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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • April 12, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 204
KOREAN THREAT
WORLD PAGE 31
DONS STUN
SEQUOIA 8-7
SPORTS PAGE 11
MALICK’S LATEST FILM IS
FLAWED BUT HEAVENLY
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18
PENTAGON: NORTH KOREA COULD LAUNCH
NUCLEAR MISSILE
Rail corridor taking shape
Henderson
retires from
school board
Multiple strokes cited for San Bruno trustee’s
decision to leave post after more than 30 years
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Skip Henderson, longtime San Bruno
Park Elementary School Board trustee,
announced his retirement effective May 1
citing challenges after multiple strokes.
Henderson, 65, made the announcement
during a special meeting Tuesday evening.
He served the district for more than 31
years and is at the end of his eighth term.
“It’s really breaking my heart. I’m very
sad over it but it’s the right decision,” said Henderson.
Skip
Henderson
Local colleges tapped for
international program
County students first group selected to go to China
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Students and faculty from the San Mateo
County Community College District will
get the chance to travel to China starting in
2014 through a new program.
This week, during a ceremony in
Beijing, Gov. Jerry Brown announced the
creation of a new program to send
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
An exhibition of creativity and skill
will be on display as pinewood cars will
be raced at the Hillsdale Shopping
Center in the center court Saturday,
April 13.
The center court is in front of Macy’s
(where Christmas and Easter events take
place), said Jim Newton, chairman of the
event and a volunteer who helped to
organize the derby.
“The whole purpose of the Pinewood
Derby day arrives
Pinewood Derby helps build character through building cars
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ground has broken on a new 111-unit
transit-oriented development in San
Mateo’s rail corridor between the
Hayward Park and Hillsdale Caltrain
stations.
The former Lithographix printing
facility at 2090 S. Delaware St. has been
demolished and the new $43.7 million
apartment complex is scheduled to be
ready to lease in spring 2014, according
to developer Wood Partners.
The high-density housing complex is
part of several new developments slated
for the area that will eventually see the
construction of about 2,000 new housing
units with the Bay Meadows Phase II
project and the Delaware Street
Apartments, the site of San Mateo’s for-
mer police headquarters.
Construction on the Delaware Street
Apartments is well underway, which
will be split into two buildings, one
being built by MidPen Housing with
about 60 units for those who make 50
percent to 90 percent of the area’s medi-
an income.
At Bay Meadows, sales of the first 156
units have started at the mixed-use proj-
ect which will eventually have 1,170
units, office buildings and the private
Nueva School.
Down the road to the north, a develop-
ment called Station Park Green where
the Kmart sits will be a whole new
neighborhood with 599 units of housing
and retail. An office complex is also
approved called Hines Offices that will
be located on two parcels at 1830 S.
Delaware St. and 470 Concar Drive.
The Wood Partners project will feature
More high-density housing coming to San Mateo
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Workers prepare the site of a new 111-unit housing
development in San Mateo’s rail corridor. See HOUSING, Page 22
DAVID WONG/DAILY JOURNAL
Nick Newton weighs a Pinewood Derby contestant’s car that will be raced this Saturday at the Hillsdale Shopping Center.
See DERBY, Page 23 Jerry Brown
See SKIP, Page 23
See CHINA, Page 22
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • April 12, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 204
KOREAN THREAT
WORLD PAGE 31
DONS STUN
SEQUOIA 8-7
SPORTS PAGE 11
MALICK’S LATEST FILM IS
FLAWED BUT HEAVENLY
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18
PENTAGON: NORTH KOREA COULD LAUNCH
NUCLEAR MISSILE
Rail corridor taking shape
Henderson
retires from
school board
Multiple strokes cited for San Bruno trustee’s
decision to leave post after more than 30 years
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Skip Henderson, longtime San Bruno
Park Elementary School Board trustee,
announced his retirement effective May 1
citing challenges after multiple strokes.
Henderson, 65, made the announcement
during a special meeting Tuesday evening.
He served the district for more than 31
years and is at the end of his eighth term.
“It’s really breaking my heart. I’m very
sad over it but it’s the right decision,” said Henderson.
Skip
Henderson
Local colleges tapped for
international program
County students first group selected to go to China
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Students and faculty from the San Mateo
County Community College District will
get the chance to travel to China starting in
2014 through a new program.
This week, during a ceremony in
Beijing, Gov. Jerry Brown announced the
creation of a new program to send
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
An exhibition of creativity and skill
will be on display as pinewood cars will
be raced at the Hillsdale Shopping
Center in the center court Saturday,
April 13.
The center court is in front of Macy’s
(where Christmas and Easter events take
place), said Jim Newton, chairman of the
event and a volunteer who helped to
organize the derby.
“The whole purpose of the Pinewood
Derby day arrives
Pinewood Derby helps build character through building cars
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ground has broken on a new 111-unit
transit-oriented development in San
Mateo’s rail corridor between the
Hayward Park and Hillsdale Caltrain
stations.
The former Lithographix printing
facility at 2090 S. Delaware St. has been
demolished and the new $43.7 million
apartment complex is scheduled to be
ready to lease in spring 2014, according
to developer Wood Partners.
The high-density housing complex is
part of several new developments slated
for the area that will eventually see the
construction of about 2,000 new housing
units with the Bay Meadows Phase II
project and the Delaware Street
Apartments, the site of San Mateo’s for-
mer police headquarters.
Construction on the Delaware Street
Apartments is well underway, which
will be split into two buildings, one
being built by MidPen Housing with
about 60 units for those who make 50
percent to 90 percent of the area’s medi-
an income.
At Bay Meadows, sales of the first 156
units have started at the mixed-use proj-
ect which will eventually have 1,170
units, office buildings and the private
Nueva School.
Down the road to the north, a develop-
ment called Station Park Green where
the Kmart sits will be a whole new
neighborhood with 599 units of housing
and retail. An office complex is also
approved called Hines Offices that will
be located on two parcels at 1830 S.
Delaware St. and 470 Concar Drive.
The Wood Partners project will feature
More high-density housing coming to San Mateo
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Workers prepare the site of a new 111-unit housing
development in San Mateo’s rail corridor. See HOUSING, Page 22
DAVID WONG/DAILY JOURNAL
Nick Newton weighs a Pinewood Derby contestant’s car that will be raced this Saturday at the Hillsdale Shopping Center.
See DERBY, Page 23 Jerry Brown
See SKIP, Page 23
See CHINA, Page 22
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Talk show host
David Letterman is
66.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1963
Civil rights leader Martin Luther King,
Jr. was arrested and jailed in
Birmingham, Ala., charged with con-
tempt of court and parading without a
permit.
“Rules are not
necessarily sacred, principles are.”
— President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945)
Actor Ed O’Neill is
67.
