the multiscreen

dayparting playbook
How to Utilize Device Dayparts for Greater Reach & Impact March 2013

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Contents
5 Introduction 8 MultiScreen Reach 12 Device Reach by Daypart 14 Relationships with Devices 16 Implementing the Device Daypart 18 Case Studies 23 Looking Ahead

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Media is now Accessible

on 4 Screens

24/7

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Introduction
Much progress has been made in recent years about changes to the television industry. The most striking change of all may not be what’s happening on TV but, instead, on other screen devices, such as PCs, smartphones and tablets. Much of how television advertising is bought and sold has remained reassuringly— and confidently—stable for decades. That confidence is justifiable when television commands complete dominance in audience reach and wields the emotional power of video advertising. However, industry conventions such as the daypart—which formerly offered a shorthand for the availability of the US audience to video ad messages (e.g., working people in Prime Time, kids and housewives in Daytime)—require a drastic revision due to the impact of Internet-enabled screen devices. New complexity has been layered over the 21st-century media day, as outlined in BBDO and Proximity’s joint research piece with Microsoft Advertising, “Meet the Screens.” Screens are all but ubiquitous in everyday life. Advertising reach and frequency opportunities are no longer defined by TV and traditional TV dayparts, but instead are spread across multiple devices and are defined by the consumer’s relationships the consumer’s preferences—even relationships—with each device. Advertisers who follow these consumer media dynamics closely can gain a competitive edge in engaging their customer; those who ignore the trends will quickly find themselves in the minority. As a follow-up to “Meet the Screens,” which outlines how people engage with different screen devices, BBDO partnered with Collective to commission and analyze data from Nielsen, and looked to best practices from Collective’s clients. To understand the new “device daypart,” Collective commissioned and analyzed data from Nielsen, and looked to our own clients’ best practices, to craft a guide for advertisers in managing this new multi-screen paradigm.

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Key findings include
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MULTISCREEN REACH
Audiences who consume media on multiple devices are now vastly in the majority, numbering 203 million people in the US, outnumbering single-screen audiences by almost 2.5 to 1. Even in Prime Time, the ratio is 1.5 multi-screen users for every one user of a single screen.

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DEVICE BY DAYPART
Different screen devices gain an edge in capturing user attention in each daypart: smartphones dominate the Morning, TV win in Early Fringe, and tablets lead in Prime Time.

RELATIONSHIPS WITH DEVICES
The tasks favored on each device are distinct and even suggest personalities as elaborated on in Meet the Screens. The computer, “The Sage,” is a life management device; the smartphone, “The Lover,: is a realtime connector; the tablet, “The Wizard,” is favored for real-time activities.

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IMPLEMENTATION
Advertisers may match their creative to the mindset associated with each screen—for instance, by bringing critical storytelling to the surface of a tablet ad, so that it intermingles with the leisure experience.

CASE STUDIES
Some brands are already using the unique characteristics of each device daypart to boost engagement with consumers—for instance, the CPG advertiser who used smartphones to reach “connected moms” in the Morning; or the technology advertiser who mixed Prime Time TV with online video to boost frequency.

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1
Multi-Screen Reach
In the past few years, with consumer adoption of the smartphone and tablet, as well as the maturation of the online video market, multi-screen users have grown to outnumber single-screen users. Multi-screen has in effect become the new normal. But the scale to which this has occurred is surprising. There are now over 203 million people in the United States—71% of the media-using audience— consuming media on multiple screens. This means multi-screen users outnumber single-screen users by approximately 2.5:1. The largest group of multi-screen users employ three screens, combining TV, online (computer) and smartphone—of whom there are 80.8 million (or 28% of the media-using population). There are almost as many of these three-screen users as there are members of the largest group of singlescreen users: those who use TV only, of whom there are 81.4 million in the US. This data may be parsed in numerous ways, but a few additional metrics are revealing: there are 35 million people who regularly combine tablet and TV use, a habit that is prominent in Prime Time. Yet TV still massively dominates, as there are very few (about 3.4 million, or 1% of total) small-screen-only users, meaning those who use only some combination of online, smartphone or tablet, without TV. While the combination of devices might cycle throughout the day, the data shows that multi-device usage dominates throughout. At least 100 million people are using multiple screens in any given daypart, and during Prime Time—traditionally the time of television’s greatest influence—there are 169 million users of multiple screens. This stands in stark contrast to the 112 million who are only engaging with a single screen in that time period: a ratio of 1.5:1.

