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Memoir Course Teacher’s Guide_reDesign

Memoir Course Teacher’s Guide_reDesign

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Published by arudenstine
This is the Teacher's Guide to a Common Core-aligned, writing and reading intensive course on Memoir.
This is the Teacher's Guide to a Common Core-aligned, writing and reading intensive course on Memoir.

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Published by: arudenstine on Mar 28, 2013
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Teacher’s  Guide  for  Memoir  Course  

   

      Imagine…You  are  the  son  of  a  young  woman  from  Wichita,  Kansas  and  a  young  man   from  Kenya.  They  met  and  fell  in  love  as  students  at  the  University  of  Hawaii.  But  when   you  were  two,  your  parents  separated,  and  your  father  moved  first  to  Boston  to  study   for  a  PhD,  and  then  returned  to  Kenya.  Your  mother  remarries,  and  your  family  moves   to  Jakarta,  the  Indonesian  homeland  of  your  new  stepfather.  When  you  are  ten,  your   mother  sends  you  to  Hawaii  to  live  with  your  grandparents  so  that  you  can  take   advantage  of  the  better  educational  opportunities  there.  Your  family  enrolls  you  in  a   private,  college  preparatory  school  where  you  are  one  of  six  African-­‐American  students.       In  these  first  ten  years  of  your  life,  you  have  lived  as  an  African-­‐American  child  in   different  cultures,  different  geographical  locations,  and  amongst  people  of  different   racial  and  ethnic  backgrounds  as  well  as  different  socio-­‐economic  classes.  For  the  next   twenty  years,  these  experiences,  and  the  ones  that  follow,  shape  how  you  look  at  the   world.  When  you  are  34,  your  write  your  memoir,  where  you  recount  the  story  of  your   life,  meditating  on  the  themes  of  race  and  class,  family  and  community.  …This  is  the   heart  of  Barak  Obama’s  memoir.     Teacher’s  Guide:       Essential  Questions   Why  do  we  desire  to  tell  the  story  of  our  lives?   What  are  the  essential  elements  of  the  story  of  your  life?     Purposes     This  course  has  been  created  to  meet  6  central  purposes:    
Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide   1  

1. Learn  about  the  genre  of  Memoir.     2. Provide  students  with  scaffolded  access  to  great,  challenging  mentor  texts,  texts   that  are  found  in  the  high  school  and  college  curriculum.   3. Learn  the  writing  process.   4. Significantly  improve  students’  writing.     5. Make  writing  a  habit  and  practice.   6. Make  reading  a  habit  and  practice.   Students  of  any  writing  level  can  participate  in  this  course,  as  all  of  the  assignments  are   open-­‐ended,  assuming  students  will  do  their  best  on  them  and  improve  from  wherever   they  begin  as  writers.       The  Structure   This  course  is  divided  into  three  5-­‐week  modules,  each  centered  on  a  particular  stage  of   the  writing  process.  Modules  can  easily  be  shortened  in  order  to  accommodate  a   quarter  or  trimester  length  course  cycle.     Module  one:  Genre  Immersion  and  Generating  Ideas   In  this  module  students  explore  stories  and  the  stories  of  great  memoirists  to   strengthen  their  reading  and  writing  skills.  Students  will  engage  in  a  wide  range  of   activities  designed  to  help  them  remember  significant  memories,  write  about  them,  and   connect  them  with  one  another.    During  this  module  students  will  learn  strategies  for   the  brainstorming  stage  of  the  writing  process,  develop  techniques  for  generating  ideas   and  for  recalling  memories,  and  learn  to  record  their  writing  ideas  in  a  Writer’s   Notebook.     Module  two:  Framing  and  Organizing   One  of  the  most  important  and  challenging  aspects  of  the  writing  process  is  narrowing-­‐ down  one’s  ideas  into  a  focused,  purposeful  piece  of  text.  In  this  module  students  will   experience  the  planning  and  structuring  stages  of  the  writing  process.    They  will  explore   the  concept  of  theme,  considering  a  focus  for  their  memoirs,  and  they  will  experiment   with  multiple  possibilities  for  structuring  their  memoirs.    By  the  end  of  this  module   students  will  create  both  an  outline  and  a  first  draft  of  their  memoirs.       Module  three:  Revising  and  Publishing   During  the  third  module  students  will  learn  about  the  last  stages  of  the  writing  process:   revising  and  publishing.    They  will  practice  many  specific  strategies  of  revision,  and  will   be  able  to  deeply  consider  the  structure,  meaning,  and  language  choices  that  will  be   most  appropriate  for  their  memoirs.    
In  addition  to  writing  about  their  lives,  students  will  read  and  listen  to  an  extensive  array  of   memoirs,  selected  because  of  their  capacity  to  “mentor”  students  in  the  genre.  There  are  over   60  different  memoir  excerpts  available  to  students  to  read  and  listen  to.      

Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide  

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How  will  students  show  what  they  have  learned?     Here  are  a  few  of  the  40  performance  tasks  students  will  undertake  in  this  course:       1. A  Published  Memoir:  The  seminal  project  for  this  course  is  a  Published  Memoir   that  will  go  through  multiple  drafts  of  the  writing  process.     2. Audio  recording  of  a  personal  story:  Create  an  audio  recording,  telling  a  favorite   personal  story,  modeled  after  the  stories  heard  on  the  radio  shows  The  Moth   and  StoryCorps.    Students  have  the  choice  to  submit  this  story  to  the  radio   shows.   3. Important  Person  Description:    Compose  a  description  of  a  person  who  is   important  in  the  students’  lives.   4. Glog:  Create  an  on-­‐line  poster  of  an  independently  read  Memoir.     5. Scene  Writing:  Write  a  scene  about  an  event  from  their  life   6. Timeline:  Create  a  timeline  of  their  life.   7. Memory  Drawing:    Draw  or  paint  an  image  of  one  of  their  memories.   8. Self-­‐Portraits:    Create  two  self-­‐portraits,  one  literal,  and  one  metaphorical.     The  Course  Design       This  course  uses  the  basic  structure  of  a  Writer’s  Workshop,  but  within  the  context  of  a   blended  classroom.  The  course  is  specifically  designed  to  provide  students  with  choice   about  the  activities  they  engage  in,  and  when  they  engage  in  them.       Each  module  has  6  types  of  activities:     1. An  Overview   2. Independent  Reading  and  Keeping  a  Reader’s  Notebook   3. Free-­‐Writing  and  Keeping  a  Writer’s  Notebook   4. Working  with  Mentor  Texts   5. Small  Scale  Performances   6. College  Prep  Performances     1. Overview:  This  is  an  opening  series  of  ungraded  activities  at  the  beginning  of  the   module  that  will  provide  students  with  a  sense  of  what  is  to  come  in  the  module.  For   the  first  module,  the  overview  is  an  introduction  to  the  genre  of  Memoir.  Teachers   can  work  with  the  whole  class  on  these  activities,  or  let  students  move  at  their  own   pace.  Or  create  a  balance  of  each.     2. Independent  Reading  and  Keeping  a  Reader’s  Notebook:  Each  module,  students   will  read  for  30  minutes  on  22  separate  occasions.  For  most  students,  this  will  be  the   equivalent  of  one  memoir,  as  they  must  select  a  memoir  that  is  at  their  reading   level.  Students  who  are  struggling  with  reading  may  end  up  selecting  memoirs  that   are  much  shorter,  in  which  case  they  should  read  more  than  one.  What’s  important   is  that  they  read    a  minimum  of  22  times  over  a  5-­‐week  period  in  order  to  keep   practicing  reading.    
Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide   3  

 

 

