NFC championship game.
With Manningham working back from
reconstructive left knee surgery and Randy
Moss not expected to return after one season
for the Super Bowl runner-up, Boldin brings
the kind of big playmaking ability that
should fit in well with strong-armed
Kaepernick and complement Michael
Crabtree in the offense.
Boldin was due to earn $6 million this sea-
son in the final year of his contract. After he
and the Ravens failed to agree on a restruc-
tured deal, Baltimore worked the swap with
San Francisco rather than simply cut him
from the roster.
Continued from page 11
SMITH
Continued from page 11
BOLDIN
Anquan Boldin
Barcelona advances in Champions League
By Joseph Wilson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BARCELONA, Spain — Hailed as perhaps
soccer’s greatest team ever, Barcelona faced a
challenge no club had overcome: advancing in
the Champions League after a 2-0 first-leg
loss on the road.
Lionel Messi & Co. came through in spec-
tacular fashion with
another record-setting
night.
Messi started the
revival with a pair of first-
half goals, and Barcelona
overwhelmed AC Milan
4-0 Tuesday to reach its
sixth straight Champions
League quarterfinal with a
4-2 aggregate win.
“It had been a long time since we had pulled
off a historic comeback,” Barcelona midfield-
er Xavi Hernandez said. “We pressed them
very well and played an exceptional match.”
Messi scored in the fifth and 40th minutes,
and David Villa and Jordi Alba added second-
half goals.
“We went out gunning from the start, and
scoring early helped us,” Villa said. “We have
believed in the comeback ever since we lost in
Milan, and belief combined with hard work is
how you achieve things.”
Before a screaming crowd of 94,944 at
Camp Nou, Europe’s largest stadium, Messi
scored his first goal to goalkeeper Christian
Abbiati’s right with curling left-footed shot
into the upper corner from 17 yards between
two defenders. The goal moved Messi past
Ruud van Nistelrooy into sole possession of
second on the Champions League career list
with 57, trailing only Raul Gonzalez’s 71.
Messi then scored his second goal to
Abbiati’s left with a low 19-yard shot after
Andres Iniesta stole the ball from Massimo
Ambrosini.
“For anyone who doubted Messi, today
Messi gave a lesson on how to play football,”
said Barcelona assistant coach Jordi Roura, in
charge while coach Tito Vilanova undergoes
treatment in New York for a saliva gland
tumor. “He is extraordinary, and surrounded
by great players, he is capable of doing what
he does.”
Villa put Barcelona ahead in the series in
the 55th minute with a 14-yard shot after
Cristian Zapata’s weak clearance was inter-
cepted by Javier Mascherano, and Kevin
Constant missed a sliding tackle on Xavi’s
through pass to the forward.
Alba sealed the win in the second minute of
stoppage time when he raced the length of the
field on a counterattack after Messi stole the
ball and passed to Alexis Sanchez on the
break.
“Milan only needed a goal, but we knew
how to handle the game very well,” Alba said.
“This is a very important win for us. A lot was
at stake.”
AC Milan, a seven-time champion, won the
first leg at San Siro on Feb. 20 and nearly got
a valuable away goal in the 38th minute, but
18-year-old forward M’baye Niang hit a post
with an open shot after a sloppy headed back-
pass by Mascherano. If Niang had tied the
game 1-1, Barcelona would have needed at
least three more goals at that point to advance
because away goals are a tiebreaker.
“Barcelona is still the best team in the
world. Moving on was a true feat,” Milan
coach Massimiliano Allegri said. “The first
leg didn’t change these two teams, and who-
ever thought so was wrong. We played worse
than in the first leg, but that is to Barcelona’s
credit.”
Messi, the four-time FIFA Player of the
Year, got his 18th multigoal game of the sea-
son and increased his season goals total to 53.
Led by the 25-year-old Messi, Barcelona is
seeking its fourth Champions League title in
eight years and is closing in on its sixth
Spanish league championship in nine seasons.
Barcelona is 16-0-4 at home in the Champions
League since a loss to Ruben Kazan in
October 2009.
Milan lost by four goals for the first time
since a 4-0 Champions League defeat at
Manchester United in March 2010.
In the night’s other match, Galatasaray won
3-2 at Schalke to advance on 4-3 aggregate
and reach the quarterfinals for the first time
since 2001.
After Roman Neustaedter put Schalke
ahead in the 17th minute, Galatasaray took a
2-1 lead when Hamit Altintop scored against
his former team in the 37th and Burak Yilmaz
got a goal in the 42nd. Michel Bastos scored
for the hosts in the 63rd, leaving the Turkish
team ahead on away goals, and Umut Bulut
ended any doubt when he scored for
Galatasaray in the fifth minute of stoppage
time.
Real Madrid, Juventus, Borussia Dortmund
and Paris Saint-Germain also are in Friday’s
quarterfinal draw. In the final second-round
matches Wednesday, Arsenal tries to overturn
a 3-1 deficit at Bayern Munich and Porto goes
to Malaga with a 1-0 lead.
If Arsenal is eliminated, England won’t
have a team in the last eight for the first time
since the 1995-96 season.
Lionel Messi
15
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Gonzalez back to Falcons;
Fitzpatrick cut by Bills
The Baltimore Ravens are paying the
price for winning a Super Bowl.
The NFL champions lost two key
components of their defense, linebackers
Paul Kruger and Dannell Ellerbe, as free
agency began Tuesday. On Monday, they
traded star receiver Anquan Boldin, a
key to their title run, to San Francisco —
the team the Ravens beat 34-31 to win
the championship.
Kruger went north to division rival
Cleveland for a five-year, $40 million
deal, while Ellerbe headed south to
Miami for $35 million over five years.
The 49ers didn’t go untouched, either.
After giving up a sixth-round draft pick
for Boldin, they saw tight end Delanie
Walker leave for Tennessee.
San Francisco also confirmed the trade
of backup quarterback Alex Smith to
Kansas City, a deal that was known for
weeks. The 49ers will receive the
Chiefs’ second-round pick, 34th overall,
in this year’s draft and a conditional pick
in next year’s draft.
The 32-year-old Boldin expressed sur-
prise that he was traded.
“I thought this was the last stop of my
career but regardless of the circum-
stances I came here to win a
Championship ... and in February we
came home Champions,” he said on
Twitter.
