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SPED

Shari Wickline EDT-786

Table of Contents
Asperger's ADHD Auditory Processing Disorder

Asperger's
About Aspergers Tips for Parents Tips for Educators Tips for Students Technology Resources for Aspergers Internet Resources for Aspergers Print Resources for Aspergers

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About Aspergers
Aspergers Syndrome is a developmental disorder characterized by an inability to communicate and socially interact with others in an effective manner. Aspergers is on the high functioning end of the Autism spectrum. These children can exhibit a range of autistic characteristics, with the exception of usually using advanced language for the childs age level. Children with Aspergers usually exhibit social awkwardness in what is considered normal societal settings. They usually have an unnatural, intense interest in specific subjects or concepts that create limitations when learning in other areas. Inability to read body language and expressions of others they are interacting with. Regularly engage in one-sided conversations that are usually deemed long-winded and uninteresting by the individual listening. Lacking empathy, but can be sympathetic. Exhibit an awkwardness in areas of movement requiring coordination, gross motor skills can seem delayed compared to peers.

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Tips for Parents


Education about the disorder is very important for all family members. Each child with Asperger's has different ability levels. It is important to understand your individual childs characteristics in order to assist them and help them progress. Helping a child with Aspergers is a team effort. Regular communication between school and home is important. Set up a treatment plan with childs doctors that consist of social skills building, speech therapy (communication skills), occupational therapy, behavioral interventions (either through therapy and/or parent trainings), regular checkups to monitor progress and support for all family members. Consistency with schedules is very important for a child with Aspergers to succeed. Each child will vary but visual and non-visual schedules are usually best. Always make your child aware of any changes in their schedule or routine in advance to help with the anxiety this alteration in routine causes these children. Give the child space to pursue their obsession of particular subjects or interests. Positively encouraging your childs interest. These interests will someday be their savior as they transition into adulthood and the work force.

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Tips for Educators


Education about Aspergers is important for everyone who will be working with the student. They thrive when provided with a lot of patience, structure and consistency. Providing students with picture or word schedules will assist during transitions, schedules are very important to a child with Aspergers and any routine changes can cause severe stress for the child. Any unstructured times, such as lunch or recess, are very difficult and cause stress for the child. Be aware of the students challenges with social cues, reading body language and inability to understand pragmatics. Break down directions into simple precise steps. Give warnings that the time for completing a task is coming to an end, or that things are going to change. It is best to give a 15min., 10min., 5min., and 1min. warnings. Students with Aspergers hear what is said in a very literal way, it is important to remember this and not get upset if the child does something totally different than what you were asking. Ex: They say something funny and you say No way, get out of here. They interpret what was said as you telling them to leave the room and usually will. If the student will be in a situation where there are a lot of people and things going on; look for signs that show if they are getting over stimulated and take them to their safe spot to reboot themselves. The most basic social skills usually need to be taught, as if they are learning a new language, in very basic steps.

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Tips for Students


Take the time to learn about what Aspergers is and how you can be a friend. Understand that someone with Aspergers communicates differently than most kids their age. Know they do not mean disrespect if they invade your personal space, this is not something they understand. Be understanding when you are talking to a student with Aspergers and they walk away or choose not to interact back, this is very difficult for them and does not mean they are being rude. Talking with them using slang phrases can confuse a child with Asperger's. They do not understand pragmatics and may need clarification on what is really being discussed. Working in groups with a student with Aspergers can be challenging on all participants. They usually see a mental blue print of the process needed to complete the project. They have great difficulty taking the ideas from others and putting/adapting them into this mental plan. This may cause them to seem bossy or difficult when they just really cannot mentally alter the plan they already made. They can be very trusting and are easily bullied, so be a friend and let the teacher or other adult know if this is going on. Everyone is their friend no matter what is being said to them, they just really do not pick up on the fact that someone is being inappropriate or mean. A student with Aspergers will keep talking about a subject they are interested in and will not stop even when told you are not interested. Be understanding of this and find ways to help them learn to notice when you are not interested any more or you would like a turn to tell them something.

