P. 1
James Montier

James Montier

|Views: 629|Likes:
Published by api-26172897

More info:

Published by: api-26172897 on Mar 15, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/18/2010

pdf

text

original

World Global Strategy

4 March 2009

Mind Matters
Revulsion and valuation
James Montier (44) 20 7762 5872 james.montier@sgcib.com We have long argued that the final stage of the de-bubbling process is revulsion. This phase is characterised by overwhelmingly cheap asset prices. Recent price moves in the UK and European stock markets have taken us to levels that have generally been associated with revulsion (i.e. 10x). Of course, cheap markets can always get cheaper, but for the long-term investor this may provide an excellent entry point. From a bottom-up viewpoint, the general cheapness of the market is confirmed. Of special note is the quality of stocks that are currently passing our deep value screens – names like Microsoft, BP, Novartis and Sony!

The hallmark of revulsion is unambiguously cheap asset prices. The speed of the market’s unravelling means that we are rapidly approaching the levels of valuation that are normally associated with revulsion. For instance, the UK and European markets are trading on 10x Graham and Dodd PEs (current price over 10 year moving average earnings). Of course, valuation isn’t a binding constraint in the short term. Cheap stocks can always get cheaper, and more expensive stocks can always get more expensive. However, for long-term investors these are compelling valuations indeed. Once upon a long ago, I was often told that my favoured valuation measures were anachronistic, that they failed to capture growth and were at best simplistic, and at worst stupid. However, in recent weeks, investors have started to raise a different question. Rather than arguing that my use of 10 year average earnings ignores growth, they now argue that this measure has been inflated by good growth in recent years! Perhaps this switch in concern is the best sign of the times! Bottom-up valuations show a similar picture. Around 60-70% of stocks are trading on Graham and Dodd PEs of less than 16x (“the maximum price one should be willing to pay for an investment” according to Ben Graham). A more stringent approach favoured by Graham focused on stocks that pass three criteria – an earnings yield that is at least twice the AAA bond yield, a dividend yield that is at least two-thirds the AAA bond yield, and total debt that is less than two-thirds of tangible book value. I add in an extra condition, which is that a stock must have a G&D PE of less than 16x. When running this test, I find fewer stocks passing the screen than passed in November last year, largely as a result of the dividend cuts. However, the quality of the names appearing is very high – stocks such as Microsoft, BP, Novartis, Sony and SK Telecom all appear. For those with a taste for the more adventurous, a truly deep value netnet screen reveals that Japanese small caps are just about the cheapest assets in the world. As I wrote recently, the slow deployment of cash into deep value opportunities remains my chosen path. The closer we move to revulsion the more cash I will seek to deploy. The road to revulsion is unpleasant, but it ends in value investor nirvana.

IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ DISCLOSURES AND DISCLAIMERS BEGINNING ON PAGE 12

www.sgresearch.socgen.com

Mind Matters

Revulsion and valuation
As regular readers will know, I have long argued that the final stage of any de-bubbling process is revulsion. The key hallmark of revulsion is unambiguously cheap asset prices. Revulsion is also characterised by us being embarrassed to admit we work in finance. On a personal note, we must surely be getting closer to revulsion on this basis. I was in the North of England a few weeks ago and took a cab, the driver asked me what I did for a living, and I had to wrack my brains for an answer that in those parts would be more socially acceptable than a banker – not easy since up there even paedophiles probably get a better press these days! Indeed, the speed of the market’s unravelling means that we are now rapidly approaching levels of valuation normally associated with revulsion. The chart below shows our perennial favourite among the valuation measures – the Graham and Dodd PE. This measures current price against a 10-year moving average of reported earnings. We are currently trading on 13.6x this measure – the cheapest we have seen since 1986. The average since 1871 is 18x. So we are definitely on the cheap side of fair value. However, we are not yet at bargain basement levels. This tends to occur at around 10x. This represents an S&P500 of around 500. In the depths of the Great Depression, we saw an all-time low in terms of valuation when you could have bought the S&P500 for just 5x 10-year earnings.
US Graham and Dodd PE – S&P500
60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1881 1885 1889 1894 1898 1903 1907 1911 1916 1920 1925 1929 1934 1938 1942 1947 1951 1956 1960 1964 1969 1973 1978 1982 1987 1991 1995 2000 2004 2009

Source: SG Global Strategy

As I have pointed out many times before, valuation isn’t a binding constraint in the short term: cheap stocks can always get cheaper and expensive stocks can always get more expensive. However, it is the primary determinant of long-term returns. To illustrate this point, the chart below shows the real returns achieved over the subsequent decade based around a purchase point defined in terms of the Graham and Dodd PE. We are currently in the third column from the left; this column represents above average (but not yet superb) returns that are likely to be achieved by a Rip Van Winkle investor who can buy and forget about them for the next ten years.