16
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Sports brief
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 38 23 .623 —
Brooklyn 38 27 .585 2
Boston 34 29 .540 5
Toronto 25 39 .391 14 1/2
Philadelphia 24 39 .381 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 48 14 .774 —
Atlanta 34 29 .540 14 1/2
Washington 20 42 .323 28
Orlando 18 47 .277 31 1/2
Charlotte 14 50 .219 35
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 39 24 .619 —
Chicago 35 28 .556 4
Milwaukee 32 30 .516 6 1/2
Detroit 23 43 .348 17 1/2
Cleveland 22 42 .344 17 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 49 16 .754 —
Memphis 42 19 .689 5
Houston 34 30 .531 14 1/2
Dallas 30 33 .476 18
New Orleans 22 43 .338 27
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 47 17 .734 —
Denver 43 22 .662 4 1/2
Utah 33 31 .516 14
Portland 29 33 .468 17
Minnesota 22 39 .361 23 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 45 20 .692 —
Golden State 36 29 .554 9
L.A. Lakers 34 31 .523 11
Phoenix 22 42 .344 22 1/2
Sacramento 22 43 .338 23
Monday’sGames
Philadelphia 106, Brooklyn 97
San Antonio 105, Oklahoma City 93
Utah 103, Detroit 90
Denver 108, Phoenix 93
Golden State 92, New York 63
Tuesday’sGames
Cleveland 95,Washington 90
Charlotte 100, Boston 74
L.A. Lakers 106, Orlando 97
Brooklyn 108, New Orleans 98
Miami 98, Atlanta 81
Minnesota 107, San Antonio 83
Dallas 115, Milwaukee 108
Memphis at Portland, Late
Wednesday’sGames
Miami at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 27 19 8 0 38 100 78
New Jersey 26 12 9 5 29 65 75
N.Y. Rangers 25 13 10 2 28 64 61
N.Y. Islanders 26 11 12 3 25 77 88
Philadelphia 27 12 14 1 25 75 82
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 26 17 5 4 38 84 66
Boston 24 17 4 3 37 72 53
Ottawa 26 13 8 5 31 61 54
Toronto 27 15 11 1 31 81 75
Buffalo 27 10 14 3 23 70 84
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 25 15 9 1 31 79 69
Winnipeg 26 13 11 2 28 68 76
Tampa Bay 26 11 14 1 23 88 81
Washington 25 10 14 1 21 69 76
Florida 27 7 14 6 20 66 101
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 26 21 2 3 45 85 58
St. Louis 26 14 10 2 30 80 79
Detroit 26 12 9 5 29 68 66
Nashville 26 11 9 6 28 58 61
Columbus 27 10 12 5 25 62 74
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 25 12 7 6 30 68 68
Minnesota 25 13 10 2 28 59 61
Edmonton 26 10 11 5 25 64 76
Colorado 25 10 11 4 24 62 73
Calgary 24 9 11 4 22 64 82
PacificDivision
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 25 19 3 3 41 87 63
Los Angeles 24 14 8 2 30 71 60
San Jose 25 11 8 6 28 58 61
Phoenix 25 12 10 3 27 72 72
Dallas 25 12 11 2 26 67 71
NOTE:Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday’sGames
Vancouver 2, Columbus 1, SO
Buffalo 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Carolina 4,Washington 0
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 3, Florida 2
Winnipeg 5,Toronto 2
St. Louis 4, San Jose 2
Anaheim 2, Minnesota 1
Nashville 4, Dallas 0
Edmonton 4, Colorado 0
Wednesday’sGames
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
Florida at Boston, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 2 0 0 6 3 1
Columbus 1 1 0 3 4 2
Sporting KC 1 1 0 3 4 3
Philadelphia 1 1 0 3 3 4
Houston 1 0 0 3 2 0
Toronto FC 1 1 0 3 2 2
New England 1 0 0 3 1 0
D.C. 1 1 0 3 1 2
New York 0 1 1 1 4 5
Chicago 0 2 0 0 0 5
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Vancouver 2 0 0 6 3 1
Los Angeles 1 0 0 3 4 0
Chivas USA 1 1 0 3 3 4
Real Salt Lake 1 1 0 3 2 1
FC Dallas 1 1 0 3 2 3
San Jose 1 1 0 3 2 3
Portland 0 1 1 1 4 5
Seattle 0 1 0 0 0 1
Colorado 0 2 0 0 1 3
NOTE:Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday’sGames
Toronto FC 2, Sporting Kansas City 1
Colorado , Philadelphia
D.C. United 1, Real Salt Lake 0
New England 1, Chicago 0
Vancouver 2, Columbus 1
Montreal 2, Portland 1
Sunday’sGames
Philadelphia 2, Colorado 1
Chivas USA 3, FC Dallas 1
San Jose 2, New York 1
Saturday, March 16
D.C. United at New York, 12:30 p.m.
Chicago at Sporting Kansas City, 3 p.m.
Toronto FC at Montreal, 4 p.m.
New England at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Columbus, 5:30 p.m.
Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.
Portland at Seattle FC, 8 p.m.
Sunday, March17
Houston at FC Dallas, 1 p.m.
Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 5 p.m.
SECONDROUND
GROUPONE
At Tokyo
Thursday, March 7
Netherlands 6, Cuba 2
Friday, March 8
Japan 4,Taiwan 3, 10 innings
Saturday, March 9
Cuba 14,Taiwan 0
Sunday, March 10
Japan 16, Netherlands 4
Monday, March 11
Netherlands 7, Cuba 6
Tuesday, March 12
Japan 10, Netherlands 6
GROUPTWO
At Miami
Tuesday, March 12
Dominican Republic 5, Italy 4
United States 7, Puerto Rico 1
Wednesday, March 13
Italy vs. Puerto Rico, 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 14
Dominican Republic vs. United States, 7 p.m.
Friday, March 15
Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 loser, 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 16
Game 5 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 1 p.m.
SEMIFINALS
At San Francisco
Sunday, March 17
Group 2 runner-up vs. Japan, 9 p.m.
Monday, March 18
Netherlands vs. Group 2 winner, 9 p.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
At San Francisco
Tuesday, March 19
Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with S
Rashad Johnson on a three-year contract.
ATLANTA FALCONS—Agreed to terms with LT
Sam Baker on a six-year contract.
BALTIMORE RAVENS—Signed LS Morgan Cox and
WR/KR David Reed to two-year contracts.
BUFFALO BILLS—Released QB Ryan Fitzpatrick.
CHICAGO BEARS—Agreed to terms with TE
Martellus Bennett on a four-year contract and LT
Jermon Bushrod on a five-year contract. Signed
DT Henry Melton to his franchise tender.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed DE Wallace
Gilberry to a contract extension.
CLEVELAND BROWNS—Agreed to terms with LB
Paul Kruger on a five-year contract.
DETROIT LIONS—Agreed to terms with S Amari
Spievey on a one-year contract.
HOUSTON TEXANS—Released WR Kevin Walter.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Agreed to terms with OL
Gosder Cherilus,OL Donald Thomas,CB Greg Toler
and LB Erik Walden.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Traded WR Percy Harvin
to Seattle for 2013 first- and seventh-round draft
picks and a 2014 third-round draft pick. Termi-
nated the contract of CB Antoine Winfield.
Re-signed T Phil Loadholt.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Released CB Nnamdi
Asomugha. Signed CB Bradley Fletcher,TE James
Casey, S Patrick Chung, LB Jason Phillips and DL
Isaac Sopoaga.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Re-signed LB Larry
Foote,WR Plaxico Burress and TE David Johnson.
Tenderedcontract offerstoRBJonathanDwyer,RB
Isaac Redman, NT Steve McLendon and WR Em-
manuel Sanders.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Released TE Randy
McMichael. Claimed RB Foswhitt Whittaker off
waivers from Arizona.
ST. LOUIS RAMS—Agreed to terms with TE Jared
Cook on a five-year contract.
TENNESSEE TITANS—Announced the retirement
of G Steve Hutchinson.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Agreed to terms with
P Sav Rocca on a two-year contract.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Named Nelson Norman
director of baseball operations for the Dominican
Republic.
BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned OF Alex Hassan
and RHP Steven Wright to Pawtucket (IL). Reas-
signed RHP Pedro Beato, 1B/OF Mark Hamilton,
OF Jeremy Hazelbaker and OF Juan Carlos Linares
to their minor league camp.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Optioned LHP Chris
Dwyer and LHP Justin Marks to Omaha (PCL) and
LHP John Lamb to Northwest Arkansas (TL).
SEATTLEMARINERS—OptionedLHPAnthonyFer-
nandez to Jackson (SL).
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES—Optioned RHP Cory Rasmus
to Gwinnett (IL) and RHP Juan Jaime and RHP
Aaron Northcraft to Mississippi (SL). Reassigned
LHP Ryan Buchter, LHP Yohan Flande, RHP Gus
Schlosser,CLuisDeLaCruz,CBraedenSchlehuber,
C Jose Yepez.
MLS GLANCE WORLD BASEBALL
CLASSIC
TRANSACTIONS
Raiders cut Bey, Huff at start of free agency
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — The Oakland
Raiders cut ties with two former
first-round picks on Tuesday by
releasing starting receiver Darrius
Heyward-Bey and defensive back
Michael Huff.
The Raiders also cut defensive
end Dave Tollefson and re-signed
cornerback Phillip Adams to a one-
year deal before the start of the
league year.
The moves to get rid of Heyward-
Bey and Huff leave just three of
Oakland’s former first-round picks
on the roster with linebacker
Rolando McClain also expected to
be released this offseason.
The lack of production from high
draft picks is a major reason why
the Raiders have lost the second-
most games in the NFL over the past
10 seasons with 111. Oakland has
failed to post a winning record or
make the playoffs during that stint.
Late owner Al Davis’ death in
October 2011 led to drastic changes
in the organization with Reggie
McKenzie taking over as general
manager and hiring Dennis Allen as
coach. The team went 4-12 under
the new regime last season as
McKenzie began a major roster
overhaul that is still ongoing.
While Heyward-Bey has been
mostly a disappointment in his
career, the move to get rid of Huff
comes as some surprise since he
was the team’s most consistent
defensive back last season.