In  addition  to  reading,  they  will  keep  a  Reader’s  Notebook.  The  Notebook  will  have  3   purposes:     • A  chart  where  students  keep  track  of  their  Independent  Reading,  including   each  Mentor  Text  they  work  with  (see  below).   • 8  entries  that  summarize  and  reflect  on  what  they  are  reading,  using  the   “Independent  Reading  Response  Ideas”  document  as  a  source  for  writing.   • 10  Reader’s  Notebook  entries  that  reflect  on  the  Mentor  Text  Memoirs  they   are  listening  to.       Assessment  of  the  Reader’s  Notebook:  Much  of  what’s  in  the  Reader’s  Notebook   can  be  assessed  by  spot  checks  and  conferences  (see  below  for  a  discussion  on   conferences)  with  students.  However,  at  least  10  of  the  Mentor  Text  Reflections   should  be  assessed  using  a  rubric,  because  they  will  provide  you  and  the  students   with  the  opportunity  to  assess  student’s  capacity  to  respond  to  literature  in   meaningful  ways.       The  Common  Core  Standards  to  be  assessed  in  the  Reader’s  Notebook:  
7.RI.2   Write  narratives  to  develop  real  or  imagined  experiences  or  events   using  effective  technique,  relevant  descriptive  details,  and  well-­‐ structured  event  sequences.   Analyze  the  interactions  between  individuals,  events,  and  ideas  in   a  text  (e.g.,  how  ideas  influence  individuals  or  events,  or  how   individuals  influence  ideas  or  events).   Determine  an  author's  point  of  view  or  purpose  in  a  text  and   analyze  how  the  author  distinguishes  his  or  her  position  from  that   of  others.   Read  and  comprehend  literary  nonfiction  in  the  grades  6-­‐8  text   complexity  band  proficiently,  with  scaffolding  as  needed  at  the   high  end  of  the  range.   Read  and  comprehend  literary  nonfiction  in  the  grades  9–10  text   complexity  band  proficiently,  with  scaffolding  as  needed  at  the   high  end  of  the  range.  (Mentor  texts:  scaffolded  w/  mp3’s)  

7.RI.3  

7.RI.6  

7.RI.10  

9-­‐10.RI.10.10  

 

Not  all  standards  should  be  assessed  in  each  entry.  The  scaffolding  for  reading  at  this   level  are  the  mp3/audio  versions  of  texts.  In  addition,  students  will  have  the   opportunity  to  select  the  texts  they  will  listen  to  and  read,  allowing  them  to  select   texts  that  fit  their  skill  level  and  interest.       By  the  end  of  the  course,  students  should  receive  a  3  on  the  rubric,  but  not  all  of   their  entries  must  by  a  3  in  order  to  achieve  mastery:  the  goal  is  for  them  to  be   learning  how  to  write  analytic  entries.  This  will  take  time  for  many  of  the  students.   Beginning  the  course  with  1s  or  2s  is  legitimate…ending  it  with  less  than  3’s  is  not.      
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Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide  

3. Free-­‐Writing  and  Keeping  a  Writer’s  Notebook:     This  course  provides  intense  focus  on  each  stage  of  the  writing  process:   brainstorming,  organizing,  structuring,  drafting,  revising,  and  publishing.  In  addition   to  keeping  a  Reader’s  Notebook,  students  must  keep  a  Writer’s  Notebook.  The   notebook  also  has  3  purposes:     • A  chart  (essentially  an  evolving  table  of  contents)  where  students  keep  track  of   each  of  their  writing  activities.   • 8  Free-­‐Writing  entries  about  their  lives,  using  the  “Writer’s  Notebook  Ideas”   document  as  a  source  of  ideas  for  writing.     • 10  Reflections  on  the  Mentor  Texts  (at  the  end  of  each  Mentor  Text,  there  are   almost  always  2  different  Writing  activities:  one  for  the  Reader’s  Notebook  and   one  for  the  Writer’s  Notebook).       Assessment  of  the  Writer’s  Notebook  should  follow  the  same  format  as  for  the   Reader’s  Notebook  (see  above).     The  Common  Core  Standards  to  be  assessed  in  the  Writer’s  Notebook:    
9-­‐10.W.3c   9-­‐10.W.4.     9-­‐10.W.10   Use  a  variety  of  techniques  to  sequence  events  so  that  they  build  on  one   another  to  create  a  coherent  whole.   Produce  clear  and  coherent  writing  in  which  the  development,  organization,   and  style  are  appropriate  to  task,  purpose,  and  audience.     Write  routinely  over  extended  time  frames  (time  for  research,  reflection,  and   revision)  and  shorter  time  frames  (a  single  sitting  or  a  day  or  two)  for  a  range  of   tasks,  purposes,  and  audiences.  