Actress Claire
Danes is 34.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A student protester (rear) takes cover from a jet of water released by a riot police vehicle as a dog jumps during a rally in which
demonstrators demanded that the government make changes to the public state education system, in Santiago, Chile.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 40s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the
mid 40s. Northwest winds around 20 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Sunday night through Thursday: Partly cloudy. Breezy.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs around 60.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 70s. West winds 5 to 10
mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
JOKER TOKEN BITTEN AVENUE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When they discussed creating a company to make
artificial knees, they planned a — JOINT VENTURE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
XENAN
SERDS
TAHPAY
LIBGOE
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
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u
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o
n

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k

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p
:
/
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.
f
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ju
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-
Answer
here:
In 1606, England’s King James I decreed the design of the orig-
inal Union Flag, which combined the flags of England and
Scotland.
In 1861, the American Civil War began as Confederate forces
opened fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina.
In 1862, Union volunteers stole a Confederate locomotive near
Marietta, Ga., and headed toward Chattanooga, Tenn., on a mis-
sion to sabotage as much of the rail line as they could; the
raiders were caught.
In 1877, the catcher’s mask was first used in a baseball game by
James Tyng of Harvard in a game against the Lynn Live Oaks.
In 1912, Clara Barton, the founder of the American Red Cross,
died in Glen Echo, Md., at age 90.
In 1934, “Tender Is the Night,” by F. Scott Fitzgerald, was first
published in book form after being serialized in Scribner’s
Magazine.
In 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt died of a cerebral
hemorrhage in Warm Springs, Ga., at age 63; he was succeeded
by Vice President Harry S. Truman.
In 1955, the Salk vaccine against polio was declared safe and
effective.
In 1961, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man
to fly in space, orbiting the earth once before making a safe
landing.
In 1981, the space shuttle Columbia blasted off from Cape
Canaveral on its first test flight. Former world heavyweight box-
ing champion Joe Louis died in Las Vegas, Nev., at age 66.
In 1983, Chicagoans went to the polls to elect Harold
Washington the city’s first black mayor.
In 1985, Sen. Jake Garn, R-Utah, became the first sitting mem-
ber of Congress to fly in space as the shuttle Discovery lifted
off.
Country singer Ned Miller is 88. Actress Jane Withers is 87.
Opera singer Montserrat Caballe is 80. Playwright Alan
Ayckbourn is 74. Jazz musician Herbie Hancock is 73. Actor
Frank Bank (“Leave It to Beaver”) is 71. Rock singer John Kay
(Steppenwolf) is 69. Author Tom Clancy is 66. Actor Dan Lauria
is 66. Author Scott Turow is 64. Singer David Cassidy is 63.
Actor-playwright Tom Noonan is 62. Rhythm-and-blues singer
JD Nicholas (The Commodores) is 61. Singer Pat Travers is 59.
Actor Andy Garcia is 57. Movie director Walter Salles is 57.
Country singer Vince Gill is 56. Actress Suzzanne (cq) Douglas is
56. Rock musician Will Sergeant (Echo & the Bunnymen) is 55.
Speier goes to Washington
The week of April 12, 2008, former
state senator Jackie Speier succeeded
in her bid to represent the 12th
Congressional District, fulfilling a
goal she first set for herself 29 years
prior.
Speier first ran for
the seat as a young leg-
islative legal council
who survived gunfire
in Guyana, which
killed the U.S. Rep. Leo J. Ryan.
She lost the campaign to fill her
assassinated boss’ seat in 1979, but
won the week of April 12, 2008 with
79.9 percent of the vote in San Mateo
County. The 12th Congressional
District represents most of San Mateo
County and a southern portion of San
Francisco. Tom Lantos held the seat
for27 years and was expected to defend
the seat against Speier in November,
but died Feb. 11, 2008 of esophageal
cancer.
District faces tax trouble
Flawed ballot language limiting the
San Mateo Union High School District
meant property owners could pay taxes
for an additional 15 years to complete
the goals of Measure M or construction
was to be scaled back 40 percent, it
was revealed the week of April 12,
2008.
Voters passed Measure M, a $298
million bond measure, in 2006 which
included language limiting the debt to
25-year bonds. Ordinarily, districts
have the option of utilizing up to 40-
year bonds. The voter-approved lan-
guage restricted the district’s ability to
fund the promised projects, said
Superintendent David Miller during a
press conference the week
of April 12, 2008. The dis-
trict was planning to peti-
tion the San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors to
amend the bond language
allowing the use of both 25-year and
40-year bonds.
DA challenges incompetence
of ‘one-man demolition derby’
The week of April 12, 2008, prose-
cutors were challenging the reports of
court-appointed doctors who believed
the parolee once dubbed a “one-man
demolition derby” for allegedly wreak-
ing havoc during a single afternoon in
Burlingame should return to a state
hospital rather than stand trial.
Court-appointed doctors believed
Sperb needs treatment rather than incar-
ceration and returned reports conclud-
ing he is not competent to stand trial.
The bizarre chain of events began
shortly after 1 p.m. Jan. 14, 2004 when
Burlingame police received a call
claiming Sperb stole items from a
fenced area of a business. Within min-
utes, dispatchers received another call
saying the man ran across Highway
101, stole a white van and fled. He
reportedly struck two parked cars dur-
ing his escape. Minutes after, an 18-
year-old man called 911 to say Sperb
entered his house and held an 8-inch
knife to his side. Sperb then stole keys
to the classic Chevrolet Camaro parked
outside the home and took the vehicle,
police reported. Sperb allegedly lost
control of the car near Davis
Drive, crashing into a Jaguar
and a Ford Explorer. When he
tried once again to flee on foot,
two neighbors tackled him.
Wall Street stumbles
Wall Street stumbled the week of
April 12, 2008 after a disappointing
first-quarter report from General
Electric Co. surprised the market and
stoked concern about the health of both
corporate profits and the wider econo-
my. The major indexes fell more than 2
percent, with the Dow Jones industrials
giving up more than 250 points.
A weaker-than-expected reading
showing consumer confidence at a 26-
year low subdued any positive senti-
ment.
The Dow fell 256.56, or 2.04 per-
cent, to 12,325.42 on Friday of that
week. GE was by far the steepest
decliner among the 30 stocks that com-
prise the Dow. Its shares dropped
$4.70, or 13 percent, to $32.05.
From the archives highlights stories origi-
nally printed five years ago this week. It
appears in the Friday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 10 Solid
Gold in first place;No.09 Winning Spirit in second
place;and No.08 Gorgeous George in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:41.51.
3 7 2
17 30 41 48 54 13
Mega number
April 9 Mega Millions
1 36 40 52 53 20
Powerball
April 10 Powerball
1 4 7 27 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 7 1 8
Daily Four
1 7 4
Daily three evening
9 18 37 41 42 3
Mega number
April 10 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
ACS Courier | Home Care Assistance
Peninsula Executives Association
Retirement Administration, Inc.