“The Raiders would like to thank
Michael Huff and Darrius Heyward-
Bey for their contributions to our
organization, both on the field and
especially in our community, over
the last several years,” the team said
in a statement. “We sincerely wish
them well in their future endeavors.”
Heyward-Bey was one of Davis’
most controversial draft picks in
2009 when he was selected seventh
overall based on his blazing speed
ahead of more productive college
receivers like Michael Crabtree,
Percy Harvin and Jeremy Maclin.
After having just nine catches as a
rookie and 26 in his second year,
Heyward-Bey showed signs of
emerging in 2011 when he caught
64 passes for 975 yards and four
touchdowns.
FOOD 17
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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• 1:00 IRISH DANCING
PERFORMANCE
& LESSONS
• 2:30-5:30 EMPEROR
NORTON
CEILI BAND
• 4:00 GUINNESS GIRLS
• 6:30'TILL LATE
DJ VANILLI
By J.M Hirsch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This recipe will require that you set
aside your aversion to anchovies. But if
you are up to the task, you will be richly
rewarded.
It is unfortunate that so many people
won’t give these tiny little flavor bombs a
fair chance. They effortlessly and quickly
add such intense, savory — meaty! — fla-
vor, they should be in regular rotation in
any home kitchen, and particularly with
any cook who struggles to get a great din-
ner on the table on a busy weeknight.
That said, I get it. Downing a whole
fish — even a tiny one — is a turnoff for
most people.
But that’s why this recipe is perfect for
you. The magic of anchovies — aside,
that is, from not tasting even a little bit
fishy — is that when added to a hot skil-
let, they melt away, dissolving into a fla-
vorful sauce reminiscent more of a steak
than of the sea. And that is why they form
the base of so many Italian sauces.
For this recipe, the goal was simplicity
— a few simple, potent ingredients that
would meld together in no time into a
phenomenal sauce to toss with pasta.
GEMILLI PASTA WITH
ANCHOVIES AND BREADCRUMBS
Gemilli pasta — small twists — has a
wonderful texture and does a great job of
capturing the sauce in this recipe. But
pasta is pasta, so use whatever shape you
have or prefer.
Start to finish: 30 minutes
Pasta recipe to make you love anchovies
FDA head says menu
labeling ‘thorny’ issue
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Diners will have to wait a little longer to
find calorie counts on most restaurant chain menus, in super-
markets and on vending machines.
Writing a new menu labeling law “has gotten extremely
thorny,” says the head of the Food and Drug Administration, as
the agency tries to figure out who should be covered by it.
The 2010 health care law charged the FDA with requiring
chain restaurants and other establishments that serve food to
put calorie counts on menus and in vending machines. The
agency issued a proposed rule in 2011, but the final rules have
since been delayed as some of those non-restaurant establish-
ments have lobbied hard to be exempt.
While the restaurant industry has signed on to the idea and
helped to write the new regulations, supermarkets, conven-
ience stores and other retailers that sell prepared food say they
want no part of it.
“There are very, very strong opinions and powerful voices
both on the consumer and public health side and on the indus-
try side, and we have worked very hard to sort of figure out
what really makes sense and also what is implementable,”
FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a recent inter-
view with The Associated Press.
Hamburg said menu labeling has turned out to be one of the
FDA’s most challenging issues, and while requiring calorie
counts in some establishments might make sense on paper, “in
practice it really would be very hard.” She did not say what
specific types of establishments she was referring to.
The challenges of putting such a law in place — and decid-
ing whom it should apply to — were made clear Monday
when a judge struck down New York City’s ban on large sug-
ary drinks. State Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling said
in his ruling that the 16-ounce limit on sodas and other high-
calorie drinks arbitrarily applied to only some sweet beverages
and some places that sell them. The new limits, championed
by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, were supposed to take effect
Tuesday.
Hamburg said the FDA is in the final stages of writing the
menu labeling regulations and the final rules should come out
in the “relative near term.” The FDA has tentatively said the
rules are due this spring, but that deadline may be optimistic
as the food industry and regulators continue to haggle over
The magic of anchovies is that when added to a hot skillet,they melt away,dissolving
into a flavorful sauce reminiscent more of a steak than of the sea.
See PASTA, Page 18
See CALORIES, Page 18
18
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD/LOCAL
Now Open!
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
$1 Fish
TACO
Servings: 4
1 pound gemilli pasta
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2-ounce tin oil-packed anchovies
8 cloves garlic, minced
2 large tomatoes, diced
Ground black pepper, to taste
1/2 cup coarse unseasoned bread-
crumbs (such as panko)
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus
extra for serving
Bring a large saucepan of salted water
to a boil. Add the pasta and cook until al
dente, about 6 to 7 minutes. Reserve 1/4
cup of the cooking water, then drain and
return the pasta to the pot. Drizzle the
pasta with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil,
toss, then cover and set aside.
Meanwhile, in a large saute pan over
medium-high, heat the olive oil. Add the
anchovies and saute for 5 minutes,
breaking them up with a silicone spatu-
la until they dissolve into a paste. Add
the garlic and saute for another minute,
then add the tomato. Cook, stirring
often, until the tomato begins to break
down, about 7 minutes. Season with
pepper. For a thinner sauce, stir in a bit
of the reserved pasta cooking water.
Uncover the pasta and, while using
tongs to toss, sprinkle in the bread-
crumbs and Parmesan, tossing until
evenly coated. Divide the pasta between
4 serving bowls, then spoon some of the
sauce into the center of each. Top each
serving with additional grated
Parmesan.
Nutrition information per serving:
730 calories; 210 calories from fat (29
percent of total calories); 23 g fat (6 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 25 mg choles-
terol; 100 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 6 g
sugar; 30 g protein; 900 mg sodium.
Continued from page 17
PASTA
how they will be written.
The 2011 proposed rules would require chain restaurants
with 20 or more locations, along with bakeries, grocery stores,
convenience stores and coffee chains, to clearly post the calo-
rie count for each item on their menus. Additional nutritional
information would have to be available upon request. The rules
would also apply to vending machines if calorie information
isn’t already visible on the package.
The proposed rules exempted movie theaters, airplanes,
bowling alleys and other businesses whose primary business is
not to sell food. Alcohol would also be exempt.
Supermarkets and convenience stores are looking for similar
exemptions in the final rules. Representatives for the super-
market industry say it could cost them up to a billion dollars to
put the rules in place — costs that would be passed on to con-
sumers.
“It’s a huge problem for us,” says Erik Lieberman of the
Food Marketing Institute, which represents retail grocery
chains.
Continued from page 17
CALORIES
and lived long enough to dedicate the two tunnels before he
died in early 2008 at the age of 80.
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, sits in Lantos’ former
seat now and was on the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors in the 1980s when a few alternatives were offered
up by Caltrans to improve traffic conditions on the coast but
none of them included tunnels.
“It’s the hallmark of a grass-roots idea to drill a hole through
the mountain,” Speier told the Daily Journal yesterday. “It was
discarded as a harebrained idea at first.”
The tunnels, Speier said, will now create a level of certainty
people on the coast have not had for years.
Sometimes the slide would close for weeks, she said, wreak-
ing havoc on residents and the economy.
Don Horsley, current president of the Board of Supervisors,
represents the coast now.
“It’s going to provide a safe, reliable connecting route along
the coastside. The opening of the tunnels will offer us an
opportunity to turn the old road into a world-class destination
for hikers, bicyclists and sightseers to see some of the most
beautiful parts of the California coast,” Horsley wrote the
Daily Journal in an email.
The grand opening, essentially a private affair for digni-
taries, will also include a parade of 30 vehicles representing
100 years from 1913 to 2013, said Mitch Reid, with the
Citizens Alliance for Tunnel Solution.
A 1913 Model T will lead the parade, he said.
Continued from page 17
TUNNELS
scratch,” said Cohen, adding they’re the
kind of mom and pop store that
Burlingame is all about.
Betti is happy to have the help. Without
a little extra something, he’s not sure how
long the place will remain open. Warm
weather normally brings a spike in busi-
ness, Betti is hopeful that will be a boost.
Also, Betti said he will most likely need to
raise prices, although didn’t really want to
do so.
When the lease came up on the City
Council agenda last week, Cohen and
Baylock decided to do something.
Baylock is prohibited from discussing the
contract, despite the lease being on city-
owned property, because her son works at
Sam’s part time. She said that actually was
a good thing since it allows her to help
with the fundraising.