2

4 March 2009

Mind Matters

Real returns over the next decade by purchase G&D PE (% p.a.)
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 33-18.5
Source: SG Global Strategy

18.5-15.7

15.7-12

12.-5

One of the interesting comments that has appeared in my meetings with clients over recent weeks concerns the denominator in the Graham and Dodd PE. In the past, I have been told my measure fails to capture growth, and that using a 10-year moving average of earnings is simplistic, even stupid. Such comments have disappeared over the last year. Instead they have been replaced by investors suggesting that the 10-year moving average is too high! If ever there was a sign of the times, this must surely be it! I would argue that the 10-year moving average is just fine. After all it contains the post-bubble destruction of earnings as well as the more recent boom (and bust). The chart below shows the 10-year moving average of reported earnings that is used as the denominator in the Graham and Dodd PE. I can find no discernable change in its growth over the most recent period. So I would submit that it is still a sensible method to use. Indeed those arguing that it is flawed are running the risk of committing the same mistake that I made in 2003, ignoring the models when you have built them to work!
S&P500 10-year moving average of reported earnings (log)
5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2
1881 1885 1889 1894 1898 1903 1907 1911 1916 1920 1925 1929 1934 1938 1942 1947 1951 1956 1960 1964 1969 1973 1978 1982 1987 1991 1995 2000 2004

Source: SG Global Strategy

4 March 2009

3

Mind Matters

Of course, the US isn’t the only equity market in the world – and while the US isn’t yet in revulsion, the UK and Europe do appear to be there already. The chart below shows the Graham and Dodd PE for the UK; we are currently trading at 10x on this measure. This is the cheapest the UK market has been since the mid-1970s. Of course, in the mid-1970s the UK had a secondary banking crisis and had to go to the IMF and ask for a bailout (sounds kind of familiar doesn’t it!).
UK Graham and Dodd PE – the UK arrives in revulsion
35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0
Jan-37 Jan-40 Jan-43 Jan-46 Jan-49 Jan-52 Jan-55 Jan-58 Jan-61 Jan-64 Jan-67 Jan-70 Jan-73 Jan-76 Jan-79 Jan-82 Jan-85 Jan-88 Jan-91 Jan-94 Jan-97 Jan-00 Jan-03 Jan-06 2000 Jan-09 2004

Source: SG Global Strategy

The history for Europe is much shorter than that available in the US or the UK. However, to give some idea of what the situation might have looked like, the chart below shows an artificial history pre 1982, calculated by applying the average discount on Europe post 1982 to the long run US history. The data post the vertical black line is the real data for Europe. Europe is currently trading on a G&D PE of 10x, the lowest valuation since 1982. Just like the UK, Europe has arrived in revulsion territory.
European G&D PE with artificial history
60 50 40 30 20 10 0
1881 1885 1889 1894 1898 1903 1907 1911 1916 1920 1925 1929 1934 1938 1942 1947 1951 1956 1960 1964 1969 1973 1978 1982 1987 1991 1995

Source: SG Global Strategy

4

4 March 2009

Mind Matters

Bottom-up perspective
As I have often said, top-down valuation can only get you so far. A bottom-up perspective can also add insights. There are, of course, myriad ways to think about bottom-up valuations, but as befits me I like a simple approach. For instance, the chart below shows the percentage of stocks in each market that are currently trading on less than 16x Graham and Dodd PEs. Why 16x? Because that is the level that Graham described as “the maximum one should be willing to pay for an investment”. This generally confirms the top-down view point. Most markets appear to have somewhere between 60-70% of stocks on Graham and Dodd PEs of less than 16x. So value investors should be in their element.
% of stocks with G&D PEs < 16x
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 US
Source: SG Global Strategy

