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ED 357/358 - FIELD EXPERIENCE - LD & EI

LESSON DESIGN & DELIVERY

LESSON PLAN 4
Your Name: Brittany Bootka School: Roosevelt Elementary

Lesson Title: Reading Strategies Rogers College Supervisor: Cinda Yonker

Length: 40 minutes Date: 3/12/2013

Cooperating Teacher: Courtney

GLCE: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. OBJECTIVE: While reading a story the learner will make/ask at least five predictions (using details and examples from the text) and questions (referring to the text) with 90% accuracy by June 2013 BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS: Students are expected to give their looking eyes, their listening ears, and their quiet mouths. I will explain that it is important for them to pay attention to the instructions. I will tell the students that they are expected to follow along while we take turns reading. If a problem does occur I will directly talk to the student and explain to them how they should be behaving. “Good morning everyone I need your looking eyes, listening ears, and quiet mouths. I want to remind you how important it is that you pay attention and participate in the lesson. Today we are going to be taking turns reading a book. I need you to be following along in your book even if it is not your turn to read aloud”. OUTLINE OF LESSON: (As appropriate, use the Direct Instruction format & label the parts.) MATERIALS NEEDED Teacher Materials Anticipatory set: (1 min) I will pass out the book in an envelope labeled top secret and I 2 envelopes will hand out their detective notebooks “Here is the top secret mission, if Three books you accept you can open up your envelope and take the notebook”. 2 detective notebooks Objective: “Today, we are going to read a Jigsaw Jones Mystery book. Student Materials While we are reading we are going to be working on two of our reading strategies predicting and questioning”. Pencil Rationale: (1 min) “Making predictions and asking questions while reading helps us to understand the story”. Input: (2 min) “You know that making predictions means using clues from the story, either the text or the pictures, to guess what will happen next. Information from: Asking J. A. (2010, December). we use the Role of Questioner: Williams, questions means that Taking on the words who, what, when, where, why, how, and what if to find out more about the story”. Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from
http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/

Modeling: (5 min) Before we start reading I will model how to make a prediction and how to ask a question “Now, when we make a prediction we can use some key words such as I think … because …, I’ll bet … because …, I suppose … because …, I think I will learn … because …. An example of a prediction would be I think Jigsaw Jones will be about a detective because there is a detective on the cover. Do you see how I gave my prediction by using clues from the book to make it? Great! When we ask questions we can use the words who, what, when, where, why, how, and what if. An example of a question is who are the detectives on the cover of the book? Again I asked my question but I still used clues from the book”. Checking for understanding: (5 min) I will be checking for understanding by asking the students if they can explain to me what a prediction is and what a question is or provide me with an example. I will also use this moment to activate prior knowledge by having the students explain to me the definitions while using the cover of the book as their clues “Can you tell me what a prediction is? (Students will say a prediction is a way to guess what will happen next or they will give me an example such as I think the book will be about a mystery) Can you tell me what a question is? (Students will say a question is a way to learn more about the story or they will say you use who, what, when, where, why, how, or what if or they will give me an example such as what mystery are the detectives going to solve) Great, now that we know how to make predictions and ask questions, let’s start reading! Guided Practice: (20 min) We will take turns reading aloud. I will be predicting and asking questions while we read and then I will ask the students to come up with their own predictions and questions “Chapter one: page 6, can you make a prediction of who might need a detective? Why? Chapter three: page 13, what do you think that means? Chapter three: page 17, what kind of problems do you think they are having? Chapter four: page 22, can you make a prediction of who the thief is? Chapter four: page 24, what disguise do you think they chose to wear? Chapter five: page 30, what do you think is wrong with ben? Chapter five: page 30, can you highlight the most important parts of the story so far? Chapter six: page 37, who do you think took Ben’s football? Chapter seven: How do you think Mike and red cap know each other? Who is red cap? Chapter eight: page 50, Can you highlight the most important parts of the story so far?”. Independent Practice: (6 min) For the last three chapters I will have the students lead. They will make the predictions and questions as we read the story together and write them down in their detective notebooks “Now, for the last three chapters I want you to make the predictions and ask the questions. After you make a prediction or ask a question I want you to write it down in your detective notebook. Try to make at least two predictions and ask two questions by the end of the story okay? Great, let’s continue reading! Closure: (1 min) “Great job, you learned how to make predictions and ask questions while reading a book. Thank you for working hard today”. Evaluation: If time permits, I will have the students read a chapter of their just right library books and have them make two predictions and ask two questions. However, if I run out of time I will use the independent practice activity to assess my objective. “Grab your just right library books and I want you to read one chapter. While
Information from: Williams, J. A. (2010, December). Taking on the Role of Questioner: Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/

