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www.haddonfieldsun.

com
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . 25-29
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
School budget adopted
Budget has 1.98 percent
tax levy increase. PAGE 3
Your copy of the HMS Bulldawg Bulletin Jr. is inside!
KATHLEEN DUFFY/The Haddonfield Sun
Caren Izzo, a teacher at Haddonfield Middle School, nervously smiles as her hair is shaved at the high school’s St. Baldrick’s Day
event in support of childhood cancer on Friday, March 15.
Shaving for St. Baldrick’s Day event
Area offers
plethora
of spring
activities
By KATHLEEN DUFFY
The Haddonfield Sun
Spring has finally arrived.
With warmer temperatures
seeping into the forecast, Haddon-
field is lively with a plethora of
events on the horizon, from a trib-
ute to retiring Mayor Tish Colom-
bi to a dancing celebration to the
Haddon Fortnightly Home and
Garden Tour.
Oh, not to mention all the excit-
ing tricentennial happenings.
Look no further for the details
about some of this spring’s antici-
pated local events.
Snag some eggs
Local children are in luck on
Saturday, March 30.
The Haddonfield Y’s Men’s
Club is at it again, holding an
Easter egg hunt at Crows Woods
beginning at 10 a.m.
Kids can hunt within their age
group for eggs of all colors.
Parents, make sure to bring a
basket!
please see CUB, page 14
2 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
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The following reports are on
file with the Haddonfield Police
Department.
On March 17 at 10:35 p.m. on
the unit block of Sylvan Lake Av-
enue, a complainant reported a
man in his early 20s soliciting
without a permit. Officers spoke
with the man who stated that he
didn’t have a permit and was try-
ing to sell music gear for a music
store. He was processed and re-
leased for violation of ordinance
chapter No. 162.
On March 17 at 1:46 p.m. on the
unit block of Kings Highway East,
a caller advised that two credit
cards were stolen from a wallet
while at church. One was an
American Express and the other
was an Orchard Bank Visa card.
On March 17 at 7 p.m. on the
unit block of Kings Highway
East, a complainant came to
headquarters to report that be-
tween 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., an un-
known person stole a small nylon
purple bag out of her handbag
that contained three gift cards.
The bag was left unattended
while she taught Sunday School
at a church.
On March 15 at 5:20 p.m. on the
100 block of Heritage Road, a
complainant reported a broken
window on her back patio with
several golf balls lying around in
her backyard. Officers spoke to
the neighbor to the rear of her
property and she reported that
one of her sons probably broke
the window. The neighbor agreed
to fix the broken window and ex-
changed information.
police
report
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 –THE HADDONFIELD SUN 3
By KATHLEEN DUFFY
The Haddonfield Sun
An average assessed home of
$491,359 in the borough will see
an increase of $194.40 in school
taxes per year, or $16.20 per
month, according to Business Ad-
ministrator Dawn Leary.
The 2013-2014 school budget
was unanimously adopted by
board members with a 1.98 per-
cent tax levy increase at the
Thursday, March 21 Board of Ed-
ucation meeting.
“We did not go up to the full 2
percent,” Leary said.
Ratables are down more than
$19 million, which affects the
whole budget, she said.
There was, however, a slight in-
crease in state aid of $32,348.
Now, the budget will be sent to
Camden County for final ap-
proval, which completes the
budget process for the year, Su-
perintendent Richard Perry said.
View the complete budget
breakdown, along with presenta-
tions, by visiting http://www.had-
donfield.k12.nj.us.
Perry plans to make recom-
mendations to the buildings and
grounds committee to move for-
ward with security initiatives, in-
cluding the installation of duress
alarms in the district’s three ele-
mentary schools.
“It puts the whole process in
place with just the push of a but-
ton,” he said.
The change would be part of
the first round of security up-
grades.
While there are phases to the
plan, it is never actually a done
deal, he said.
“(Security is) something that’s
ongoing,” he said. “This isn’t the
end.”
School budget adopted with
1.98 percent tax levy increase
please see BOARD, page 12
4 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
Can you tell we’re
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always wanted, without braces.
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It’s been proven to be efective in practices nationwide.
So whether your teeth are crowded, too far apart, or have
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Call for your free,
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856-874-8214
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Brian Patel, the Owner of Conte Brothers, and General Sales Manager, Bill Levin, have put together a group of Financial
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Have you been unable to finance a Car due to some negative impact in your Credit History?
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Hours: Mon-Fri 9AM- 7PM & Sat 9AM-5PM • Closed Sun
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tax, tags and reg. fees. Service Specials for March 2013. Now through 6/30/13, save $20 on any repair totaling $100 or more. May not be combined with any other offer. One discount per customer, per vehicle. Offer expires 06/30/2013.
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2008 FORD
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WEEKLY PAYMENT
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Gail Elizabeth Benson
March 16, 2013
Gail Elizabeth Benson (nee
Smith), 76 of Haddonfield, passed
away on March 16, 2013.
She was the beloved wife of Dr.
Charles E.; loving mother of Deb-
orah E. Quigley (Thomas) of Had-
donfield, and Charles N. (Karen)
of Chicago, Ill.; grandmother of
Sean Quigley; sister of Margaret
Hoffman (Roy) and aunt to many
nieces and nephews.
Gail graduated Collingswood
High School in 1955, Pennsylva-
nia Hospital School of Nursing in
1957, and Franklin College in
1960.
She used her nursing skills her
whole life: she taught nursing at
Miami Valley Hospital, Ohio,
Baptist Hospital in N.C., and
Gloucester County College;
worked as school nurse in Bar-
rington, Scout camp nurse at Pine
Hill, and for youth church trips.
She was an active member of
the First Baptist Church of
Haddonfield, singing in the choir.
Earlier at HUMC, she served as
director of Youth Christian Edu-
cation, as well as teaching for
many years at the HUMC Nurs-
ery School. She was a member of
the Fortnightly EMD, Delta Zeta
Alumni, and the Haddonfield
Lions Club.
She worked the election day
polls for many years, coached a
winning boys youth soccer team,
refereed youth soccer for the
town, served in leadership and
teaching positions for the Scouts,
and numerous other community
activities.
Memorial donations may be
made in Mrs. Benson’s name to
the First Baptist Church, 124 East
Kings Highway, Haddonfield or
Scout Pack Troop No. 64, c/o
William Carr, 124 East Kings
Highway, Haddonfield, NJ 08033.
Kain-Murphy Funeral Services
of Haddonfield made arrange-
ments.
obituary
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 –THE HADDONFIELD SUN 5
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briefs
Last Man’s Dinner
set for April 1
The 73rd annual Last Man’s
Dinner will be held Monday, April
1 at Tavistock Country Club.
The cash bar will open at 6
with the program following at 7
p.m.
The Last Man’s Club of Had-
donfield American Legion Post
No. 38 was chartered in 1940 by
World War I veterans, and has ex-
panded over the years.
The program will feature a
prime rib dinner, military hon-
ors, a POW/MIA remembrance
service and a remembrance serv-
ice for those members who have
passed away in the last year.
Special entertainment will be
performed by the Emerald Socie-
ty Pipes of Drums.
Tickets are $40 and valet park-
ing is included.
For more details, call Tom
Baird at (609) 923-1442 or (856) 428-
4070.
Men’s Club Easter Egg
Hunt on March 30
The Haddonfield Y’s Men’s
Club will hold its annual Easter
Egg Hunt for children on Satur-
day, March 30 at Crows Woods in
Haddonfield.
The event will begin at 10 a.m.
and is open to all youngsters in
the community.
Participants will be divided
into age groups and will be super-
vised by members of the Haddon-
field Y’s Men’s Club. Several
prized eggs will also be hidden in
each of the age group areas.
Parents are encouraged to
bring their children early and
provide them with a plastic con-
tainer or Easter basket to place
their eggs in.
The Easter Bunny will arrive
on a fire truck to lead the hunt
and will be available for photo op-
portunities afterward.
Balloons will also be given out.
Bereavement support
planned for April, May
Anyone who has experienced
the loss of a loved one is offered
the opportunity to share your
grief with others on Mondays
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Lutheran
Church of Our Savior in Haddon-
field from April 8 through May 13.
Bereavement support sessions
will be held in the church parlor
on the second floor. Discussion
will focus on provided handout
materials. All shared conversa-
tions will be held confidential.
Contact the church office at
(856) 429-5122 for additional infor-
mation or with questions.
Child Find available
for Haddonfield kids
Do you have or know of a spe-
cial child aged 3 to 5 residing in
the Haddonfield Public School
District who may have trouble
keeping up with other children in
their age group? Are you aware of
any children below the age of 3
with similar problems?
If so, Haddonfield’s Child Find
can help.
All public schools in the state
are required to provide programs
for preschool developmentally de-
layed children and the Haddon-
field School District has had a
successful program for several
years.
Other community agencies
also provide early intervention
services for children from birth
to three years. In order to contin-
ue to serve these children, we
must survey the community to
find them.
If you need more information
about Child Find, contact Bonni
Rubin-Sugarman, M.A., director
of Special Education at (856) 429-
4985 ext. 149, or write to Child
Find, c/0 Haddonfield Child
Study Team Office, Haddonfield
Memorial High School, 401 Kings
Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ
08033.
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6 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
108 Kings Highway East
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856-427-0933
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 108 Kings Highway East, 3rd
Floor, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. It is mailed
weekly to select addresses in the 08033 ZIP
code.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 856-427-0933.
To submit a news release, please email
news@haddonfieldsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call 856-427-0933 or
email advertising@haddonfieldsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers – including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@haddonfieldsun.com, via fax at
856-427-0934, or via the mail. You can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Sun reserves the right to reprint your
letter in any medium – including electroni-
cally.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HADDONFIELD EDITOR Kathleen Duffy
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
letters to the editor
I
n November, New Jersey voters
will have the opportunity to ap-
prove a bill that would increase the
state’s minimum wage from $7.25 per
hour to $8.25 per hour, starting in Sep-
tember 2014. An approving vote would
also kick in automatic cost-of-living in-
creases each year based on the Con-
sumer Price Index.
In his State of the Union address
this year, President Obama recom-
mended raising the minimum wage to
$9 per hour. If Congress approves of
that measure, it would take effect na-
tionwide.
Not surprisingly, though, small busi-
ness owners in New Jersey are over-
whelmingly against raising the mini-
mum wage. The New Jersey chapter of
the National Federation of Independ-
ent Business showed that 93 percent of
its members oppose the move. NFIB
Director Laurie Ehlbeck called the re-
sults one of the “most one-sided” she’s
ever seen.
And it should be no surprise as to
why.
The state’s, and the country’s,
biggest current employment problem
isn’t that workers are paid too little; it’s
that there aren’t enough jobs available.
Raising the minimum wage, forcing
small business owners to spend more
money, is not a solid tactic to encour-
age hiring. The focus should be on in-
centivizing small business owners to
hire more workers, not to pay their
current workers more money.
The government’s logic is misguided
if it believes that the reason that un-
employed workers won’t take entry-
level jobs is that the salary isn’t high
enough. That’s part of the problem,
true, but that’s mainly because our
government is incentivizing people not
to work,with the structure of unem-
ployment benefits being what they’ve
been for so long now.
It would be a shame for a bill like
this to pass at a time when the state’s
job market just reported positive gains.
The state Labor Department reported
recently that New Jersey gained 66,400
jobs in 2012, the largest such jump
since 2000.
Sure, we’re still way off the pre-re-
cession employment rate, but at least
it’s a start.
Our local and federal governments
need to find a way incentivize small
businesses to hire, instead of burden-
ing them with yet another added cost
of doing business.
in our opinion
Put people to work
Creating more jobs, not raising minimum wage, is the answer
Your thoughts?
