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Enterprise Data Center Design and Methodology

Enterprise Data Center Design and Methodology

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Published by Rich Hintz
practical guide to designing a data center from inception through construction. The fundamental design principles take a simple, flexible, and modular approach based on accurate, real-world requirements and capacities. This approach contradicts the conventional (but totally inadequate) method of using square footage to determine basic capacities like power and cooling requirements.
practical guide to designing a data center from inception through construction. The fundamental design principles take a simple, flexible, and modular approach based on accurate, real-world requirements and capacities. This approach contradicts the conventional (but totally inadequate) method of using square footage to determine basic capacities like power and cooling requirements.

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Published by: Rich Hintz on Mar 12, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/07/2013

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Be aware of any surrounding facilities that might be sources of electromagnetic
interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI). Telecommunications signal
facilities, airports, electrical railways, and other similar facilities often emit high
levels of EMI or RFI that might interfere with your computer hardware and
networks.

If you must locate in an area with sources of EMI or RFI, you might need to factor
shielding of the center into your plans.

Vibration

Aside from natural vibration problems caused by the planet, there are man-made
rumblings to consider. Airports, railways, highways, tunnels, mining operations,
quarries, and certain types of industrial plants can generate constant or intermittent

Chapter 5

Site Selection 55

vibrations that could disrupt data center operations. Inside the center, such
vibrations could cause disruption to data center hardware, and outside the center,
they could cause disruption of utilities.

If constant vibration is a problem in the area, you should weigh the possibility of
equipment damage over the long term. In the case of occasional tremors, you might
consider seismic stabilizers or bracing kits which primarily keep the racks from
tipping over.

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