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
ATTENTION:
Small Business
Resource Fair
Tuesday, April 30 •
9 am to 1 pm
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
SEMINAR TOPICS INCLUDE:
*Practical Social Media for the Small
Business, presented by Right Mix Marketing
*Guerrilla Marketing Strategies for the Small
Business, presented by Speak Well and Sell
*How Online Backup Can Save Your Business,
presented by Backblaze
*Increase Customer Loyalty through SMS / Text
Message Marketing, presented by Discount Loyalty
MORE seminars will be added!!!
N
etw
ork w
ith other business
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eet representatives from
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If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
Attend a schedule of helpful,
inform
ative business sem
inars on various
topics that will help you grow your business
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in
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REGISTER TODAY AT:
smallbusinessresourcefair.eventbrite.com
Or call 650-344-5200 x 121
for more information
Continental breakfast will be provided
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Burglary. Three vehicles were broken into at
a school by two landscapers hired by a church
on Grand Avenue before 5:53 p.m. on
Thursday, April 4.
Disturbance. A man exposed himself and uri-
nated in front of a woman and her children on
the bus on Mission Road before 4:26 p.m. on
Thursday, April 4.
Arrest. A person was arrested for disorderly
conduct on Grand Avenue before 2:10 p.m. on
Thursday, April 4.
Arrest. A man was arrested for smoking mar-
ijuana after he asked a stranger to smoke with
him at a Starbucks on Grand Avenue before
8:53 a.m. on Thursday, April 4.
Burglary. Two portable DVD players were
stolen from a rental car on South Airport
Boulevard before 8:51 a.m. on Thursday, April
4.
Grand theft. A vehicle was stolen on Grand
Avenue before 2:09 a.m. on Thursday, April 4.
Grand theft. An expensive bicycle was stolen
from a garage that was left open on Arroyo
Drive before 12:21 a.m. on Thursday, April 4.
HALF MOON BAY
Arrest. A woman was arrested on an out-
standing warrant on Etheldore Avenue in El
Granada before 11:20 p.m. on Monday, April
8.
Burglary. About $2,000 worth of items were
stolen from a home on the 400 block of Grand
Boulevard before 9:48 p.m. on Monday, April
8.
Public intoxication. An Montara man was
found to be too intoxicated to care for himself
at the intersection of Pine Street and Pilarcitos
Avenue before 8:24 p.m. Friday, April 5.
Police reports
Cleaning emergency
A woman accidentally called 911 while
trying to wash her phone on Alhambra
Road in South San Francisco before
12:08 p.m. on Thursday, April 4.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Only a few hands went up when Woodside
firefighter/paramedic Steven Silici asked
Carlmont freshmen if they had taken a CPR
class before.
Soon after, all 50 of the freshmen in fifth
period were trained in the hands-only portion
of CPR as well as how to handle a person who
is choking and use an automated external
defibrillator — which all the schools in the
Sequoia Union High School District now have
on campus. The 40-minute safety presentation
won’t result in the students being certified.
However, it will mean about 500 students on
campus can help in their community. The
training, which took place Thursday at
Carlmont, is through a grant-funded partner-
ship with the Sequoia Healthcare District. By
the end of May, more than 2,000 freshmen in
the district will have completed the training,
said district Wellness Coordinator Karen Li.
These are skills trained individuals will
most likely use on someone they know —
family, friends, co-workers, said Woodside
Fire Battalion Chief Emil Picchi. In less than
an hour, a group of 50 teens can be trained in
these basic skills that can help a person’s sur-
vival rate, he said. Picchi was happy about the
partnership but would like to see the effort
expanded throughout the county and conduct-
ed annually with the incoming freshmen.
Students watched a short informative video
then took turns practicing the skills shown on
dummies on the gym floor. Teachers, district
staff and representatives from Woodside Fire
Department and the Sequoia Healthcare
District circulated to give guidance like to
keep elbows straight and the correct place-
ment of hands.
Li said the idea came from Sequoia
Healthcare District, which approached her.
Then, after working with Woodside Fire, the
plan moved forward with a focus on the
hands-only portion. Silici explained that les-
son is much shorter, but it’s also something
people are generally less afraid to try. The les-
son fits in as part of the required health unit,
said physical education teacher Irene Oliveire-
de Wood.
Picchi told students not to be afraid to use
the CPR skills, something many people say
keeps them from helping a person.
“You’re really trying to help them,” he told
the class, adding that could be what saves a
person’s life.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
High school freshmen trained in CPR
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Freshman Brandon Yadao practices CPR as his classmate, Austin Werchick, watches during a
health lesson taught at Carlmont High School in Belmont Thursday.
1. Make sure the person is lying on his or
her back on a firm, flat surface.
2. Move clothes out of the way.
3. Put the heel of one hand on the lower
half of the breastbone. Put the heel of
your other hand on top of the first hand.
4. Push straight down at least 2 inches at
a rate of at least 100 pushes a minute.
5. After each push, let the chest come
back up to its normal position.
*Source: American Heart Association
How to give CPR
4
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Man killed crossing street
A man died from his injuries after
being struck by a car crossing B Street
at Ninth Avenue Wednesday night in
San Mateo, according to police.
San Mateo resident Melvin Prives,
68, died from his injuries later that
night at Stanford Hospital, according to
police.
Drugs and alcohol do not appear to be
a factor in the accident that took place
at about 7:40 p.m. and the driver was
not cited for any violations, according
to police. It is unclear whether the vic-
tim was walking in a crosswalk.
The crash is under investigation and
anyone with information about the inci-
dent can call San Mateo police traffic
investigators at (650) 522-7740.
Pedestrian badly
injured in Foster City
A 57-year-old San Mateo woman was
badly injured when a vehicle struck her
at the intersection of Foster City
Boulevard and Bounty Drive yesterday
morning, according to police.
The accident took place at about 7:40
a.m. and the victim was transported to
Stanford Hospital, according to police.
The victim was found in the middle
of the road when first responders
arrived on scene. They immediately
began treatment, according to police.
The accident remains under investi-
gation and anyone who may have wit-
nessed it is encouraged to call Foster
City police at (650) 286-3300.
Crews control fire at
industrial sheet metal company
An industrial building in San Carlos
was evacuated after a fire broke out
there yesterday morning, a fire official
said.
The one-alarm fire was reported at
9:18 a.m. at 266 Industrial Road, where
the company Spacesonic Precision
Sheet Metal is based, Fire Marshal Jim
Palisi said.
Everyone in the building got out safe-
ly before fire crews arrived and no
injuries were reported, Palisi said.
The fire was under control at 9:50
a.m. The cause of the blaze remains
under investigation.
According to Spacesonic’s website,
the company makes and assembles
sheet metal into various products and
parts.
Redwood City man arrested for
possession of stolen property
San Carlos police arrested Kenneth
Browne in the area of Eaton Avenue
and Alameda de las Pulgas Wednesday
morning after a minor vehicle code vio-
lation stop revealed he had stolen prop-
erty in his car, according to police.