Do you plan on voting for or against the
state constitutional amendment that
would raise New Jersey’s minimum
wage by $1 to $8.25 per hour?
Rochford will bring stability
to Haddonfield, writer says
One of my votes will be for Neal this
year.
My wife and I moved to Haddonfield
about 20 years ago, which is recent by Had-
donfield standards. It’s a great town and
I’ve always been proud to be a part of this
community. Haddonfield is so much more
of a community than any other place I’ve
lived. There is a distinct charm here that
brings in visitors, and turns visitors into
residents. In our cookie-cutter world, Had-
donfield is uncommon among sameness.
Beyond the physical dimensions, our
town has a vibrant spirit of volunteerism
and personal investment within the com-
munity; these rare elements that are com-
mon among many here.
I’ve lived here for enough years to value
and appreciate the wisdom of the long-
term view on Haddonfield. It is the com-
mitment to long-term prosperity and vi-
sion that has kept our town growing and
thriving for so many years, even through a
difficult economy.
Haddonfield continues to stand out in
our county, our region and our state as one
of the best places to live, work and raise a
family.
Neal Rochford embodies this spirit of
Haddonfield; his investment of personal
time, effort and care in the community and
community organizations is significant
and extensive.
I believe that Neal embodies the long
view for Haddonfield’s prosperity.
As a resident committed to the best of
Haddonfield, Neal’s perspective is essential
in the planning process now and for the
next generation. I’ll vote for Neal because
one of my votes needs to be cast for the sta-
bility and the vision he brings to the job.
William Graves
Writer: Sharing baseball fields
creates various problems
Along with dozens of residents of Had-
donfield, I wish to voice my concern re-
garding up to eight other towns using our
baseball fields located on Prospect Road.
Haddonfield Little League hosts a Presi-
dent’s League in which several towns use
our fields in exchange for contributing
monetarily to the maintenance of the
fields. With this league comes an inordi-
nate amount of increased traffic and
speeding in our neighborhood, illegal park-
please see LETTERS, page 10
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 –THE HADDONFIELD SUN 7
Wednesday, April 10th and 17th
Monday,
April 8th and 15th
Tuesday, April 9th and
Friday, April 12th
Tuesday, April 16th
MAKE THE CALL. IT'S YOUR TIME!
Please recycle this newspaper.
Special to The Sun
Haddonfield’s very own Cub Scouts Pack No. 65 celebrated its annual Pinewood Derby on Friday, March
8. Each Scout gave detailed attention to make sure that its carefully crafted car passed inspection. Rac-
ers from the Cub Scouts Tiger, Wolf and Bear dens competed by making and racing their own car! The ex-
citement for each racer to square off against other racers to make it to the grand finale was palpable.
Cub Scout Pack No. 65 and the Pinewood Derby have been a long-standing tradition in Haddonfield for
more than 80 years. Learn more or donate to help our local kids enjoy quality hikes, camp outs and
events. Your support makes a difference. Visit www.CubPack65.com today.
WEDNESDAY MARCH 27
Overeaters Anonymous: 9 a.m. at
First Presbyterian Church. Call
(609) 239-0022 or visit
www.southjersey.org for informa-
tion.
Grace Church Worship Service: 7
to 7:30 a.m. 19 Kings Highway
East, Haddonfield. Email
office@gracehaddon.org for
information.
Line dancing: 1:30 to 3 p.m. at
Mabel Kay Hospitality House,
Senior Citizen Center. Call 354-
8789 for more information.
Preschool Storytime: Haddonfield
Public Library. 1:30 p.m. Ages 3 to
5. Call 429-1304 for information.
Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. at
Mount Olivet Baptist Church, 202
Douglass Ave., Haddonfield.
First Baptist Church Youth Group:
7 p.m. September through June.
124 Kings Highway East, Haddon-
field.
Wednesday Night Prayer: 7 p.m. at
Haddonfield Bible Church. 324
Belmont Ave., Haddonfield.
Evening Meeting: 7:30 p.m. at First
Church of Christ, Scientist, 355
Kings Highway East, Haddonfield.
Hymns, testimonies of healing
and inspirational readings from
the Bible and Science and Health
with Key to the Scriptures, by
Mary Baker Eddy.
THURSDAY MARCH 28
Recreation Council meeting: 8 p.m.
at Borough Hall. Visit www.had-
donfieldnj.org for more informa-
tion.
Grace Church Worship Service:
9:30 to 10 a.m. with healing serv-
ice. 19 Kings Highway East, Had-
donfield. Email office@gracehad-
don.org for information.
Art Workplace: Mabel Kay House. 9
a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. Call
354-8789 for more information.
Toddlertime: Haddonfield Public
Library. 10:30 a.m. Ages 2 to 3.
Call 429-1304 for information.
FRIDAY MARCH 29
Friday Program: Mabel Kay House.
12:30 to 2 p.m. Call 354-8789 for
more information.
Kiwanis Club of the Haddons
meeting: 12:15 p.m. at Tavistock
Country Club. Visit www.haddon-
skiwanis.com to join or for more
information.
Rockabye Readers: Ages 9 to 24
months with a caregiver. 10:30
a.m. at Haddonfield Public
Library. For more information visit
www.haddonfieldlibrary.org.
SATURDAY MARCH 30
Grace Church Worship Service:
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. 19 Kings High-
way East, Haddonfield. Email
office@gracehaddon.org for
information.
Haddonfield United Methodist
Church Worship: Casual worship
at 5 p.m. in the chapel.
MONDAY APRIL 1
Monday Morning Prayer: 8 a.m. at
Mount Olivet Baptist Church, 202
Douglass Ave., Haddonfield.
TUESDAY APRIL 2
Haddonfield Planning Board meet-
ing: 7:30 p.m. in Borough Hall
auditorium, 242 Kings Highway
East. Visit www.haddonfieldnj.org
to confirm meeting time and for
agenda.
Bridge: 12:30 p.m. at Mabel Kay Hos-
pitality House, Senior Citizen
Center. Call 354-8789 for more
information.
Lite Aerobics: 1 p.m. at Mabel Kay
Hospitality House, Senior Citizen
Center. Call 354-8789 for more
information.
Preschool Storytime: Haddonfield
Public Library. 10:30 a.m. Ages 3 to
5. Call 429-1304 for information.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Haddonfield Sun, 108
Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email:
news@haddonfieldsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.haddonfieldsun.com).
Borough Clerk Deanna Bennett
has released the following ballot
positions for the May 14 munici-
pal election.
1. John A. Moscatelli; 2. Ken-
neth Kouba; 3. Jeff Kasko; 4. Neal
P. Rochford; 5. Lee A. Albright;
and 6. Ed Borden.
Clerk releases
election ballot
positions
Visit us online at
www.haddonfieldsun.com
• POWER SEEDING • POWER WASHING • THATCHING • SEEDING •
• FERTILIZING • SEASONAL CLEAN-UPS • SHRUB & FLOWER PLANTING •
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10 THE HADDONFIELD SUN
ing, extended use and abuse of
the field’s lighting and PA system.
Together with regular games,
practice, championship games
and use of the field by those wish-
ing to practice on their own, the
fields are in use seven days a
week, nine months of the year
often from 8 a.m. to approximate-
ly 10 p.m.
We have submitted a petition to
the borough in regard to this in-
trusion of our privacy and hope
to reinstate our rights, as tax-pay-
ing residents, to a reasonable
measure of peace and quiet.
We have attended the February
planning board meeting, where
Mayor Colombi, Commissioner
Borden, Steve Walko and Mr.
LaProcido were present, asking
for borough oversight to be exer-
cised in regard to HLL and a copy
of the written guidelines for oper-
ation of the baseball fields on
Prospect Road.
Two months later, we have no
response to our request even after
several follow-up phone calls.
Joseph Trombetta
Writer: BOE overextends
power over kids
Well, the chickens may have fi-
nally come home to roost. The
River City, Haddonfield BOE may
have to face the judicial music in
the near future; for overextending
its power over school kids, when
they are off school property.
Several years ago, school kids
were disciplined by school offi-
cials for unsavory behavior off
school grounds. They were even-
tually sued by the involved par-
ents because their kids’ future
scholastic careers were damaged.
I hope any lawyer fees and cash
settlements don't find their way
into tax bills for the citizens. The
next thing to look for, will be 16
oz. sodas; and Doritos for lunch
snacks.
Major Joe Welsh, USAF Retired
letterS
to the editor
LETTERS
Continued from page 6
1107 Winding Drive • Cherry Hill
Asking $2,200,000
6 bedrooms 5 full baths and 2 half baths.
A extraordinary private property!
Susan Azar
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 856-616-7165
Susan.Azar@LNF.com
65 Haddon Avenue • Haddonfield, NJ 08033 • 856-795-6966 • www.longandfoster.com
LONG & FOSTER
325 S. Hinchman Avenue • Haddonfield
Asking $799,900
4 bedrooms 3 full/2 half baths. Half acre lot
4 car garage. Prestigious Haddonfield
Neighborhood and Street.
Brian Mulvenna
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-760-4126
Brian.mulvenna@LNF.com
304 2nd Avenue • Haddon Heights
Asking $429,900
Charming Colonial. 4 Bedrooms, 2 Full
Baths and 1 Half Bath. Move-in condition!
Close to schools, shopping and Center City.
Brian Mulvenna
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-760-4126
Brian.mulvenna@LNF.com
28 Haddonfield Commons • Haddonfield
Asking $219,000
2 bedroom 2 bath first floor with an
private entry. Brand new carpets, paint,
appliances etc...
Susan Azar
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 856-616-7165
Susan.Azar@LNF.com
Brian Mulvenna
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-760-4126
Brian.mulvenna@LNF.com
131 Chestnut Street - Haddonfield
Asking $619,900
5 bedrooms 3.5 baths. Gorgeous property
loaded with amenities!
Ann Koelling
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-922-6136
ARKoelling@verizon.net
2 Wilderness • Medford
$799,000
Grand 5-6 bedroom home, Lake Community
Deb Sabel
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-220-4967
dds7382@aol.com
2105 Berwick Drive • Cinnaminson
Asking $424,500
4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths on a cul-de-sac!
Completely upgraded in a great location
Janet Papale
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-760-0776
JanetPapale@comcast.net
Cheryl Lamantia
Broker Associate
Direct: 856-357-4145
Cheryl.lamantia@LNF.com
7 Bradford Court. • Medford
Asking $899,000
6,500sf on the Golf Course. Everything you
could want in a Home!
43 Friends Avenue • Haddonfield
Asking $729,000
4 bedrooms/4.5 baths. 2 detached garage
on a nice lot. New construction.
Susan Azar
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 856-616-7165
Susan.Azar@LNF.com
2
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Brian Mulvenna
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-760-4126
Brian.mulvenna@LNF.com
N
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W
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I
S
T
I
N
G
!
55 Sleepy Hollow • Tabernacle
$700,000
4 Bedroom Home on premium wooded lot!
Deb Sabel
Real Estate Agent
Direct: 609-220-4967
dds7382@aol.com
N
E
W
L
I
S
T
I
N
G
!
O
P
E
N

H
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U
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3
/2
3
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1
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3
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W
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P
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!
1230 Sequoia • Cherry Hill
Asking $519,000
Expanded 4,400+- sf Ft. in Ridings of Fox Run w/ 6 Bd, 5.5 Ba Colonial
w/ Open layout made for entertaining plus custom & unique features,
this elegant home has too much to list! Call for or your personal tour.
305 Barberry Lane • Haddonfield
Asking $749,900
Tons of character and amenities in this large property.
6 bedrooms, 4 full baths, completely updated. 1 block from
Lizzy Haddon school and close to town. Just move in and enjoy!
N
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!