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Multiscreen Audiences are the New Normal

203
THERE ARE 203 MILLION MULTISCREEN USERS IN THE UNITED STATES

71%
THAT IS 71% OF THE MEDIA-USING POPULATION

2.5:1
MULTI-SCREEN USERS OUTNUMBER SINGLESCREEN USERS BY APPROXIMATELY 2.5:1

Prime Time Multiscreen Users to Single-Screen Users Ratio is 1.5:1
MONTHLY MEDIA AUDIENCE BY SCREEN USE, BY DAYPART (AUDIENCE IN MILLIONS) 1 SCREEN 2 SCREENS 3 SCREENS 4 SCREENS
EARLY MORNING AM AM 133.8 MULTI-SCREEN USERS 122.0

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- 10

92.0

39.0

2.8

10AM - 4:30PM 4:30PM - 8PM 8PM - 11PM 11PM - 2AM
LATE FRINGE PRIME TIME EARLY FRINGE

DAYTIME

168.5 MULTI-SCREEN USERS 105.7

99.9

62.2

6.4

172.8 MULTI-SCREEN USERS 107.8

99.9

65.7

7 .2

169.2 MULTI-SCREEN USERS 111.9

94.0

65.9

9.3

106.7 MULTI-SCREEN USERS 152.6

84.3

20.5

1.9

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Audience by Screen Use
(MONTHLY AUDIENCE IN MILLIONS) TELEVISION ONLINE TABLET SMARTPHONE

HOW TO READ THIS CHART
This chart illustrates the popularity of different device combinations, organized by the total number of screens through with a user consumes media within a single month.

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0.9 MM 0.9 MM

0.1 MM

81.4 MM

Screen

-S CR EE NM EDIA USERS

1

0.2 MM 2.0 MM

1.0 MM

0.1 MM

TAL 83.3 million TO

LE G SIN

70.5 MM

15.9 MM

The most prominent screen combination occurs within the three-screen universe, with opting for the combination of online, smartphone, and TV.

ScreenS

0.2 MM 3.2 MM

N IO LL M MI 6 6 . . 9 9 8 8

TA OT TO T

11.4 MM

ScreenS

4

ScreenS

.6 95

IL LI O N

M

TO TA L

3SC RE EN

MED IA USER S

3

18 .5

E M MI EN LLI RE ON T C S OTAL 4

11

D IA

US ER S

80.8 MM

A LL 22 -S -S CC RR EE EN EN ME M E D ID AIA US U E ES R SRS

80.8 million users

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Device Reach by Daypart
Reach by device is dominated by television, which finds an audience of between 222 and 275 million across dayparts, peaking in Prime Time. Online reach follows with a range of 88 to 145 million users, while smartphones are next with a reach of 41 to 99 million. Tablets, the newcomer, draw an audience of 11 to 29 million. While the absolute numbers fluctuate, the ranking does not significantly change throughout the day. What does change is the degree to which audiences favor different devices, determined on a relative basis. Each daypart appears to have a relative “winner”: the time when use of that device peaks compared to other devices. This trend can be easily spotted in the boost in tablet reach during Prime Time vs. Daytime (29 million vs. 21 million users). The nuances are revealed in the next chart, which illustrates how the use of each device, in each daypart, indexes against that device’s daily average. For each daypart, the device with the highest index is the “Dominant Device Daypart.” This data reveals that a consumer’s marginal attention gravitates to certain devices over the course of the day— information useful to a programmer or advertiser seeking to understand when their content will likely receive an extra boost of attention and engagement on each device.