UK

Europe

Japan

Asia

The problem of the disappearing dividends
A more stringent approach was recommended by Ben Graham shortly before his death. He argued that stocks should have an earnings yield at least twice the AAA bond yield, a dividend yield at least two-thirds the AAA bond yield, and total debt less than two-thirds of tangible book value. To this list I have added a constraint that it must have a G&D PE of less than 16x. The table below shows the percentage of large cap stocks in each country/region passing these four criteria. Despite the fact that the markets are now below the levels seen in November 2008, the number of bottom-up opportunities is actually lower. The reason for this is all too obvious, dividends have been cut. So in past runs of the screen, stocks such as Pfizer and Nokia have appeared, and then proceeded to cut their dividend.
% of large cap stocks passing Graham criteria (ex Financials)
Now Nov-08

US Europe UK Asia Japan
Source: SG Global Strategy

2 6 6 16 20

4 9 8 17 20

4 March 2009

5

Mind Matters

Quality and deep value
That said, the quality of the stocks that are passing the deep value screen is impressive. Normally when I run these screens I get a list of stocks which I have never heard of (which doesn’t stop me from buying them, of course). However, these days I am seeing names that I actually know. For instance, Microsoft is appearing in the US screen, BP in the UK, Novartis in the European screen, Sony in Japan, and SK Telecom in the Asian version (a full list of the stocks appears at the end of this note). This suggests that it is perfectly possible for an investor to build a diversified global portfolio of deep value stocks provided that they are prepared to shut their eyes for the next few years.

Small caps and net current assets
For those who are still worried about the use of earnings-based valuations, an alternative is to return to a balance sheet approach which Ben Graham would have approved (see Mind Matters, 30 September 2008). In particular, Graham favoured net-nets. That is: The type of bargain issue that can be most readily identified is a common stock that sells for less than the company’s net working assets alone, after deducting all prior obligations. This would mean that that the buyer would pay nothing at all for the fixed assets – buildings, machinery, etc. or any goodwill items that might exist. Very few companies turn out to have an ultimate value less than the working capital alone, although scattered instances may be found. The surprising thing, rather, is that there have been so many enterprises obtainable which have been valued in the market on this bargain basis. It is clear that these issues were selling at a price well below the value of the enterprise as a private business. No proprietor or majority holder would think of selling what he owned at so ridiculously low a figure…In various ways practically all these bargain issues turned out to be profitable and the average annual return proved much more remunerative than most other investments. When Graham refers to net working capital, he means a company’s current assets minus its total liabilities. Of course, Graham wasn’t content with just buying firms trading on prices less than net current asset value. He required an even greater margin of safety. He would exhort the buying of stocks with prices of less than two-thirds of net current asset value (further increasing his margin of safety). In today’s market place, the vast majority of net-nets will tend to be small caps. The chart below shows the number of stocks that pass the net-net test over time. Currently I am finding the highest number of net-nets I have ever come across. The geographical breakdown of the net-nets is revealing. Half of all the net-nets I can find are actually in Japan. This suggests that Japanese small caps may be one of the cheapest asset classes on earth!

6

4 March 2009

Mind Matters

Number of stocks passing the net-net test over time
600

500

400

300

200

100

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Source: SG Global Strategy

Geographical breakdown of the current net-nets

Japan US UK Europe

Source: SG Global Strategy

Conclusions
As I wrote recently, the pursuit of value is one of the key tenets of my investment creed. From both a top-down and a bottom-up viewpoint I am being offered some truly incredible opportunities (especially outside of the US). Top-down valuation shows that the UK and Europe are both at levels that could be considered reflective of revulsion. From a bottom-up perspective, for those with long time horizons, buying a diversified deep value quality set of stocks hasn’t been easier for years. For those with a thirst for adventure, Japanese small caps look exceptionally good value at the moment.