12 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
6955 Central Highway • Pennsauken, NJ 08109
(One block from Cooper River)
www.habitatcamden.org
Phone (856) 486-0040
Fax (856) 486-0088
Tues-Fri 10am-6pm • Sat 9am-4pm • Closed Sun and Mon
D
o
n
a
te-Deduct • Shop-Save
• Volun
te
e
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New and Used Building Materials
New and Gently-Used Home
Furnishings and Furniture
Appliances - Working and less
than 10 years old
Kitchen Cabinets and Cabinetry
Flooring
ITEMS WE
ACCEPT FOR
DONATIONS
Board president resigns
In a letter read by Perry, Board
President Steve Weinstein, who
was absent from the meeting, an-
nounced his resignation. He will
continue in his role as a board
member until the end of his term
next January and will not seek re-
election.
“I will miss serving with him,
but it was an honor for me to do
so,” Perry said. “Steve is the best
I’ve ever served with.”
Weinstein took a position as
general counsel vice president at
Rowan University in December
and attributed the new job to his
decision.
“The demands of this position
do not permit me to devote time
necessary to continue my respon-
sibilities as board president,” We-
instein said in the letter.
Glenn Moramarco was nomi-
nated and elected to replace Wein-
stein as board president at the
meeting.
“I know they’re very big shoes
to fill,” he said.
To replace Moramarco as vice
president, Andrew Berlin was
chosen by the board.
Turf bid
It was announced at the meet-
ing that a $948,000 bid came in
from LandTek for construction of
the turf at Anniversary and Sta-
dium fields. The borough will
front $333,000 of the cost and the
school board will pitch in
$614,000. According to Perry, the
turf committee raised more than
$630,000 for the fields.
Originally, the goal was a bid of
$1,100,000.
“That’s good in that there’s
money available from what the
turf committee raised to take
care of extra items that we may
have to put on the fields,” Perry
said.
Discussions are to come on fu-
ture maintenance and replace-
ment costs.
Construction will begin after
the track season at Anniversary
Field on approximately May 20.
The football field’s construction
is planned for after graduation on
or about June 18.
The expected completion date
is Aug. 23, with a ceremony
planned for the Sept. 12 home
football game, Perry said.
Savvy speakers
Several students were recog-
nized for their academic accom-
plishments at the meeting.
Central School’s Andrew
Pasco, a fifth grader, won first
place in the elementary category
of the Foreign Language Educa-
tors of New Jersey’s Annual Pod-
cast Competition.
Hailing from Elizabeth Haddon
Elementary School, second
graders Thea Spellmeyer and Rex
Cottone put together a doctor/pa-
tient podcast, ranking second
runner-up in the competition.
Sophia Kurtz, an eighth grader
at Haddonfield Middle School
who has practiced Spanish for
more than five years, ranked as
first runner-up in the podcast’s
middle school category.
At the high school level, Court-
ney Lenny and Robert Rizzuto
were named scholarship winners
for the 2013 Foreign Language Ed-
ucators of NJ Scholarship for
German.
BOARD
Continued from page 3
Board President Weinstein resigns
The Haddonfield Public Li-
brary released the following April
children events.
Attend Preschool Story Time
for ages 3 to 5 on Tuesdays at 10:30
a.m. and Wednesdays at 1:30
p.m.
Rockabye Readers for babies
and parents or caretakers is of-
fered every Friday at 10:30 a.m.
for 9 to 24 months April 12 to May
17 for registered participants.
Make a butterfly at Preschool
Story Time on April 16 and 17 and
at Toddertime on April 18.
Toddlertime, for ages 2 to 3, is
offered Thursdays at 10:30 a.m.
Celebrate National Library
Week from April 8 to 14.
Read to a dog on Tuesdays,
April 2, 16 and 30 from 4 to 5 p.m.
(Visa) and Thursdays, April 4 and
18 from 4 to 5 p.m. (Desi.) Emerg-
ing readers or kids of any age
who love dog may call (856) 429-
1304. Ask for the children’s room
to sign up for a 15-minute session
of reading to Visa or Desi.
Children events planned
at Haddonfield Library
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 –THE HADDONFIELD SUN 13
By SHANNON CAULFIELD
and KRISTINA SCALA
The Haddonfield Sun
At approximately noon
Wednesday, March 20, an elderly
man drove his car into a home lo-
cated on the 100 block of Chestnut
Street.
The driver of the vehicle sus-
tained minor injuries and was
cited for careless driving.
The silver station wagon trav-
eled across a median, struck a
white SUV, traveled across the
parking lot and struck the side of
a residence, which incurred
minor damage.
The driver hit the accelerator,
instead of the brake, according to
officials.
"Could have been a lot worse.
He traveled a ways, so we're very
fortunate," a Haddonfield Police
Department official said.
The owner of the SUV, was not
in the car at the time of the acci-
dent.
She arrived at the scene after
the station wagon struck the
house.
Both vehicles were towed from
the scene.
The accident is currently
under investigation.
SHANNON CAULFIELD and
KRISTINA SCALA/The Sun
The silver station wagon
that struck the side of a
house on the 100 block
of Chestnut Street was
towed away from the
scene on Wednesday,
March 20. RIGHT: The
front of the car crumpled
on impact.
Car strikes house
Driver sustains minor injuries,
cited for careless driving
Send us your
Haddonfield news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@haddonfieldsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call
the editor at (856) 427-0933.
14 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
Find Your Next Home • Search Sold Listings
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Haddon Township and Collingswood.
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Of patios, walks, steps and fire pits
Stick around for a special visit
from the Easter Bunny and take
home a balloon to round out the
day.
Flowers galore
Support Haddonfield’s Cub
Scouts.
Haddonfield Cub Scouts Pack
No. 65 is helping to bring in
spring with an annual flower sale
and fundraiser.
Place your order by Monday,
April 8 and have the flowers deliv-
ered for free in the 08033 zip code
on Saturday, April 27.
Available flowers include impa-
tiens, begonias, geraniums, snap-
dragons, petunias, marigolds,
herbs and tomatoes.
Learn more, purchase flowers
or make a donation online at
www.CubPack65.com. Questions?
Contact the pack at
cubpack65@gmail.com.
Prime rib dinner
Who doesn’t like a good steak?
For the 73rd year, the Last
Man’s Club of Haddonfield Amer-
ican Legion Post No. 38 is holding
a prime rib dinner on Monday,
April 1 at Tavistock Country
Club. The cash bar feature opens
at 6 p.m. with the program begin-
ning at 7 p.m., including enter-
tainment by the Emerald Society
Pipes of Drums.
Tickets, including valet park-
ing, are $40.
Contact Tom Baird at (609) 923-
1442 or (856) 428-4070 for addition-
al information. Keep up-to-date
with Post No. 38 news by visiting
http://www.h-a-
s.org/al38/home.html.
Dance away
Do a jig with Dance Haddon-
field on Friday, April 5, to cele-
brate the nonprofit’s 13th annual
dance, and to commemorate 300
years since the town was founded.
The Indian King Tavern’s curator,
Linda Hess, will demonstrate an
18th century dance.
The dance will be held at the
Holiday Inn in Cherry Hill, 2175
West Marlton Pike, and tickets
are priced at $50. The cost in-
cludes hors d’oeuvres, dinner and
dessert. There will also be a cash
bar available.
Dress code calls for formal or
semi-formal attire.
Call (856) 429-9154 for addition-
al details. Learn more about the
active group by visiting
www.dancehaddonfield.org.
Tribute to Mayor Colombi
Mayor Tish Colombi’s 28 years
of service to the community as a
commissioner in a red dress suit
come to an end in May.
The borough has arranged for
a tribute dinner at Tavistock
CUB
Continued from page 1
Cub Scouts selling spring flowers
please see CROWS, page 24
HADDONFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL MARCH 2013
Photo by Bulldawg Bulletin Jr. Staff
Connor Poisel (center) wins the HMS Geography Bee after a close and exciting competition. Seamus
Glennon (left) and David Doyle (right) were the runners-up.
By Anna Haley
On January 11, 2013, Haddon-
field Middle School’s 7th and 8th
grade participated in the annual
Geography Bee. With 50 students
on the stage, and the rest of the
7th and 8th grade in the audience,
it was quite a day to remember.
Not only was it filled with inter-
esting geographical facts, it was
also humorous. With Mr. Farrell
as the announcer, his witty re-
marks and “George” stories were
much appreciated by the audi-
ence as well as the contestants.
Mr. Farrell tells us, “As a com-
mentator, this Geography in par-
ticular was very intriguing be-
cause all three finalists really had
the opportunity to win. There
were a ton of suspenseful mo-
ments!”
To begin the bee, contestants
were asked three rounds of multi-
ple choice questions about the
states in America.
Two students at a time would
approach their microphones to
answer. The quick pace of the
questioning kept everyone on
their toes.
It wasn’t until the fourth round
that the contest got tense. Contest-
ants were asked questions relat-
ing to the seven continents and
multiple choices were not given
in this round. Many contestants
were eliminated narrowing it
down to the final ten.
Then, contestants were given a
chalkboard and a map of the
United States.
When a question was asked, an
answer had to be written on the
chalkboard in a limited amount
of time.
The audience was also given a
map by way of a projector so they
could imagine the answer.
When an answer was given, the
contestant said their answer out
loud so everyone could hear it.
The three judges, Ms. Izzo, Mr.
Thomas, and Mr. Provoznak, de-
cided whether the answer was
correct or incorrect according to
their official answer sheets.
When a contestant’s answer was
wrong, they were asked to take a
seat at the back of the stage with
the other contestants.
The competition was the most
exciting when only four contest-
ants remained. According to the
official rules, in order to win the
entire Geography Bee, a contest-
ant must have been the only one
to get that question right, and
must be able to get the next ques-
tion asked right also. If that per-
son can answer the second ques-
tion directed towards them, they
are declared the winner. Many
times contestants were unable to
correctly answer the second ques-
tion.
When Connor Poisel was the
only one left to get the question
right, he was then asked the fol-
low-up question. If he didn’t an-
swer the question correctly, the
competition would continue, but
if he did, he would be declared
the winner.
When his final answer was
locked on his chalkboard, the en-
tire audience stared in awe.
Cheers erupted from the audi-
ence when his final answer was
correct and he was declared the
2013 winner of the HMS Geogra-
phy Bee.
Connor sates, “It was so nerve-
racking when I was up there, but
it was extremely exciting that I
was able to celebrate my victory
after the second year participat-
ing in the Geography Bee!”
Poisel Wins
Geography Bee
By Joseph De Simone
Three hundred—-that’s a big
number! Especially when you are
referring to the number of years
that a small town has been
around. This year, with events
scheduled throughout the year,
Haddonfield will be celebrating
its 300th birthday; that is longer
than the Aztec and Macedonian
Empires combined.
It all started in 1713 when Eliza-
beth Haddon along with her hus-
band, John Estaugh, built a home
in what is now the Estates section
of Haddonfield. They settled on a
portion of 500 acres that her fa-
ther, John Haddon, had bought to
escape religious persecution.
John was a Quaker and a friend
of William Penn and Haddonfield
is named after him. Elizabeth
was well educated and she used
this knowledge to help expand
her town by creating plots of land
and buildings for farmers and ar-
tisans. When Haddonfield was
first settled, there were about 50
people living here. Now, there are
over 11,000.
To celebrate Haddonfield’s Tri-
centennial, the town has many
events planned throughout the
year including a series of open
houses at the Indian King Tavern.
The Indian King Tavern will also
be the location for a reading of
the Declaration of Independence
on July 4. Historical actors por-
traying Elizabeth Haddon and
John Estaugh will visit 3rd and
4th grade classrooms and appear
at other events dedicated to the
Tricentennial. In the fall of 2013,
The Historical Society of Had-
donfield will be publishing a biog-
raphy of Elizabeth Haddon Es-
taugh. For more information
about Haddonfield’s history or
the Tricentennial events visit the
new A website www.haddon-
field300.org.
