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WEB BASED TRAINING (WBT)

WEB BASED TRAINING (WBT)

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This is comprehensive work to know about virtual classroom, virtual lab and simulation in web based training.
This is comprehensive work to know about virtual classroom, virtual lab and simulation in web based training.

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VIRTUAL CLASSROOM, VIRTUAL LAB & SIMULATION IN WEB BASED TRAINING

Virtual Classroom, Virtual Lab. & Simulation in WBT| INVENTOR08

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Virtual Classroom....................................................................................3
1.1 Definition:...........................................................................................................3 1.2 Concept:..............................................................................................................3 1.3 Need/Requirement.............................................................................................3 1.4 Characteristics...................................................................................................4 1.5 Alternatives to Virtual Classroom....................................................................4 1.6 Activities:............................................................................................................4 1.7 Advantages.........................................................................................................4 1.8 Limitations.........................................................................................................4 1.9 Consideration ....................................................................................................4

2.0 VIRTUAL LABORATORY..................................................................5
2.1 Definition:...........................................................................................................5 2.2 Need- ..................................................................................................................5 2.3 Organization of the Lab- ..................................................................................5 2.4 Key Components of the Lab.............................................................................6 2.5 Advantages.........................................................................................................6 2.6 Limitations.........................................................................................................7 2.7 Conclusion..........................................................................................................7

3. SIMULATION.........................................................................................7
3.1 Definition............................................................................................................7 3.2 Need....................................................................................................................7 3.3 Advantages .......................................................................................................7 3.4 Disadvantages ...................................................................................................7 3.5 Considerations...................................................................................................8

3.6 Conclusion..........................................................................................................8

4. REFERENCES:.......................................................................................8

ASSIGNMENT
TOPIC: Virtual Classroom, Virtual Lab and Simulation

1. VIRTUAL CLASSROOM
1.1 Definition:
Virtual classrooms are complete programs of learning .They consist of a mixture of synchronous and asynchronous events. They are special application of computer and network technologies to the task of education. [1] A Virtual Classroom is private online space in Blackboard that teachers can use to support student learning. It is accessible via the Internet, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Just like your face–to–face classroom, a Virtual Classroom is a busy place.[2] Virtual classrooms use Web-based collaboration tools to mimic the structure and activity of a physical classroom course. They feature an instructor who leads a class of learners thourgh an explicit syllabus of material on a predetermined schedule. [3]

1.2 Concept:
Virtual is something whose existence is simulated with software. Virtual education [4] refers to instruction in a learning environment where teacher and student are separated by time or space, or both, and the teacher provides course content through course management applications, multimedia resources, the Internet, videoconferencing, etc. Students receive the content and communicate with the teacher via the same technologies. Virtual classrooms may involve three overlapping scopes of interaction technologies: VC courses, meetings and presentations. Among the synchronous events are online meetings, which may include online presentations.

1.3 Need/Requirement
In the age of Information technology revolution, the shelf life of technology is decreasing very fast, everyone wants to update and upgrade knowledge, skills and attitude in order to lead successful life in world of work. For this, time, distance, cost and expertise is barrier for growth. Virtual classroom can overcome all of above barriers.

1.4 Characteristics
1. 2. 3. Technology serves to facilitate teacher/student and student/student interaction at a distance. Virtual classroom enrich interactive communication through integrated voice, video, and data. In addition, the Web plays a supporting role in this environment. Actually, they are considered as teaching and learning environment located within a computermediated communication system. All activities and interactions take place through the computer instead of face-to-face.

1.5 Alternatives to Virtual Classroom
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Traditional Classroom-face to face basis with teachers and other students. Continuing Education Courses- intensive two or three days workshops. Correspondence courses Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) Audio/Video conferencing 6. Satellite Television programmes

1.6 Activities:
A Virtual Classroom might contain:
• • • • • • •

Class activities Group and individual learning activities Discussions and chats with students, parents and guests Quizzes and surveys Homework activities and assessment documents Full online courses with modules of work Forums and synchronous chat sessions Web Quests, Hotlists, Scavenger Hunts, etc.

• • • • •

Class organization Important information for students and parents Calendar and timetables Unit overviews Student grade/mark book and criteria sheets Student homepages

1.7 Advantages
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Virtual classrooms provide the community and control some learners need. Classroom learning is familiar and proven. Flexible time: students may participate at any time of the day. Economical Efficient learning Overcome Location: students are not limited to courses offered in their geographic locality More active learning: the computer forces response and attention.

1.8 Limitations
1. Limited offerings: the choice of courses is limited at present. 2. Equipment requirements: students who do not have a computer will have to travel to use the necessary equipment. 3. Delayed feedback: it may be hours until a question is answered by the teacher.