At approximately 7 a.m., sheriff’s
deputies pulled over Browne and found
the stolen property from a San Carlos
vehicle theft the previous day as well as
drug paraphernalia, according to police.
Seven honored
for mentoring work
Friends for Youth is honoring seven
Peninsula locals for their efforts sup-
porting the organization and work men-
toring youth.
The honorees have “shown an out-
standing commitment and enthusiasm”
for young people over a significant
period of time from public policy initia-
tives to financial support or individual
time, according to the nonprofit’s
announcement of the awards.
The Making a Difference Award
recipients are:
• U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo;
• San Mateo County District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe;
• Redwood City 2020 and Executive
Director Pat Brown;
• Lucile Packard Foundation for
Children’s Health;
• Sobrato Family Foundation;
• Friends for Youth Boardmember
Dave Rozzi; and
• Friends for Youth Mentor and
Boardmember Rob Inouye.
The winners will be recognized with
handmade tile plaques at the agency’s
14th annual mentoring conference April
18 and 19. For more information on the
conference visit www.friendsfory-
outh.org/MI-Conference.html.
Three displaced after
two-alarm house fire
A two-alarm fire in the Brisbane hills
displaced three residents yesterday
afternoon, a North County Fire
Authority spokesman said.
Fire officials received a call at 2:50
p.m. reporting an explosion heard in the
area of the 400 block of Sierra Point
Road, spokesman Matt Lucett said.
Fire crews were alerted that there was
smoke and flames coming from the
house and upon arrival switched to a
two-alarm response, Lucett said.
The blaze was in the first story of the
two-story home. Two residents who had
been home were able to get out safely,
Lucett said.
The residence sustained smoke dam-
age throughout and the first story was
damaged by flames, Lucett said.
Three residents living in the home
have made arrangements to stay with
relatives and friends.
Neighboring homes were not threat-
ened by the blaze, and no evacuations
were necessary, according to Lucett.
The cause is under investigation.
Lucett said the explosion initially
reported appears to have been associat-
ed with the fire.
Local briefs
Face slasher gets
four years prison
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Redwood City man who took a plea deal rather than stand
trial for the beer bottle face slashing of a man celebrating his 21st
birthday with three female friends was sen-
tenced yesterday to four years in prison.
Ismael Cruz, 36, could have faced a life
sentence if convicted at trial in the June 11,
2012 incident outside Mazzocco’s Bar on
Middlefield Road but instead pleaded no
contest to felony assault. The four-year term
was the maximum amount he faced under
the terms of the settlement.
Prosecutors say the encounter began
around 2 a.m. when the victim and his three
female companions left the bar and encountered Cruz and his
friends outside. Cruz reportedly made vulgar remarks to the
women and, when the victim asked him to calm down, the two
exchanged punches. Cruz broke a beer bottle, charged forward
and slashed the man in the face leaving him with a pronounced
and permanent 7-inch scar from the top of his head to his neck
and a second 3-inch scar near his ear, said prosecutors.
The man required hospitalization to remove the glass and close
the wounds.
The permanent disfigurement led to Cruz initially being
charged with aggravated mayhem which carries up to a life sen-
tence.
Prosecutors agreed to settle the case out of concern of how a
jury would perceive the victim and the circumstances of the bar
fight.
Cruz has credit of 350 days while in custody on $50,000 bail.
S.F. police withdraw request to use stun guns
San Francisco’s police chief has withdrawn his contentious
proposal to equip officers with stun guns as part of a pilot pro-
gram, saying too many restrictions on using the less-than-
lethal devices would have increased the risk to officers and res-
idents.
Chief Greg Suhr told the police commission on Wednesday
he thinks those limitations of the devices, commonly known as
Tasers, were too rigid for certain people at-risk, the elderly,
those too thin in stature or near traffic.
Ismael Cruz
Around the Bay
5
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A convicted sex offender once committed to a
state hospital as a violent predator and awaiting
trial for allegedly flashing a mother and child at
a Christmas tree lot is now accused of harassing
several San Bruno children and repeatedly ask-
ing a 9-year-old girl if she had a boyfriend.
Allan Wayne Meaney, 67, was free on
$100,000 bail in the indecent exposure case
when he was arrested Tuesday, April 9 after a
father called San Bruno police to report him lin-
gering near children playing soccer.
Meaney was reportedly first spotted outside a
San Bruno apartment complex where five
young children were playing soccer. When the
father of one child questioned Meaney about his
presence, he reportedly said he was looking for
somebody named “Jim.” He left when told no
“Jim” lived there but returned moments later
and stood near the children until he was told to
leave. Meaney drove away but again returned,
parking and flagging down a 9-year-old girl in a
school uniform who was asked four to five
times if she had a boyfriend, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
After the girl walked away, Meaney reported-
ly stood by the soccer-playing kids again until
the father called police.
He was charged with annoying a minor under
18 and committing a new crime while out of
custody on bail. He will enter a plea April 19
and remains in custody in lieu of $500,000 bail.
Meaney is also facing trial June 24 on felony
charges of indecent exposure and child annoy-
ance stemming from the earlier indecent expo-
sure case. He is also charged with a misde-
meanor count of hit-and-
run for allegedly crashing
his car while fleeing the
child’s screaming mother.
On Dec. 1, the woman
reported seeing Meaney a
few feet away while look-
ing at Christmas trees with
her 6-year-old daughter and
seeing him grab his geni-
tals through the open zip-
per of his pants. When the
mother yelled at Meaney and grabbed at his
jacket to hold him for authorities, he pulled
away and ran to his car with the woman in pur-
suit screaming for help, according to prosecu-
tors.
Meaney allegedly got into his car but crashed
into another vehicle, giving a clerk at the tree lot
the opportunity to write down his license plate
number. Colma police arrested Meaney at his
home.
Meaney has several prior convictions for sex-
ual abuse against children and was once
detained at a state facility as a mentally disor-
dered sex offender, a term now replaced with
the label sexually violent predator. The determi-
nation allows the court to order a convict held
beyond his or her prison term if they meet cer-
tain criteria and are considered to remain a dan-
ger.
Meaney faces a third strike and possible 25
years to life imprisonment if convicted in the
flashing incident.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said he
anticipates the two cases being consolidated and
said the new charges up the possible punish-
ment to 50 years to life.
Accused flasher charged
with harassing children
Allan Meaney
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A handful of Redwood City schools will soon
be generating solar power through a contract
and solar power purchase agreement with
Siemens Industry, Inc. unanimously approved
by the district’s Board of Trustees Wednesday.
The partnership will result in upgrades in all
15 schools to the energy management systems,
lighting, rest rooms and water as well as the tires
of the district’s fleet. In addition, five schools —
Adelante, Hawes, John Gill, Clifford and
Kennedy — will have solar panels installed.
Under the agreement, Siemens Industry will
fund, build, own and operate the solar panel
with no up-front costs to the district.