Both Cohen and Baylock have memo-
ries of Sam’s and noted it’s provided the
first job for countless local teens over the
years.
Sam’s Italian Sandwich Company, orig-
inally located at 297 California Drive in
Burlingame, opened in 1972. The idea
came from when Betti would drive to
North Beach in San Francisco to visit a
deli called Freddie’s while in high school.
Betti was sold on the idea of owning his
own shop. At 22, along with his friend
Rich Vento, who would be his partner dur-
ing the first five years of Sam’s, the busi-
ness was born.
There’s never been a Sam tied to Sam’s.
It was a name the guys liked. Things start-
ed simply in the space previously used as
a cabbie dispatch office. Four sandwiches
were available. It was 75 cents for a medi-
um and $1.10 for a large. In the ’90s the
menu expanded to five items, including
turkey.
Williams joined the team before turkey
was offered on the menu. She worked at a
flower shop around the corner, said Betti,
adding they had started dating. When the
flower shop closed, Williams came to
work at the shop until something better
came along. They’re still together but now
the shop has pictures of their family and
grandsons in it.
The menu had only five sandwiches on
it until the move in 2005. Betti explained
simply that the menu was limited because
of the small space of the original location.
Rising rents moved the locally-loved
sandwich shop slightly down the road to a
former Greyhound bus depot at the inter-
section of Howard Drive, California Drive
and Highland Avenue. Moving gave Betti
the option to expand the menu to include
hot sandwiches, hot dogs, soup and chili.
Some things have remained the same.
The shop has always been a bit seasonal
with higher sales in the summer — some-
thing Betti hopes will remain true as the
weather warms up.
For more information, or to make a
donation, visit savesams.com.
Alternatively, checks made out to The City
of Burlingame, with “Sam’s Sandwiches”
in the memo section, and mailed to 1527
Newlands Ave., Burlingame, CA 94010.
Money will be delivered to Burlingame
City Hall when the goal is reached.
Continued from page 1
SAM’S
FOOD 19
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This classic Irish quick bread — no rising
time needed — lends itself to numerous creative
variations. Traditional recipes often call for
nothing but flour, salt, baking soda and butter-
milk or yogurt. Currants are a common addition,
but that’s just the start. Any number of seeds,
nuts, chopped dried fruit and even chocolate can
be added.
For our take on soda bread, we decided to
have a little of everything. We started with a rich
take on the classic recipe, studding it with cur-
rants and caraway seeds. But then we also show
you how to swap those out to make an oatmeal-
rye version with walnuts and fresh thyme and
chives. And for a sweet finish, we created a
chocolate variation, adding a generous 1/2 cup
of cocoa powder, dried cherries and dark choco-
late.
To create your own variations, start with the
basic recipe and leave out the caraway seeds and
currants. Add 1 to 2 teaspoons of seasonings and
about 1 cup of dried fruit, nuts or seeds.
IRISH SODA BREAD THREE WAYS
Start to finish: 1 hour (20 minutes active)
Servings: 12 (per variety)
4 cups white pastry flour
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon caraway seeds (optional)
6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter, melt-
ed
3/4 cup dried currants, plumped in hot water
1 egg
1 2/3 cups buttermilk or plain regular yogurt
(not Greek style)
Heat the oven to 400 F. Coat a loaf pan or a 9-
by-9-inch baking pan with cooking spray.
In a large bowl, whisk together the flour,
sugar, salt, baking soda and caraway seeds, if
using. While stirring, mix in the melted butter
until small lumps form and the butter has been
evenly distributed. Gently stir in the currants.
In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and
buttermilk. All at once, pour the egg-buttermilk
mixture into the flour mixture. Stir gently but
thoroughly, just until the flour mixture is mois-
tened. Do not over-mix the dough or the bread
will be tough.
Scoop the dough into the prepared pan and
bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until a wooden
skewer or cake tester inserted at the center
comes out clean. Allow to cool in the pan for 5
to 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire
rack. Serve warm with butter or jam.
OATMEAL-RYE SODA BREAD
WITH HERBS AND WALNUTS
Follow the recipe above, but instead of white
pastry flour substitute 2 1/2 cups whole-wheat
pastry flour, 1 cup oatmeal and 1 cup rye flour.
Omit the caraway seeds. In place of the cur-
rants, stir in 3 tablespoons chopped fresh
thyme, 3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives and
1 cup chopped toasted walnuts. Bake as direct-
ed.
DOUBLE CHOCOLATE
CHERRY SODA BREAD
Follow the main recipe, but sift 1/2 cup cocoa
powder into the dry ingredients in the first step.
Also, increase the sugar to 2/3 cup and omit the
caraway seeds. In place of the currants, stir in 1
cup chopped dried cherries and 1 cup chopped
dark chocolate. Bake as directed.
Three creative takes on the classic Irish soda bread
To create your own soda bread variation,start with the basic recipe and leave out the caraway
seeds and currants.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13
RSVP Deadline for San Mateo
County Newcomers Club
Luncheon. The Luncheon is March
19. Noon. Divino Restaurant, 968
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Sheri Boles,
former commission spokesperson
with the California Public Utilities, will
speak. Checks must be $25 per
person and must be received today
in order to attend. For more
information call 286-0688.
Free Blood Pressure and $2 Blood
Glucose Screening. 9 a.m. to 10:30
a.m. Eight-hour fast, water and meds
only, and delay diabetes meds. Drop
in. For more information call 696-
3660.
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Diversity Job Fair. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
San Mateo County Event Center, 2495
S. Delaware St., San Mateo. Free. Meet
growing Bay Area employers
recruiting for hundreds of job and
career openings in diverse industries
from entry-level to professional and
technical. Dress professionally and
bring several copies of your resume.
For more information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
Phase2Careers’ Diversity Job Fair.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. San Mateo County
Event Center, 2495 S. Delaware St., San
Mateo. Free admission and parking.
For more information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
Opening of ‘Plowing Ahead:
Historic Peninsula Farming.’ The
exhibit will be open every day except
Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. $5 for
adults. $3 for seniors and students.
Free for children 5 and under. For
more information call 299-0104.
42nd Street Moon Theatre Goup’s
20th AnniversaryLuncheon. 11 a.m.
(social) and noon (lunch). Basque
Cultural Center, 599 Railroad Ave.,
South San Francisco. Stephanie
Roades-Bickham will be speaking.
Reservations required. $30. For more
information or to RSVP go to
www.canadianwomensclub.org.
American Cancer Society’s
Volunteer Orientation. 3:30 p.m. to
4 p.m. 3 Twin Dolphin Drives, Suite
175, Redwood Shores. Help save a life.
Come learn about being a Volunteer
driver, legislative ambassador,
committee member or other
opportunities. For more information
contact brenda.gilbert@cancer.org.
Xbox 360 Wednesdays. 3:30 p.m. to
5 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Stop by for fun
Xbox 360 with Kinect movement
games, such as Dance Central, Kinect
Sports and more. No registration
required. For ages 12 to 19. For more
information call 591-8286.
Dealing with Bullying
Presentation. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Foster City Teen Center, 670 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. The RESPECT! Before
the workshop, there will be a viewing
of the 2011 documentary ‘Bully’ at
4:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be
served. Free. For more information go
to fostercity.org.
Medical Class. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Skyline College, 3300 College Drive,
San Bruno. Free. Please wear
comfortable shoes and clothing. For
more information call 616-7096.
Rainwater harvesting and gray
water reuse workshop. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Learn methods for
harvesting rainwater and capturing
household gray water for use in your
garden and landscape. Free. For more
information call 259-2339.
Paula Harris and The Beasts of
Blues with the The Big Ass Brass. 7
p.m. The Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. Doors open at 6 p.m.
Musicians should sign-up early to
play. $5 cover. For more information
visit www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Redwood City Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Rose
arranging demonstration. Learn how
to make dazzling rose arrangements
worthy of show. Rosarian Barbara
Gordon will demonstrate her
winning rose arranging skills. Free.
For more information call 465-3967.
THURSDAY, MARCH 14
Expungement: Sealing Your
Criminal and Conviction record.
