A Review of Vowel-Symbolism

jwr Occasionally new details lead to reviews in this study. Of course each summary is a snapshot in a evolving series of impressions. Theses seem to develop as the time is ticking away. Most of the new information is added by new web-documents, which gradually seem to be completing the global library. Some of the documents may have existed before I found these, but for some reason they must have escaped my search-strategy.

YHWH-references and translations
The chronological overview of YHWH-references respectively translations from 1400BCE to 1900 indicate the importance of vowels as symbols inside the divine name1: Yehua, Yawhanan (Yôhanan), Ia-u-a (Ia-u), YHW, Yah, Jehovah, YH (Yah), Yahu (Hebrew), Ia & Iaô (Greek), IAΩ2, ΙΕΗΩΟϒΑ3, Iaoue, IAÔ (Ιαω in Greek and [Iah] in Latin), Iabe (for Samaritans), resp. Aïa for the Jews4, IOA (ΙΩΑ), Ieue, Ieue, Yohoua, Yohouah, Ieoa, Ihehoua, Jehovah5, Hiehouahi, Ihevhe, Ioua, Iehoua (← Ioua /Ioue - Jupiter), Iohauah, Iehouah (instead of Ioua), Iehue6, Ιαουε7 → Iaoouee, Iabe, Iäouiee8. Only the true vowels may be considered for sacred symbolism such as vows, which excludes semivowels and consonants.

IAU
Nearly all languages have at least three phonemic vowels, usually /i/, /a/, /u/. [i] and [u] are the close or high vowels, [a] is a open or low vowel, for which the tongue is positioned low in the mouth. In the PIE-sky-god's name Dyaus, respectively Diæus the high vowels (I, Y, and U) are including the low vowels (A, Æ) at a central position. This overview certainly explains why I, U and A have been seen as the most important and fundamental vowels. The sky-god's PIE-name Dyaus is applying a triphthong, combining glitches from [i] over [a] to [u]9. The “closed” vowels10 “Ee” and “Oo” are “killer vowels” when singers get into their higher register. That’s why singers love singing “aw” vowels on high notes, because the [a]-vowel is “open”11 or “perfect”12. Therefore the “imperfect” vowels “Ee” and “Oo” may have been avoided at the origins of symbolism. The impurity of transitions like OU, EU, AE, or AU may be disputable.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

The Vowels in the Divine Name(s) The Name ΙΑΩ The Name ΙΑΩ Quaestiones in Exodum cap. XV – quoted in The Name Of God Yehowah. Its Story, By Gérard Gertoux The Name Of God Yehowah. Its Story, By Gérard Gertoux A7 - Is Galatino the first who introduced the name Jehovah in 1518? resp. Iehoua or Iihue not derived from Ioue (Jupiter!), but from from Aramaic yihweh, respectively Hebrew Iehoua However, there are other equally reputable scholars who can provide evidence that the underlying Greek of Jave is "ιαου" and not "ιαουε". London Papyri. Xlvi, 446-482 Notes on the Vowels (as a Foundation for the Symbolism of the Claudian Letters referring to the physical position of the vocal chords in which the vocal chords are at their widest open position Aiming The Voice

IOUE / IOUA
According to John Pic della Mirandola (1463-1494) numerous Hebrew scholars believed that the name Iehoua had been derived from the name Ioue (Jupiter) converting into Ioua and subsequently to Iehoua13. The idea of a a Roman root Jupiter had been rejected by archbishop Gilbert Génébrard (in his book written in 1568 to defend the Trinity). He attacked the form Ioua used by Chateillon reminding that St Augustine had explained according to the writer Varro that the Jews had worshiped Ioue (Jupiter!), and that the use of Ioua was thus a return to paganism14. From the point of purity Ioua however may have been a common root for IOU-piter and YHWH, which leaves the discussion of the true origins open.

The leading letter D and the trailer S
A remarkable attribute for the divine names Jupiter and the various YHWH-translations is the absence of the leading letter D and the trailer S, which are found in the PIE-sky-god's name Dyaus.

Greco-Roman traditions
If numerous medieval scholars believed that the name Iehoua had been derived from the name Ioue (Jupiter) this may explain why so many Alpine peoples used ego-pronouns such as ieu, iau, iou, yiou15, io, etc. which resembled the locally corresponding divine names: D ieu (or Jeu), Diau (or Iau), Diou (respectively Iaou or Yow), Dio. Dios,.... which for areas following the Greco-Roman tradition also had been reflected in the Thursdays' variants 16 (derived from Latin: dies Jovis) such as dijous17, giovedì, Jeudi, jueves, joves, joibe18, joi19, dydd Iau20, Dy' Yow 21, Diriaou22. Some of these words include the leading letter D and/or the trailer S. Others have lost these consonants. All of these Thursdays' variants reveal a high density of vowel symbols. The order of the days was Sun, Moon, Ares, Hermes, Zeus, Aphrodite, and Cronos, named after the heavenly bodies that presided over the first daylight hour of each day, according to hellenistic astrology23. The highest gradient in linguistic vowel-symbolism is found in the neighborhood of the oldest center of Christianity northern of the Alps, at Chur (Switzerland)24. Some remains of the vowel symbolism may have been revived by Frederick III's device AEIOU 25, which contains the five vowels in the Roman alphabet.