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Television Continues to Dominate Reach
MONTHLY REACH BY DEVICE BY DAYPART (AUDIENCE IN MILLIONS) TV ONLINE SMARTPHONE TABLET
EARLY MORNING AM AM
114.6 222.1

6

- 10

16.2

81.3

10AM - 4:30PM 4:30PM - 8PM 8PM - 11PM 11PM - 2AM
LATE FRINGE PRIME TIME EARLY FRINGE

DAYTIME

21.6

99.3

144.7

252.1

23.1

94.4

145.2

270.8

29.0

96.2

134.5

275.1

11.4

41.3

88.7

249.0

“Dominant Device Dayparts” Reveal Extra Boosts of Engagement
DEVICE USE INDEXED TO DAILY AVERAGE
EARLY MORNING AM AM

6

- 10

60

61

63

85

SMARTPHONE USE “WINS” IN THE EARLY MORNING DAYPART — THE MORNING COMMUTE

10AM - 4:30PM

DAYTIME

127

177

148

154

ONLINE USE DOMINATES DURING DAYTIME — WHEN WORK-RELATED SEARCH, & VIDEO ENTERTAINMENT BREAKS, PEAK

4:30PM - 8PM

EARLY FRINGE

109

108

107

107

EARLY FRINGE APPEARS TO BE A “TRANSITION” DAYPART — IN WHICH ALL DEVICES ARE USED HEAVILY SINCE WORK, COMMUTE & LEISURE BEHAVIORS ARE MINGLED

8PM - 11PM

PRIME TIME

131

101

134

112

TABLET USE IS STRONGER DURING PRIME TIME — AS MULTITASKING BETWEEN THE TV & THE LAP-FRIENDLY TABLET SPIKES

11PM - 2AM

LATE FRINGE 73 53 48 41

TV USE IS HIGHEST DURING PRIME TIME, BUT IT IS COMPARATIVELY STRONGEST IN LATE FRINGE — THE LIE-IN-BED-WITH-THE-TV-ON HOURS

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Relationships with Devices
But why are audiences reaching for one device over another? While audiences watch television in many mindsets—from breathlessly viewing crime drama to thoughtfully watching news—they do so to accomplish only one task: entertainment. Arguably the greatest change to the 21st-century daypart is that three of the four devices commonly access the Internet, and therefore may be put to many uses. Focusing on the smaller devices where media is consumed through the Internet, BBDO and Collective asked consumers what drives their device choices. We received a clear answer: 82% of audiences choose the device because it is the best match for the task at hand. The next most important considerations are: screen size, web access and web connection speed. Perhaps more interesting are the different tasks consumers prefer on each Internet-enabled device. Viewed together, these tasks reveal different personalities for each device.

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Internet Devices Reveal Their Personalities
USERS’ PREFERRED TASK, BY DEVICE SMARTPHONE The Lover—RealTime Connections
Chatting/texting with others Social media search

The smartphone’s appeal as an internet device aligns with its relationship to the consumer. The Lover, a connector, the smartphone is the device that knows the consumer most intimately, providing true utility and value It is a real-time portable connector that never leaves their side, used for quick responses, social media and on-the go search.

TABLET The Wizard—Leisure
Shopping/looking for products & services Watching online videos News/weather/sports

The tablet appears to be the “leisure device,” The Wizard who never ceases to wow, is used for shopping, watching online videos and learning about the world through news and sports content.

COMPUTER The Sage— Life Management
Managing personal finances Productivity-related tasks Email

The computer is the The Sage, the “life management device,” used for activities that require focus and secure connections such as work, managing personal finances and email. The Sage empowers the user and is a trusted device.