Construction could start this summer. The
project is estimated to save the district a min-
imum of $812,826 over 20 years for the solar
power purchase agreement at five schools and
$406,920 over 15 years for the energy efficient
facility improvements. The district and
Siemens are looking at securing an additional
savings offered through the California Energy
Commission that could result in a savings of
$667,920 over 15 years.
Solar power coming to Redwood City schools
REUTERS
China’s Premier Li Keqiang, right, gestures as he talks to Gov.Jerry Brown during a meeting at
the Zhongnanhai Leadership Compound in Beijing, China.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown got
a firsthand look on Thursday at the world’s
most extensive high-speed rail system and
praised the initiative that created the Chinese
railway, saying he was anxious to start build-
ing similarly ambitious projects in California.
During a five-hour ride covering more than
800 miles, the governor also touted the possi-
bility of Chinese investment in the $68 billion
high-speed rail project he is pushing in
California.
Covering the cost of the unpopular rail sys-
tem is one of the project’s biggest unknowns.
The Democratic governor walked the aisles
during the trip between Beijing and Shanghai,
shaking hands with Chinese passengers and
marveling at how much the country has devel-
oped since his only other visit to China in
1986.
“We sit around and mope. And process. And
navel gaze,” Brown said, according to KXTV-
ABC in Sacramento, which sent a reporter on
the trade mission. “And the rest of the world is
moving at Mach speed. So when we go back,
we’ll emulate some of that.”
Brown was joined by Dan Richard, head of
the California High-Speed Rail Authority, and
representatives of Tangshan Railway Vehicle
Co., a Chinese company that designed and
built that country’s bullet train system.
He also brought his own reading material
for the trip — a copy of the Chinese govern-
ment’s five-year plan. He remarked that he
enjoyed the ride, according to the Los Angeles
Times reporter traveling with the governor.
“I like it because I can read and it’s easy to
get on,” Brown said.
Brown is a champion of the bullet train plan
for California, which was approved by voters
in 2008 but has been losing favor as its costs
have soared. It is one of the most expensive
public works projects in the U.S.
He has said the project is crucial for the
state’s future, in large part to relieve pressure
off the state’s freeway system.
Jerry Brown praises
Chinese for bullet train
6
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
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A beautiful flight
Crowd-sourcedballet comes to Foster
City as part of interactive performance
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A ballet choreographed through online suggestions will be
presented as part of the “Inside the Dancer’s Studio” at
Hillbarn Theatre next week — a chance for audience members
to really interact with those creating the show.
Earlier this year, Diablo Ballet decided to turn to social
media as a way to source an original show. Known as the web
ballet, “The Flight of the Dodo” includes original choreogra-
phy from suggestions submitted by individuals all around the
world through Diablo’s Twitter feed. Originally performed in
March, the show makes a two-day stop on the Peninsula at
Foster City’s Hillbarn Theatre April 12-13 as part of the
“Inside the Dancer’s Studio” series. The evenings includes
four ballets — “The Blue Boy,” “Sinuosity,” “La Covacha”
and “The Flight of the Dodo” — and a question and answer
session between the audience, choreographers and dancers.
“This is a great way to really feel a part of what we’re
doing,” said Diablo’s Artistic Director Lauren Jonas.
The mission of the organization is to be more interactive.
Both the web ballet and the series are examples of ways
Diablo is giving fans a chance to be part of the performance,
she said.
Jonas has also enjoyed Dancer’s Studio series, which started
in 2010, because it gives her a chance to meet supporters of the
company in person.
Interacting with the public took a social media turn for the
dance company earlier this year with their web ballet push.
“The Flight of the Dodo” was the end result. Suggestions
came in to use the Dodo bird but also to make it deliberately
ironic — which is why it follows the flight of a bird not meant
to soar.
Suggestions were collected until Valentine’s Day then cho-
reographer Robert Dekkers had two weeks to create a 10-
minute dance work utilizing the winning ideas.
The seven suggestions acted as a guide for Dekkers who was
taken outside his comfort zone.
“It really pushed me,” he said, adding it was a collaborative
effort with the dancers.
Having limited time meant needing to go with his gut and
not overthink details. He chose things that weren’t details he
would normally use like the color turquoise. Ultimately all the
ideas helped create a vision of which Dekkers is proud.
Those who made the winning suggestions were offered tick-
ets to March performances of the crowd-sourced piece.
Dekkers had a chance to hear their feedback on his use of the
suggestions — all of which was positive.
Hillbarn Theatre presents “Inside the Dancer’s Studio” at 8
p.m. Friday, April 12 and Saturday, April 13 at 1285 East
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Tickets are $46. For more infor-
mation and tickets visit hillbarntheatre.org or www.diablobal-
let.org.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Five San Mateo County schools were
among 218 recognized yesterday by
State Superintendent Tom Torlakson as
being California Distinguished Schools.
The 2013 California Distinguished
Schools Program directly recognizes
those schools that have made progress in
narrowing the academic achievement
gap. Local schools to be recognized
include: Burlingame Intermediate,
Fernando Rivera Intermediate in Daly
City, Taylor Middle in Millbrae, Tierra
Linda Middle in San Carlos, Bowditch
Middle in Foster City and Menlo-
Atherton High in Atherton.
Burlingame Superintendent Maggie
MacIsaac described the recognition as
wonderful news.
“BIS stands out because of the rich
program the school offers our students
and because of the positive, supportive
culture at the school. The teachers, staff,
administration and parents are all part of
the educational process at BIS and it
shows,” said MacIsaac.
San Carlos Superintendent Craig
Baker said he was proud not only of the
school but for the great work of its chil-
dren and community day in and day out.
“That said, I think all our schools are
distinguished in so many ways. I don’t
see this as a comparison of one school
over another, just an acknowledgment of
one of our schools doing a stellar job,”
said Baker.
To apply for Distinguished School
honors, schools must meet a variety of
eligibility criteria, including accounta-
bility measures. Once schools are
deemed eligible, the California
Department of Education invites them to
apply to be recognized as a California
Distinguished School. The application
process consists of a written application,
which includes a comprehensive
description of two of the school’s signa-
ture practices, and a county-led site val-
idation review process, which validates
the implementation of those signature
practices.
Elementary and secondary schools are
recognized in alternate years.
Schools earning the Distinguished
School title agree to share their signature
practices with other schools and become
a mentor to those seeking to replicate
their work. Schools will be honored in
May during regional award ceremonies
where Torlakson will present each
school with a 2013 Distinguished
School plaque and flag.
“These schools have gone the extra
mile to provide high-quality instruction
that puts their students on the right path
toward career and college,” Torlakson
wrote in a press release. “Given the
enormous challenges schools have
faced in recent years, it is inspiring to
see this kind of success in so many
schools. Our future depends on meet-
ing the needs of every student no mat-
ter where they come from or where
they live.”