13 The Name Of God Yehowah. Its Story, By Gérard Gertoux A8 - Was the pronunciation Jehovah widely accepted in the 16th century ? 14 The Vowels in the Divine Name(s) 15 “Yiou” & “Dïou” in the dialect of Nimes 16 Salutations, Divine Names, Weekdays and Ego-pronouns in Many Languages 17 Catalan 18 Friulian 19 Romanian 20 Welsh 21 Cornish 22 Breton 23 Source: Names of the days of the week 24 Reconstruction of the PIE-Trinity-Concept and The Etymological Fieldlines 25 Designing a new Language - The Dictionary of sacred Vowel Triads

Germanic traditions
In Germanic traditions the Dyaus-related deity had been encoded in the Tuesday's variants such as Old English Tīwesdæg ("Tiw's day"26), Zîestag27, Tysday28, Tiisdei 29, … Most of these words include a leading consonant T or Z and in comparison to the Roman tradition they use a reduced set of vowels. In Scandinavian dialects a high concentration of vowels may be found in the multifunctional æ (ash)-variants30, accompanied by other single vowel words, which may be illustrated by an all vowel-based sentence like: “A æ u å æ ø i æ å, æ i å u å æ ø i æ å?” to be translated as: “I am on the island in the river, are you also on the island in the river?” - All vowels, all one letter words31. Germanic peoples seem to apply and concentrate this “Æ”-vowel for some of the most important words such as the ego-pronoun, the unity-symbol “one”, “to be”, “law”, “tradition”, “marriage”.32

Egypt
In Ancient Egypt – The Light of the World (Vol. 1-page 501) Gerald Massey suggests a much older religion, but he does not document any source for this statement33: There was a religion of the god Iu or Iao in Egypt thirteen thousand years ago. That god was Atum-Iu, born son of Ptah. He was the earliest father in heaven because he was the divine Ra in his primordial sovereignty. He is the god in two persons who was first figured as the sun upon the double horizon = the father in the west, the son in the east. This god went forth from Kam by several names and various routes. Those who worshipped him as Atum became the Adamites, the Edomites, the red men; those who worshipped him as Iao, Iah, or Iu became the Jews in many lands, and these are the Jews of that world-wide dispersion recognized by Isaiah, which did not follow any known historical exodus from Egypt or captivity in Babylon, or migration from Palestine. Massey also lists an impressive overview of I*U- related divine names for the Jewish god 34: It is the religious community, not the race, that will account for the Jews who emigrated to the ends of the earth, and for the names of the Jewish god, who was the Egyptian Iu, Phoenician Iao, Hebrew Iah, Assyrian Iau, Egypto-gnostic Ieou (greater and lesser), Chinese Iaou, Polynesian Iho-Iho, Dyak Iaouh, Nicobar Islands Eewu, Mexican Ao, Toda Au, Hungarian Iao, Manx Iee, Cornish Iau, Welsh Iau (greater and lesser), Hebrew IaoSabaoth, Chaldean Iao-Heptaktis, Greek Ia, and IE35, Latin Jupiter and Jove. An overview of Massey's I*U-related theses has been documented in Notes to Gerald Massey's Ancient Egypt.

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

from Tiw, respectively Norse Týr Old High German and Ziestag (Swiss German) Scots Language West Frisian Sources: æ , and documentation: Archaic Phrases and The Etymological Fieldlines BBC - Languages - Your Say - Weird words - Troels - 2008-01-06 æ (The Creation Legend encoded in a Singular Vowel) The Hermetic Codex II - Bipolar Monotheism From: Ancient Egypt – The Light of the World (Vol. 1-page 501) by Gerald Massey This probably correlates to the word EI and the letter E at Apollo's temple as described by Plutarch in Of the word EI engraven over the gate of apollo's temple at delphi. - The Morals, vol. 4 . See the details in Appendix III and the image in : E - of the E-symbol Engraven Over the Gate of Apollos Temple at Delphi

Massey suggests to consider the ass's utterance “ee-aw” as a prototype for the vowel IAOU – transits, from which the Egyptian language derived the ass's name Iu, Aiu, and Aai. The ass's utterance seems to have been the symbol for the first step towards extending the divine concept to a full Gnostic name of seven vowels: Jehovah. This legendary concept might promote the ass to the author of the musical scale. In Massey's documentation Iu signifies “to come and go”, that is: “I” is symbolizing “to come”, and “U” symbolizes“to go”. The central “A” is inserted later to complete the triphtong Aiu, Iao, Ioa, Iahu, which is to be completed to the Gnostic seven vowel word Jehovah. These successive steps may be sketched in a triangle from the initial letter I, to the second stage IU, the third stage IAU to the ultimate level Jehovah like:

I I U36 I A U37 …

J e h o v a h38

36 prototype IU (“to come and go”) for the vowel IAOU – transits: symbolized by the ass's utterance “ee-aw” 37 The central “A” is inserted later to complete the triphtong Aiu, Iao, Ioa, Iahu 38 The inserting process is to be completed up to the Gnostic seven vowel word Jehovah.