  4. Working  with  Mentor  Texts:  This  course  provides  an  abundance  of  Memoirs  for   students  to  explore,  both  in  their  own  independent  reading  and  through  the  more   structured  Mentor  Text  activities.  Each  module  has  excerpts  from  25  great  Memoirs.   We  consider  these  Mentor  Texts  because  they  were  specifically  selected  on  the   merits  of  they  can  teach  students  that  will  help  them  understand  the  genre,  gain   ideas  for  their  own  memoir,  AND  gain  a  significant  amount  of  cultural  capital,  as   they  learn  about  people  from  all  walks  of  life,  and  moments  in  history.       Each  mentor  text  has  a  small  deck  of  ppt  slides,  as  well  as  an  mp3s.  (We  are  working   on  getting  the  hard  copy  of  the  texts  sent  to  the  school  as  well.)     Each  module,  students  must  listen  and  respond  to  15  of  the  available  Mentor  Texts   (an  average  of  3  each  week,  but  it’s  fine  for  them  to  listen  to  10  one  week  and  none   the  following  week).  The  Mentor  texts  can  be  worked  with  in  2  different  ways:  first,   students  can  access  the  mp3’s  and  accompanying  ppt  decks  when  they  want.   Second,  as  students  undertake  Small  Scale  Performances,  they  will  be  referred  to   the  Mentor  Text  examples  that  will  help  them  with  the  performances.    

Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide  

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  Students  will  reflect  on  and  respond  to  the  Mentor  Texts  in  their  Readers’  and   Writers’  Notebooks  (see  above).     Mentor  Texts     Module 1
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Ann Jacobs A Summer Life, by Gary Soto I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou West With The Night, by Beryl Markham Finding Fish, by Antwone Fisher Looking Back, by Lois Lowry Angela’s Ashes, by Frank McCourt The Color of Water, by James McBride Naked, by David Sedaris How to Be Black, by Baratunde Thurston Dust Tracks on the Road, by Zora Neale Huston Bad Boy, by Walter Dean Myers “All-Ball,” by Mary Pope Osborne The Story of My Life, by Helen Keller “Everything Will Be OK,” by James Howe In My Own Words: Growing Up Inside the Sanctuary of my Imagination, by Nicholasa Mohr My Lord, What a Morning, by Marian Anderson Bone Black, by bell hooks The Woman Warrior, by Maxine Hong King A History of Psychology, by Margaret Floy Washburne Silent Dancing: A Partial Remembrance of a Puerto Rican Childhood, by Judith Ortiz Cofer “Reverand Abbot and those Bloodshot Eyes,” by Walter Dean Myers Hole in My Life, by Jack Gantos Having Our Say, by Sarah and Elizabeth Delaney The Liars’ Club, by Mary Karr

Module 2
“Pegasus for a Summer,” by Michael Rosen Hole in My Life, by Jack Gantos “Food From the Outside,” by Rita Williams-Garcia Homesick: My Own Story, by Jean Fritz “Scout’s Honor,” by Avi The Woman Warrior, by Maxine Hong Kingston Naked, by David Sedaris My Invented Country, by Isabel Allende The Black Notebooks, by Toi Derricotte Bone Black, by bell hooks “The Snapping Turtle,” by Joseph Bruchac Lost Childhood, by Annelex Layson “Why I Never Ran Away From Home,” by Katherine Paterson “The Great Rat Hunt,” by Lawrence Yep No Disrespect, by Sister Souljah “Learning to Swim,” by Kyoko Mori To Be Young, Gifted, and Black, by Lorraine Hansberry The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie The Language of Baklava, by Diana Abu-Jaber Night, by Elie Wiesel Lanterns, by Marian Wright Edelman My Bloody Life, by Reymundo Sanchez All Creatures Great and Small, by James Herriot My Life in France, by Julia Child “Me Talk Pretty One Day,” by David Sedaris

Module 3
Too Fat to Fish, by Artie Lange The Glass Castle, by Jeannette Walls A Long Way Gone, by Ishmael Beah An American Childhood, by Annie Dillard Unafraid of the Dark, by Rosemary Bray Rocket Boys, by Homer Hickam Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun, by Geoffrey Canada Sleepwalk With Me, by Mike Birbiglia The Autobiography of Malcolm X, by Malcolm X “Waiting for Midnight,” Karen Hesse “Bus Problems,” by Howard Norman “How I Lost My Station in Life,” by E.L. Konigsburg Dreams From My Father, by Barack Obama “The Long Closet,” by Jane Yolen “Taking a Dare,” by Nicholasa Mohr “Interview With a Shrimp,” by Paul Fleishman Brain Surgeon, by Keith Black “In The Blink of an Eye,” by Norma Fox Mazer Zami: A New Spelling of my Name, by Audre Lorde “Flying,” by Reeve Lindbergh Calling the Doves, by Juan Felipe Herrera How to Be Black, by Baratunde Thurston A Walk in the Woods, by Bill Bryson American Chica, by Marie Arana A Writer’s Life, by Annie Dillard

Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide  

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5. Teacher/Student  Conferences:  You  will  find  that  conferences  with  individual   students  are  an  essential  part  of  this  course.  We  are  strongly  recommending  that   you  undertake  2  conferences  with  each  student  each  week  (if  at  all  possible):     • One  that  focuses  on  what  the  students  are  reading,  what  they  think  about  the   texts,  their  wonderings,  and  their  interests…as  well  as  their  Reader’s  Notebook:   what  are  they  writing  about?  Does  it  really  reflect  their  thinking?  How  can  their   thinking  be  pushed  to  a  higher/deeper  level?     • The  second  focuses  on  what  students  are  writing,  both  in  their  Writer’s   Notebook  and  for  their  Small  Scale  Performances:  what  are  they  working  on  in   their  writing?  What  techniques  would  be  helpful  for  them  to  learn?  What  are   they  doing  well  and  what  are  their  gaps?  What  is  the  next  step  in  their   development  as  a  writer?     6. Small  Scale  Performances:  Each  module,  students  will  be  provided  with  a  lengthy   list  of  Small  Scale  Performances  (there  are  26  in  the  first  module,  10  of  which   students  are  required  to  complete.  In  addition  to  the  10  required  performances,   students  must  select  8  additional  performances  to  undertake).  As  the  teacher  you   can  decide  if  you  want  students  to  undertake  these  together,  creating  some  nice   opportunities  for  sharing  and  collaboration,  or  if  you  want  to  give  students  choice   about  when  to  complete  them  (or  a  combination:  you  can  facilitate  the  work,  and   students  who  want  to  can  participate  with  you).       As  you  look  at  the  list  of  performances,  you  will  see  a  wide  range  of  options,   including  a  number  of  art  performances,  poetry  writing,  and  more  straightforward   personal  writing.  There  should  be  enough  options  for  students  to  find  performances   that  appeal  to  them  and  that  add  variety  to  their  learning  experiences.     Examples  of  Small  Scale  Performances  from  Module  1  (    
#   1   2   3   4   5   6   Small  Scale  Performance  (*  ‘s  are  required)   *Photo-­‐Writing:  Use  a  photo  as  the  basis  for  a  description  of  an  event  in  your  life.       *Object-­‐Writing:  Use  an  important  object  as  the  basis  for  a  description  of  an   important  event,  feeling,  or  experience  in  your  life.     Family  Interview:  Interview  a  family  member  about  yourself.   Memory  Drawing:    Draw  or  paint  an  image  of  one  of  your  memories.   *  “I  remember”  Writing:  Create  a  piece  of  writing  using  the  repeated  phrase  “I   remember.”   *Revising  an  Entry  from  the  Writer’s  Notebook:  Choose  one  of  the  entries  you’ve   written  and  revise  it  attending  to  purpose,  elaboration/elimination,  organization  and   clarification,  grammar  and  punctuation.   “I  carry”  Writing:  Create  a  piece  of  writing  using  the  repeated  phrase  “I  carry.”   Common  Core   Standards   8.W.3,  8.W.3.d,  9-­‐ 10.W.3.b   8.W.3,  8.W.3.d,  9-­‐ 10.W.3.b   6.SL.1c   n/a   8.W.3,  8.W.3.d,  9-­‐ 10.W.3.b   9-­‐10.W.  4,  9-­‐ 10.W.5,  9-­‐10.W.10,   8.L.1,  8.L.2.a   8.W.3,  8.W.3.d,  9-­‐ 10.W.3.b  

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  7. College  Prep  Performances:  There  are  several  college  preparatory  performances  in   this  course,  all  of  which  are  required.  The  criteria  for  identifying  a  performance  as   college  prep  (rather  than  small  scale),  is  that  it  requires  students  to  undertake  tasks   that  might  or  will  be  found  in  college.  The  course’s  final  project  is  a  memoir,  and   students  will  work  on  it  for  quite  some  time,  making  refinements  and  revisions  using   the  writing  process.  In  addition  to  this,  students  will  undertake  a  few  other   assignments  that  require  revision  and  a  high  quality  finished  product.      
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College  Preparatory/Final  Performances  
*Important  Person  Description:    Write  a  description  of  a  person  who  is   important  to  you.   *Audio-­‐recording  of  personal  story:  Create  an  audio  recording  of  yourself   telling  a  favorite  personal  story,  modeled  after  the  stories  you  will  hear  on   the  radio  shows  The  Moth  and  StoryCorps.    You  have  the  choice  to  submit   this  story  to  the  radio  show  for  possible  inclusion.  