Noon. San Mateo County Law
Library, 710 Hamilton St., Redwood
City. Free. For more information call
363-4913.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Frankenweenie.’ 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Movie is rated PG and
lasts 87 minutes. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Film Screening: ‘Not Exactly
Cooperstown.’ 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Join filmmaker Jon
Leonoudakis for a screening of ‘Not
Exactly Cooperstown,’ an unorthodox
look at America’s most orthodox
game. Attendees are encouraged to
arrive in their finest baseball regalia
for a special prize. For more
information call 591-8286.
Drop-In eBook Program. 6 p.m. to 7
p.m. South San Francisco Public Main
Library, 840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. Library staff will have
information on the library’s eBook
collections and show patrons how to
download eBooks to their electronic
devices. Patrons are encouraged to
bring their eReaders and tablet
computers to the event. For more
information call 829-3860.
Backyard Composting Workshop.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. San Carlos Adult
Community Center, 601 Chestnut St.,
San Carlos. For more information
email info@recycleworks.org.
San Mateo County Republican
Central Committee. 7 p.m. American
Legion San Mateo Post 82, 130 S.
Blvd., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 931-4596.
Weaving Moments Together to
Attain Social Justice: Talk by
Dolores Huerta. 7:30 p.m. Note
Dame de Namur Theatre, Notre Dame
de Namur University, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. Free. For more
information call 508-3713.
FRIDAY, MARCH 15
16th Annual Senior Health Fair. 9
a.m. to noon. Municipal Services
Building, 33 Arroyo Drive, South San
Francisco. Free screenings by Kaiser
Permante, health awareness services,
community resources. Free. For more
information call 829-3820.
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031 Pacific
Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Census Records Workshop. 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive,
San Bruno. Genealogical workshop
on how to locate records on the U.S.
census from 1790 to 1940. $15
payable in advance. For more
information or to reserve a space call
238-3488.
St. Patrick’s Day Celebration:
Corned Beef Lunch and the Nice‘N
Easy Band. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Tickets
available at the front desk. For more
information call 616-7150.
Happy Hour and Lighthouse String
Band. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. New Leaf
Community Markets, 150 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. Free. Join for a
special happy hour featuring a wine
tasting presented by Darlene de la
Cerna of Classic Artisan Wines and
music by the Lighthouse String Band.
This is a family-friendly event but you
must be 21 to sample. For more
information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
The Annual Member’s Show
Reception. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The
Coastal Arts League Museum, 300
Main St., Half Moon Bay. This annual
event allows every dues paying
member of the Coastal Arts League
to bring at least one piece of their
own work to the show. Wall space will
be an important criterion as to how
many pieces will be accepted. Come
see what some of your neighbors are
up to. Gallery open Friday through
Monday from noon to 5 p.m. Closes
March 31. For more information visit
coastalartsleague.com.
A Virtuoso Debut/Brahms’ First
concert with pre-concert lecture. 7
p.m. Fox Theatre, 2223 Broadway,
Redwood City. Concert begins at 8
p.m. after the lecture. $40 for general
admission, $35 for seniors and $20 for
youth/students. For more information
and for tickets go to
peninsulasymphony.org.
San Carlos Children’s Theater
Presents ‘The U-u-ugly Duckling.’
7 p.m. Mustang Hall, Central Middle
School, 828 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
$12 in advance at
www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com
or $15 at the door. For more
information call 594-2730.
The Holy Spirit and Power
Conference. 7:30 p.m. Victory
International Church, 1730 S.
Amphlett Blvd., San Mateo. Healings,
signs and wonders led by Mike
Zachman, host of The Point Live radio
broadcast. Free. For more information
call 655-4748.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Supervisors. Maltbie said the recently
passed half-cent sales tax known as
Measure A gives the county a 10-year
window to right the ship by creating a
financially stable and sustainable organi-
zation that uses new tools and re-estab-
lishes public confidence in government.
Supervisor Adrienne Tissier lauded the
plan, particularly pilot programs that
might shake up the status quo.
“We have in some areas become stale,”
she said.
Maltbie’s plan calls for reclassifying
future workers and programs into seven
categories: regular, term, temporary/extra
help/fellowship/paid interns, contractors,
volunteers, self-help and shared services.
He also suggested finding new ways to
retain workers such as dual career tracks.
Regular would be the smallest catego-
ry, meeting criteria like high-risk work,
policy development or critical decision
making. Maltbie estimates 10 percent to
15 percent fewer people in this category
countywide than currently but said it will
vary by department. A challenge, though,
is that criteria may favor management
over line workers and morale should suf-
fer if employees work side by side but
have different retirement systems. A
social worker in Child Protective Services
is a position that would fit the bill,
according to a report on the plan.
Limited term employees would have
benefits aside from a defined pension
plan. Some jobs have a fair degree of
turnover in large part because of housing
prices with the county essentially acting
as a training ground, Maltbie said.
This category would free the county
from offering pensions to those who
aren’t sticking around for a lengthy peri-
od but the learning curve and training
requirements might hamper productivity
and customer service.
To expand temporary and extra help,
Maltbie suggested researching the viabil-
ity of raising the 1,040 hour limit for all
short-term employees and providing
health care options. Maltbie’s office this
year is kicking off a fellowship pilot pro-
gram for recent college graduates work-
ing with policy and innovation to improve
community participation and use social
media. Another idea is creating “encore”
opportunities for retiring workers looking
to reinvent their careers or work beyond
normal retirement age.
The county has always made fair use of
its contractors and could do more,
Maltbie said, citing the private defender
program and fire protection as two exam-
ples of existing uses.
Volunteers and unpaid workers are a
way to supplement the workforce while
giving them the chance to connect further
with government. Self-help services con-
nect the public to the county without a
human middleman like voting by mail or
paying property taxes online, Maltbie
said.
Shared services are also another way to
cut costs and improve efficiency by com-
bining resources with local organizations
like cities, schools or nonprofits, he said.
Maltbie first introduced the idea of an
organization shakeup during the June
2012 budget hearings and, since then,
has convened a 23-member task force to
look at staffing models.
Maltbie was clear yesterday that any
adopted changes affect future staff not
current employees and will be imple-
mented with vacancies or the start of new
programs and projects.
Burlingame Councilman Michael
Brownrigg, who sat on the task force,
called the proposed changes “profound”
for the county’s residents and a way to
get out in front of change before it hap-
pens. Half the workforce has been in its
job four years or less and the county
can’t rely on workers staying put until
age 65 to earn compensation, he said.
Implementing the changes is no small
feat and will require the county to revise
its charter, civil service rule ordinance
and other personnel policies and process-
es. The county will likely make big mis-
takes during this “transformative” move
but that’s OK, said Supervisor Dave
Pine.
“I think that should be a mantra,” he
said.
The tentative schedule calls for discus-
sions beginning now all the way through
pilot projects in September. All projects,
like the “Nextdoor” information sharing
platform available later this year, will be
eligible for Measure A funds.
Continued from page 1
OVERHAUL
in the town in a manner that recognizes
the benefits of wireless communications
technology while accommodating the
values of the community. Specific points
of the ordinance reduce visual effects of
wireless communications facilities, pre-
serve the rural character of the town,
encourage co-location of facilities and
locate facilities where impacts on the
town’s residents are minimized.
Assistant City Manager Kathy Leroux
said Monday’s meeting had more than
100 people in attendance with a good
discussion about health and aesthetic
concerns. The goal is to draft an ordi-
nance to meet the town needs but also
work with businesses, she said.
The town plans to hold a third meeting
at 6 p.m. Monday, April 8 at Town Hall,
1600 Floribunda Ave. A temporary time-
line would have a discussion about a
possible ordinance going before the
council in May, with introduction in
June and possible adoption in July, said
Leroux.
Since 2006, there have been many
changes in the wireless industry, includ-
ing the implementation of new technolo-
gy and equipment, new legislation and
court rulings, and direction from the
Federal Communications Commission.
In February 2012, Congress made a
sweeping change to the Federal
Telecommunications Act requiring that
certain types of wireless projects be
allowed by state and local governments.
The Hillsborough City Council adopted
a moratorium on the processing of all
wireless communication facilities in
September to allow the community and
staff an opportunity to study the issue
and then to develop a new town wireless
ordinance to reflect that balance.
The conversation has already sparked
legal problems.
In December, a telephone company
filed a lawsuit against Hillsborough and
its City Council for the passage of an
urgency ordinance that puts a temporary
moratorium on the issuance of wireless
communications facility permits.