Five San Mateo County schools
recognized as distinguished
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Half Moon Bay man convicted of
threatening his young niece’s stuffed
animals and dolls if she did not perform
sexual acts was sentenced yesterday to
the minimum term of nine years in
prison.
Prosecutors sought 18 years for
Johnathan Edhammer, 24, who faced up
to 22 years in prison based on the
molestation convictions. The sentence
comes nearly a year after a jury found
Edhammer guilty of multiple felony
counts of lewd acts on a child and found
he committed continuous child molesta-
tion between 2007 and 2010. The jury
also acquitted Edhammer on one count.
Edhammer was accused of molesting
his half-niece starting
at age 9 when she
would spend her
school breaks at his
home in Half Moon
Bay. Prosecutors said
Edhammer would
take away her stuffed
animals and return
them only after the
girl performed a sex
act. The situation
was repeated until April 2010 when he
changed tactics, threatening to cut her
and her dolls if she did not perform a dif-
ferent sex act, according to prosecutors.
The girl knew Edhammer had a knife
collection and complied out of fear,
according to the District Attorney’s
Office.
She finally told a friend about the
molestation and word eventually
reached her parents who contacted
police.
Edhammer has maintained his inno-
cence.
In March, Edhammer sought a new
trial but was denied after a judge ruled
he was not refused his right to testify.
Edhammer, who was free on a
$500,000 property bond until his convic-
tion, has credit of 388 days against the
prison term. He must also register as a
sex offender for life and serve 85 percent
of the sentence before being eligible for
parole.
Uncle imprisoned nine years for molestation
Johnathan
Edhammer
LOCAL/NATION 7
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so on…making a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so
let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Trends Indicate
Upswing in the Economy
Advertisement
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Congress’ most serious
gun-control effort in years cleared its first hur-
dle Thursday as the Senate pushed past conser-
vatives’ attempted blockade under the teary
gaze of families of victims of December’s
Connecticut school shootings.
The bipartisan 68-31 vote rebuffed an effort
to keep debate from even starting, giving an
early victory — and perhaps political momen-
tum — to President Barack Obama and his gun
control allies. Four months after 20 first-graders
and six staffers at Sandy Hook Elementary
School in Newtown were killed, relatives
watching the vote from a gallery overlooking
the Senate floor dabbed at tears and clasped
hands, some seeming to pray.
Even so, few supporters of the legislation are
confident of victory. Several weeks of emotion-
al, unpredictable Senate debate lie ahead, and a
mix of gun-rights amendments, opposition
from the National Rifle Association and skepti-
cism from House Republican leaders leave big
questions about what will emerge from
Congress. Foes of the proposed new restrictions
say they would penalize law-abiding citizens
and do nothing to curb gun violence.
“The hard work starts now,” said Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who
brought the legislation to the floor for debate.
Still, in a Congress marked by a notable lack
of cooperation between Democrats and
Republicans, Thursday’s vote was one of sever-
al displays of unusual rapport across party lines.
In other examples not connected to the issue of
guns:
• Negotiators for the two parties said they
had reached agreement on the major elements
of a Senate immigration bill they’re expected to
unveil next week.
• The top Republican in government, House
Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, publicly dis-
agreed with his party campaign chairman’s crit-
icism of Obama’s budget proposal to trim
future Social Security and Medicare benefits.
Wednesday night, GOP senators left a White
House dinner praising Obama for reaching out
to them on his budget.
• Senators of both parties had a rare joint
luncheon to honor Arizona Sen. John McCain,
the GOP’s 2008 presidential nominee, on the
40th anniversary of his release from a North
Vietnamese prison.
Hoping to bring pressure on Congress to act
on gun control, supporters of new restrictions
have been demonstrating in Washington. They
have erected a mock graveyard with thousands
of crosses on the National Mall, symbolizing
victims of gun violence.
The Senate’s firearms bill would subject
nearly all gun buyers to background checks,
add muscle to federal laws barring illicit firearm
sales and provide slightly more money for
school safety measures.
Excluded and facing near-certain defeat in
upcoming votes were proposals to ban military-
style weapons and high-capacity ammunition
magazines — factors in the Newtown killings
some other recent mass shootings. But keeping
those provisions out of the current legislation
did not mollify critics.
Opponents said the remaining proposals were
unwarranted intrusions on the Second
Amendment right to bear arms, would be
ignored by criminals and would do little to pre-
vent future Newtowns. Obama’s plans have
received scant support from Republicans and
many moderate Democrats, with many saying
they prefer improvements in dealing with the
mentally ill and stronger enforcement of exist-
ing laws.
“I’m not interested in a symbolic gesture
which would offer the families of the Sandy
Hook shootings no real solutions that they
seek,” said Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, the
Senate’s No. 2 Republican.
Gun control bill clears its first hurdle in Senate
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Redwood City bank robbery suspect
nabbed after the teller followed him outside
and gave police updates from his cellphone
will stand trial.
Marco Antonio Rubio-Baez, 27, had plead-
ed not guilty to drug and robbery charges but
was held to answer on all charges yesterday
after a judge found sufficient evidence.
The preliminary hearing came after Rubio-
Baez first asked to act as his own attorney and
then withdrew the request. He returns to court
with his appointed attorney April 25 to enter a
Superior Court plea and possibly set a trial date.
Rubio-Baez is accused of stealing $4,000
from the First Republic Bank on the 700 block
of El Camino Real and prosecutors say he
later confessed to taking the money for rent,
cellphone bills and to send
back to his mother in
Mexico.
After the man later iden-
tified as Rubio-Baez
walked into the bank April
1 and walked out with the
bag of cash he demanded,
the teller triggered the
alarm and followed the
suspect outside he build-
ing. Using his cellphone,
the teller gave police updates on the suspect’s
location and Rubio-Baez was apprehended
near Sequoia Station. Redwood City police
reported finding the money and a small bag of
methamphetamine.
Rubio-Baez remains in custody on
$100,000 bail.
In online giving, Seattle,
D.C. among most generous
WASHINGTON — A new ranking of the
most generous cities in online donations
shows Seattle residents give the most money
to charity, followed by three cities in the
Washington, D.C., region.
Blackbaud, a technology provider for non-
profits, found Seattle ranked first for the sec-
ond year in 2012, followed by Alexandria, Va.,
Washington, D.C., and Arlington, Va.
The Charleston, S.C.-based company
ranked cities with more than 100,000 people
based on individual donations online. The
report Thursday found donors in 265 cities
gave $509 million last year, up 15 percent
from 2011. Blackbaud provides technology
for online fundraising.
The top 10 also includes Ann Arbor, Mich.,
Cambridge, Mass., Berkeley, San Francisco,
St. Louis and Minneapolis.
Regionally, the South has the most cities in
the top 25, followed by the West, Midwest and
Northeast.