1.9 Consideration

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Select a qualified instructor. Provide complete instruction. Simplify tasks for learners. Manage teams and deal with problem learners. Enable interpersonal communication. Pick tools to suit learners: Language fluency, Accents, Typing skills and Technical expertise. Consider the speed of learners’ network connections.

2.0 VIRTUAL LABORATORY
2.1 Definition:
The Virtual Laboratory (VLAB) is a software environment designed to support model development by facilitating the manipulation of models and providing mechanisms for retrieving and storing large numbers (e.g., thousands) of them.(Fedrel,1997) The Virtual Laboratory is an interactive environment for creating and conducting simulated experiments: a playground for experimentation. It consists of domain-dependent simulation programs, experimental units called objects that encompass data files, tools that operate on these objects. Current release is focused on graphical applications of L-systems, with an emphasis on the generation of fractals and the modelling of plants. The objects are organized, accessed and manipulated using domain-independent vlab system programs. The user can expand the laboratory by adding new objects, creating new experiments and creating hyperobject copies of objects.

2.2 NeedThe idea behind VLAB emerged from the need for an environment for organizing and simplifying work related to computer based simulation of biological phenomena. The first implementation of vlab was created in 1990.Since then, the original programs have been redesigned and reimplemented, and new components and features have been introduced.

2.3 Organization of the LabThe domain-independent framework for Virtual Laboratory consists of:
• •

an object-oriented file system (oofs) for representing experimental units (objects) and alternative representations of experiments (hyperobjects); vlab system programs for organizing, accessing and manipulating these objects

VLAB Object- A laboratory object is a directory containing files that define the object and a subdirectory extension. The following table 1 shows the file types included for an object. Filename
*.txt,*.map, *.mat,*.dat, *.s,*.l,*.v, *.a, etc.

Function Data files contain our knowledge of a particular model. Each object will vary in the type and number of data files that describe it. Defines the data files which make up the object and the tools which apply to them. A graphical representation (140x140 pixel screenshot) of the experiment. Contains a unique identification number for the object in the database. A subdirectory of extensions (lists objects which inherit some features of the current object).

specifications icon .id ext

VLAB Hyperobject- Hyperobjects are links to objects in the database. The following information is stored with each: Filename Function node Contains a hyperlink to an object in an oofs database. Not all hyperobjects need to point to an object in an oofs database. Those that do not contain a hyper-link are used as place-holders for other hyperobjects. Also contains the name of the hyperobject. This description is usually related to the object the hyperlink points to under the given context. Also contains the order of children. The order of children in a parent can be changed, which affects the traversal of hyperobject databases. text Contains a textual description of the hyperobject. Ext A subdirectory of children (other hyperobjects inheriting from this one)

2.4 Key Components of the Lab
1. The Object Browser- A user may browse through the objects and hyperobjects in the lab by following the hierarchy induced by the prototype-extension relation. The browser provides a visual interface for navigating through the hierarchy. The browser also makes it possible to move, copy, delete and rename objects. The browser also facilitates the presentation of a VLAB object in several different contexts, as hyperobjects, while keeping the main database intact. 2. The Lab Table- Upon invocation of the object manager, all files that make up the selected object are copied to a temporary location called the lab table. Consequently, manipulation of object parameters does not affect the stored version. When the experiment is completed, the user may save the results by overwriting the original object or by creating an extension. In the latter case, the files on the lab table are compared with those in the prototype object; those files that differ from the prototype are saved, and links to the remaining files are established automatically. 3. The Object Manager- Objects are manipulated using a vlab system program called the object manager. The menu lists the tools and utilities available for experimenting with the object, and allows the user to select them dynamically. The user may manipulate the object as a whole, without detailed knowledge of the programs involved or the component files. 4. The Panel Manager- The ability to easily manipulate the parameters of an experiment is an important feature of the Virtual Laboratory. All parameters of an experiment are represented in the object's data files. Parameter modification can be performed using virtual control panels. A generalpurpose panel manager creates panels according to definition files also included in the object. A panel definition file itemizes the appearance of each control button or slider in the panel, and the format of the message to be sent as a result of control manipulation. These messages are used to edit the data files. As a control on the panel is manipulated, the corresponding parameter in the data file will be updated. 5. The Virtual Laboratory Daemon- The vlab daemon is invoked automatically by other processes, and thus remains invisible to the end-user. However, the information on its operation and the format of messages is essential to implementing extensions of the Virtual Laboratory framework. Main functions are: support of communication between components and launching of objects (i.e.: invocation of the object manager).

2.5 Advantages
1. it is now possible to simulate engineering and science laboratory projects on a computer. 2. Experiment-oriented problems can be offered without the overhead incurred when maintaining a full laboratory. 3. It makes it easy to experiment with the models, retrieve and resume work initiated in the past, and organize the results for publications and presentations. 4. The flexible association of objects into structures accessed using the hyperbrowser makes it possible to use vlab as an attractive vehicle for interactive presentations.