Filed by Newpath Networks and
Crown Castle West, the lawsuit says that
Crown submitted four applications to the
city in June to construct telecommunica-
tions and wireless broadband infrastruc-
ture in the city’s public right-of-way but
was told by city staff that the applica-
tions were incomplete, according to the
claim. Crown contends city staff
declared the applications incomplete to
give the council time to pass the urgency
ordinance, according to the claim. The
moratorium is in effect until Aug. 9,
2013. In total, Crown seeks 19 installa-
tions in Hillsborough and the town want-
ed to look at the total plan, Assistant
City Attorney Mark Hudak said previ-
ously.
Hillsborough has since filed a cross
complaint stating that Newpath
Networks and Crown Castle West is
requesting privileges offered to tele-
phone companies yet will not provide
those services, thus should not get the
access.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
WIRELESS
COMICS/GAMES
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numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

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8 LP player (hyph.)
12 Major nuisance
13 Afr. neighbor
14 -- -- for the money
15 Headless nail
16 Dull color (2 wds.)
18 Caesar’s false friend
20 Lagoon protector
21 Tease
22 Firefy holder
23 Confned
26 Gets stuck (2 wds.)
29 Tints
30 Puffn kin
31 Beldam
33 Always, in poems
34 Slalom obstacle
35 Tow-away --
36 Crowbars
38 Giggle (hyph.)
39 Nile reptile
40 Put down
41 Advantage
43 Like a castle
46 Made to ft
48 Hail a cab
50 Type of mgr.
51 Monopolize
52 Bone below the elbow
53 Small fry
54 Feel grateful
55 Edinburgh miss
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2 Stinging remark
3 Fact fudger
4 Toughs it out
5 Fix software
6 Yours and mine
7 Herr in Madras
8 Gorp consumers
9 As to (2 wds.)
10 Feudal estate
11 -- take forever!
17 Overstuffs
19 Skosh
22 Copacetic
23 Ernesto Guevara
24 Novelist Jean --
25 “Runaway Bride” groom
26 Protrudes
27 Oops! (hyph.)
28 Glazier’s unit
30 Org. for seniors
32 -- whiz!
34 Fresco base
35 Lively
37 Safes
38 Aunt, in Madrid
40 Evade
41 El --, Texas
42 Shopper’s aid
43 Pet plea
44 First name in jazz
45 Rather and Marino
46 Do doilies
47 Letter before sigma
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wednesday, MarCH 13, 2013
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You are presently in
a positive cycle in terms of your fnancial affairs.
You might even acquire something that was long
overdue.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- One of the best ways
to get your co-workers’ cooperation is to make sure
that what’s good for you can be great for them as
well. It’s one of the keys to success.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Rather than vying for
center stage, keep a low profle, especially if you’ve
been given a key role to play. It’s the best way to get
the acknowledgment that you crave.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- If you want some
interesting things to occur in your social life, you
can’t wait for the right people to come to you. Seek
them out yourself and, in a nice way, make your
presence felt.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- One of the best ways
to deal with a competitive situation is to take more
positive action than your adversaries do. Keep an
optimistic, proactive frame of mind, and you’ll come
out ahead.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Examine all new endeavors
not merely for what they can do for you immediately,
but how they can enhance your future. When you
look ahead, make sure all the pieces ft together.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Sometimes we fnd
ourselves in the excellent position of being able to
reap a harvest from seeds we haven’t sown. This
might be your scenario today, so be alert for such an
opportunity.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Snap judgments you
arrive at might not be as perceptive as those of
your mate’s. Listen to his or her input, which could
provide you with some alternatives that you haven’t
considered.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- The amount of zeal
you display while working on a job is likely to set the
tone that others will follow. If you want everything to
unobtrusively buzz along, maintain an accelerated
pace.
saGiTTarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You are likely to
have more fun and feel more comfortable in a small
gathering than in a large group. Try to stay within
your comfort zone.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If your primary
goal is to amply provide for those you love, you’ll
make sure that this objective is met, no matter what
the day may throw at you.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You should pay
attention to intuition that tells you the proper course
of action to take. Any afterthoughts will be less
accurate, and land you on the rocks.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday• Mar. 13, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • Mar. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
For assisted living facility
in South San Francisco
On the Job Training Available.
Apply in person
Westborough Royale,
89 Westborough Blvd, South SF
CAREGIVERS
WANTED
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
Mid Peninsula
CNAs needed
Hiring now!
Hourly & Live-ins
Drivers encouraged
Call Mon-Fri 9am – 3pm
Reliable Caregivers
415-436-0100
(650)286-0111
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
HOUSE CLEANERS WANTED
F/T and P/T. Monday thru Friday.
Experienced, transportation, bilingual
$11.00 to start. Gary (650)591-6037
NEWSPAPER
INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by
regular mail to
800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING COOKS - FT & PT, Good
Pay, D.O.E., Short Order Cooks, Apply in
Person @ Neal’s Coffee Shop, 114
DeAnza Blvd., San Mateo,
(650)581-1754
RESTAURANT -
CITY PUB is looking for an
experienced Food Server
capable of fitting in with our
fast paced team service.
Apply in Person,
10:30-5:00 M-F
2620 Broadway,
Redwood City
RESTAURANT STAFF WANTED -
Front, Bar & Kitchen. Apply in person at
1201 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519395
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Salih Oeztuerk
Agnieszka Hajdukiewicz
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Salih Oeztuerk, Agnieszka
Hajdukiewicz filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
a.Present name: Salih Oeztuerk
a.Proposed name: Salih Bazidi
b.Present name:Agnieszka Hajdukiewicz
b.Proposed name: Agnieszka Bazidi
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 11,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/15/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/07/2012
(Published, 02/20/13, 02/27/13, 3/06/13,
03/13/13)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519664
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Tina Jo Orban
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Tina Jo Orban filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Tina Jo Orban, aka Tina
J. Orban, aka Tina Orban
Proposed name: Toni Merie Orban
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/22/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/15/2012
(Published, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 3/13/13,
03/20/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254507
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Bradford Properties, 780 Brad-
ford St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Heesun Hong & Chong Sung Hong,
18 Lyme Lane, Foster City, CA 94404
and Ki Moon Hong and Myung Sook
Hong Trustees for the Ki Moon Hong &
Myung Sook Hong 1998 Revocable
Trust. The business is conducted by an
Unincorporated Assocation other than a
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Heesun Hong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 519711
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Antonio DeJesus AguilarVillalobos
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Antonio DeJesus AguilarVilla-
lobos filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Antonio / DeJesus Aguilar
/ Villalobos aka Antonio Aguilar
Proposed name: Antonio / DeJesus
/Aguilar Villalobos
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on April 11,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 02/22/2012
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/15/2012
(Published, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 3/13/13,
03/20/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254146
The following person is doing business
as: Parkview Produce Co., Inc., 125 Ter-
minal Ct #40 C, D, E, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Parkview
Produce Co., Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Robert Tantillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254436
The following person is doing business
as: Strands for Hair Inc., 44 42nd Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner:
Strands for Hair Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/06/1986.
/s/ Lisa Loufas Molinari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254431
The following person is doing business
as: Eros Beauty Salon, 965 Ralston Ave-
nue, BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Die-
mtuyen T. Truong, 2676 Orinda Dr., San
Jose, CA 95121. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Diemtuyen T. Truong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254329
The following person is doing business
as: Next Step, 702 Marshall St., Ste.
614, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Next Step Growth, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 10/01/2008.
/s/ Jennifer Vessels /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254499
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pure Beautiful Healing, 2) Pure
Beautiful Chi, 21 Eastwood Drive, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary Minfong
Ho, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/ Mary Minfong Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/20/13, 02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254425
The following person is doing business
as: Rufflewood, 400 Cherry Ave., SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Janet Gutierrez,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/03/2011.
/s/ Janet J. Gutierrez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254532
The following person is doing business
as: Ergo Rite, 358 De Anza Avenue,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owners: Ergo
Rite, CA. The business is conducted by a
Limited Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Dominic Toscanelli /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/27/13, 03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13).