Fiscal tug-of-war stalls
Indiana voucher expansion
INDIANAPOLIS — The timing would
seem perfect for an expansion of school vouch-
ers in Indiana, where the state’s high court
recently upheld the nation’s broadest voucher
law and the initiative enjoys broad support in
one of the country’s most conservative states.
But a plan to make vouchers more widely
available to families has met a roadblock: It
might be a budget buster. So despite the
momentum, lawmakers say they want more
time to look at the voucher program approved
two years ago.
“I think there’s some reform fatigue going
on in the Legislature. We’ve done a lot of
heavy lifting in the last few years and there’s
been a lot of controversy in our hallways,” said
Republican Indiana Senate President Pro Tem
David Long, a voucher supporter. “People are
just trying to catch their breath a little bit.”
Bank robbery suspect nabbed
by tailing teller heads to trial
Marco
Rubio-Baez
Around the nation
“The hard
work starts now.”
— Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 8
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
F
eeling hungry? Head to
Redwood City where
new restaurants are plen-
tiful. New arrivals include Ozo
Modern California Cuisine at
2397 Broadway, Rockn Wraps
Kabobs at 2503 Broadway,
Vesta at 2022 Broadway, and
Fish’s Wild on Theatre Way. If
that’s not enough to choose
from, coming soon are La Viga
at 2042 Broadway and Quinto
Sol at the corner of Theatre Way
and Broadway.
***
Speaking of Redwood City,
the Parks, Recreation and
Community Services
Department along with the
Police Activities League won a
community partnership award
from the Stanford University
Office of Public Affairs. The
award recognizes the two enti-
ties’ work with Stanford to
address childhood obesity.
***
San Francisco-based
Everybody Solar recently
announced that it has surpassed
its fundraising goal of $34,000
and can now begin its inaugural
solar project, a 13.5 kW system
on the roof of Rebuilding
Together Peninsula, located in
Redwood City. The fundraising
effort kicked off in May of last
year and has attracted approxi-
mately 100 donors to date. This
installation will bring much
needed solar power to RTP’s
Redwood City headquarters,
saving the nonprofit close to
$100,000 throughout the sys-
tem’s life.
***
The Assistance League of
San Mateo County is celebrat-
ing its 60th year. This weekend,
it will honor Tuskegee Airman
pilot Les Williams. The public
is invited to the celebration from
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April
13 at the Assistance League
Chapter headquarters, 528 N.
San Mateo Drive, San Mateo.
For more information visit san-
mateocounty.assistanceleague.or
g.
***
The Silicon Valley
Community Foundation has
been selected to participate in
phase 2 of the Community
Leadership Project, a funding
partnership between the David
and Lucile Packard, James
Irvine and William and Flora
Hewlett foundations to
strengthen small, community-
based organizations serving low-
income people and communities
of color. The foundations will be
investing $10 million over the
next three years to help selected
community based organizations
in three regions of California
become more financially sus-
tainable and operationally
resilient. The Silicon Valley
Community Foundation was
awarded a $1 million grant to
support small organizations in
the South Bay.
SVCF is pleased to announce
that interested organizations can
apply to be part of the project.
***
Ronald McDonald House
Charities has received a
$125,000 grant from Dell. This
Powering the Possible Grant
has been awarded to be shared
among 14 Ronald McDonald
House Chapters in cities where
Dell has offices, including the
Stanford location. The money is
designated to support programs
for families with children under-
going pediatric cancer treatment.
And, additional support was giv-
ing to five of the RMHC
Chapters through the donation
of DELL laptops, computers and
tablets to be used for community
presentations and family “down-
time” in open areas of the House
and Ronald McDonald Family
Rooms, tracking guest referrals,
completing administrative work
and facility management.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly
collection of facts culled from the
notebooks of the Daily Journal staff.
It appears in the Friday edition of the
Daily Journal.
Reporters’ notebook
By Lolita C. Baldor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Senior
Pentagon leaders are taking another
look at sharply reducing the number
of unpaid furlough days that depart-
ment civilians will have to take in
the coming months, suggesting they
may be able to cut the number from
14 to as few as seven, defense offi-
cials said Thursday.
If the number is reduced, it would
be the second time the Pentagon has
cut the number of furlough days. It
had initially been set at 22 days.
The officials say no decision has
been made and that they are not rul-
ing out efforts to drop the furloughs
entirely. The renewed talks come as
Navy leaders continue to push for
eliminating required furloughs for
Navy civilians. The officials spoke
on condition of anonymity because
they weren’t authorized to discuss
the issue publicly.
Defense officials are reviewing a
range of options to determine how
many furlough days they can cut,
because recent legislation gives the
Pentagon more flexibility in how it
allocates the required spending cuts
for this year. So far, Pentagon lead-
ers have insisted that civilians
across all the military services be
treated equally, suggesting it would
be unfair for workers in one service
to face more unpaid days off that
those in another service.
Officials: Pentagon looks to
cut unpaid furlough days
Ocean salmon seasons
offer abundant catches
PORTLAND, Ore. — West Coast
ocean salmon fishing seasons have
been set for this year and promise
lots of opportunities for both sport
and commercial fishing, particular-
ly off Oregon and California.
The Pacific Fishery Management
Council adopted the seasons
Thursday in Portland. They still
have to be approved by NOAA
Fisheries Service.
Forecasts call for strong returns
to the Klamath and Sacramento
rivers in California, which account
for most of the salmon swimming
off Oregon and California.
That is a marked improvement
over 2008 and 2009, when poor
returns to the Sacramento led to the
biggest salmon fishery closure on
record.
Specific seasons are set depend-
ing on location and species, but
they generally run from spring into
fall.
Bill bans lenders from
garnishing graduates’ wages
SACRAMENTO — People who
are having trouble repaying student
loans from private lenders would
get some relief under a bill that has
passed the state Assembly.
The legislation by Democratic
Assemblyman Bob Wieckowski of
Fremont would prevent the lenders
from garnishing the wages of those
with unpaid debt.
Private lenders are allowed to
withhold up to 25 percent of a
delinquent borrower’s disposable
income. The lawmaker says pre-
venting automatic withholding
would encourage lenders to create
manageable repayment plans for
graduates who find themselves
underemployed.
AB233 went to the Senate
Thursday on a largely party-line,
50-22 vote. Republican lawmakers
opposed it.
Around the state
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Defense
Secretary Chuck Hagel rejected the
suggestion that President Barack
Obama tapped him to “cut the
heart out of the Pentagon,” point-
edly reminding lawmakers
Thursday that Congress approved
the smaller, deficit-driven military
budgets long before he took the
job.
Faced with a $487 billion budg-
et cut over a decade, Hagel and
Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
said the Pentagon had no choice in
drawing up the politically unpopu-
lar reductions in the president’s
proposed $526.6 billion budget for
next year.
The blueprint calls for another
round of domestic base closures,
higher health care fees for retirees
and their dependents, and a smaller
pay raise for personnel. Dempsey
cast the choice as between a well-
compensated force and the readi-
ness of the nation’s war fighters.