2.6 Limitations
1. The lack of support for hierarchical model construction. 2. vlab does not currently provide a mechanism for constructing objects thatinclude other objects as components, or inherit files from several prototypes. 3. Vlab also does not produce visual cues indicating which application program has been spawned by which object manager. 4. vlab does not allow for a selective transfer of parts of objects.

2.7 Conclusion
The long experience with the consecutive incarnations of vlab shows that it provides an effective and pleasant environment for organizing and conducting interactive experiments with visual simulation models. Gentner and Nielson [2] envisioned that future computer users will focus on manipulating huge numbers of complex information objects while being connected to a network shared by other users and computers. This is exactly what vlab makes it possible to do.

3. SIMULATION
3.1 Definition
A 'simulation' is an artificially dynamic and closed systemic environment in which a particular set of conditions is created according to a priori rules in order to study or experience something that exists or could exist in reality. In computer simulations (and indeed simulation type games) the a priori rules are predefined algorithms that determine the output or outcomes of the system.(Linser,2007)

3.2 Need
Simulation can increase a learner’s retention up to 90-95% as well as a learner’s motivation, creativity, curiosity, and eagerness to learn. These are among the main reasons that active utilization of Web-based modeling and simulation (WBMS) tools in Web-based education (WBE) systems are in demand for the next generation of virtual learning environments (VLE)(Uskov,2005). Gartner Research predicts that by 2006, 70 % of all off-the-shelf and custom e-learning content will include some application of simulations (0.8 probability).

3.3 Advantages
1. Study the behaviour of a system without building it. 2. Results are accurate in general, compared to analytical model. 3. Help to find un-expected phenomenon, behaviour of the system. 4. Easy to perform ``What-If'' analysis.

3.4 Disadvantages
1. Expensive to build a simulation model. 2. Expensive to conduct simulation. 3. Sometimes it is difficult to interpret the simulation results. 4. Lack of sophisticated technology and tools, and standards for their development.

5. Very often existing Web-based simulators are resistant to assimilate into conventional WBE systems due in part to the old-fashioned design and development models, and technical solutions of existing WBE systems.

3.5 Considerations
Several key issues that include but are not limited to: - What are the trends in design and development of Web-Based modeling and simulations? - What are the most perspective technologies for a massive production of top quality Web based Simulatos? What are the standards for Web-based simulators? - How will WBMS tools and technologies evolve in 3, 5, and 10 years? How will they affect the design and development of WBE systems? - What are relations between Web-based simulations and WBE? What are best practices, experience, findings, and outcomes of research and development project on this topic? - How can (should) colleges and universities use Web-based modeling and simulation to improve student’s knowledge, retention, and motivation? - What kind and what level of complexity of Web-based simulations should be used in academic curricula? How to incorporate Web-based simulations into different online learning technologies and learning scenarios?

3.6 Conclusion
Internet asynchronous web learning reduces the workload of classroom teaching. To help the novice learn better simulation problem solving, this research addresses designing the usability into computer-based training (CBT) environment by focusing on the simulation experience and the interaction design.

4. REFERENCES:
1. ALamri, Asma Complete programs of e-learning.Integrated Learning environment over internet. 2. Education Queensland. (2008) . "Virtual Classroom: What is a virtual class room? " Available at:http://education.qld.gov.au/learningplace/onlinelearnin /virtualclassroom.html 3. Horton,William, Designing web-based training,Chapter 9,page 397 4. Kurbel, Karl: Virtuality on the Students' and on the Teachers' sides: A Multimedia and Internet

5. 6.

7. 8.

9.

based International Master Program; ICEF Berlin GmbH (Eds.), Proceedings on the 7th International Conference on Technology Supported Learning and Training – Online Educa; Berlin, Germany; November 2001, pp. 133–136 L. Mercer. The Virtual Laboratory. Master's thesis, University of Regina, Regina, Canada, 1991. L. Mercer, P. Prusinkiewicz, J. Hanan. The concept and design of a Virtual Laboratory. In Graphics Interface '90 Conference proceedings, pages 149-155. Canadian Information Processing Society, 1990. E. Lowe - Extensions to the Virtual Laboratory. Master's thesis, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, 1995. H. Lieberman. Using prototypical objects to implement shared behavior in object oriented systems. In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Object-Oriented Programming Systems, Languages and Applications, pages 214-223, New York, 1986, Association for Computing Machinery. http://pages.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/~pwp/bmv/vlab-for-linux/html-docs/environment.html

10.Federl, Pavol ,1997, Thesis, “Design and Implementation of Global Virtual Laboratory - a NetworkAccessible Simulation Environment” 11.Roni Linser,(2007),The Magic Circle - Game Design Principles and Online Role-play Simulations 12.Workshop Chair: Dr. Vladimir Uskov, The First International Workshop Modeling and Simulation in WebBased Education May 18-20, 2005, Cancun, Mexico

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