4 March 2009

7

Mind Matters

Stocks passing the Graham criteria
Company name EY>(2*AAA) DY>2/3 of Mkt cap ($) AAA G&D PE Country

Allegheny Technologies Inc. Analog Devices Inc. Carnival Corp. Cummins Inc. Illinois Tool Works Inc. Microsoft Corp. Robert Half International Inc. Rowan Cos. Inc. Texas Instruments Inc. Tiffany & Co. Acerinox S.A. Bekaert S.A. N.V. BP PLC Charter International PLC Compagnie Financiere Richemont S.A. Deutsche Lufthansa AG ENI S.p.A. Iberia Lineas Aereas de Espana S.A. Kesko Oyj Konecranes Oyj Koninklijke Boskalis Westminster N.V. MAN AG Nexans Nokian Renkaat Oyj Novartis AG OMV AG Orkla ASA Persimmon PLC Repsol YPF S.A. Royal Dutch Shell Class A Salzgitter AG Skanska AB Societe BIC StatoilHydro ASA Sulzer AG Swatch Group AG Total S.A. Vallourec S.A. Wacker Chemie AG AGA Rangemaster Group PLC Air Partner PLC Bovis Homes Group PLC BP PLC Braemar Shipping Services PLC Castings PLC Charter International PLC Computacenter PLC Diploma PLC Greggs PLC Headlam Group PLC Hornby PLC Kier Group PLC Millennium & Copthorne Hotels PLC Persimmon PLC

31.9 9.7 16.0 20.6 11.9 11.8 11.2 34.2 10.2 13.9 14.6 19.8 15.1 22.9 14.1 30.4 17.3 20.7 11.5 22.6 17.6 27.6 11.2 12.7 9.8 24.2 21.3 36.6 22.4 18.9 34.7 12.0 9.7 12.5 23.5 15.1 16.9 33.0 17.7 27.8 16.2 19.1 15.1 20.6 21.8 22.9 17.6 11.4 10.0 18.2 21.5 15.0 11.6 36.6

4.0 4.2 8.8 3.0 4.3 3.0 3.6 2.9 3.8 4.3 7.2 5.3 3.9 15.1 9.3 10.2 6.2 7.2 8.8 6.6 7.1 4.5 5.0 5.3 5.8 13.6 8.6 6.6 8.5 3.7 4.0 6.9 3.5 12.2 6.2 16.5 7.7 9.2 9.7 7.9 5.3 7.6 7.2 4.1 11.3 11.3 4.2 3.4 13.6

1,916.9 5,428.5 16,403.5 4,188.5 14,210.3 2,326.4 1,368.5 18,318.6 2,344.0 2,914.0 957.1 977.1 15,845.1 5,040.3 79,816.0 2,191.5 2,082.1 956.7 1,640.2 5,967.4 1,080.8 1,471.3 82,096.0 7,826.3 5,927.6 1,450.1 18,744.9 3,372.8 2,883.6 2,376.0 52,021.2 1,305.5 6,372.8 4,222.6 3,116.5 76.6 58.0 658.8 72.3 79.0 977.1 282.6 174.5 537.7 238.7 40.7 464.0 792.7 1,450.1

8.6 United States 16.0 United States 8.3 United States 11.8 United States 13.9 United States 14.7 United States 14.9 United States 7.2 United States 13.7 United States 11.0 United States 10.0 Spain 9.5 Belgium 10.4 United Kingdom 11.3 United Kingdom 10.7 Switzerland 9.1 Germany 7.6 Italy 7.7 Spain 11.3 Finland 14.3 Finland 13.9 Netherlands 9.1 Germany 7.5 France 14.6 Finland 12.9 Switzerland 7.2 Austria 8.3 Norway 4.7 United Kingdom 6.9 Spain 7.0 Netherlands 7.0 Germany 9.1 Sweden 15.3 France 10.9 Norway 12.6 Switzerland 12.3 Switzerland 11.0 France 10.8 France 10.5 Germany 3.7 United Kingdom 12.6 United Kingdom 6.4 United Kingdom 10.4 United Kingdom 10.9 United Kingdom 7.1 United Kingdom 11.3 United Kingdom 4.8 United Kingdom 11.1 United Kingdom 16.0 United Kingdom 11.6 United Kingdom 7.8 United Kingdom 10.5 United Kingdom 7.6 United Kingdom 4.7 United Kingdom

3.0 143,582.6

8.0 117,959.7

7.3 133,757.1

6.6 111,692.6

8.0 117,959.7

8

4 March 2009

Mind Matters

Company name

EY>(2*AAA)

