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How to Make Goat Cheese Free Report

How to Make Goat Cheese Free Report

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Published by Strategic Services
The Basics of
Making Goat Cheese

The Basics of Goat Cheese making
The art of cheese making can be exciting and fun. Understanding all the ingredients and how they work will help simplify this process.
You can make cheese at home and many other things as well. Real savings can be realized when you no longer need to purchase those items from the store. All cheese is basically milk, cultures, salt, and rennet. What makes one cheese different from the others is the temperature the milk is heated to, the type of culture added and the way it is processed. Temperature, humidity, rennet, cultures and whether it is eaten fresh or aged will determine the type of cheese you will have. Milk is the most important ingredient in cheesemaking. It is important when making cheese to be as clean as you can. Milk is a perfect medium for growing bacteria. Good or bad! Make sure your pots are clean and dry. You will need a stainless steel or unchipped enamel pan, a thermometer for taking temperatures, a long knife for cutting curds and a strainer. The following is a collection of resources gathered to give you a general information base to start out with, including easy, soft-cheese making recipes you can try at home.
Goat Cheese
Goat cheese is known as chèvre, after the French word for goat. Goat cheese is often higher in protein and lower in fat than cheese from cow’s milk
The Basics of
Making Goat Cheese

The Basics of Goat Cheese making
The art of cheese making can be exciting and fun. Understanding all the ingredients and how they work will help simplify this process.
You can make cheese at home and many other things as well. Real savings can be realized when you no longer need to purchase those items from the store. All cheese is basically milk, cultures, salt, and rennet. What makes one cheese different from the others is the temperature the milk is heated to, the type of culture added and the way it is processed. Temperature, humidity, rennet, cultures and whether it is eaten fresh or aged will determine the type of cheese you will have. Milk is the most important ingredient in cheesemaking. It is important when making cheese to be as clean as you can. Milk is a perfect medium for growing bacteria. Good or bad! Make sure your pots are clean and dry. You will need a stainless steel or unchipped enamel pan, a thermometer for taking temperatures, a long knife for cutting curds and a strainer. The following is a collection of resources gathered to give you a general information base to start out with, including easy, soft-cheese making recipes you can try at home.
Goat Cheese
Goat cheese is known as chèvre, after the French word for goat. Goat cheese is often higher in protein and lower in fat than cheese from cow’s milk

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The Basics of Making Goat Cheese

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Recipes using your homemade cheese!

Brought to you with the compliments of http://keeping-goats.com Please visit our site for more information about goatkeeping, goat breeds, making goat cheese, goat meat recipes and goat farming.

Go to http://keeping-goats.com to buy your copy of “Goat Crazy” and get the BONUS goat recipes Cook Book!

Published by http://strategic-services-aust.com This document may be shared and distributed freely at no charge, with active links maintained and content not to be altered in any way.

The Basics of Goat Cheese making
The art of cheese making can be exciting and fun. Understanding all the ingredients and how they work will help simplify this process. You can make cheese at home and many other things as well. Real savings can be realized when you no longer need to purchase those items from the store. All cheese is basically milk, cultures, salt, and rennet. What makes one cheese different from the others is the temperature the milk is heated to, the type of culture added and the way it is processed. Temperature, humidity, rennet, cultures and whether it is eaten fresh or aged will determine the type of cheese you will have. Milk is the most important ingredient in cheesemaking. It is important when making cheese to be as clean as you can. Milk is a perfect medium for growing bacteria. Good or bad! Make sure your pots are clean and dry. You will need a stainless steel or unchipped enamel pan, a thermometer for taking temperatures, a long knife for cutting curds and a strainer. The following is a collection of resources gathered to give you a general information base to start out with, including easy, softcheese making recipes you can try at home. Goat Cheese Goat cheese is known as chèvre, after the French word for goat. Goat cheese is often higher in protein and lower in fat than cheese from cow’s milk

Here is a very simple recipe for making goat soft cheese: It does not use rennet but instead uses lemon juice to curdle the milk. It uses 1/2 gallon fresh goat milk (unpasteurized), the juice of two lemons, and sea salt). 1. Heat milk on medium heat to 185°F 2. Remove from heat , then stir in lemon juice . Continue to stir for several minutes until milk has curdled 3. Add 1/2 tablespoon of coarse salt (kosher salt or sea salt) 4. Strain milk through cheesecloth 5. Wrap curds in cheesecloth and hang (using a rubber band works well) in the refrigerator to drain for 4-8 hours This soft goat cheese is great on crackers or added to a salad or pasta Below is the nutritional information for soft goat cheese. (1 oz)

Calories Protein Total Fat Carbohydrate Sugars Calcium Magnesium

76 5.25 5.98 g .25 g .25 g 40 mg 5 mg

Recipe for making Goat Cheese: QUESO BLANCO

Start with one gallon of goat milk. Bring the milk rapidly up to 180 degrees for 5 minutes. Keep an eye on it to make sure it doesn't scorch. Stir in ¼ cup of vinegar diluted in ¾ cup if water. Soft curds will begin to form almost immediately. Stir for about 5 minutes and then pour into a strainer lined with a good quality cheesecloth. Add whatever herbs and spices you desire and non-iodized salt to taste. This cheese may be made into a ball and rolled in dried parsley or nuts. Chill and enjoy.