Common  Core  Standards  
8.W.3,  8.W.3.d,  8.W.3.e,  9-­‐ 10.L.1,  9-­‐10.L.2,  9-­‐10.W.3.b,   9-­‐10.W.5,  9-­‐10.W.10   9-­‐10.SL.6  

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    8. Online  Grammar  Booster:  There  is  one  additional  element  that  could  prove  helpful   in  this  course:  an  on-­‐line  grammar  module.  Many  of  our  students  struggle  with   grammar  and  punctuation.  This  course  is  potentially  a  great  opportunity  for  students   to  take  an  online  booster  when  they  need  a  break  from  reading  and  writing.  There   are  a  number  of  booster’s  available,  some  free,  some  not.         What  will  a  typical  day  or  week  look  like?     As  the  teacher  of  this  course,  much  of  the  structuring  of  the  course  will  depend  on  your   style  and  pedagogical  approach.  Because  the  course  requires  so  much  reading  and   writing,  we  recommend  a  blend  of  whole  class  and  independently  paced  work,  as  it  will   allow  students  to  experience  variation  from  day  to  day.       For  example,  in  Week  1,  the  whole  class  might  participate  in  the  opening  activities  that   introduce  students  to  the  genre  and  the  details  of  the  course.  These  activities  might   take  a  couple  of  days,  or  they  might  be  spread  across  several  days,  mixing  in  the  Set  up   of  the  Reader’s  and  Writer’s  Notebooks,  selection  of  an  Independent  Reading  Book,  and   learning  to  Free-­‐Write.     In  the  ensuing  weeks,  Mondays  might  be  a  day  when  the  class  might  begin  working  on   one  of  the  Required  Small  Scale  Performances-­‐-­‐all  of  the  performances  begin  with  a   Lesson  Launch  that  includes  modeling,  they  then  move  into  an  Investigation  period,  and   close  with  Synthesis  activities  that  often  require  writing  in  the  Reader’s  and  Writer’s   Notebooks.  Perhaps  Thursday  will  be  the  day  that  you  begin  working  with  students  on  a   2nd  required  Small  Scale  Performance.    
Memoir  Teacher’s  Guide   8  

  On  Tuesday,  Wednesday  and  Friday,  students  would  have  the  opportunity  to  read  their   Memoir,  listen  to  required  mentor  texts,  undertake  an  additional  2  Small  Scale   Performances,  and  write  in  their  journals.  On  these  days,  you  can  conference  with   students,  facilitate  mini-­‐lessons  on  topics  the  students  are  struggling  with  (maybe  five   students  don’t  know  how  to  use  quotation  marks  when  they  write  dialogue,  or  7   students  aren’t  sure  what  symbolism  is).  As  you  confer  with  students  you  will  learn   where  the  gaps  in  their  knowledge  are  and  can  plan  mini-­‐lessons  to  address  these   specific  gaps—students  can  meet  you  at  a  table  in  the  room,  while  the  rest  of  the   students  keep  working  on  their  assignments.  Then,  disband  these  students  and  continue   moving  around  the  room,  working  with  all  of  the  students  and  learning  what  you  need   to  prepare  next.         Mentor  Texts:  What  students  will  read  and  listen  to     Module 1
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Ann Jacobs A Summer Life, by Gary Soto I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou West With The Night, by Beryl Markham Finding Fish, by Antwone Fisher Looking Back, by Lois Lowry Angela’s Ashes, by Frank McCourt The Color of Water, by James McBride Naked, by David Sedaris How to Be Black, by Baratunde Thurston Dust Tracks on the Road, by Zora Neale Huston Bad Boy, by Walter Dean Myers “All-Ball,” by Mary Pope Osborne The Story of My Life, by Helen Keller “Everything Will Be OK,” by James Howe In My Own Words: Growing Up Inside the Sanctuary of my Imagination, by Nicholasa Mohr My Lord, What a Morning, by Marian Anderson Bone Black, by bell hooks The Woman Warrior, by Maxine Hong King A History of Psychology, by Margaret Floy Washburne Silent Dancing: A Partial Remembrance of a Puerto Rican Childhood, by Judith Ortiz Cofer “Reverand Abbot and those Bloodshot Eyes,” by Walter Dean Myers Hole in My Life, by Jack Gantos Having Our Say, by Sarah and Elizabeth Delaney The Liars’ Club, by Mary Karr