It might be hard to imagine
what life was like in Haddonfield
300 years ago. There certainly
was no Starbucks, which would
have been a shame for the adults,
and no Happy Hippo, which
would have been sad for the kids.
One thing that is the same is the
strong sense of family and com-
munity that runs throughout
Haddonfield. It was important
300 years ago and it still is impor-
tant today. So, join with family
and friends to celebrate Haddon-
field’s 300th birthday — no pres-
ents required!
Haddonfield Celebrates
300th Anniversary
2 THE BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. — MARCH 2013
Photo by Bulldawg Bulletin Jr. Staff
After a tense and competitive Spelling Bee at HMS, the contestants are narrowed down to those pictured
above. These students will compete in a school “Spell Off” to determine who will compete in the County
Bee.
By Jenna Zappetti
Students from 6th, 7th and 8th
grade gathered on February 13,
2013 in the Haddonfield Middle
School gym to participate in the
annual school-wide Scripps Na-
tional Spelling Bee. To qualify for
the Bee, every student took a writ-
ten test in Language Arts class
consisting of 25 challenging
words that tested their spelling
abilities.
The students that earned the
highest scores in each class ad-
vanced into the Spelling Bee. In
order to advance to the next
round, each contestant had to cor-
rectly spell three words ranging
in difficulty from villa and satire
to incandescence and grandilo-
quence.
“There were a lot of words
from the list we were given to
study,” recalls Sophie Hamilton,
one of the winners from 8th
grade. “That helped but I was re-
ally nervous and it was really
nerve-racking to go in front of the
whole school and spell!”
Each student had to stand in
front of two judges, an announcer
and all of their peers and teach-
ers while attempting to spell the
given word with complete accura-
cy. The students’ ability to con-
centrate under pressure was test-
ed along with their ability to
spell. The winners of the school-
wide Bee include Marcia Baker,
Julia Bersani, Will Buzzard, Julia
Chin, Joseph DeSimone, Brennan
Dews, Maura Dodson, Sean Far-
rell, Paul Gerlach, Claire Haitsch,
Sophie Hamilton, Isaac Ja-
cobowitz, Teo Lupinetti, Jaime
McComick, Lachlan Mersky,
William Michael and Grace
Pasco. These students will now
participate in a “Spell-off ” on
Wednesday, March 6th to see who
will advance to the Camden
County Spelling Bee on March 13,
2013. Good luck to all of the par-
ticipants! After competing in a
“spell off ” on March 6th, ten of
these students were selected to
compete at the county level.
Claire Haitcsch came in third at
the Camden County Bee on
March 13th.
Spellers Gather to be in the Bee
By Lauren Warner
and Natalie Zucca
On January 18, 2013 Haddon-
field Middle School suffered from
a tragic loss. The seventh grade
guidance counselor, Mr. Toto, a
man of many kind words and
deeds for others, passed away. Stu-
dents, teachers, and staff were
shocked when the devastating
news broke out.
“Mr. Toto and I worked togeth-
er for five years and he inter-
viewed me. He is the reason I’m
here.
“Mr. Toto was a genuine per-
son,” says eighth grade counselor
Mrs. McKelvey.
Soon after Mr. Toto passed, stu-
dents, teachers, and staff shared
their memories, thoughts and
feelings about their wonderful
time with Mr. Toto on large white
banners displayed on his office
door and the bulletin board
across the hall.
The banners and many sympa-
thy cards were sent to Mr. Toto’s
family from HMS.
Mr. Toto is survived by his wife
Mary Kirby Toto, his children
John J. Toto Jr. and MaryKay
Mahar (Peter); his brother Joseph
R. Toto; his nephew Esther Papa
and two granddaughters, Luci
and Charley. Born in Philadel-
phia, Mr. Toto was the son of the
late John S. and Mary Frisina
Toto.
Mr. Toto’s family expressed
their gratitude to HMS in the fol-
lowing statement “Our family
was overwhelmed by the love and
support that HMS has shown us
during this tough time. It really
helped us to understand John’s
(Mr. Toto) impact on your school
and community.”
In addition to his legacy as a
caring counselor, Mr. Toto was a
life skills teacher and the founder
of the Haddonfield Middle School
Peer Leaders Program. The Peer
Leaders are seventh and eighth
grade students who strive to help
others, make the world a better
place, and become fantastic lead-
ers.
A few activities Peer Leaders
partake in are tutoring at the Fel-
lowship House in Camden, New
Jersey, assisting school guests
during Back to School Night and
conferences, and most important-
ly, being outstanding role models.
Mr. Toto had faith in every stu-
dent and their potential to lead.
For students who were not accept-
ed into seventh grade peer lead-
ers, Mr. Toto created the Leader-
ship Club.
During the club meetings, he
trained every child to improve
their leadership skills while
working hand-in-hand with the
current peer leaders.
By the end of the year, every
student in Leadership Club was
selected to be an eighth grade
Peer Leader.
“Mr. Toto exemplified the
amount of caring and compas-
sion that any educator should
possess. He will be dearly missed
by students and staff members
alike,” says Mr. Kozak, an eighth
grade science teacher.
In addition to his dedication to
Haddonfield Middle School, Mr.
Toto was also a member of the
Haddonfield Rotary Club and won
the Spirit of Philadelphia Award
in 1986 when he was President of
The Bridge.
Many compassionate students
and teachers attended his view-
ing to pay their respects on
Wednesday January 23. The fu-
neral was held on Thursday, Jan-
uary 24 at the Immaculate Con-
ception D.V.M.
One of his students, Olivia
Conquest, stated, “Mr. Toto will
be dearly missed. Haddonfield
Middle School will never be the
same without him.”
The first day Mr. Toto entered
Haddonfield Middle School, 35
years ago, he was determined to
make the school a better place.
And that’s exactly what he did.
In memory of Mr. Toto, his for-
mer office has been converted
into a guidance waiting room for
students.
A plaque dedicating the space
in Mr. Toto’s honor will be dis-
played in the room.
HMS Mourns
Tragic Loss
By Sophia Peifer
History books came to life as
the 6th grade class visited the
Penn Museum on January 23rd to
get a glimpse of the cultures they
have been studying in Social
Studies.
When they arrived at the muse-
um, each homeroom went on a
guided tour of a different exhibit.
University of Pennsylvania stu-
dents guided HMS students to
various cultural exhibits includ-
ing Rome, China, Mesopotamia,
Greece, and Israel.
The galleries contained thou-
sands of preserved artifacts such
as jewelry, metalwork, mosaics,
glass vessels, gold and silver
coins, and pottery. Because of the
diversity of artifacts, the gal-
leries provided a positive learn-
ing experience and allowed the
students to experience many
unique cultures.
Exhibits of Rome and Greece
highlighted their various gods
and beliefs. The Chinese exhibit
showcased an enormous crystal
ball, while the Israel exhibit in-
cluded a room with Israeli archi-
tecture. In addition, the
Mesopotamian exhibit showcased
their different inventions.
Many students stated that they
enjoyed the trip. “I liked looking
at the different countries and cul-
tures.” said 6th grader Jenny
Scott.
“My favorite part was seeing
the people work on mummifying
the mummy,” said 6th grader Lily
Samaha.
Another 6th grader named
Teddy Decencio said, “I really
liked the China exhibit because
in the middle of the exhibit there
was a big crystal ball.”
After the guided tours students
were allowed to explore the ex-
hibits and choose where they
wanted to go. Then, students par-
ticipated in a scavenger hunt
using clues to find objects that
represented writing, daily life,
women, religion, government,
and currency.
Sixth grade Social Studies and
Language Arts teacher Mrs. Had-
den said, “My class especially en-
joyed the Egyptian exhibit be-
cause of all of the mummies and
artifacts. Also they had a new
room where they showed the
stages of mummification which
even had a mummified cat and al-
ligator.” The trip was a positive
learning experience for everyone.
Sixth Graders Step Back in Time
MARCH 2013 –THE BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. 3
Photo by Bulldawg Bulletin Jr. Staff
At the last HMS Spirit Day Pep Rally before her retirement, seventh grade Language Arts Teacher Mrs.
Oakley thanked her students for being the best part of her job. Dr. Priolo also thanked Mrs. Oakley for her
dedication as a teacher at HMS for 26 years. (Spirit Day story on page 4).
By Sophia Kurtz
Editorials represent the views of
the writer and do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the newspa-
per staff or school.
In this generation, technology
has been used more than ever:
toddlers entertain themselves
with iPads during long flights,
teenagers text into the midnight
hours with their smart phones,
and the everyday TV show or
movie is a new wonderland for
young minds to escape to.
As a teenager, I have grown up
in one of the few households of
my town without the luxury of
watching the TV show “Sponge-
bob Squarepants” or “Phineas
and Ferb” on a rectangular
screen in my room.
When my friends learn this
fact, they often respond with a
stunned expression and ask,
“How do you live?” I explain that I
write, as I am doing now, read
many books, and spend hours
sketching. But while I do not own
a television, that does not mean I
have escaped technology’s wide,
luring embrace. Hours of my
childhood have been spent watch-
ing episodes of cancelled shows
with my father on his computer,
texting friends on an iPhone, and
posting my status on Facebook
with my personal laptop. Let’s not
even mention the countless video
games I have played. Now, many
children, ages eight and lower, are
exposed to this technology very
early. But how has this affected
our generation?
Access to computers for young
children has given a new mean-
ing to safety. Many social media
sites ban children who state that
their date of birth is under 13;
however, many children lie about
their age to gain access onto sites,
particularly Facebook. A study by
McAfee, an American security
software company, found that 37
percent of 10 to 12 year olds have
access to Facebook. Naive young
children give random strangers
access to personal information
with the simple act of accepting a
“friend request” by clicking a
mouse. Cyber-bullying finds a
new hole to fill in the many
trenches of the Internet. One
only needs to ask about Amanda
Todd to know that these problems
are more serious than over-pro-
tective parents.
Overuse of technology also
prevents children from having a
healthy social life. Video games
are a common culprit, with boys
spending almost ten hours a week
playing them. The Internet can
also suck in the innocent minds
of children. According to Com-
mon Sense Media, an organiza-
tion that studies the affects media
and technology have on young
users, “among teens who own cell
phones, 41% answered “yes”
when asked whether they would
describe themselves as “addict-
ed” to their phones”.
Many teenagers text or search
the Internet on their phones,
while in the middle of a conversa-
tion with someone right in front
of them!
However frivolous it may
sound, teenagers’ texting lingo
has leaked onto their writing.
Teachers across the country have
noticed a decline in proper
spelling and punctuation. We are
butchering the English language
with our laziness when we decide
to write “u” instead of “you” or
say “jk” instead of “just kidding”.
Spelling common words correctly
(however frustrating it is to add
those few, so difficult, so painful,
flicks of a wrist to complete the
word) is all that is required.
Technology is always chang-
ing, and so are the fads of genera-
tions.
Speaking in text lingo may just
roll over someday, like fashion
trends, but children’s safety and
addiction to the Internet isn’t a
fad. Cell phones aren’t necessary
for small children; they don’t
need access to technology until
they are ready to use it responsi-
bly.
An iPad given to a four year-old
doesn’t qualify as a toy. For the
sake of our generation, a book
will do just fine.
Our Generation –
Technology Dependent
An Editorial by Jayne Grabowski
Editorials represent the views of
the writer and do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the newspa-
per staff or school.