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Technology Resources for Asperger's


Lap Tops Can be used to assist in communication, organization and writing (students usually have poor handwriting skills) Sensory stimulators to assist with calming such as weighted materials, a brush, tactile items for hand manipulation, body sox, bands, seat wedges, ear plugs and many more. Tracking bracelet if they have tendencies to wander. SymTrend A very inexpensive program that is downloadable onto a variety of portable devices. The program helps track, monitor and remind the students of a wide range of tasks, social cues and behaviors that they are working on improving. https:// www.symtrend.com

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OASIS @ MAPP Online Asperger Syndrome Information and Support This is a wonderful site full of valuable resources for educators and parents. http://aspergersyndrome.org Autism Inspiration This is a subscription database that is full of valuable resources for those working with children with Asperger's. The cost is $14.95 per month or $149.95 per year. http://autisminspiration.com Autism Society of America This site provides information on the latest research and ways to assist those with Asperger's. http://www.autism-society.org/ Autism Speaks This site provides information on various resources that are available across the country. http://www.autismspeaks.org/ DARN Dayton Aspergers Resource Network Provides access to local resources available assist those with Asperger's and those that care for them. http://darngroup.tripod.com Parenting Asperger's Community Provides resources and lists of support groups for each state. http://www.parentingaspergerscommunity.com

Internet Resources for Aspergers

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Print Resources for Aspergers AAPC Publishing A publisher that provides print

resources for educators, parents and individuals with ASD. http://www.aapcpublishing.net/ Hoopmann, K. (2001). Of Mice and Aliens. England: Jessica Kingsley Publishing. Powers, M. (2002). Asperger Syndrome & Your Child: A Parents Guide. New York, NY: Harper Collins. Smith, B. & Southwick, J. (1999). Asperger Syndrome and Difficult Moments. Overland Park, KS: Autism Asperger Publishing Co. Stillman, W. (2010). The Everything Parents Guide to Children with Aspergers Syndrome. Avon, MA: Adams Media

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ADHD
AboutADHD Tips for Parents Tips for Educators Tips for Students Technology Resources forADHD Internet Resources forADHD Print Resources froADHD

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About ADHD
ADHD (Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder) causes trouble with paying attention (concentration), controlling impulsive behaviors and sometimes overly active. There are three different types of ADHD:
Predominately Inattentive Type this type of ADHD causes the individual to have trouble focusing, staying on task, stay organized or follow instructions. Predominately Hyperactive-Impulsive Type this type of ADHD causes the individual to fidget and talk a lot, feel restless or impulsively touch or interrupt others. Combined Type this type of ADHD has both the above types equally dominate in the individual. Diagnostic guidelines for ADHD state that individuals must present multiple symptoms for at least six months in various settings, some prior to age seven and the symptoms must cause difficulties in functioning successfully at home, school or when out.

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Tips for Parents


It is important for parents of children with ADHD to stay positive and informed. Knowing the symptoms that cause issues for their child are of great importance. Setting and following a schedule are important for the child to succeed, this is very difficult when parents have busy lives, but with planning and team work it can be successfully accomplished. Get support from your childs doctors, community networks and school personnel. Keep expectations and rules for the child clearly defined and achievable. Have a set routine that prompts relaxation and helps decrease the effects of overstimulation the child experiences throughout the day.

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Tips for Educators


Keep an open line of communication between home and school. Let the parent know they are welcome to inquire about their childs progress and voice their suggestions and concerns. Develop a behavior plan that is unique to the child. ADHD is not a one-size fits all disorder and neither is their behavior and educational plans. Remember that the ADHD child is easily distracted and may seem to be listening when they really are not. This causes them to miss parts or sometimes all of the instructions being given. Give them room and breaks to move freely. Sitting for prolonged periods of time causes inattention issues to worsen. Make sure all expectations and rules are clearly stated and written out for the child. Just because they are verbally told does not mean they will remember. Know what ways the student learns best and teach, as much as possible, to these styles. Use timers to assist students with staying on task. Back to ADHD

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Tips for Students


Ask for clarification when directions are missed or not understood. Use visual or word check lists to help stay on task. Repeat directions or rules back to the parent/teacher to ensure they have been fully understood. This also gives the parent/teacher a chance to clarify anything that may have been missed. If the student is old enough let them take part in the planning of schedules, development of expectations and plans for behavior. Become aware of what causes distractibility and learn how to redirect attention to where it needs to be. Get enough rest and stay physically active to help regulate hyperactiveness and concentration. Keep an open line of communication with parents, teachers and doctors about treatments or modifications that are and are not working.