DY>2/3 of Mkt cap ($) AAA

G&D PE Country

Renishaw PLC Royal Dutch Shell PLC (CL B) St. Ives PLC T. Clarke PLC Ted Baker PLC Acer Inc. Aneka Tambang ASM Pacific Technology Ltd. ASUSTeK Computer Inc. Bumi Resources Cheung Kong (Holdings) Ltd. China Shipping Development Co. Ltd. China Travel International Investment Hong Kong Ltd. Chinese Estates (Holdings) Ltd. CITIC Pacific Ltd. CNPC (Hong Kong) Ltd. Compal Electronics Inc. Cosco Corp. (Singapore) Ltd. Cosco Pacific Ltd. Denway Motors Ltd. Evergreen Marine Corp. (Taiwan) Ltd. Feng Hsin Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. Formosa Chemicals & Fibre Corp. Formosa Plastics Corp. Formosa Taffeta Co. Ltd. GAIL (India) Ltd. Hang Lung Group Ltd. Hang Lung Properties Ltd. Hang Seng Bank Ltd. Henderson Land Development Co. Ltd. Hopewell Holdings Ltd. Hysan Development Co. Ltd. International Container Terminal Services Inc. Inventec Corp. Jiangxi Copper Co. Ltd. Keppel Corp. Ltd. Kerry Properties Ltd. Kingboard Chemical Holdings Ltd. Korea Electric Power Corp. Lite-On Technology Corp. MiTAC International Corp. MTR Corp. Ltd. Nan Ya Plastics Corp. Oil & Natural Gas Corp. Ltd. Orient Overseas (International) Ltd. POSCO PTT Exploration & Production PCL S-Oil Corp. SembCorp Industries Ltd. Sesa Goa Ltd. Shanghai Industrial Holdings Ltd. Singapore Airlines Ltd. Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. Singapore Telecommunications Ltd. Sino Land Co. Ltd.

15.9 17.5 32.0 11.6 11.2 12.0 46.4 11.7 21.4 51.3 19.4 22.8 10.2 41.1 63.4 10.6 17.5 19.0 26.7 13.3 28.1 14.6 25.6 18.0 28.1 11.1 29.6 22.0 11.7 30.0 32.0 33.2 14.5 21.0 25.0 16.8 36.4 26.4 9.8 16.9 31.3 16.3 24.7 14.3 41.1 15.1 15.2 13.6 14.4 44.5 11.0 16.9 10.6 9.9 27.3

8.5 34.8 9.7 5.1 8.0 18.6 9.0 7.8 10.1 4.0 8.3 5.5 4.1 18.1 4.5 11.8 9.9 13.2 4.9 13.5 9.8 20.8 14.4 20.5 3.4 3.7 4.6 7.7 4.4 12.5 5.3 3.3 12.4 5.3 8.5 7.0 7.9 3.2 14.5 11.2 2.7 21.3 4.9 48.0 3.2 5.8 9.7 5.3 5.1 4.4 10.1 10.6 5.0 6.8

314.8 70.5 72.4 195.7 3,495.2 954.2 1,122.7 4,048.4 1,245.6 19,062.2 1,314.0 807.5 2,346.1 3,811.6 1,511.1 2,268.9 1,040.2 1,649.4 2,258.1 1,160.4 549.2 5,550.9 7,777.6 775.5 3,308.1 3,611.6 8,003.8 21,439.4 7,249.8 2,496.2 1,594.3 412.8 755.5 1,086.6 4,491.7 2,715.3 1,391.9 9,920.8 1,316.4 560.2 12,682.4 7,246.9 28,444.9 1,451.9 17,695.2 8,153.8 3,808.3 2,430.5 1,223.9 2,472.8 7,774.6 2,794.0 25,277.6 3,778.6