Facebook and other social
media networks have given me
opportunities to interact with
people I wouldn’t normally talk to
and allow me to socialize with
friends from school. Unfortunate-
ly, some people who misuse these
sites cause some to believe that
teens should not have access to
them. However, if teens did not
have access to these sites they
would miss out on several advan-
tages. Facebook or other social
networking sites provide an easy
way to interact with friends, a
good way to keep in touch with
distant family members, and an
effective way of getting help with
schoolwork.
First of all, Facebook, Twitter
and other social media networks
are an easy way to communicate
with friends and peers. I know
that some of my acquaintances
have Twitter accounts, and we al-
ways chat over them. It’s our way
to reminisce about past experi-
ences, share funny videos, and
give each other advice. Out of my
nine close friends, all of them
have social media accounts and
none of them use them in a harm-
ful way.
They just use them to pass time
in a fun and productive way.
Imagine a teen sitting alone at
home while her parents are at
work. She has nothing to do and
no one to talk to. However, she
can talk to people she knows with
just the click of a mouse if she
has Facebook. Without the use of
these websites, adolescents would
be limited to the use of money-
wasting cell phones to communi-
cate with friends unless they saw
them in person.
In addition to socializing with
friends, social media networks
such as Facebook are a great way
to keep in touch with far-away rel-
atives. With all of the problems
we have in our world today, in the
end family is what matters the
most. However, many of you may
have family members that live
towns, states, or even countries
away. For those of you with dis-
tant relatives, you know that long
distance calls are expensive for
even a short conversation. A solu-
tion to this problem is Facebook.
You could have the longest con-
versation in the history of man
and it wouldn’t cost you a cent.
But what if you don’t want others
seeing your conversation? Well, it
is also possible to make messages
private. Now, doesn’t that sound
better than a ten dollar phone
call?
Not only can social media con-
nect you with relatives, but it
could also help you academically
if you use it for the right reasons.
Personally, I don’t always under-
stand homework the first time I
look at it. We’ve all been there;
you get home and sit down to do
schoolwork and suddenly nothing
you learned that day makes
sense. But if you have fellow
classmates on these social media
networks, you can ask for expla-
nations or instructions and they
almost always give it to you. Face-
book is also very effective if you
know you will be absent because
you can request for one of your
friends to bring home the work
you will miss. I ask for help with
homework over the internet regu-
larly, whether it be walking
through a math problem or the
meaning of a certain metaphor.
Twitter and Facebook have im-
proved the grades of so many peo-
ple I know that it surprises me
that some people feel that teens
shouldn’t use these sites. Some
people argue that these sites ruin
teen’s ability to spell but to be
honest, that isn’t social media’s
fault. No one is forcing children
to say “u” instead of “you” on
these websites, so the decline of
proper spelling would have hap-
pened either way.
Even if you’re a good student
to begin with, you can use social
media to make you even more
successful.
Some people think that if teens
are banned from social media it
might “limit” cyber bullying, but
it couldn’t even do that because
bullies are going to find a way to
torment victims whether they are
shielded by a screen or not.
Maybe we could improve social
media by banning profiles that
spew hate instead of just cutting
it off completely. If you think
about it, that would cut out all
problems with social media in-
stead of getting rid of all the good
things too.
After all, if social media does
more good than harm, there is ab-
solutely no reason whatsoever to
prevent teens from using it.
Technology Keeps Kids Connected
4 THE BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. — MARCH 2013
Advisor:
Mrs. Annette Sanchirico
Student Editor:
Anna Haley
School News: Kaitlyn Bon-
net, Brianna Gess, Anna
Haley, Sophia Peifer, Meghan
Smart, JT Tully, Lauren
Warner, Jenna Zappetti and
Natalie Zucca
Features: Grace Bowman,
Joseph De Simone and
Katherine Warner
Editorials: Jayne Grabows-
ki and Sophia Kurtz
Thank you to the adminis-
tration and Board of Educa-
tion for their support of our
newspaper.
HMS Principal: Dr. Gino
Priolo and Vice Principal Mrs.
Sandra Horwitz
BULLDAWG BULLETIN JR. STAFF
By Kaitlyn Bonnet
The Haddonfield Middle school
student body continues to show
enthusiastic school spirit.
Throughout Spirit Week, the stu-
dents actively participated in
dressing up according to the
theme of that day. Pajama day,
clash day, and sports day were
three of the days during spirit
week which culminated in the
Spirit Day Pep Rally.
On Spirit Day, the student body
showed their support for New-
town by wearing green and white.
Mrs. Verdeur, a Student Coun-
cil advisor stated, “Spirit Week
was a huge success and a great
way for our whole school to come
together! I was also very proud of
our students for representing
Sandy Hook Elementary School
in Newtown, Connecticut, by
wearing green and white on the
final day of competition.”
As always, the pep rally was
very competitive and entertain-
ing.
Events included the obstacle
course, pie eating, balloon pop-
ping, hot spot (basketball), the
marshmallow toss and last but
not least Tug O’ War. The 6th, 7th
and 8th grade students as well as
teacher representatives from
each grade participated in these
events. Strongly claiming the
school title this year, the 8th
grade took home the Spirit Week
trophy!
Another special moment at the
pep rally was when Dr. Priolo
handed the microphone to Mrs.
Oakley who gave the students a
goodbye message before retiring.
“You are truly the best part of
working here,” Mrs. Oakley ex-
claimed to the crowd of students.
Mrs. Oakley retired after 32
years of teaching, 26 of which
were at Haddonfield Middle
School.
During her time at HMS, she
has served as a reading specialist
and taught Language Arts to all
three grade levels. She was also
the advisor of the Drama Club for
many years.
She will now work as a reading
coach and consultant at a non-
profit organization called, Read-
ing Assist Institute.
Mrs. O’Neill, the Writing
teacher took Mrs. Oakley’s posi-
tion as 7th Grade Language Arts
Teacher.
In addition to planning and
running Spirit Week, the student
council also ran a few fundraising
events.
The Haddonfield Middle school
is still raising money for the High
School’s turf fields. This winter,
instead of selling water ice, the
student council is selling soft
pretzels.
Upcoming events include the
talent show and volleyball
marathon.
The student council is looking
forward to a fun filled spring.
Student Council Shows School Spirit
Got Skis?
By Meghan Smart
and Briana Gess
BEEP. BEEP. BEEP. Almost
every eighth grader in Haddon-
field Middle School had alarms
set for 4:45 AM on February 2nd, a
cold and snowy Saturday morn-
ing.
It was freezing outside which
was just perfect for the annual
eighth grade class ski trip to Blue
Mountain, PA.
Accompanied by their chaper-
ones, the students boarded the
luxury buses at promptly 6:00 AM
to begin the long two-hour jour-
ney north to Blue Mountain. Fun
movies entertained the tired, ex-
cited students for the ride, while
warm food fueled their bodies
with the energy they’d need for a
long day of endless skiing, snow-
boarding and tubing.
Every student rode the ski lifts
up with all of their friends, ready
to get the day started.
For a lot of students, this was
their first time skiing or snow-
boarding and although they were
all excited, many were definitely
feeling a little bit anxious. “I was
really nervous all the way down
the hill, and I did fall a few times,”
admitted Abby Bentley, a first
time snowboarder, “but once I
was done the first hill, the next
one wasn’t so bad.”
At first, the icy slopes were
hard to get used to except for the
experienced skiers and snow-
boarders.
For the beginners, the green
hills like Connector and Paradise,
were the way to go. For the expert
skiers, the Black Diamonds and
Double Black Diamonds like the
Chute and Challenger provided a
fun challenge.
Expert snowboarders, who
wanted a thrill, went down Lower
Sidewinder, a black diamond ter-
rain park. The more you went
down, the easier it got. August
Falcione, an expert snowboarder,
said, “It was really fun and cool to
go on the terrain with my
friends.”
At the end of the day, the
group of exhausted eighth
graders trudged to their buses.
They settled into their big, com-
fortable seats, and watched Pitch
Perfect with smiles on their faces,
reflecting on the wonderful day
spent in the snow.
“My favorite part about the ski
trip was riding on the lifts with
my friends, and then skiing down
the mountain right into the lodge
where we could warm up with
some hot cocoa,” said Meg
Schroeter, who skied for the third
time in her life that day.
Most eighth grade students
agreed that this was a long but
thoroughly enjoyable day. All the
energy they had in them was let
out on the slopes; all the bruises
they received were totally worth
it, and all the laughs that they had
would never be forgotten. Satur-
day February 2, 2013 will be a last-
ing memory for the 2013 eighth
grade class.
By JT Tully
After the tragic shooting at
Sandy Hook Elementary, many
schools began to reexamine their
safety procedures. The shooting
deeply affected everyone when it
took the lives of twenty kids and
six school staff. Many people won-
dered, what can we do to improve
our school safety?
Many controversial ideas were
discussed across the nation such
as using armed guards and allow-
ing teachers or administrators to
carry weapons. Ohio and Texas
are already training teachers to
carry firearms. While some peo-
ple are in favor of this idea, oth-
ers are strongly against it. Sup-
porters say that an armed teacher
can stop a massacre from happen-
ing. Those that are against the
idea say that allowing teachers to
carry weapons would intimidate
students and possibly create more
danger.
Most schools are looking to
make more mild changes to their
school safety procedures. Had-
donfield Middle School has al-
ready made adjustments since
the shooting at Sandy Hook. Ms.
Horwitz, the vice-principal at
HMS stated, “I don’t think it will
ever get so bad that we have to
have an armed guard in our
school, but we certainly need to
take safety precautions.”
Haddonfield Middle School
teachers and students are already
trained to handle Tier I, I and III
drills. Each of these drills has dif-
ferent procedures according to
the severity of the situation such
as locking classrooms and mov-
ing away from doors and win-
dows.
However, since Sandy Hook
some additional precautions have
been added. “To improve our
school safety, we have made many
adjustments. All of our doors are
locked at 7:30 AM now instead of
8:30 AM and you have to go
through the main office doors to
enter the building. Students are
reminded to never open an exteri-
or door for anyone. All visitors to
the school must enter through the
main office,” explained Mrs. Hor-
witz.
One other change that may be
considered in the future is the
possibility of bringing back a
School Resource Officer. This po-
sition was previously eliminated
due to budget cuts but may need
to be re-implemented at some
point. These officers can protect
students and also educate stu-
dents about the dangers of drugs
and alcohol.
Along with safety procedures
for the possibility of an intruder,
HMS is also implementing weath-
er related drills and precautions.
Weather related risks were exam-
ined after the recent tragedy of
hurricane Sandy. “We are defi-
nitely taking safety precautions
dealing with natural disasters, in-
cluding new drills for hurri-
cances, tornados and earth-
quakes,” stated Mrs. Horwitz.
This year students are being
trained to do a “drop and tuck,” a
body position that will protect
them from flying glass and debris
in a weather disaster. This posi-
tion is designed to protect all of
the vital organs that could be
hurt in a severe storm.
Training is taking place in the
gymnasium and is being lead by
Mrs. Horwitz.
Sandy Hook Changes School Safety
Are state efforts to bring busi-
ness to the state effective at creat-
ing jobs? This and other ques-
tions will form the basis of “Cor-
porate Welfare? A Study Group
on Subsidies for Businesses in
New Jersey” at the Religious So-
ciety of Friends in Haddonfield
in April.
The Peace and Social Concerns
Committee of Haddonfield
Monthly Meeting has organized
the study group, which will meet
at 7 p.m. on April 2, April 16 and
April 30.
The free series will explore:
• Different types of economic
subsidies that the state offers
businesses as an incentive to
move to or continue operating
within the Garden State.
• How the funds are made avail-
able to business, which compa-
nies and industries receive the
most support and are the state’s
taxpayers benefiting?
• What tools exist for communi-
ties to assure that their taxes sup-
port effective job training and cre-
ation?
