Art in the Sun Conference

St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments       How  can  I  encourage   students  to  maintain   better  sketchbooks  to   develop  ideas  and   creativity?       What  are  beginning   lessons  to  encourage   faithful  use  of  the   sketchbooks?       **Can  I  get  lesson  series   and  concepts  from  Greg?       How  can  I  incorporate   regular  sketchbooks  for   computer  graphics/   photo  classes?         Can  use  handmade   sketchbooks  as  a   beginning  project  for   studio  art  classes     **Where  can  I  find  4  x  6   or  4  x  12  sketchbooks  for   all  of  my  students?      

Keynote speaker: Greg Stanforth and Bob Fisher Greg has BFA and MFA in Digital Photo Bob, former student of Greg and art leader Creating a culture of Sketchbooks in a high school art program Bob: was the type of student that listened to every word from his art teachers and wanted to ‘carve a creative life.’ He used sketchbooks to experiment with ideas and plan larger works. Studied many media with drawing and painting from life, experimenting with technique to broaden understanding and creative process. Worked a variety of jobs and exhibited in galleries. Would display sketchbooks with final installations of the finished work. Worked in graphic design, logo design working freelance Joined the Cartoon Network for four years and then decided to change directions… went back to the sketchbook approach with daily dedication: www.sketchbob.com Started his own design company and took graduate classes in business to help managing his new company. Showed his artwork at Kent State Sketchbooks are incredibly important to the development of the artists and the creative process. Greg: teach students to maintain the sketchbook on a daily basis and for various applications ‘It is the most important development tool for the artist. And will be a life-long tool.’ Use a sketchbook that is 4 x 6 or longer watercolor 4 x 12 Requirements: begin every assignment with at least one sketch in the sketchbook. It is a graded assignment. Make the cover design unique and personalized. Composition, structure and color schemes can all be solved in the sketchbook stage. Students share design ideas from the sketchbook in class before doing any larger work. **Critique and individualized feedback. Must fill the whole page** extend ideas to cover the whole page to think about composition and the formalities of design. Students are encouraged to use the sketchbook in everyday life: it will travel with them everywhere. Do not copy anyone else’s artwork: 40% of all of the sketchbook must be from observation: Drawing from real life. Share your work with others: conduct peer to peer critiques to share your ideas with other students to help build your own work. **Video record students discussing their own and their peers’ work during a critique while they show the sketchbook.**

Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments       What  critique  m odels   work  the  best  for   student-­‐student   analysis?         What  tools  does  Greg   use  to  facilitate  good   discussion  from   sketchbooks?                          

**Find something in someone else’s work that you wish you had done. Reflect on that in your artwork/ journal. Make your studies in the sketchbook personal and a record of your life and your concerns. Family, friends, teenage angst, life events, life studies, classwork, keep it real! Art buddy: Every student will have an art buddy to discuss their lives and their sketchbooks during class. Critiques become a personal counseling session where students have someone to share their ideas and life experiences with. How do you scaffold students to work up to using the sketchbook? Start small: e.g. fill two whole pages with shapes. Take notes in the given space of the drawing. Cover the page in watercolor to create a fun background for future work. Draw every day!! Practice your art by making one work of art every day on average: do three on Sunday, for example if you get busy during the week, but stay up to date! Outliers: find this book and read it!! 10,000 hours concept. Remember: Grades are a tool, regarding their overall growth, grades are irrelevant: use them as encouragement and a tool. **Students must accept the reality of being a ‘bad artist’ before they gain skill and become a good artist. Allow students to engage the creative process and grow: DO NOT COPY, create your own work. Allow students to simply enjoy being an artist. “You ARE an artist, now grow.” **Inspire: encourage students to believe that their ideas are just as good as someone else’s… you may need to keep studying and working, but your ideas are valid and good! Any class, any setting, encourage sketchbooks: use language prompts, math, anything to keep student work growing. **Your sketchbook is about you: you are the most important person in the world: document your story and your growth. Publications to share with students: www.Sketchbob.com/resources will have links to use The Shape of Content, Ben Shahn Drawing from life Graphic An Illustrated life: graphic designers

Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments       How  can  I  persuade   computer/  digital   media  classes  to  utilize   sketchbooks?         How  can  I  best   incorporate  their   artwork  into  the   computer  work?  Scan  it   in,  edit  on  the   computer  with  In   Design/  Photoshop?            