Homemade Goat Cheese Recipe:
2 gallons whole cow's milk (or goat's milk) 2 tablespoons white vinegar pinch of salt chives, green onions, parsley, toasted sesame seeds, or choice of flavors Directions: 1. Heat milk in large pot on stove until it almost boils. 2. Turn it off and add vinegar. 3. Stir as the curds separate from the whey. The curds will look like large lumps of cottage cheese, and the whey will be like a yellow tinted water. 4. In your sink, line a colander with a thin towel or cheesecloth and pour the curds and whey into the strainer. 5. Let all the whey drain away (note: if you have pets they might like this as a treat, the whey is very good for them, and high in protein). 6. Let the curds cool, then squeeze as much moisture out as possible. 7. Put in a large bowl and stir in salt and your choice of seasonings to flavor the cheese. 8. Press into a medium sized bowl, or roll into a tube inside of saran plastic wrap. 9. Place in refrigerator and let it sit there for 2 days before tasting. This makes a soft cheese that can be carefully sliced but is almost spreadable as well.

Unlike hard cheese, however, it does not melt. We like it especially well with chives added to it. Also good with pimiento, toasted sesame seeds, garlic and many other things.

Fundamentals of making goat cheese:
Things You’ll Need:
• • • • • • • • •

Colander Cheesecloth Goat milk Fresh lemon juice or vinegar A large pot Ladle Salt and pepper to taste Buttermilk (optional) Additional seasonings (optional)

Step1 Make a grocery list and obtain the basic materials needed to make the cheese. The list includes goat milk (about 1/2 gallon), lemons, kosher salt and cheese cloth. Also, you may also add buttermilk for an extra creamy flavor, if desired. Step2 Heat the milk in a stainless steel/non-reactive pot to at least 185 degrees (or low heat). Allow to simmer, watching carefully to avoid boiling or burning. Step3 Remove the milk from heat and allow to sit. Add lemon (or vinegar), stirring until the curds separate from the whey. The

mixture should look like large clumps of cottage cheese when properly separated. Step4 Line a colander with several layers of the cheesecloth. Ladle curds into a strainer, discarding the whey. Step5 Allow curds to cool, squeezing as much moisture out of them as possible. Put curds in a bowl and season with sea salt. You can also add other seasonings of your choice, such as Herbs de Provence or whatever else you desire. Step6 Press curds into the bowl to make a block, or wrap in cheesecloth. Place curds in the refrigerator for at least 1-2 days before removing and tasting.

Tips & Warnings
• Be creative with the seasonings you add to the goat cheese.

The French prefer salt and pepper. However Herbs de Provence, parsley and olive oil are sometimes used. You can also make this cheese without any seasonings.
• The whey can be used for protein shakes or other enriched

meals if you don't want to discard it.
• Go to a farmers market for fresh goat milk. Supermarkets

often do not carry goat milk or if they do it is of substandard freshness.
• Let the cheese warm to room temperature before serving to

bring out the maximum flavor.
• Don't age the cheese too long if you plan to eat it fresh. The

best goat cheese is not aged long at all (at most 2 days).

Simply put, cheese making is the process of removing water from dairy milk. The first characteristic of a cheese is based on how much water is removed. Soft cheeses like cream cheese contain more water than a hard cheese like cheddar. Very dry cheeses like parmesan contains all most no water.

Milk is mostly water. Cows milk, for example, contains over 87% water by weight. What remains are the components of cheese. Fat, protein, lactose and minerals. The cheese maker begins removing water from milk in number of ways.

The simplest method is to add an acid such as lemon juice or vinegar directly to the milk. A second method uses bacteria to create an acid in the milk. This is the preferred method because the bacteria also provides flavor and character to the finished product. In both methods the acid causes the milk protein to coagulate into curd which is the solid protein of milk.

The basic ingredients for making cheese are milk, starter culture and or natural acids, and rennet.