9.1 United Kingdom 8.8 United Kingdom 2.3 United Kingdom 7.6 United Kingdom 14.3 United Kingdom 15.2 Taiwan 11.0 Indonesia 10.6 Hong Kong 7.5 Taiwan 12.4 Indonesia 7.8 Hong Kong 15.5 China 14.0 Hong Kong 8.4 Hong Kong 4.1 Hong Kong 13.4 Hong Kong 8.7 Taiwan 14.2 Singapore 7.7 Hong Kong 13.7 Hong Kong 8.0 Taiwan 13.4 Taiwan 8.4 Taiwan 12.8 Taiwan 10.6 Taiwan 14.3 India 10.9 Hong Kong 14.1 Hong Kong 14.4 Hong Kong 6.6 Hong Kong 11.7 Hong Kong 7.0 Hong Kong 14.6 Philippines 7.0 Taiwan 13.5 China 11.5 Singapore 8.7 Hong Kong 6.8 Hong Kong 7.5 South Korea 6.4 Taiwan 6.5 Taiwan 14.5 Hong Kong 8.8 Taiwan 13.4 India 4.5 Hong Kong 11.4 South Korea 15.2 Thailand 11.1 South Korea 11.3 Singapore 10.2 India 13.4 Hong Kong 8.9 Singapore 10.4 Singapore 14.7 Singapore 8.8 Hong Kong

6.8 127,661.0

4 March 2009

9

Mind Matters

Company name

EY>(2*AAA)

DY>2/3 of Mkt cap ($) AAA

G&D PE Country

SINOPEC Shanghai Petrochemical Co. Ltd. SK Telecom Co. Ltd. Steel Authority of India Ltd. Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd. Swire Pacific Ltd. Taiwan Secom Co. Ltd. TECO Electric & Machinery Co. Ltd. Television Broadcasts Ltd. Tung Ho Steel Enterprise Corp. U-Ming Marine Transport Corp. United Microelectronics Corp. UOL Group Ltd. Walsin Lihwa Corp. Wharf (Holdings) Ltd. Yanzhou Coal Mining Co. Ltd. Yue Yuen Industrial (Holdings) Ltd. Yulon Motor Co. Ltd. Advantest Corp. Aisin Seiki Co. Ltd. Ajinomoto Co. Inc. Alps Electric Co. Ltd. Asahi Kasei Corp. Brother Industries Ltd. Citizen Holdings Co. Ltd. Dai Nippon Printing Co. Ltd. Daihatsu Motor Co. Ltd. Daiichi Sankyo Co. Ltd. Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd. Denki Kagaku Kogyo K.K. Denso Corp. Fuji Media Holdings Inc. FUJIFILM Holdings Corp. Hitachi Chemical Co. Ltd. Hitachi High-Technologies Corp. Ito En Ltd. Itochu Techno-Solutions Corp. JTEKT Corp. Kaneka Corp. Konami Corp. Kyocera Corp. Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co. Inc. Mitsubishi Rayon Co. Ltd. Mitsumi Electric Co. Ltd. Murata Manufacturing Co. Ltd. NGK Spark Plug Co. Ltd. NHK Spring Co. Ltd. Nippon Steel Corp. Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd. Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd. Nitto Denko Corp. Nok Corp. OMRON Corp. Onward Holdings Co. Ltd. Panasonic Electric Works Co. Ltd. Ricoh Co. Ltd.

13.5 12.5 26.0 18.7 36.4 9.5 15.7 11.2 22.6 24.3 13.3 11.1 9.9 33.7 15.8 14.8 14.9 7.5 21.0 6.5 9.4 16.4 15.9 11.0 8.4 11.2 8.7 8.6 9.0 16.4 6.1 11.8 15.1 17.0 6.7 13.0 27.1 12.9 10.1 10.1 24.3 13.9 24.2 9.5 13.3 27.5 22.5 13.5 23.7 16.3 23.0 16.3 14.3 10.7 13.9

5.3 5.2 5.2 4.3 6.8 7.8 10.8 7.0 15.0 19.5 9.6 4.5 5.8 4.9 4.1 6.0 4.2 4.1 3.9 2.5 7.7 4.3 3.6 4.7 4.5 2.3 4.5 2.4 6.6 2.9 3.2 2.0 3.2 2.6 3.1 4.5 4.8 3.7 4.1 2.1 4.5 6.4 4.3 2.7 3.6 4.6 4.4 3.2 5.4 4.7 3.1 3.5 5.6 4.3 3.1