What Drives Device Choice?
THE BEST MATCH FOR THE TASK AT HAND (E.G. EMAIL, VIDEO, SOCIAL SHARING) SCREEN SIZE OF DEVICE HOW EASY IT IS TO ACCESS THE WEB ON THE DEVICE SPEED OF WEB ACCESS ON THE DEVICE MOBILITY OF THE DEVICE (I.E. EASE WITH WHICH IT CAN BE MOVED AROUND) WHETHER OR NOT WEBSITE(S) VISITED IS/ARE OPTIMIZED FOR THE DEVICE TIME IT TAKES THE DEVICE TO BOOT UP

82% 67% 67% 65% 51% 49% 47% 34% 25% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%

RESOLUTION OF THE DEVICE DISPLAY

SIZE OF AVAILABLE DATA PLAN

0%

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Implementing the Device Daypart
How can advertisers apply these consumer insights to the way they implement media? Device dayparting is appropriate when an advertiser wishes to take advantage of the sophisticated tools of multi-screen advertising—which can target consumers based on space, time and device choice—to complement their TV investment and optimize an ad campaign for maximum impact. How can device dayparting be applied to an advertiser’s advantage? Here are five simple steps to achieve the greatest impact.

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CLARIFY

THE BRAND’S REACH GOALS
To maximize reach among audiences who rely less on TV, a multi-screen approach would be most effective, as it would cast a wider net on multiple devices. If the advertiser’s goal is frequency and the target is more narrowly defined (e.g., moms in minivans), by using data, the advertiser can repeat messaging on multiple devices to the same audience for optimal impact.

MATCH

THE IMPACT GOAL TO THE DEVICE DAYPART
Brands can use device dayparting and an understanding of the audience’s mindset during each time of day to further their marketing goals. For instance, a financial services brand requiring a consumer to make a complex decision might invest in Daytime/Online, encouraging the audience to digest detailed content at a time when they’re more likely to be in front of a computer.

ADAPT

CREATIVE MESSAGING TO EACH DEVICE
Different devices invite different engagement behaviors. On a tablet, an advertiser may wish to bring storytelling to the surface of the ad so that it intermingles with the leisure experience. On the computer, an advertiser may wish to point the user to a website where a full range of available brand information can be explored and acted upon. Smartphones can create a fertile environment for on-the-go social sharing or location-based research.

DELIVER

TARGETED MEDIA ACROSS DEVICES
A brand’s media distribution should be managed across screens in order to deliver impressions proportionate to the target’s device daypart preferences. Using targeting data (e.g., ages 18-49) allows an advertiser to curate the user’s ad experience and achieve the proven benefits of multi-screen reach and frequency (see Collective’s paper, “The Multiscreen Advertising Playbook”).

PREPARE

FOR MULTI-SCREEN FOLLOW-THROUGH
With technology and media use becoming more complex, the challenge to create a smooth, integrated experience for the user grows. For example, mobile ads should lead to mobile sites and ultimately mobile actions, and so forth. The consumer experience at the end of the advertising journey is just as important as the ad creative, placement and timing.

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CASE STUDY
Mobile Moms for CPG
CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVE
A Fortune 100 brand in the food category reinvented a flagship product and was looking for ways to increase favorable opinion among women 25-49 with young kids. Wishing to take advantage of the “real-time connections” qualities of the mobile screen, the client aimed to make the “connected mom” aware of the product by emphasizing mobile advertising at a time when she was likely connecting with friends over her mobile device.

CAMPAIGN APPROACH
The client chose to segment campaign delivery by “Dominant Device Daypart.” The campaign targeted Connected Moms on smartphones from 6am-9am when Moms were active on that device. The mobile media was supplemented throughout the day via online video and banner delivery, with an emphasis on tablets during the Early Fringe and Prime Time dayparts. Collective monitored the engagement habits of a device-dayparted campaign vs. control groups in an attitudinal test and monitored interaction rates.