The Composition of Milk

Fat Protein Lactose Minerals Water

3.5%

Cheese can be made from any dairy animal

3.5% milk. Fresh raw milk from cows or goats, store 4.9% bought milk from whole to skim and specialty 0.7% milks from health food stores. One rule of 87.4% thumb regardless of the source of your milk is, the fresher the better. When purchasing milk from the store be sure to check the freshness dates.

Don't be afraid to ask your grocer for milk from their latest delivery. If you explain what you are using it for they should be very helpful. Milk should always be kept refrigerated until ready for use.

PROS & USES RAW COW Preferred for making butter, hard and Italian cheeses RAW GOAT Preferred for feta and goat's cheese. Works in most cheese recipes.

CONS & PROBLEMS Regulated in many States and not readily available

Not readily available.

WHOLE

Available everywhere. recipes.

Homogenized and may require adjustment with calcium chloride.

PROCESSED Works well in all cheese

LOW FAT

Produces high quality low Homogenized and may require adjustment with calcium chloride. Will yield a drier more crumbly curd of lesser weight. when used in cream and soft cheese recipes.

PROCESSED fat cheese, especially

FAT FREE Produces quality no fat SKIM MILK cheese, especially when used in cream and soft cheese recipes. Excellent when combined with heavy cream to recreate raw milk consistency.

Homogenized and may require adjustment with calcium chloride. Will yield a drier more crumbly curd of lesser weight.

HEAVY CREAM

Used to make butter and adjust the cream content of skim milk for producing hard cheese from store bought milk.

LIGHT CREAM

Used to make desert cheeses like Mascarpone.

Using Store Bought Milk Store bought milk is homogenized, which means that the cream particles (butter fat) have been mechanically broken up into microscopic particles. This is done to prevent the cream from separating from the milk. Homogenizing milk also alters the protein. Unless the cheese maker compensates for this the milk will not make a satisfactory curd for hard cheese. When making cottage cheese or any hard cheeses with store bought milk you must prepare a special mixture. The basic recipe is 1 part heavy cream to 7 parts skim milk. All of the recipes given here are formulated to use store bought milk and the instructions for preparing this mixture are given in each recipe when necessary.

Calcium Chloride (optional) Another step used to compensate for the processing of store bought milk is the addition of calcium chloride prior to adding rennet to the cheese mixture. The addition of calcium chloride will help restore the altered milk protein and aid in the development of a quality curd. Specific instructions for using calcium chloride are given with each recipe.

Pasteurization All milk, regardless of its source will contain bacteria. Pasteurizing is a simple process which will kill any bacteria which may be in the milk. We have found that pasteurizing any milk, including store bought, will improve the quality of the cheese. To pasteurize your milk simply place the milk in a double boiler and heat the milk to 161oF. Stirring often to avoid scorching. Once you have reached 161oF place the pot of milk into a sink of cold water and cool the milk to your cheese making temperature. Complete details on pasteurizing are given in the step-by-step instructions later in this document.

Starter Cultures The acidification of milk in cheese making by means of bacteria is called ripening. A variety of bacteria cultures are available for making specific cheese types. These bacteria, commonly called starters, are added to the milk after pasteurization and at specific temperatures. They are allowed to work for specific time periods depending on the type of cheese. During this period the bacteria consumes the lactose which is milk sugar. The biological process is the same as the fermentation of beer or wine. As the bacteria eat, they produce lactic acid which in turn causes the milk protein to develop into curd. Other byproducts of this ripening stage provide flavor compounds which enhance the character of the finished cheese.

MESOPHILIC lactococcus lactis ssp cremoris For fresh and hard cheeses such as Cheddar, Colby, Feta, Chevre.

For fresh cheeses such as Camembert, THERMOPHILIC streptococcus thermophilus Gouda, Blue, Baby Swiss and others where a buttery flavor and eye formation is desired

HELVETIC lactobacillus helveticus

For Italian cheeses like parmesan, romano, provolone and mozzarella

These cheese starter cultures are available in two forms. They are defined as culturable and direct-to-vat. Culturable starters are similar to sourdough starters in that they are prepared in advanced and preserved for future use. Direct-to-vat cultures are much more convenient for the home cheese maker. No preparation of the culture is required. These freeze dried cultures are added directly to the milk in the same way you would use bread yeast.

Rennet

Rennet is an enzyme which acts on protein and causes it to coagulate. There are two sources of rennet enzyme. Animal rennet is an enzyme which is extracted from the fourth stomach of calves and vegetable based rennet.

Vegetable based rennet contains no animal products and has the same coagulating ability as animal rennet when used in milk that

has been ripened (acidified) by a cheese starter bacteria. This rennet is available in tablet and liquid form. Rennet must be diluted with distilled water prior to adding to milk. Rennet must be refrigerated.