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Technology Resources for ADHD Timers and clocks, there are a variety that can be used depending on the best fit for the child.

Ear muffs, ear plugs or noise cancelling headphones help students by muffled background noises that cause problems with concentration. WatchMinder is a device that is worn on the wrist. It gives individuals reminders and assists learning to self-monitor certain behaviors. The watch will vibrate and a message will scroll across the screen. http://watchminder.com/ PDAs or other handheld devices that can be used to store schedules, checklists and other applications relevant for the individual to self-monitor their progress.

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Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder This site provides a network of resources for parents and educators of individuals with ADHD. The site provide access to the local chapter here in Dayton. http://www.chadd.org/ National Resource center for ADHD This site provides information about ADHD, as well as educational issues related to the disorder. http://www.help4adhd.org/

Internet Resources for CHADD ChildrenADHD and Adults with Attention

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Print Resources for ADHD


Reif, S.F. (2005). How to reach and teach children with ADD/ADHD: Practical techniques, strategies, and interventions. Hoboken, NJ: Josey-Bass Publishing. Shapiro, L. (2010). The ADHD workbook for kids: Helping children gain self-confidence, social skills and self-control. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publishing. Taylor, J.F. (2006). The survival guide for kids with ADD or ADHD. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing.
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AboutAuditory Processing Disorder Tips for Parents Tips for Educators Tips for Students Technology Resources forAPD InternetResources forAPD Print Resourcesfor APD

Auditory Processing Disorder

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About Auditory Processing Disorder Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) is also known as Central Auditory

Processing Disorder (CAPD). The disorder makes it impossible for the individual to process the information they hear the same way as their peers. Their hearing is fully functional, but once the sounds are heard the brain does not fully recognize and process them appropriately. The symptoms of APD can be similar to those of ADHD. It is important to distinguish between whether the child is having auditory processing difficulties or if they are just easily distracted. The disorder can be identified by having a series of auditory screenings done to assure there is not a problem with the childs ears, but rather a problem with how their brain processes the information once it heard.

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Tips for Parents


Have the child look at you when speaking to them. Ask child to repeat directions back to ensure proper understanding is taking place. Write down directions for use at later times. Try to eliminate background noises that is around when speaking to the child. Work with your childs audiologist to learn techniques for assisting your child while at home or in school.
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Tips for Educators


Provide the student with preferential seating so they can always be in listening range and view of the teacher. Make sure to have the students attention (eye contact) before giving them instructions or speaking to them. Give them visual reminders and lists to assist with maintaining focus and understanding. Reduce, as much as possible, any background noise that may limit the students ability to focus on what is being taught. Make sure to state directions slowly and clearly giving time for the students to repeat them back to you to assure they are understood.

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Tips for Students


Ask for clarification when and if it is needed. Make it a habit to repeat directions back to adults. Maintain focus on the individual speaking to ensure you are hearing what they are saying to you. Ask to move seats if you are not able to hear or see the teacher. Ask that multi-step directions be written out for you or restated until you have a solid understanding of expectations.
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Technology Resources for Auditory Processing Disorders


ALDs Assistive Listening Devices allow the teacher to speak into a microphone that transmits the sounds to a headset worn by the student.

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Internet Resources for Auditory Processing Disorders

AIT Institute Auditory Integration Training This site provides an Accommodation and Modifications Checklist for educators to use when assessing their classroom environment for students with APD. http:// www.aitinstitute.org/auditory_processing_classroom_modificat apdUS Auditory Processing Disorder Awareness & Advocacy in the U.S. This site provides information and resources for parents and educators working with students with an auditory disorder. http://www.capdsupport.org/ Bridges 4 kids This site provides resources that bridge the gap between home, school and communities for children with APD. http://www.bridges4kids.org/

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Print Resources for Auditory Processing Disorders


Bellis, T.J. (2002). Assessment & management of central auditory processing disorders in the educational setting: from science to practice. Independence, KY: Singular (Cengage Learning). Bellis, T.J. (2003). When the brain cant hear: Unraveling the mystery of auditory processing disorder. New York, NY: Atria Books. Holland, J.L. (2011). Train the brain to hear: Brain training techniques to treat auditory processing disorders in kids with ADD/ADHD, low spectrum autism, and auditory processing disorders. Boca Raton, FL: Universal Publishers.

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