799.1 9,808.8 6,040.2 20,162.6 9,348.0 595.5 521.6 1,524.3 603.9 1,099.3 2,902.3 862.9 493.9 5,849.8 1,389.6 3,086.1 653.5 2,179.3 4,604.3 4,811.6 506.9 4,485.8 1,865.4 1,343.9 5,966.8 3,265.4 11,452.7 3,304.6 821.7 16,856.5 2,698.1 9,718.3 2,088.0 1,701.9 1,157.6 1,233.6 1,723.0 1,702.1 2,042.6 10,900.6 1,909.5 1,096.5 1,095.3 8,214.8 1,780.5 830.1 18,037.7 1,196.3 1,534.7 3,140.2 1,258.6 2,548.2 888.6 4,575.3 8,318.2

10.2 China 11.3 South Korea 14.5 India 11.2 Hong Kong 7.4 Hong Kong 15.9 Taiwan 13.5 Taiwan 15.2 Hong Kong 12.8 Taiwan 12.7 Taiwan 6.2 Taiwan 5.6 Singapore 6.1 Taiwan 7.4 Hong Kong 11.8 China 10.6 Hong Kong 5.3 Taiwan 11.8 Japan 11.3 Japan 16.3 Japan 5.4 Japan 15.2 Japan 12.0 Japan 12.2 Japan 13.6 Japan 16.2 Japan 15.0 Japan 15.7 Japan 9.4 Japan 12.7 Japan 13.6 Japan 12.1 Japan 11.9 Japan 11.9 Japan 13.3 Japan 10.7 Japan 11.0 Japan 9.8 Japan 11.8 Japan 13.4 Japan 10.4 Japan 9.5 Japan 16.2 Japan 14.8 Japan 12.3 Japan 10.5 Japan 13.0 Japan 15.4 Japan 15.3 Japan 10.4 Japan 7.7 Japan 13.3 Japan 10.8 Japan 16.4 Japan 10.5 Japan

10

4 March 2009

Mind Matters

Company name

EY>(2*AAA)

DY>2/3 of Mkt cap ($) AAA

G&D PE Country

Rohm Co. Ltd. Sharp Corp. Shimamura Co. Ltd. Shinko Electric Industries Co. Ltd. Sony Corp. Stanley Electric Co. Ltd. Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd. Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd. Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. Ltd. Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. TDK Corp. THK Co. Ltd. Tokyo Steel Manufacturing Co. Ltd. Toppan Printing Co. Ltd. Toyoda Gosei Co. Ltd. Toyota Boshoku Corp. Yamaha Corp. Yamato Kogyo Co. Ltd. Yokogawa Electric Corp.
Source: SG Global Strategy

6.1 12.4 11.2 9.7 21.2 17.0 15.5 28.4 26.0 10.9 17.8 12.6 7.2 10.6 19.0 22.5 25.6 25.4 13.9

2.8 3.7 2.3 3.1 1.4 3.1 2.7 4.0 3.3 4.4 4.2 3.3 2.2 4.0 3.7 3.6 6.7 2.4 5.0

5,705.2 8,638.0 1,884.8 1,247.5 17,011.7 1,909.3 6,222.9 1,617.4 5,846.1 33,021.6 4,302.4 1,545.2 1,531.8 4,189.6 1,771.4 1,817.7 1,534.1 1,479.5 916.4

9.9 Japan 15.4 Japan 16.3 Japan 14.6 Japan 11.6 Japan 13.7 Japan 15.8 Japan 14.3 Japan 14.1 Japan 13.9 Japan 10.3 Japan 12.9 Japan 14.9 Japan 13.4 Japan 12.9 Japan 13.3 Japan 12.5 Japan 11.0 Japan 14.6 Japan

4 March 2009

11

Mind Matters

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES
ENI MAN AG StatoilHydro Vallourec SG makes a market in Eni warrants SG is acting as Mandated Lead Arranger of the acquisition facilities set up by MAN for the acquisition of Brazil-based Volkswagen Truck & Bus SG is acting as joint bookrunner in the StathoilHydro's senior bond issue SG is acting as financial advisor to Vallourec for the acquisition of three tubular businesses from Grant Predico