NOTE: If your recipe calls for rennet tablets use this conversion. 1/2 rennet tablet = 1/4 teaspoon liquid rennet.

GOAT CHEESE RECIPES / SALADS Strawberry, Walnut, Goat Cheese Salad
Salad 6 cups spinach leaves 1 cup strawberries, hulled and sliced thin 1/4 cup walnuts, broken into pieces 3 ounces soft goat cheese, crumbled Freshly ground pepper Vinaigarette 2 tablespoons grape seed oil 2 tablespoon pomegranate molasses (found in Middle Eastern stores) 1 1/2 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon minced shallot Salt to taste In a bowl, whish all the dressing ingredients until well blended. In a large serving bowl, mix the salad ingredients, arranging the strawberries on top. Drizzle dressing on the salad and then twist with fresh pepper.

Melon and Goat Cheese Salad
2 pound melon (cantaloupe, crane, or honeydew) 4 cups greens (red mustard, cress, or a mixture) 1 cup fresh berries (mixed – blueberries, gooseberries, and raspberries) 8 ounces fresh Chevre 1/2 cup walnuts Fresh ground pepper

Goat Cheese and Honey Phyllo
16 ounces chevre cheese 1 egg 4 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon Grand Marnier liqueur 1 tablespoon lemon juice Pinch nutmeg 2 tablespoons flour Dough 1 box phyllo dough 8 ounces clarified butter Sugar Fruit Garnish 5 tablespoons sugar 1/2 cup white wine 1 vanilla bean, split 4 tablespoons butter 1 1/2 cups fresh fruit, peeled and seeded, cut into fun shapes For the filling, mix all ingredients in a food processor, except the flour. Gradually sift in flour, mixing until smooth. Place in refrigerator until ready to use. For the dough, place one sheet of phyllo dough on work surface. Apply a coat of clarified butter with a pastry brush. Sprinkle with sugar. Place another sheet of phyllo on top, and repeat, ending with a third sheet of phyllo. Brush the top layer with butter, set aside. Repeat process, making a total of 6 stacks. For the fruit, combine sugar, white wine, and vanilla bean in a saucepan, bring to a boil. Lower heat and cook until mixture is reduced by two-thirds. Remove vanilla bean. In a sauté pan, melt the butter. Add fruit and cook until soften but not too soft. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place a stack of layered phyllo on a clean dry surface and with a sharp knife, cut 3 circles 5 1/2 inches in diameter, cutting through to bottom of stack. Repeat with remaining stacks until you have 18 circles of layered dough. Spread 2 tablespoons of goat cheese mixture in center of a circle, leaving a margin of about an inch. Place another circle on top. Fold the edges of phyllo up and over, sealing all around. Bake on cookie sheet 7 to 10 minutes or until golden brown. Serve with additional fruit or honey.

Goat Cheese and Tomato Fondue
2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 cup shallots, chopped 2 tablespoons garlic, finely chopped 3 cups tomatoes, crushed with basil 1 cup hearty red wine 1 tablespoon orange zest 1 tablespoon each parsley and basil, chopped Salt and pepper 8 to 10 ounces goat milk Teleme (goat milk sharp cheddar) In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over moderate heat. Stir in shallots and garlic, sautéing until soft but not brown. Add tomatoes and wine, simmering uncovered for 5 to 10 minutes until the mixture reduces to a light sauce. Stir in zest and herbs. Season the mixture with salt and pepper. Pour the mixture into a 6-cup ovenproof baking dish. Place cheese in the middle.

Bake in a preheated 325-degree oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until the cheese melts.

Goat Pesto and Sun-Dried Tomato Pizza
4 teaspoons olive oil 8 soft taco sized flour tortillas 1 cup prepared pesto sauce, divided usage 2 cups mozzarella cheese, grated, divided equally

8 sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil, cut into strips, divided equally 4 ounces goat cheese, divided equally 2 teaspoons pine nuts Place 4 tortillas on an oiled baking pan. Brush with equal parts of pesto. Sprinkle with equal parts of mozzarella. Place another tortilla on top. Again add on pesto and mozzarella cheese on the second tortilla. Arrange sun-dried tomatoes, goat cheese, and pine nuts on the top tortilla. Bake at 400 degrees until crispy.

There are over thirty great goat product recipes in the bonus recipes book you get when you order “Goat Crazy” ebook!

Brought to you with the compliments of http://keeping-goats.com Please visit our site for more information about goatkeeping, goat breeds, making goat cheese, goat meat recipes and goat farming. Published by http://strategic-services-aust.com This document may be shared and distributed freely at no charge, with active links maintained and content not to be altered in any way.
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