The session on April 30 will fea-
ture remarks by Gordon MacIn-
ness, a former state lawmaker
and assistant state education
commissioner who is now the
president of New Jersey Policy
Perspectives. MacInness’ experi-
ence in New Jersey’s worlds of
policy, nonprofits and politics in-
cludes leadership stints at the
New Jersey Network, the Fund
for New Jersey and Citizens for
Better Schools. He took the helm
of New Jersey Policy Perspec-
tives in 2012, after completing a
fellowship at the Century Foun-
dation.
Each of the three study-group
sessions will meet from 7 to 9 p.m.
at the meetinghouse on Friends
Avenue, one block north and west
of the intersection of Kings High-
way and Haddon Avenue.
To register, write to
Llotz25@hotmail.com.
Free economic study group formed
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 –THE HADDONFIELD SUN 19
We are the only community in the area with four separate and
distinct neighborhoods that allow residents to participate in a
program specific to their cognitive ability. In fact, our innovative
approach focuses on meaning and purpose, enabling many of
our residents to achieve a higher level of functioning and
greater quality of life versus traditional programs.
29 Warwick Road
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
(856) 429-0403
HaddonfieldUMC.com
CEL EBRA T E EAS T ER!
Special sunrise service at 6:46 a.m. in the cloisters (of f of Warwick Rd.)
Traditional worship at 8 a.m. (chapel) and 10:30 a.m. (sanctuary)
Contemporary worship at 9 a.m. in Fellowship Hall.
Childcare available for kindergarten age and younger.
Visit us online at www.haddonfieldsun.com
20 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
Can you tell we’re
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856-874-8214
National, state and community
organizations are leading a mas-
sive effort to highlight the impor-
tance of advance healthcare deci-
sion-making – an effort that has
culminated in the formal designa-
tion of April 16 as National
Healthcare Decisions Day.
As a participating organiza-
tion, the Tri-County Regional
Ethics Committee – an arm of the
state ombudsman office – is pro-
viding information and tools for
the public to talk about their
wishes with family, friends and
healthcare providers, and execute
written advance directives
(healthcare power of attorney
and living will) in accordance
with state laws.
These resources will be avail-
able at a free Community Health
Fair to be held at Fox Rehab locat-
ed at 7 Carnegie Plaza (off
Springdale Road) in Cherry Hill,
on Tuesday, April 16 from 1 to 4
p.m.
Guests will receive complimen-
tary health screenings and infor-
mation about advance care plan-
ning. Health screenings will in-
clude blood pressure and blood
sugar, eye and hearing exams,
balance tests, nutrition counsel-
ing, massages and more.
A free Living Will Clinic will
also be provided on-site by attor-
neys from Price & Price Elder
Law based in Haddonfield. Guests
will have an opportunity to re-
view the “Five Wishes” Living
Will document with an
attorney and complete it at the
event.
“As a result of National Health-
care Decisions Day, many more
people in our community can be
expected to have meaningful con-
versations about their healthcare
decisions and complete reliable
advance directives to make their
wishes known,” TREC President
Jane Knapp said.
“Fewer families will have to
struggle with making difficult
healthcare decisions in the ab-
sence of guidance from the pa-
tient, and healthcare providers
will be better equipped to address
advance healthcare planning is-
sues before a crisis and be better
able to honor patient wishes
when the time comes to do so”,
Knapp said.
For more information about
National Healthcare Decisions
Day, please visit www.nhdd.
org.
To pre-register for the Living
Will Clinic on April 16, contact
Price & Price Elder Law at (856)
429-5522. Space is limited.
National Healthcare Decisions Day approaches
Please recycle this newspaper.
B a l l e t N . J . P r e s e n t s S l e e p i n g B e a u t y
The Voorhees School Theatre • Holly Oak Drive • Voorhees, New Jersey • For more information and tickets call 856-768-9503
Performances Adults Children
General $16 General $14
April 27 at 2:30 p.m. _____________ _____________
April 28 at 2:30 p.m. _____________ _____________
May 4 at 2:30 p.m. _____________ _____________
May 5 at 2:30 p.m. _____________ _____________
Preferred Seating available by phone for $6 additional for adults and $4 for children
Name _________________________________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________________________________
City __________________________________ State _____________________ ZIP __________
Phone Number _________________________________________________________________
Ballet N.J. is a non-profit cultural organization
Check payable to Ballet N.J. Visa MasterCard
Card # _____________________________________________________ Exp. Date _______________
Cardholders Signature __________________________________________________________________
(Visa/MasterCard handling fee of $4.50 per order.)
Amount enclosed/charged _________________________________________
Mail to:
Ballet N.J. Box Office
401 Bloomfield Drive, Suite #4
West Berlin, NJ 08091
Please enclose a stamped,
self addressed envelope
to expedite delivery of your tickets.
401 Bloomfield Dr. #4
West Berlin, NJ 08091
856-768-9503
www.BalletNJ.com
Ballet NJ presents the
June 24-July 26, 2013 Classes: Ages 3 to Adult
Ballet, Pointe, Pas De Deux, Flexibility Training, Jazz Hip-Hop,
Adult Ballet and Conditioning
The Academy of Ballet NJ is now accepting registration for our 2013 Ballet
Summer Intensive. Classes in ballet are fun when taught by energetic and
nurturing teachers. Your child will gain poise, confidence and a lifelong love
of the arts by training in a caring and non-competitive environment.
Call 856-768-9503 for more information. academyofballetnj.org
Ballet NJ Summer Intensive
Ballet NJ will present the “Sleeping Beauty” at the
Voorhees School Theatre on April 27, 28, May 4 and 5.
This production will feature Guest Artists of the Pennsylvania Ballet:
Evelyn Kocak, soloist of Pennsylavania Ballet, as Aurora and Ian Hussey,
principal dancer of Pennsylvania Ballet, as the Prince. Good seats will go
fast so call (856) 768-9503 now, to reserve your ticket for what will be the
highlight of the Spring dance season in South Jersey.
Spring has arrived and the
Mabel Kay House is inviting sen-
iors to enjoy the activities offered
for the coming months.
Enjoy a challenging game of
bridge the first, third, and fifth
Tuesday of the month at 12:30
p.m. On the second and fourth
Tuesday at 1 p.m., enjoy a game of
bingo. Also each Tuesday we have
lite aerobics at 1 p.m. at Tarditi
Commons. Art workplace will be
held each Thursday from 9 a.m. to
noon and 1 to 4 p.m.
For seniors who want to have
fun and exercise at the same time,
try cardio fun (sitting or stand-
ing) on Mondays at 11:30 a.m. in
the Tarditi Commons Communi-
ty Room.
Senior tai chi is for all senior
citizens, both seated and stand-
ing, creating a range of motion
and balance and enjoyment on
Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. in
theTarditi Commons, Communi-
ty Room.
Line dancing is held at the
house every Wednesday at 1:30
p.m. It is not just country but
many styles of dancing.
The third Wednesday of the
month join the Computer Club at
10 a.m. Bring your laptop and
your questions. This club is both
social and informative.
Fridays are special. On April 5,
enjoy a pizza and bingo afternoon
from noon to 2 p.m. On Friday,
April 12, attend Garden Club
Craft Time from noon to 2 p.m. On
April 19, Kennedy Health Care
will be on hand from noon to 2
p.m. On April 26, attend Friendly
Friday from noon to 2 p.m. Re-
freshments are served on all Fri-
days.
For more information, call
(856) 354-8789.
22 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
Mabel Kay House invites seniors to activities
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 –THE HADDONFIELD SUN 23
10% OFF
GutterGard

or Seamless Gutters
The Gutter Guys
Expires 5/1/13. Not to be combined with other offers.
With this coupon. Valid at participating offices only.
Coupon must be presented at time of estimate.
$35 OFF
Repairs
The Gutter Guys
Expires 5/1/13. Not to be combined with other offers.
With this coupon. Valid only in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May and
Ocean Counties, NJ. Coupon must be presented at time of estimate.
$10 OFF
Gutter Cleaning
The Gutter Guys
Expires 5/1/13. Not to be combined with other offers.
With this coupon. Valid only in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May and
Ocean Counties, NJ. Coupon must be presented at time of estimate.
Since 1988 Over 300,000 Of Your Family, Friends & Neighbors Have Trusted
The Gutter Guys To Work On Their Homes. Why take a chance with anyone else?
Special to The Sun
Fifth-grader Sam
Beatty performs
a drum solo at
the JF Tatem Tal-
ent Show on
March 1 at Had-
donfield Middle
School.
Country Club slated for Sunday,
April 7 at a price of $45 per per-
son, which includes contribution
to a gift, according to the town
website. A cash bar will open at 5
p.m. with dinner set for 5:45 p.m.
An R.S.V.P. is requested by Fri-
day, March 29. Buy tickets for the
night at www.haddonfieldnj.org.
Gardens bloom
Crows Woods Community Gar-
dens re-opens for the season
bright and early on Saturday,
April 13.
The gardeners practice organic
techniques and love to talk about
the bumper crops they often see.
Learn more about plots, tips
and the local gardeners at
www.crowswoodsgardeners.com.
Lunch at church
The First Presbyterian Church
is host to the Presbyterian
Women’s Spring Luncheon this
spring.
On Tuesday, April 16 at 12:30
p.m. in Fellowship Hall, women
are invited to congregate at the
cost of $8 per person. According
to a release, church member Re-
becca Bryan will be on hand to
speak to the group.
Contact Pat Woodward at (856)
354-8485 to make reservations.
Celebrate our world
Local green thumbs are unit-
ing to celebrate Earth Day on Sat-
urday, April 27 from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. There is no fee to attend.
Taking place in the Crows
Woods Nature Preserve Pavilion,
volunteers from several local en-
vironmental organizations have a
variety of workshops and activi-
ties already lined up. And, of
course, the tricentennial will
make its mark on the event this
year.
Samuel Nicholson Rhoads’
birthday will be honored. Rhoads
was a 19th century naturalist
from town.
Learn more about the event by
visiting
http://haddonfield300.org/event/
all-rhoads-lead-to-crows-woods-a-
tricentennial-earth-day-celebra-
tion/.
Homes and gardens
While canceled last year, the
Haddon Fortnightly is gearing up
to make this year’s Home and
Garden Tour on Friday, May 3
from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., a success.
Proceeds from the tour help the
clubhouse in Haddonfield, ac-
cording to a release.
Call Tina at (856) 428-0294 for
more details or visit www.had-
donfortnightly.org.
Returns in May
First Friday comes back this
May.
May 3 will be bustling with
local acts and promotions.
Plus, May 18 sees the return of
the Haddonfield Farmers Market
with plenty of locally grown
fruits and veggies.
More information will be re-
leased soon. Keep an eye on
www.shophaddonfieldnj.com for
updates.
Play some ball
For the 13th year, the Lizzy
Haddon Basketball Invitational
through the Haddonfield Lions
Club comes back Saturday, May 4
and Sunday, May 5.
The cost is $450 per team,
which includes t-shirts. More
than 80 regional teams are expect-
ed to register. There will be sever-
al brackets for grades three to 12.
According to the club website,
registration forms are due April
19. All proceeds go toward the
Lion’s charity projects.
Learn more and check out the
game schedule at www.haddon-
fieldlions.org/Pages/Invitation-
al.aspx.
Drink up!
Hey, beer enthusiasts, don’t
miss this rare event.
Stop by the Indian King Tav-
ern, 233 Kings Highway East, on
Saturday, May 18 for one of three
sessions of beer tasting at “3
Cheers for 300!”
For the second time, the
Friends of the Indian King Tav-
ern is opening the tavern door
and hauling in some pints.
Sessions include food, beer,
music and a special town toast.
The first is from noon to 2:30 p.m.,
followed by 3 to 5:30 p.m. and, last-
ly, 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are $50 and go on sale
April 1.
