You are on page 1of 1

Emergency operations

XI-H. LOW G CONDITIONS AND MAST BUMPING


Ref: RFH (11-10)

1. INTRODUCTION
Probably the scariest of emergency conditions due to speed of reactions required and consequences if correct recovery procedure is not followed. Only a problem with teetering / semi rigid rotor hubs.

2. DESCRIPTION
Pushing the cyclic control forward abruptly from either straight-and-level flight or after a climb can put the helicopter into a low G (weightless) flight condition. When a push-over is performed, the angle of attack and thrust of the rotor is reduced, causing a low G or weightless flight condition. Feeling of being light in the seat. Loss of lateral control Leads to no left horizontal component of thrust Thrust from tail rotor which is above the CG now acts to the right causing a rapid roll to the right

3. CORRECTIVE ACTION
DO NOT attempt to stop the right roll by applying full left cyclic before regaining main rotor thrust, the rotor can exceed its flapping limits and cause structural failure of the rotor shaft due to mast bumping, or it may allow a blade to contact the airframe. Avoid the conditions where it might occur o Turbulence o Abrupt movement of the cyclic and collective o Push over from a climb Immediately and smoothly apply aft cyclic Do not attempt to correct the rolling action with lateral cyclic. By applying aft cyclic, you will load the rotor system, which in turn produces thrust. Once thrust is restored, left cyclic control becomes effective, and you can roll the helicopter to a level attitude.

CFI Binder Jonathan Beeby