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THIS BRAND LINKED THEIR AUDIENCE (“CONNECTED MOMS”) TO THE DEVICE THAT FIT THAT AUDIENCE BEST.
The combined mobile + online video campaign generated a 22% lift in favorability
BRAND FAVORABILITY FOR DEVICE-DAYPARTED MOBILE AND ONLINE VIDEO CAMPAIGN

CONTROL

41%

EXPOSED

50%

22% LIFT

Smartphone units for the device-dayparted campaign generated interaction rates 48% higher than the industry norm
INTERACTION RATE FOR DEVICE-DAYPARTED MOBILE AND ONLINE VIDEO CAMPAIGN

INDUSTRY NORM

0.86%

DEVICE-DAYPARTED

1.27%

48% HIGHER

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CASE STUDY
Prime Time Awards Shows and Online Video
CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVE
A technology company was trying to emphasize the connection between its product and the entertainment industry by advertising on two major televised awards shows. While overall awareness of the product was high, the retention of key attributes for the brand was poor. The client wished to take advantage of multi-screen frequency to drive home its attribute-specific message by reinforcing the TV campaign with digital.

CAMPAIGN APPROACH
Collective created a target group of viewers who had watched the awards shows in the past. The brand wished to take advantage of the large audience of more than 181 million people, who consumes media on both TV and the Internet to drive home the key attribute messaging. In the two weeks following the live Prime Time event, Collective delivered the brand’s online video ads to the awards show audience.

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THIS BRAND TOOK ADVANTAGE OF THE LARGE TV + ONLINE AUDIENCE TO DRIVE HOME A MESSAGE WHICH HAD ELUDED AUDIENCES IN THE PAST.
The brand’s suspicions about the poor recall of key attributes was confirmed by a low baseline awareness
AWARENESS OF KEY PRODUCT ATTRIBUTES: TV AND ONLINE VIDEO WATCHERS

BASELINE
PRODUCT ATTRIBUTE

6%

ONLINE ONLY

10%

TV ONLY

24%

ONLINE + TV

35%

4.8x LIFT

The targeting successfully aligned the TV and digital audiences, achieving 80% overlap
OVERLAPPING TV AND ONLINE AUDIENCES THROUGH TARGETING

TV ADS ONLY

EXPOSED TO

80%
BOTH ONLINE & TV ADS
EXPOSED TO

EXPOSED TO

ONLINE ADS ONLY

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Looking Ahead
The choreographed use of multiple screens to tell a story is still in its infancy. Looking ahead, Collective sees several trends in technology and advertising that will affect how these tools develop.

Second-Screen Ad Experiences
While the second-screen experience is already widely embraced by content providers (television networks and the app developers who support them), Collective sees greater opportunity in second-screen experiences for advertising. Using technologies such as audio fingerprinting (automatic content recognition or ACR), advertisers can create synchronized ad experiences between devices, amounting to a multi-device ad “takeover.” These synchronizations can use data (rather than the use of any particular app) to make the consumer experience passive, and therefore more scalable.

Ad Sequencing Across Devices
Research from Nielsen IAG and others shows that multi-screen ad exposure creates a better result. Testing the many elements in this phenomenon—frequency, the timing between exposures, etc.—allows advertisers to truly optimize the experience. Do TV ads followed by online ads work best? Or do synched tablet and TV create the best result? Multi-screen data and ad delivery can find the most powerful combination.

Sequenced Ad Narratives
The logical extension of an ad-sequencing capability is to use creative versioning to form narratives. For instance, by following big, emotional TV ads with actionoriented digital ads, the advertiser has the opportunity to drive their consumer down the purchase funnel in the course of a single campaign, or tell a true multi-screen story that invites the consumer—in a controlled way—to delve deeper into a storyline or product content.

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WRITTEN BY JUSTIN EVANS FREDERICK STALLINGS EDITED BY GRACE CHANG

WWW.BBDO.COM WWW.PROXIMITYWORLD.COM WWW.DIGITALLABBLOG.COM

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