Module 2
“Pegasus for a Summer,” by Michael Rosen Hole in My Life, by Jack Gantos “Food From the Outside,” by Rita Williams-Garcia Homesick: My Own Story, by Jean Fritz “Scout’s Honor,” by Avi The Woman Warrior, by Maxine Hong Kingston Naked, by David Sedaris My Invented Country, by Isabel Allende The Black Notebooks, by Toi Derricotte Bone Black, by bell hooks “The Snapping Turtle,” by Joseph Bruchac Lost Childhood, by Annelex Layson “Why I Never Ran Away From Home,” by Katherine Paterson “The Great Rat Hunt,” by Lawrence Yep No Disrespect, by Sister Souljah “Learning to Swim,” by Kyoko Mori To Be Young, Gifted, and Black, by Lorraine Hansberry The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie The Language of Baklava, by Diana Abu-Jaber Night, by Elie Wiesel Lanterns, by Marian Wright Edelman My Bloody Life, by Reymundo Sanchez All Creatures Great and Small, by James Herriot My Life in France, by Julia Child “Me Talk Pretty One Day,” by David Sedaris

Module 3
Too Fat to Fish, by Artie Lange The Glass Castle, by Jeannette Walls “The Long Closet,” by Jane Yolen “Taking a Dare,” by Nicholasa Mohr

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A Long Way Gone, by Ishmael Beah An American Childhood, by Annie Dillard Unafraid of the Dark, by Rosemary Bray Rocket Boys, by Homer Hickam Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun, by Geoffrey Canada Sleepwalk With Me, by Mike Birbiglia The Autobiography of Malcolm X, by Malcolm X “Waiting for Midnight,” Karen Hesse “Bus Problems,” by Howard Norman “How I Lost My Station in Life,” by E.L. Konigsburg Dreams From My Father, by Barack Obama

“Interview With a Shrimp,” by Paul Fleishman Brain Surgeon, by Keith Black “In The Blink of an Eye,” by Norma Fox Mazer Zami: A New Spelling of my Name, by Audre Lorde “Flying,” by Reeve Lindbergh Calling the Doves, by Juan Felipe Herrera How to Be Black, by Baratunde Thurston A Walk in the Woods, by Bill Bryson American Chica, by Marie Arana A Writer’s Life, by Annie Dillard

        Texts  to  support  your  teaching  of  this  course     The  course  is  modeled  closely  after  the  book  Writing  a  Life:  Teaching  Memoir  to   Sharpen  Insight,  Shape  Meaning—And  Triumph  Over  Tests,  by  Katherine  Bomer.    We   strongly  recommend  that  you  read  this  book  in  preparation  for  teaching  the  course,   since  it  will  help  you  to  understand  the  logic  behind  the  teaching  approach,  and  to   become  more  confident  in  adapting  the  course  to  fit  the  unique  needs  of  your  students.     In  order  to  be  most  prepared  to  teach  this  course,  we  recommend  that  you  explore   some  or  all  of  the  following  resources.    These  resources  will  help  you  to  understand  the   philosophy  behind  Writer’s  Workshop,  as  well  as  to  acquire  practical  strategies  for   implementing  Writer’s  Workshop  effectively  in  your  classroom.     • Writing  a  Life:  Teaching  Memoir  to  Sharpen  Insight,  Shape  Meaning—And   Triumph  Over  Tests,  by  Katherine  Bomer       • Writing  Workshop:  The  Essential  Guide,  by  Ralph  Fletcher  and  JoAnn  Portalupi     • Teaching  Writing  to  Adolescents,  by  Kelly  Gallagher     • Assessing  Writing,  and  How’s  it  Going?,  by  Carl  Anderson     • Conferring,  by  Patrick  Allen     • Every  Child  a  Reader  &  Writer  -­‐  The  Noyce  Foundation   http://www.noycefdn.org/ecrwresources.php        

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