Students need to create their own work and can create from studies in real life. Draw from observation… We all must teach in our own situation: adjust your instruction to meet the needs of your situation and the student needs. Debate: Do computer design students need to learn how to draw? All colleges and corporations require drawing that will meet the need of their business: Over all job taskings, the ability to record accurate drawings from observation is paramount. -Build the foundation for 3-D thought and ability. “If you can find and copy an artwork or photo, it does not tell you what it will look in 3-D, plus consider that plagiarism is illegal. Copying from photo is not allowed in any AP portfolio.” The ability to draw is highly sought after in every field “Your first and foremost job as an art teacher is to teach students to draw.”

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Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments                            

Participatory Art: Tara Carpenter, professor BYU Participatory Art/ Relationary Aesthetics is deliberately designed to have the viewer finish the work of art: Share with our community through public space artwork TED talk: Candy Chang Allow community to add their views and feelings… for example: “Before I die, I want to…” people share hopes and dreams to verify coexistence… sharing … supporting… “Thinking about death clarifies life.” Initiatives like this can liberate a community Can be modified for local needs: i.e. “Before I graduate I want to…” “Right now I feel…” How can anonymous expression be liberating? “What do you want to say that you will not verbalize?” “Are you happy today? Why/ why not?” “What is bothering you today?” “I want to be…” “I saw the hand of kindness today in…” (participants draw a hand and write the event/ feeling inside the hand.) “Art is…” “My favorite memory of Alta High is…” “Today I will…” Could be adapted to focus the elements/ principles “Line is…, shape is… color is…” Prompts need to be well thought out and formatted Be aware of needed censorship Have an installation monitor to maintain it, rebuild as needed and to censor the responses. Provide space to get the participation of people: can be a bulletin board with post it notes, a string with paper clips, hung from the ceiling, butcher paper taped up to the wall, etc. Inside Out: Rirkritt Tirivanjia -What can we do in gallery space? Free: an installation where the artist cooked rice and food for people and gave free meals. Participants sat and talked; they were free to share. Marcel Duchamp “A work of art is a work of art if the artist says it is.” Chris Birdy… “I am Chris Birdy”

Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments       How  can  I  backwards  fill   my  3-­‐D  graphics  class  to   incorporate  drawing   skills  to  fill  the  gap  from   not  having  animation?     Can/  should  Alta  create   and  teach  2-­‐D  animation   class?  Is  there  any   drawing  class  that  has  at   least  a  primer  lesson?     Does  Commercial  Art   teach  animation?                    

Teaching Animation: Liz Mathews and Rodayne Esmay @ UVU The computer animation industry requires advanced drawing and paper (classical) animation skills. Gesture, building form, body, 3-D rendering in a 2-D medium. Also need math skills. **Elements and Principles of Art are ciritical! Must also have a solid understanding of perspective: 1 pt, 2 pt, even 3 pt At Pixar animation studios, computer skills are nice, but NOT REQUIRED. Real drawing skills ARE. Cyprus High and Granger High are now offering classical animation classes: 2-D animation as a drawing class. (not 3-D computer graphics) **So far, the only high schools in the state! If we want students to be college and career ready for animation, there MUST be an animation aspect if the drawing classes, if not a fully dedicated animation course that is a prerequisite for computer 3-D graphics. “The animation ship has come in” article from USA Today newspapers discussing Pixar and other animation programs. **Need light tables for quick tracing reference**Art Graph name brand at lightfoot.ltd, cost only $66 !! flashcardmachine.com **Download flashlight apps for the iPad/ laptop to use the screen for a light table. Steel peg bar: holds paper on the light table to assist drawing process ** www.Monkeyjam.org free stop action animation **Utah Governor has created a task force to encourage and support animation programs in the state. Write a grant to earn money for supplies and funds for visiting artists, etc… Use www.donorschoose.org Join ACME (based in California) tutorial system for lessons on animation. The cost is $2,000 for 15 students would need 4K/ yr for a whole class of only 30 students!! -Students submit work to the ACME website and receive and give peer edits of artwork from college level students. UVU uses it. Teach Basic animation principles: research and use step by step processes to help students work with animation concepts. **UVU is offering evening classes in animation: contact Mr. Esmay Find animated movie called Paper Man

Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments                              

Keynote speaker: Greg Stanforth Greg has BFA and MFA in Digital Photo “The best encouragement a student can have is the success of his/her own work.” Explore visual metaphors to help revise/ define your own identity. ** AP board requires that 2/3 of all AP work is done OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM. Encourage students to attend local art classes, community education classes, etc… to develop their work/ portfolio Be sure to make open-ended assignments so that students can have as many opportunities to problem solve and make as many decisions as possible. For example: ‘make a creative self portrait.’ Or ‘Looking at yourself looking in from outside.’ Exaggerated facial expression, Depth of field: show the illusion of space, full length, life size self portraits (no references except a mirror), figure in time self-portrait (show motion with multiple images of yourself. Selfportrait in a reflective object. Photo and computer graphics classes MUST use ONLY their own work. Do not just ‘google it’ Make it clear from the beginning that they need to shoot their own photos and make their own work. Even if you do not have an AP program, encourage students to do a year-long concentration as if they were in AP. Have photo and computer classes do the same thing. **Critiques must allow students to verbalize and be conversant about their own work. Must be able to use the right vocab, analyze work and know what they are talking about. Teach them to ‘juxtapose their compositions,’ ‘Rule of thirds, golden mean’… etc and MUST have a solid grounding in the elements and principles of art with a focus on art criticism and discussion. **Order posters and media to support vocabulary and art history, historic and contemporary artists.** The Shape of Content (Harvard University Press, 1957) The Outliers, the story of success by Malcolm Gladwell Talent is irrelevant: You will be successful if you are willing to do what it takes to put in the hard work to be successful.

Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments         How  can  I  get  students   involved  and  excited   about  their  journal?                 How  will  students  react   to  this  philosophy  of   owning  the  journal?                

Paylandia: a listing of artistic jobs, average salaries and requirements for entry into art fields of graphics, design etc… Keynote speaker: Bob Fisher 5 step creative process: sketchbook as ... the anatomy of a page and in class work. We need to teach students how to utilize a sketchbook and to realize what it can be for them, how valuable it can be. How can we use it to its full potential? A sketchbook is a repository, laboratory, playground, journal and a finished piece. This is a place where you are completely free; there is no right/ wrong approach, but be free to make mistakes and to make discoveries about yourself and the world around you. Play with it and have fun! You have an opportunity to fail, but also the opportunity to be successful: you can go back and paint over or fix earlier works. Every page needs to look like a finished work of art. Use mixed media: cut and paste other papers, photos, etc… draw, paint, use ink, pencil, watercolor, etc…this is YOUR journal. Facilitate student self discovery and analysis to push ideas further and further to come to designs that will be successful. Creative Process: a five-step model I Preparation II Incubation III Inspiration IV Evaluation V Elaboration Brainstorming: the everyday objects game: brainstorm a list of everyday nouns and write them on the board. Randomly choose three and students must draw as many thumbnails as they can in 2 minutes… then discuss rules and thinking outside the box: what were the rules? Play with ideas… then choose three more objects and repeat the activity. (students usually produce twice as much after the discussion once they open up the possibilities) Doodle Game: blindly/randomly make marks… then start to see forms and shapes in the marks and refine/ bring into focus the marks… (think of creating shapes in the clouds)

Art in the Sun Conference
St George, Utah Friday 22 Feb 2013
Questions/  Comments                                      

The Exquisite Corpse: Andre Breton: poet and author started a parlor game with a piece of paper: first person draws or write an idea: passes to another person and they make another… the third person ‘resolves’ the composition. Afterwards, have each of the three people who worked on it to share in critique what they were thinking and what decisions they made along the way. Discuss how they adapted the texture, composition, color, etc… and critique the final work.

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