23 Wednesday • Mar. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
INVITATION TO BIDDERS TO PREQUALIFY TO BID ON
THE BURLINGAME SCHOOL DISTRICT’S ROADWAY REALIGNMENT AT BURLINGAME
INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL PROJECT
1. Notice is hereby given that the governing board of the Burlingame School District has
determined that all bidders for the following District project (“Project”) must be
prequalified prior to submitting a bid on this Project:
- Roadway Realignment at Burlingame Intermediate School
2. Any contractor interested in bidding on this Project must submit fully completed
District prequalification forms and questionnaires (“Prequalification Package”) to the
District. Sealed Prequalification packages will be received until 10:00 a.m. on April 2,
2013 at the District Office, 1825 Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, CA 94010. All
Prequalification Packages shall be on the forms provided by the District.
Please note the district office will be closed April 1, 2013
3. Prequalification Packages will be available for pick-up at the following locations after
March 13, 2013:
A. District Office, 1825 Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, CA 94010 or
B. The office of the District’s Program Manager, Dreiling Terrones Architecture,
1103 Juanita Avenue, Burlingame, CA 94010.
4. To prequalify for the Project, a contractor is required, in addition to other criteria, to
possess a valid Class A State of California Contractor license. The contractor’s
license(s) must remain active and in good standing throughout the term of the Project.
5. If a contactor prequalifies to bid on the Project and is ultimately awarded a contract
for the Project, the following provisions apply:
A. The successful Bidder shall be required to furnish a 100 % Performance Bond and
a 100% Payment Bond if it is awarded the contract for the Project.
B. The successful Bidder may substitute securities for any monies withheld by the
District to ensure performance under the Contract, in accordance with the provisions
of section 22300 of the Public Contract Code.
C. The Contractor and all Subcontractors under the Contractor shall pay all laborers,
workers, and mechanics on all work included in this Contract not less than the
general prevailing rate of per diem wages and the general prevailing rate for holiday
and overtime work as determined by the Director of the Department of Industrial
Relations, State of California, for the locality in which the work is to be performed
within the boundaries of the District, pursuant to sections 1770 et seq. of the
California Labor Code. Prevailing wage rates are available from the District or on the
Internet at: <http://www.dir.ca.gov>.
6. The Prequalification Packages (questionnaire answers and financial statements)
submitted by contractors are not public records and are not open to public inspection.
All information provided will be kept confidential to the extent permitted by law.
However, the contents may be disclosed to third parties for the purpose of
verification, or investigation of substantial allegations, or in the appeal process,
however State law requires that the names of contractors applying for prequalification
status shall be public records subject to disclosure.
7. A contractor may be denied prequalification status for either omission of requested
information or falsification of information.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, March 13 and 20, 2013.
NOTICE OF Availability and Notice of Intent to Adopt a Negative Declaration for
the SamTrans Service Plan
Project Title: SamTrans Service Plan
Responsible/Lead Agency: San Mateo County Transit District,
1250 San Carlos Ave., P.O. Box 3006,
San Carlos, CA 94070-1306
Project Location: San Mateo County plus bus service to San Francisco and
Palo Alto in Santa Clara County
Contact: Hilda Lafebre, Manager, Capital Projects & Environmental
Planning, (650) 622-7842 lafebreh@samtrans.com
Review Period: March 13, 2013 to April 15, 2013
Project Description:
SamTrans currently provides 48 bus routes throughout San Mateo County with service into the
cities of San Francisco and Palo Alto. The proposed SamTrans Service Plan (SSP) would make
changes to existing bus service by: 1) improving bus service along El Camino Real; 2) creating
an enhanced core market bus network; 3) modifying bus service through consolidations, route
changes, and service frequency changes; 4) discontinuation of certain bus services; 5) introduc-
tion of new routes; and 6) introduction of an alternative services pilot program.
The proposed SSP is intended to lead to an increase in ridership and revenue and to provide
better service to the communities currently served without incurring additional operating costs to
the agency. A detailed description of the proposed SSP and mapping of the proposed changes
by bus route is provided on SSP website: http://www.samtrans.com/Planning/Planning_and_Re-
search/SamTransServicePlan/SSP-StudyReportsAndDocuments.html
Negative Declaration:
In accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the CEQA Guidelines,
SamTrans prepared a Draft Initial Study / Negative Declaration for the SSP. Based on the Initial
Study, staff determined that the SSP could not have a significant on the environment. The pro-
posed SSP does not involve any physical alteration of the environment or the construction of
new facilities. Potential impacts of changes in bus routes related to traffic, air quality, noise and
greenhouse gas emissions were reviewed and found to be less than significant.
Public Comment Period:
March 13, 2013 to April 15, 2013
The public and all affected agencies are hereby invited to review the Draft Initial Study / Nega-
tive Declaration and submit written comments. Comments are due April 15, 2013, and should
be sent to Hilda Lafebre, San Mateo County Transit District, P.O. Box 3006, San Carlos, CA
94070-1306 or lafebreh@samtrans.com
Public Hearing Date:
The public hearing will be held at the San Mateo County Transit District Board Meeting on April
3, 2013 at 2:00 PM. The public hearing location is the Edward J. Bacciocco Auditorium, on the
second floor at SamTrans Administrative Offices, 1250 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos, CA 94070-
1306.
Document Availability: The Draft Initial Study / Negative Declaration and supporting technical
studies are available on the SSP project website: http://www.samtrans.com/Planning/Plan-
ning_and_Research/SamTransServicePlan/SSP-StudyReportsAndDocuments.html
Hardcopies of the Draft Initial Study / Negative Declaration are available for review at the San
Mateo County Transit District, 1250 San Carlos Ave, San Carlos, CA 94070-1306
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254718
The following person is doing business
as: Holistic Health Solutions, 3104 Cana-
nea Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Klang Business Services, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Sandra Klang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254358
The following person is doing business
as: B2B Tech, 321 37th Ave., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Maryan Beal, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/03/2013.
/s/ Maryan Beal/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254653
The following person is doing business
as: World Class Wine and Spirits, 144
Occidental Avenue, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: DJK Imports, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ David Konefal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254719
The following person is doing business
as: Package Unit Pros, 777 Niantic
Drive, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Dan Munier, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Daniel J. Munier /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254628
The following person is doing business
as: Cantilever Communication, 615
Woodland Avenue, MENLO PARK, CA
94025 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Jeffrey Koppelmaa, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Jeffrey Koppelmaa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/06/13, 03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254645
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Cobrahealthinfo, 2) Cobrainfo, 433
Airport Blvd., Ste. 550, Burlingame, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Bankrate, Inc., A Delaware
Corporation, DE. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2011.
/s/ James Gilmartin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254838
The following person is doing business
as: San Mateo Acupuncture Center, 126
2nd Ave. Ste. 100. SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Angela Galatierra-Ganding,
330 Van Buren Ave., Apt. 9, Oakland,
CA 94610. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Angela Galatierra-Ganding/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254571
The following person is doing business
as: ASJ Associates, 3281 Geoffrey Dr.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Augustine
Soto, Jr., same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Augustine Soto, Jr. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254834
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Money Management, 837
Jenevein Ave., #3, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Deborah McGraw, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Deborah McGraw /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254757
The following person is doing business
as: Craftsman Advisors, 40 Homeplace
Court, HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
William S. Wisialowski, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
09/13/2012.
/s/ William S. Wisialowski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254691
The following person is doing business
as: Garmex Foods, 937 Rollins Rd., Apt.
3, BURLINGAME, CA, 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jose
R. Garcia, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Jose R. Garcia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254856
The following person is doing business
as: Frank’s Delivery Service, 119 37th
Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Frank W. Colclough & Janet J. Col-
clough, same address. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Frank W. Colclough /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/13/13, 03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Jan. 31, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
EDIW, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1448 BURLINGAME AVE
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
February 27, March 6, 13, 2013
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-246197
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Law
Offices of Nancy Lu, 500 Airport Blvd.,
Ste. 100, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. The
fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on
08/12/2011. The business was conduct-
ed by: Nan Lu, same address.
/s/ Nan Lu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/11/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 02/27/13,
03/06/13, 03/14/13, 03/20/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-253162
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Re-
fresh Nail Care, 1305D Palmetto Ave-
nue, PACIFICA, CA 94044. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 02/15/2013. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Cindy Thai, 602
Cedar Court, Daly City, CA 94014.