For more information, visit
www.indiankingfriends.org or
http://haddonfield300.org/event/
3-cheers-for-300/.
Event submissions
Have an event coming up, but
didn’t see it in our listing? Shoot
us an email including any perti-
nent information to news@had-
donfieldsun.com.
24 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
10% OFF YOUR FIRST BOOKED JOB!
Your one stop home
services contractor!
LANDSCAPING &
MAINTENANCE
• Plantings & Mulch
• Stone Spreading
• Power Washing
• Yard Clean-ups
• Gutter Cleaning
• Raindrop Gutter Guards
RESTORATION &
RESURFACING
• Resurfacing
• Concrete Resurfacing
• Driveway Resealing
• Pavers & Brick Steps
• Decks & Fences
BASEMENTS &
CRAWL SPACES
• Waterproofing
• Encapsulation
• Remediation
• Sump Pumps
• Battery Backups
• Drainage
We provide contracting services to homeowners, builders
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highest quality workmanship with exceptional service.
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HIC#: 13VH05966700
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CROWS
Continued from page 14
Crows Woods re-opens April 13
classified
T HE HA DDO N F I E L D S U N
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 PAGE 25
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 9 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Cherr y Hi l l Sun • Haddonf i el d Sun
Marl t on Sun • Medf ord Sun
Moorest own Sun • Mt . Laurel Sun
Shamong Sun • Tabernacl e Sun
Voorhees Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
55per week
Only
$
45per week
List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
CLEANING BY STEPHANIE
House & Office Cleaning
Weekly, bi-weekly, Monthly
Linen changes, beds made,
low rates
20 years experience
call for appt. (609) 845-5922
ALLBRITE CARPET CLEANING
(856) 764-7966
1 STORY WHOLE HOUSE
WALL-TO-WALL CARPET CLEANING
$
169
2 Story $249 • 3 Story $319
Every room, hall, closet and stairs unlimited SQ. FT.

Master bath floor & grout $99.00
Carpeting & FIooring
CIeaning
Concrete Masonry
"The best cIeaning service¨
PeopIe Choice Award, since 2003!
European women. honest, very reIiabIe,
exceIIent job. Attention to detaiI.
Very reasonabIe rates! We start in 1994
and stiII have the same customers!
PIease caII, you won't regret it!
(856) 216-7400
ANNMARIE
HOUSE & OFFICE
CLEANING
18 Years Experience
Reliable, Excellent References
Affordable Rates
Weekly/Bi-weekly/Monthly
Free Estimates
(609) 977-6547
WINDOW CLEANING
PRESSURE WASHING
609-953-0886
Windows • Screens • Skylights • Chandeliers • Gutters & More!
Pressure Washing
Homes • Decks • Driveways • Patios • Concrete • Roofs • Pool Area
www.windowwashingwizard.com
Fully
Insured
Free
Estimates
W
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WAS
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WIZARD
Pine Grove
Brick · BIock · Stucco · Stone · Concrete
InstaII · RepIace · Repairs
No Job Too SmaII
609-346-5541
Fully
Ìnsured
Registered
Since 1975 · Third Generation Mason
Steps · Chimneys · Foundations · Sidewalks
Patios · Porches · French Drains
MA8ONRY & CONCRETE
Need Your Home CIeaned?
Reliable results,
excellent refs.
call Anne 856-482-1357
$25 OFF
Window Cleaning
$50 OFF
Deck Cleaning
and Sealing
$25 OFF
House Pressure
Washing
CALL TOM
856-429-4882
www.southjerseycaretakers.com
AMERICAN SERVICES
Window Cleaning • Pressure Washing
Concrete Pool Cleaning
Deck Cleaning and Sealing
CIeaning
C & C Mason Contractors
Brick | BIock | Stone
Stucco | Concrete
All Types of Masonry Repair
No Job Too SmaII
WE BEAT MOST ESTIMATES
Licensed & Fully Insured
609-704-9713 or
CELL 609-313-3606
MASONRY & CONCRETE
• Specializing in all types of Masonry, Brick,
Block, Stucco & Chimney repairs
• Concrete installed & repaired
• Concrete Leveling-Mudjacking • French Drains
• All Work Guaranteed
Residental - No Job Too Small - Commercial
(609) 230-1682 • (609) 268-9497
S & J Construction, LLC
Licensed & Full Insured
NJ Lic # 13VHO5615400
FULLY
INSURED!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
609-953-8961
Professional Window Cleaning, Screens,
Skylights, Chandeliers & more!
Professional Gutter Cleaning • Powerwashing
10% New
Customer Discount
PARADISE WINDOW
AND GUTTER CLEANING
Highest Quality Concrete
Work & Repairs
#1 In Service
(8S6} 840-30S8
Lic.# 13VH05511100
A-LIST
CONCBBTB
BEST CLEANING IN TOWN
I'll clean your house -
including floors by hand,
windows in & out, etc.
RESPONSIBLE • HONEST
RELIABLE • GOOD REFERENCES
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
Zoraida - (267) 701-4058
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Steve's
Home Repair
Siding • Capping • Painting
Gutters • Carpentry & More
(856) 810-2182
Fully Licensed • Insured
Handyman Services
Handyman Services
Handyman Services
Ìnterior Painting, Carpentry
& Small Home Repairs
No job too small
Licensed & Ìnsured
NJ License #
13VH06482500
Free Estimates; 10% off
labor with this add
Call Now: 267-761-8880 &
Ask for Brian
HOME REPAIR, MAINTENANCE
AND LANDSCAPE!
Painting, Staining, Installation, Assembly
& more! Landscape Design, Rock and
Stone Work, Fence Repairs, Wood chips
and Mulching… too many to list, just ask!
Free estimates upon request
*
Both Indoor & Outdoor Work
*
Call Bruce at 856-296-5515
CLASSIFIED 26 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
www.jhstraincarpentry.com
Over
30 yr. exp.
Spring Ahead!
Decks • Decorative Trims • Crown Moldings
Bookcases • Custom Mantles • Built-Ins • Baths
Home Project Consulting
FREE ESTIMATES - REFERENCES - LICENSED & INSURED
CALL TODAY! (609) 561-7751
Lic. 13VH00932400
856-627-1974
www.RASBUILDERSNJ.com
Custom Homes, Additions, Sun rooms,
Siding, Baths, Decks, Garages,
Basements, Roof, Windows
RAS BUILDERS
Since 1974 FREE ESTIMATES
GeneraI Contracting
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Trip hazards eliminated
“Cracks are our specialty.”
Residential and Commercial Services
New Concrete
Decorative Concrete Power Washing
Stain Removal
Seal Coating
Concrete Repair
BASCIANI
ELECTRIC LLC
Residential/Commercial
Service upgrade &
all types of wiring
No Job Too Small
Senior & Military Discounts
FREE ESTIMATES
609-801-1185
Full Ins. & Bonded
20 yrs. exp.• Lic 13923
EIectricaI Services
HeIp Wanted
609-481-8030
• Home Clean Outs
• Basements
• Estate Buy Outs
• Attics
• Pre-Settlement Real Estate
Clean Outs
Showcase
Railings LLC
Your Style and Budget
Wrought Iron &
Wood Balusters
609-561-2055
www.showcaserailings.com
Lic.# 13VH06048100
ºOuality 8ervice At A Price That Won't You"
856-346-3388
www.gibsonelectrical.com
FREE E8T¡MATE8 º NO JOB TOO 8MALLl
• Residential • Service Upgrades
• Recessed Lighting
• Backup Generators & Installs
$1000 OFF
Complete Siding Project
Not valid on prior sales/estimates. Expires 4/30/13.
$500 OFF
Any Complete Roofing Project
Not valid on prior sales/estimates. Expires 4/30/13.
NJ Lic # 13VH05500600
LLC
FREE
Estimates!
(856) 988-7775
SIDING • ROOFING • WINDOWS
www.designacastle.com
856-429-8991
On time. Done Right.
For all your home repairs. Locally owned & operated.
www.mrhandyman.com Lic. # NJ-HIC13VH03642600
CLEAN OUT / BUY OUT
Quick Removal
Attics, Basements
Estate Buyouts
Real Estate Clean Outs
Storage Unit Buyouts
609-560-4831
stusurplus@gmail.com
CASH
PAID
Home Improvement
Landscaping
3 D´:
zz=- $-:«::-
d
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856-979-1303
ELECTRICIAN
All types of electrical
work… small or large!
We bill by the job, not by the hour!
KAISER ELECTRIC
We answer our phones!
(856) 722-0070
Lic.#7379 Bonded
GeneraI Contracting
Office Clerk -
www.eOutlet4u.com
Part Time Mon-Fri
9:30AM - 3PM
$8.50 - $10 per hour
to start
send resume to
eOutlet4u@yahoo.com
or call (856) 206-0410
after 2 PM
Mount Laurel area
HELP WANTED
Looking for an ambious,
hardworking landscape
laborer. Good pay with
quick, advancement
possibilities. Call Tim -
(609) 953-9404
Telephone Sales Person
Wanted
Monday through Friday
9AM-1PM
$10.00 / Hour + Bonus
Medford office
call Anthony
856-816-3155
3D Landscaping
Owner operated an insured
CALL NOW FOR SPRING SPECIALS!
Gardening, Mulching, Lawn
Maintenance and more
For your free estimate call Rich today:
609-707-2318
*References upon request
ASIAN MASSAGE
THERAPY
With Table Shower
New Beautiful Young Staff
609-859-1233
1816 Rt 70, Southampton
Massage
Lawn Restoration
Furniture For saIe
FURNITURE & RUG SALE
Cherry Furniture And
Three Oriental Rugs For
Sale
1124 Wyndwood Rd.
HaddonfieId, NJ
(856) 520-8434
Call for details!
Correnty's Lawn Svcs.
Specialist in Smaller
Property Maintenance
Spring CIean-up SpeciaIs
Anthony 856-428-5262
Painting
¡nterior Painting & Restorations,
Wallpaper Removal, Paperhanging,
Drywall & Plaster Repairs
Call Ray Forker
for a FREE estimate
856-234-0014
FULLY ¡N8URED
www.rayforkerpainting.com
Serving South Jersey
for over 50 years.
Lic.# 13VH01426900
Respraying Aluminum,
Cedar, Asbestos, Wood &
Vinyl Siding, Stucco,
Carpentry Repairs
FREE ESTIMATES
609-654-7651
856-667-7651
Cell: 609-868-1178
Lic# 13VH04812500
Painting & Staining -
Interior/Exterior
MATT
NOBLE
Painting for Four Generations
POWERWASHING
Paul’s Painting of Medford
Is now offering painting of
interior rooms for
$100 ea.
(609) 320-9717
Quality work at Reasonable Price
NJ Lic# 13VH00929000
856-356-2775
Board Your
Dog In A
Loving Home
Not A KenneI
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Dog Boarding
CLASSIFIED MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 - THE HADDONFIELD SUN 27
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Painting Pet Care
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I2/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
ROOF CLEANING &
POWERWASHING
Remove Black Mold & Algae
Vinyl Siding
Concrete Driveways
Decks & Fence
Sealing & Staining
FREE ESTIMATES
Fully Insured
856 912-5499
10% OFF WITH THIS AD
Power Washing
Call for a
free a no
obligation
Estimate
856-824-1360
Crowley Painting
FREE ESTÌMATES
Call 609-680-0452
DAVÌNCÌ PAÌNTÌNG
Quality Work
Reasonable Price
Licensed & Ìnsured
856-341-4861
ReaI Estate Wanted
WANTED TO RENT
Furnished Room, First
Floor Only
Private. Burl. Co. area near
Marlton & Mt. Laurel.