Summary
Traces of archaic vowel symbolism may be found in: • the previously listed YHWH-references respectively translations: Yehua, Ia-u-a (Ia-u), YHW, Yah, Jehovah, YH (Yah), Yahu (Hebrew), Ia & Iaô (Greek), IAΩ39, ΙΕΗΩΟϒΑ40, Iaoue, IAÔ, Iabe, Aïa 41, IOA (ΙΩΑ), Ieue, Ieue, Yohoua, Yohouah, Ieoa, Ihehoua, Jehovah42, Hiehouahi, Ihevhe, Ioua, Iehoua, Iohauah, Iehouah, Iehue43, Ιαουε44, Iaoouee, Iabe, Iäouiee45. • • • the PIE-sky-god's name Dyaus the god Iu or Iao in Egypt thirteen thousand years ago the Greco-Roman tradition of iaeou-based divine names such as Dieu (or Jeu), Diau (or Iau), Diou (respectively Iaou or Yow), Dio. Dios,.... , their ego-pronouns, such as ieu, iau, iou, yiou46, io, etc. the Germanic tradition of Tiw's day"47, Zîestag48, Tysday49, Tiisdei. The English vowel ego-pronoun Y, respectively I, may refer to the deity Tiw (Old high German), Tys (Scots language), Tiis (West-Frisian) or alternatively to a deity similar to Iau (Welsh), Yow (Cornish), Iaou (Breton). Abrasax-stones often bear Hebraic names of God: Iao, Sabaoth, Adonai, Eloai. The name ΙΑΩ, to which ΣΑΒΑΩΘ is sometimes added, is found with this figure even more frequently than ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ, and they are often combined 50. The 7 letters spelling its name represent each of the 7 classic planets—Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. the Scandinavian tradition of æ-variants and other singular vowel words, for example in the sentence: A æ u å æ ø i æ å, æ i å u å æ ø i æ å?51. Massey's list of divine names for the Jewish god 52: : the Egyptian Iu, Phoenician Iao, Hebrew Iah, Assyrian Iau, Egypto-gnostic Ieou, Chinese Iaou, Polynesian Iho-Iho, Dyak Iaouh, Nicobar Islands Eewu, Mexican Ao, Toda Au, Hungarian Iao, Manx Iee, Cornish Iau, Welsh Iau, Hebrew Iao-Sabaoth, Chaldean IaoHeptaktis, Greek Ia, and IE53, Latin Jupiter and Jove.
39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 The Name ΙΑΩ The Name ΙΑΩ Quaestiones in Exodum cap. XV – quoted in The Name Of God Yehowah. Its Story, By Gérard Gertoux The Name Of God Yehowah. Its Story, By Gérard Gertoux A7 - Is Galatino the first who introduced the name Jehovah in 1518? resp. Iehoua or Iihue not derived from Ioue (Jupiter!), but from from Aramaic yihweh, respectively Hebrew Iehoua However, there are other equally reputable scholars who can provide evidence that the underlying Greek of Jave is "ιαου" and not "ιαουε". London Papyri. Xlvi, 446-482 “Yiou” & “Dïou” in the dialect of Nimes from Tiw, respectively Norse Týr Old High German and Ziestag (Swiss German) Scots Language Source: Abraxas BBC - Languages - Your Say - Weird words - Troels - 2008-01-06 From: Ancient Egypt – The Light of the World (Vol. 1-page 501) by Gerald Massey This probably correlates to the word EI and the letter E at Apollo's temple as described by Plutarch in Of the word EI engraven over the gate of apollo's temple at delphi. - The Morals, vol. 4 . See the details in Appendix III and the image in : E - of the E-symbol Engraven Over the Gate of Apollos Temple at Delphi

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The archaic vowel symbolism seems to interrelate the Jupiter-tradition, the Hebrew tradition and the Germanic, respectively Scandinavian traditions. These vowels seem to reflect religious symbolism such as eternity, law, tradition, marriage. [i] and [u] are the close or high vowels, [a] is a open or low vowel, and [i], [u], [a] represent the fundamental vowels. Therefore [i] and [u] seem to be antipodes. In the sky-god's name Dyaus the set of high/close vowels [i] and [u] include the low/open vowel [a].

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