/s/ Cindy Thai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 02/25/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 03/13/13,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Martha Frances Picone
Case Number: 123128
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Martha Frances Picone,
Mary F. Picone, Mary Picone. A Petition
for Probate has been filed by Sandra
Murray in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Sandra Murray
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: April 8, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. Probate, Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
24
Wednesday • Mar. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Sound finely
tuned
5 Parsley family
herb
9 Straight from the
garden
14 Role for Ronny
15 Neighborhood
16 Ceiling
17 GREEN
20 Next in line
21 Hobbyist’s buy
22 Tennis racket part
23 First word of
“Greensleeves”
25 In a glass by
itself
27 GREEN
33 Green prefix
34 Green shade
35 Aimée of “La
Dolce Vita”
37 Cozy reading
rooms
39 Personal
property
42 “At Wit’s End”
humorist
Bombeck
43 Drilling tool
45 Buster?
47 It might say
“Wipe your paws”
48 GREEN
52 __ carotene
53 Draws
54 Parlor piece
57 “The Green
Hornet” airer,
1966-’67
59 Puget Sound port
63 GREEN
66 Japan’s
commercial
center,
historically
67 Accessory on the
handlebars
68 TV part?
69 __-case scenario
70 Oscillation
71 Body art, briefly
DOWN
1 Little, to
Leoncavallo
2 Aware of, as the
latest
3 Fruit coat
4 Protect again, as
a driveway
5 Pre-Renaissance
period
6 Football
commentator
Cross
7 Drip, say
8 Emilio Estefan,
notably
9 Producer
Ziegfeld
10 Cellphone
customer’s
creation,
perhaps
11 Mideast ruler
12 “Right away,
señor!”
13 Internet address
letters
18 Brilliance
19 Gossip tidbit
24 Install in
Congress
26 Dr.’s group
27 Sanskrit scripture
28 Frost over
29 Mute sound?
30 Stuck (to)
31 Marilyn, before
she was Marilyn
32 Poison __
36 Latest addition to
the British Royal
Family
38 Reversals
40 __ food
41 Genetic research
insect
44 U.S. 1, for one
46 Lobster
Newburg
ingredient
49 Emphatic type:
Abbr.
50 Big wheels
51 Author
Fitzgerald
54 Put in the
overhead bin
55 Very
56 Cold feet
58 Seagoing help
60 Military
classification
61 Go all weak in
the knees
62 Seagoing assents
64 Bit of muesli
65 Schnozz
extender
By Gerry Wildenberg
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
03/13/13
03/13/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
203 Public Notices
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Spencer T. Malysiak
Spencer T. Malysiak Law Corp.
3300 Douglas Blvd., Suite 455
ROSEVILLE, CA 95661
(916)788-1020
Dated: March 4, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on March 13, 20, 27, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
WATER HEATER - $75, SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
L6 WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
296 Appliances
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
SOLD!
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99
(650)365-3987
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. $35 (650)341-8342
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all SOLD!
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17” Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, (650)290-1960
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDREN’S VHS Disney movies, (4),
all $30., (650)518-0813
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE HAND Carved mallard duck
beautiful in a decoy $55., (650)341-8342
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PANASONIC CAMCORDER- VHSC
Rarely used, SOLD!
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
TV - 27" Sony TV $15., (650)494-1687
304 Furniture
1920’S BANQUET TABLE - Solid wal-
nut, horsehair chairs, matching buffet,
$450., (650)283-5582
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) $75 (650)349-5003
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - Medium brown, 50” x 39”,
two swinging doors plus 6 deep drawers,
SOLD!
DRESSER 6 Drawers $20
(650)341-2397
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
304 Furniture
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 6’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf.
SOLD!
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHOWER STOOL, round, 14" diameter,
revolves, and locks in place (never used)
$40 (650)344-2254
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
25 Wednesday • Mar. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
308 Tools
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60” x 40” tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8’ BY 11’ CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy $3700.00. Will sell
for $600, (650)349-5003
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42”, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SET OF MIRRORS (2) - 33” x 50”, no
border, plain mirrors, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
SOLD!
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, all $30., (650)518-
0813
X BOX with case - 4 games, all $60.,
(650)518-0813
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " (some help moving)
(650)345-2508
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COAT - Size 6/8, Ladies, Red, Jones
New York, cute, like new, polyester,
warm above knee length, $35.,
(650)34 5-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
Reversible. Outside: weatherproof tan
color. Inside: Navy plush. Zipper clo-
sure, elastic cuffs. $15 (650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WINTER coat - knee length,
size 14, rust color, $25., (650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor label.
Excellent condition. $18.00
(650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., SOLD!
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00
(650)871-7200
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2011 SCATTANTE CFR SPORT ROAD-
BIKE - Carbon, Shimano hardware,
$1400 new, now $700., SOLD!
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$50.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CART (bag boy express model) 3
wheeler, dual brakes $39., Redwood City
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4” by 4”
inches to 1” by 8”. All 12” to 24” in length.
Over 1 cord. $50, (650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
SATURDAY,
MARCH 16th 2013
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
The House San Carlos ( aka
Generations Church) is having
their first Rummage Sale
fundraiser. We are raising
money for the upgrades of our
church & outreach. We will be
selling LOTS of new & used
items; office supplies, furniture,
household items, music equip.,
clothing, tools & gardening,
books, etc. We will also be
selling breakfast, lunch &
dessert items all day. Our
Coffeehouse will also be open
all day.
We will be renting spaces for
people to sell their items too.
$15 small space **
$25 large space
~Limited Spaces Available~
Get yours early -
Going to be a GREAT event
~Reserve your spot by credit
card, check or cash~
Also accepting donations
items in good condition!!!!
The House San Carlos
2811 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos CA 94070
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
450 Homes for Rent
RENTERS
Stop Paying Your
Landlord’s Mortgage.
Free Report reveals How
Easy it is to Buy
Your Own Home.
www.BuyHome4Me.com
Free recorded message
1-800-231-0064
ID# 1001
JM Sun Team # 00981193 Re/Max
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1993 HONDA Civic, sun roof, electric
windows, immaculate in and out, low mi-
lage, $3,400 obo, SOLD!
2009 INFINITY FX 35 Silver, 16,800k,
Low Jack, lots of extras, $32,000
(650)742-6776
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$17,000. obo, SOLD!
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
BAY AREA UPHOLSTERY
(650)583-5143
Specializing in: Trucks, Autos,
Boats & Furniture.
40+ years in trade
615 Airport Blvd., SSF
Bayareaupholstery.org
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Wednesday • Mar. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cabinetry
Cleaning
HOUSE CLEANING
Homes, apartments,
condos, offices.
Call
Clean Superstar
(650)576-7794
Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)280-9240
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST
HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
A+ BBB rating
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 • Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FREE DUMPING
Bricks, Blocks
&Trees
(650)873-8025
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)518-1173
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
º lnterior/exterior
º Wallpaper & Ceiling Removal
º Crown Nolding
º Baseooard Case
º Texture, 8tucco
º Powerwash & more
(650) 341-5761
P
A
I
NT
I
N
G
&
BEYOND
20 Years Exp. - Lic / Bonded
FREE
Estimates
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 208-9437
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Wednesday • Mar. 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
TRUSTS & DIVORCE
Attorney Fees Reduced
For New March Clients.
HarrisZelnigherLaw.com
Ira Harris: (650)342-3777
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
COMING SOON!
AMAZING MASSAGE
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
Opening in March!
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
PROVIDING
CAREGIVING
Care Giver services
Hillsborough, Burlingame areas.
Several years experience,
friendly, compassionate care.
Ask for Paula.
Call: 650-834-0771 or
email: johnspanek@gmail.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Wednesday • March 13, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Need Cash?
We do Collateral Loans
on your jewelry, gold, silver, coins, and better watches.
Loans any size! Cash on the spot! No credit checks!
ESTATE JEWELRY · COINS · BULLION · PAWN
Safe Downtown Millbrae with plenty of free parking.
Come enter our
50th Anniversary
Monthly Drawing
Win $250 Gilt Certincate
Come in to enter. No purchase necessary
certincate towards jewelry only.
Drawing will be held last Thursday each month
We repair
gold jewelry
301 Broadway, Millbrae (650) 697-6570
Monday - Fr|day 9am-6pm º Saturday 9am-2pm
www.Num|s|nternat|ona|.com
Family owned since 1963 Millbrae Business of the Year. Sell locally

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