you are reading I want you to make predictions and ask questions. Make sure you write these down in your writers notebook”. EVALUATION OF OBJECTIVE: While reading a story the learner will make/ask at least five predictions (using details and examples from the text) and questions (referring to the text) with 90% accuracy by June 2013 REFLECTIONS ON TEACHING AND MANAGEMENT CLASSROOM AND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT: 1. How did you share your expectations with your students? I started my lesson by explaining to Tony and Kaylee that it was important they follow along even if it was not their turn reading. I told them that they needed to read with voice, meaning that they could not just read through the words as fast as they could. Instead they should pay attention to the emotion that the character is feeling. I also told them that they needed to pay attention to commas and periods, so they knew when to pause and when to stop. In addition, I told Tony and Kaylee that they had to read at least two pages before they switched. By knowing this the students knew that they needed to follow along. 2. Did you have any behavioral situations which you needed to address during the lesson? Explain. Tony and Kaylee were so excited to read the story and write down their predictions and questions in their detective notebook. The only time that I needed to talk to a student is when Kaylee wanted to help Tony read some of the words he did not know. I explained to her that it was great that she wanted to help him, but she needed to let him sound out the words first. After talking to Kaylee there were no other problems. 3. What considerations (regarding behavior) did you make when preparing for this lesson? When I was preparing this lesson I knew that I wanted to incorporate the mystery theme into my mini lesson on making predictions and asking questions. To do this I put the books in envelopes that said keep out and gave them detective notebooks. By doing this I hoped that the students would get into their characters and just have fun reading the book. I think because I did this the students were excited to read and really focused. They wanted to work really hard to predict the thief and ask the right questions
Information from: Williams, J. A. (2010, December). Taking on the Role of Questioner: Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/

so they could figure out the mystery. I also told the students that I expected them to read two pages before they switch. This way they knew my expectations and they knew that they had to pay attention even if they were not reading. I think this help me to keep the students focused on the story. LESSON EVALUATION & RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. Did the students achieve your daily objective for this lesson? How do you know? I do not think the students achieved the daily objective. We only got about half way through the book, so I do not think the students had enough guided practice with these two reading strategies. Also as I was listening to them read I noticed that Kaylee really struggles with using clues from the story to make her predictions or to ask questions. However, she did make predictions and ask questions without being prompted, which was great. Tony would only make a prediction or ask a question when prompted. However, he did use clues from the story to make his predictions or to ask questions. I also noticed that Kaylee has great decoding skills but struggles with fluency because she tends to read very fast. Tony needs to work on decoding skills and he has awkward pausing. Both students used voice while they were reading. They really made the characters come to life! It was so much fun to read the story with them! 2. If you were to teach a follow up lesson tomorrow, what would you focus on? Why? If I was to do a follow up lesson I think I would focus on teaching how to use clues from the story to make predictions and to ask questions. This could benefit Kaylee because she really struggles with reading comprehension. I think I would use inspiration on the I-pad to keep track of the important facts that we have learned about the story so far. This way Kaylee could refer to this when she wanted to make a prediction or ask a question. I also think I would explain when we make predictions or ask questions. I think Tony could benefit from this. I am not sure if he knows when to make predictions or when to ask questions, or if he is just doing it in his head and not sharing his thoughts. If I could I would like to do this with I-pads. That way I could use a program where the students could send their answers to me anonymously and then Tony might feel comfortable participating.
Information from: Williams, J. A. (2010, December). Taking on the Role of Questioner: Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/

Thoughts: This lesson was so much fun! Tony and Kaylee were so excited to open up their envelope and find the story inside and to write down their predictions and questions in their detective notebook. It was great to see them having fun because normally they struggle with reading comprehension and with using these strategies.

Information from: Williams, J. A. (2010, December). Taking on the Role of Questioner: Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/

REFLECTIONS ON TEACHING AND MANAGEMENT CLASSROOM AND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT: 1. How did you share your expectations with your students? 2. Did you have any behavioral situations which you needed to address during the lesson? Explain. 3. What considerations (regarding behavior) did you make when preparing for this lesson?

LESSON EVALUATION & RECOMMENDATIONS: 1, Did the students achieve your daily objective for this lesson? How do you know? 2. If you were to teach a follow up lesson tomorrow, what would you focus on? Why?

Student signature:

_______________________

Cooperating Teacher: _______________________ College Supervisor: ______________________

Information from: Williams, J. A. (2010, December). Taking on the Role of Questioner: Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/

Information from: Williams, J. A. (2010, December). Taking on the Role of Questioner: Revisiting Reciprocal Teaching. Taking on the Role of Questioner:... Preview & Related Info. Retrieved January 27, 2013, from http://www.mendeley.com/research/taking-role-questioner-revisiting-reciprocal-teaching/