609-654-5057
Services
American Red Cross
Life Guarding Classes To Be Held
At Royal Fitness In Barrington
Contact
LindaBolger226@gmail.com
for Information & Schedules
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT:
Elite team of trainers and coaches now spearheading the
expansion of a major business all throughout the northeast
and looking for motivated, business minded leaders who not
only want to diversify their income, but who enjoy teaching,
coaching and training other people on how to run a business.
Although we are a global corporation, our
aggressive expansion is getting the attention of
people in virtually every background. We are
involved with a multi-trillion/year deregulation in
telecommunications and now, in the deregulation of
energy! We work with numerous Fortune 100
companies. In Spring 2011, we were featured on
Prime Time Television based on what we've done.
We will teach you all of the aspects of our business!
• Trainers, public speakers, coaches, sales
consultants
• Work & teach in one on one situations, small
groups, large ballroom settings, and even on
stage in front of 20,000 people
• Be your own boss
• Set your own hours
• Capitalize on three of the biggest industries in the
world: telecommunications, energy, banking
• Work from home
• Company rewards trips
• Unlimited income potential: Compensation is
performance based including weekly bonuses
and monthly residual pay
• Customize a plan that fits your desired income,
schedule, family life
Please send contact information / resume to the
following email address:
dosomethingsignificant@yahoo.com
Expert Tree Care
by Dave Macneil
Trimming, Removal, Land Clearing
Fully Insured, Quality Work
Serving Medford & Tabernacle Area
for 25 Years
609-859-1506
TREE SERVICE
Tree & Shrub Pruning
Tree Removal · Stump Grinding
Bucket Truck · Chipping Service
Fully Insured
D.E.C. Contracting
609-953-9794
609-405-3873
Lic #13VH03950800
ISA Cert. Arborist NJ-0993A
Tree Service
Ninety Tanner Street • Haddonfield, NJ 08033
(856) 428-9677, Ext. 241
rwoods@lvlrealtors.com
Ron Woods
Associate Broker
LENNY, VERMAAT
LEONARD
I N C O R P O R A T E D
R E A L T O R S
HADDON TOWNSHIP
Attractive stone and aluminum split
level style home located on a beauti-
ful tree-lined street in the desirable
Haddon Leigh section of Haddon
Township. The home features three
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, formal living
room with stone fireplace, formal
dining room, remodeled eat-in
kitchen with skylight, family room,
one car attached garage, spacious, well-maintained rear yard, concrete patio, thermal replace-
ment windows throughout, and much more. A great home offered for reasonable price. $299,000
HADDON TOWNSHIP
Historic home with a waterfront
view. The Stoy House (built in
1793) is a grand home featuring
five bedrooms, remodeled kitchen,
sun porch, central air condition-
ing, etc. The interior of the home
has original moldings and a feel of
the old world charm. It is situated
on a beautiful half acre+lot with a
waterfront view. Don't miss this rare opportunity to own a wonderful historic home.
Offered for $399,900. Contact Ron Woods at 428-9677 ext. 241 for details.
Painting
Bruee's PaInrIng
30 yrs. Dependable Service
Immediate Service
Small Jobs Welcomed
Specials - Decks - Surfaces $1.30/sq. ft.
$150 small rooms
Call Bruce Wolf/Medford Area
609-654-5057
CLASSIFIED 28 THE HADDONFIELD SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
GLASS REPAIR
FOGGED UNITS
INSULATING GLASS
WINDOW/PATIO DOOR REPAIR
‘We fix your panes”
856-488-5716
Windows
Tutoring
READING ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE
heed a pat|eot, mot|vat|og t0tor?
Certified Reading Specialist for
K-12, College Students, and Adults
Assessments, Phonics,
Comprehension, Writing, Study
and Organizational Skills.
Specializing in Hands-On,
Multi-Sensory Tutoring for ADHD,
Language-Based/Auditory/
VisualProcessing Disorders.
Facilitate and personalize
home and school goals and
accommodations.
Customized one-to-one tutoring
in your home or my office.
Ellen Topiel HIT The Books Reading
and Student Services
Holistic Innovative Tutoring
(609) 410-2674
Looking to finish the
school year strong?
Spanish • French • English
(all levels)
NJ Certified Foreign Language Teacher
Call Mrs. B (856) 258-4646
SPANISH AP
National/American Waterproofing
· French/Trench Drains · Sump pumps
· Back up systems · WaII repair
856-767-4443
www.americanwatermanagement.com.
Lic # 13VH06045200
Waterproofing
• Waterproofing
• Encapsulation
• Remediation
• Sump Pumps
• Drainage
609-489-4889 www.RenuNJ.com
Life-Time Warranty!
HIC#: 13VH05966700
call for a Free Estimate!
Roofing
30 Years Experience • Family Owned and Operated • High Quality Products • Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics • Professional Installation
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/13.
$1,000 BFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
10º BFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
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Must present coupon at time of estimate.
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Offer expires 3/31/13.
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Offer expires 3/31/13.
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MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 - THE HADDONFIELD SUN 29
RLAL1ORS
Ninety 1anner Street · Haddonfield, New Jersey
LENNY, VERMAAT
LEONARD
I N C O R P O R A T E D
Visit www.lvlrealtors.com to tour our many properties
Joy Messner
428-9677 x 248
CaroIe Yeager
428-9677 x 238
Francis X. Ward
428-9677 x 242
HADDONFIELD · 424 Kings Highway East
Two story contemporary home tucked away with views of Evans Pond. This home features a for-
mal living room & dining room, eat-in kitchen, large pantry, family room, 1st floor laundry, powder
room, master suite plus 3 other nice sized bedrooms, 2.5 BAs, two car garage & so much more.
$625,000 (6163607) Text JRWEAAZM to 64842
CaroIe Yeager
428-9677 x 238
Gary Vermaat
428-9677 x 243
Mark Lenny
428-9677 x 239
Mark Lenny
428-9677 x 239
VOORHEES · 10 Stockton Drive
Executive family home in Sturbridge Estates with a 2 story foyer & grand circular
staircase. Features 4 BRs & 2.5 BAs with a huge master bedroom suite, family room,
den & 3 car garage. Former model home on a half-acre+ lot.
$629,000 (6083445) Text JREWAAVP to 64842
HADDONFIELD · 405 Loucroft Road
11 room stately brick Colonial on .92 acres of lush grounds. 6 bedrooms,
4 full baths and 2 powder rooms including a stunning Master Bedroom Suite.
If you want the best, this home is for you!
$1,900,000 (5689923) Text to JRWEAACR to 64842
HADDONFIELD · 35 Grove Street
Wonderful opportunity to work and live in this architecturally stunning Victorian located in the downtown historic area.
Two large separate offices, 2,000 sq. Ft. And kitchen on 1st floor, second and third floors have been beautifully updat-
ed. Five bedrooms, a gourmet kitchen and professionally landscaped. The back yard makes this a truly special find.
$750,000 (6153988)
HADDONFIELD · 771 West Redman Avenue
Great 2 ½ story Colonial located in Elizabeth Haddon section. Features formal
living room & dining room, eat-in kitchen, powder room, family room, 4 nice sized
bedrooms, full bath, den/office/sunroom, full basement & & a 2 car detached garage.
$425,000 (6158788) Text JRWEAAZG to 64842
HADDONFIELD · 118 Jefferson Avenue
Picture perfect home with a spacious open floor plan. Lots of light and living space. Enjoy the
four season sun room, finished rec room, open modern kitchen. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home
offers a beautiful private landscaped yard. List of quality upgrades. Walk to town and speedline.
$549,900 (6186758)
COLLINGSWOOD · 175 Fern Avenue
Located on one of the most desirable streets, this Cottage/Colonial built in 1915 has some of the original features: leaded glass sidelights,
stained woodwork, turned staircase, & doors w/ glass knobs. Heated front porch, LR, DR, & eat-in kit. 3 BRs, ba, flred & walled attic. Blocks to
downtown shops & restaurants, PATCO speedline & Cooper River Park. Enjoy award-winning Farmer's Market, May Fair & seasonal events!
$189,500 (6166823)
Visit www.lvlrealtors.com or text LVL to 64842 to tour our Haddonfield Properties.
LENNY, VERMAAT
LEONARD
I N C O R P O R A T E D
RE ALTORS
GARY VERMAAT
Broker of Record, Owner
MARK LENNY
Broker/Owner
126 Roberts Avenue
Immaculate two story Colonial overlooking the park and
woods. All recently redone and painted. Large living room,
home office bonus room on 3rd floor, central air, newer
windows and roof.
$329,900 (6148697)
CaII Mark Lenny at 428-9677 x 239 · Text JRWEAAYW to 64842
180 Winding Way
Beautiful two story brick Center Hall Colonial Style home that features 4 BRs, 4
full & 1 partial BA, formal living room & dining room, state of the art kitchen
w/breakfast room, family room, library, master suite, full finished basement
w/office, work shop, home theater & wine cellar, 2 car garage & so much more.
$998,000 (6163468)
CaII Gary Vermaat at 428-9677 x 243 · Text JRWEAAZL to 64842
408 East Cottage Avenue
By PJ Ward and Sons, fully renovated 2 story Center Hall Colonial style home (2360 sq ft) in
Haddonfield, New Jersey. The dwelling will sit on a 55 X 125 lot, has up to 4 BRs, 2 full baths,
plus one 1/2 bath. The newly renovated house includes a master suite w/full bath, open
kitchen & family room, finished 600+ sq ft basement, unfinished third floor attic & detached
1 car garage w/carriage style doors. Project estimated to be complete by May 2013.
$679,900 (6170630)
CaII Mark Lenny at 428-9677 x 239 · Text JRWEAAZY to 64842
411 Birdwood Avenue
Great 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 2 story Colonial that features a
formal living room & dining room, eat-in kitchen/great room
w/fireplace, family room, master suite, basement, in-ground
pool & 2 car detached garage.
$629,900 (6169895)
CaII Gary Vermaat at 428-9677 x 243 · Text JRWEAAZV to 64842
Come Home to
310 Carriage House Lane
This 3 story Center Hall Colonial, built by John Forster, is a
classic & boasts 5 BRs, 3.5 BAs including a master bedroom
& NEWER master bath. Also a NEWER country-style
kitchen, family room, office & cul-de-sac lot.
$469,000 (6185186)
CaII Mark Lenny at 428-9677 x 239 · Text JRWEABAV to 64842
306 Washington Avenue
This Victorian townhouse which sits among million dol-
lar houses on famed Washington Avenue can be yours
for less than half that price. Wraparound porch, wood
floors, 5 bedrooms, 1.5 baths & a deep lot. Just blocks
to shops, schools and Hi-speedline.
$369,000 (6186776)
CaII Mark Lenny at 428-9677 x 239 · Text JRWEABAZ to 64842
517 Somerset Drive
Exceptional quality abounds in this custom 2 story Colonial home. Some of the
features include 4/5 BRs, 3 full BAs, 2 partial BAs, formal LR & DR, gourmet
kitchen w/breakfast room, grand family room, sunroom, office/study or 5th BR,
master suite recreation room, exercise room, hobby room & so much more.
$950,000 (6052561)
CaII Gary Vermaat at 428-9677 x 243 or Lisa CIarke at 428-9677 x 227
Text JRWEAATG to 64842
Haddonfield
856-428-5150 Ninety Tanner Street • Haddonfield, NJ
412 Hawthorne Avenue
Versatile 3-4 bedroom, 2 full bath Cape Style Home locat-
ed in the Birdwood Section of Historic Haddonfield. Some
of this homes features are LR, DR, kitchen, C/A, hardwood
floors, chair rails, crown molding and a 2-car garage.
$449,000 (4170663)
CaII Gary Vermaat at 428-9677 x 243 · Text JRWEABAB to 64842
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