US THIRD PARTY FOREIGN AFFILIATE RESEARCH DISCLOSURES:
SG and its affiliates beneficially own 1% or more of any class of common equity of ENI, Nexans, Nokia, Repsol-YPF, The Swatch Group, Total, Vallourec. SG or its affiliates act as market maker or liquidity provider in the equities securities of Acerinox, ENI, Nokia, Novartis AG, Royal Dutch Shell, Total. SG or its affiliates expect to receive or intend to seek compensation for investment banking services in the next 3 months from BP, Deutsche Lufthansa, MAN AG, Nexans, Nissan Motor Co, Novartis AG, Repsol-YPF, Royal Dutch Shell, StatoilHydro, Total, Vallourec. SG or its affiliates have received compensation for investment banking services in the past 12 months of ENI, MAN AG, Total, Vallourec. SG or its affiliates managed or co-managed in the past 12 months a public offering of securities of ENI, Total.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: The information herein is not intended to be an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, any securities and including any expression of opinion, has been obtained from or is based upon sources believed to be reliable but is not guaranteed as to accuracy or completeness although Société Générale (“SG”) believe it to be clear, fair and not misleading. SG, and their affiliated companies in the SG Group, may from time to time deal in, profit from the trading of, hold or act as market-makers or act as advisers, brokers or bankers in relation to the securities, or derivatives thereof, of persons, firms or entities mentioned in this document or be represented on the board of such persons, firms or entities. Employees of SG, and their affiliated companies in the SG Group, or individuals connected to then, other than the authors of this report, may from time to time have a position in or be holding any of the investments or related investments mentioned in this document. Each author of this report is not permitted to trade in or hold any of the investments or related investments which are the subject of this document. SG and their affiliated companies in the SG Group are under no obligation to disclose or take account of this document when advising or dealing with or for their customers. The views of SG reflected in this document may change without notice. To the maximum extent possible at law, SG does not accept any liability whatsoever arising from the use of the material or information contained herein. This research document is not intended for use by or targeted at retail customers. Should a retail customer obtain a copy of this report they should not base their investment decisions solely on the basis of this document but must seek independent financial advice. Important notice: The circumstances in which materials provided by SG Fixed & Forex Research, SG Commodity Research, SG Convertible Research, SG Technical Research and SG Equity Derivatives Research have been produced are such (for example because of reporting or remuneration structures or the physical location of the author of the material) that it is not appropriate to characterise it as independent investment research as referred to in European MIF directive and that it should be treated as a marketing material even if it contains a research recommendation (« recommandation d’investissement à caractère promotionnel »). However, it must be made clear that all publications issued by SG will be clear, fair, and not misleading. Analyst Certification: Each author of this research report hereby certifies that (i) the views expressed in the research report accurately reflect his or her personal views about any and all of the subject securities or issuers and (ii) no part of his or her compensation was, is, or will be related, directly or indirectly, to the specific recommendations or views expressed in this report. Notice to French Investors: This publication is issued in France by or through Société Générale ("SG") which is authorised by the CECEI and regulated by the AMF (Autorité des Marchés Financiers). Notice to UK investors: This publication is issued in the United Kingdom by or through Société Générale ("SG") London Branch which is regulated by the Financial Services Authority ("FSA") for the conduct of its UK business. Notice To US Investors: This report is intended only for major US institutional investors pursuant to SEC Rule 15a-6. Any US person wishing to discuss this report or effect transactions in any security discussed herein should do so with or through SG Americas Securities, LLC (“SGAS”) 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020. (212)-278-6000. THIS RESEARCH REPORT IS PRODUCED BY SOCIETE GENERALE AND NOT SGAS. Notice to Japanese Investors: This report is distributed in Japan by Société Générale Securities (North Pacific) Ltd., Tokyo Branch, which is regulated by the Financial Services Agency of Japan. The products mentioned in this report may not be eligible for sale in Japan and they may not be suitable for all types of investors. Notice to Australian Investors: Société Générale Australia Branch (ABN 71 092 516 286) (SG) takes responsibility for publishing this document. SG holds an AFSL no. 236651 issued under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) ("Act"). The information contained in this newsletter is only directed to recipients who are wholesale clients as defined under the Act. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: Please refer to our website: http:\\www.sgresearch.socgen.com http://www.sgcib.com. Copyright: The Société Générale Group 2009. All rights reserved.

12

4 March 2009

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->