Hagel: Job not to cut heart out of Pentagon
REUTERS
U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks during a briefing on the
Defense Department's FY2014 budget at the Pentagon.
OPINION 9
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Anti-Catholic commentary
Editor,
Dorothy Dimitre’s column in the
April 10 edition of the Daily Journal
titled “Iconic images” displays in print
the kind of anti-Catholic comment one
hears spoken today with a wink and a
nod only in bigoted circles.
She describes the ordination of
Francis I before more than 200,000 vis-
itors to the Piazza di San Pietro as pope
folderol. That word means, of course,
useless ornament or nonsense.
Her condescension toward Catholics
— and, one could suppose, Orthodox
as well — is reflected in her assertion
that faithful Christians are kept “wal-
lowing in the dark ages — people not
allowed to think for themselves.”
In a generous comment, Mrs. Dimitre
writes, “I guess Pope Francis is a bit of
an improvement.” Perhaps, as a result,
she suggests that “devotees” will finally
realize “that popes are just fallible
human beings in pretentious attire.”
She certainly displays a deep under-
standing of the dogma of papal infalli-
bility.
She concludes by suggesting that
“the pope and his entourage will dis-
pense of their ostentatious pageantry
and begin to live in the real world. But
don’t count on it.”
Mrs. Dimitre’s unthinking Catholics,
poor souls unable to break their chains
of rosary beads, throughout the ages
would include such as saints Thomas
More, Thomas Aquinas, Francis,
Dominic and Peter, the first pope.
Others held in Mrs. Dimitre’s view of
ignorant thrall might be Justices
Roberts, Scalia and Alito; Mother
Theresa; Pope John Paul II; Marconi;
Copernicus; Mary Queen of Scots and
even Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. The
lady’s words speak for themselves.
Gordon M. Seely
Belmont
Internet sales tax
Editor,
So Amazon.com did rip California
one really nice sales tax hole after forc-
ing it into sales tax collections for the
Jerry Brown’s Special Projects Fund,
also known as California General Fund,
the one with the bottomless pit. It looks
like the projected tax revenue amounts
to a paltry $100 million instead of the
$1.9 billion these financial whiz-kids in
the government calculated on their sun-
powered ethanol-driven calculators.
Serves them right!
Now let’s look at the other unintend-
ed consequences of that grab. Tens of
thousands of affiliates no longer
engaged buying and selling in
California using the Amazon trading
platform. How much do you think that
stupid decision cost the economy here
in California? Adding no doubt also to
some serious unemployment payouts
while taking hundreds of millions of
real dollars out of the state’s economy.
Well done boys! We are talking about
half-hearted reasoning a fifth grader
would have been able to solve. I guess
it is true, you get the leadership and
government you voted for.
Oh, and, soon we will be investing
with some of our vapor money in that
awesome new high-speed railway sys-
tem to export California money to Las
Vegas, too, I hear. I cannot wait to
throw some money away there but,
darn, I wish I could have invested some
of my hard-earned cash, after I paid
about 50 percent taxes and fees and
other contributions, in this Fisker com-
pany. It is just not my day I guess.
Harry Roussard
Foster City
Letters to the editor
Santa Cruz Sentinel
W
hat’s $100 million between
friends? Certainly not
enough to put the steam
brakes on California’s high-speed rail
plan, which is continuing down the
tracks generally unimpeded despite the
fact no one can truly say how
California is going to pay for this $69
billion boondoggle.
That $100 million of which we speak
— $97 million, to be more accurate,
but this is California’s high-speed rail
plan, so we can play with the numbers
a bit and apparently no one will care —
are extra planning costs for the project
that came to light earlier this week.
The state’s rail boosters said the
money is needed for additional office
and field work to design the rail line,
which has seen its construction estimate
double to $69 billion since voters
backed the plan in 2008. Rail officials
say the extra cash is because of delays
to the project’s aggressive timeline and
the need to study alternative plans to
appease the concerns of communities
along the San Francisco-to-Los Angeles
rail corridor.
Incidentally, that now puts the
pre-construction planning budget
at $878 million.
If you haven’t been paying attention,
Gov. Jerry Brown loves high-speed rail,
enough to continually push for a plan
that voters and money watchers have
expressed serious doubts about. We
think those doubts are warranted.
California, up until the passage of
Proposition 30 this past fall, couldn’t
even afford to pay for schools, much
less this publicly funded folly.
Consider that the High-Speed Rail
Authority, the organization created to
manage the project, has expressed seri-
ous doubts about the plan, while the
nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office
has cited the project’s “highly specula-
tive” funding.
Public polls, meanwhile, have shown
that a majority of state voters, who five
years ago backed what now looks to be
no more than a rough sketch of the
project, wouldn’t mind another crack at
turning down the plan.
In fairness, the federal Government
Accountability Office late last month
gave good grades to the authority’s
business plan, saying ridership and rev-
enue forecasts were reasonable, but it
also could not assess whether the
authority’s projected costs are feasible.
The feds also noted that little money
problem — a funding gap of $39 bil-
lion unlikely to be filled by the federal
government given the current political
climate in Congress.
It’s not like the governor is thinking
small.
Brown wants to build a massive twin-
tunnel canal system to carry water from
the Sacramento-San Joaquin River
Delta to Southern California farms and
cities, wading into a huge fight between
environmentalists and developers.
He wants to revamp the California
Environmental Quality Act, the
decades-old law that requires environ-
mental impact studies for building proj-
ects, over the objections of his
Democratic allies.
He is looking to turn the school
finance system on its head, tossing con-
fusing funding formulas and local man-
dates.
And he wants to lay the first tracks of
a California high-speed rail project.
We appreciate the big thinking. It’s
what California needs.
But we’d like fiscal responsibility to
be part of the Brown legacy, and fiscal
prudence appears to be sitting this high-
speed rail project out.
Brown all aboard high-speed rail The return of
Crystal Springs
W
ell, that was a surprise. Just when I thought the
idea of a Crystal Springs Uplands School in
Belmont was deader than fried chicken,
Councilwoman Coralin Feierbach announced Tuesday she
is willing and interested in having the school revisit its
plans for a middle school on
Davis Drive.
The school plans had the
kibosh put on them in October
when the Belmont City Council
voted 3-2 to not amend the
city’s general plan to allow the
school at the site. That was
after a heated, and some said
unnecessarily heated, public
planning process that some-
times devolved into name call-
ing and allegations over tactics
and stances.
So why the change of heart?
Feierbach, who is more known
for her stubbornness than caprice, said it was an evolving
mental process for her that was ultimately sparked with the
idea that the site was being considered for housing, specifi-
cally, the possibility of multi-unit housing. Additionally,
Feierbach said the price for the land may have dropped
from its estimated $14 million price tag and that the school
may be able and willing to up its cash offer to the city to
allow the new facility. Housing doesn’t pay for itself,
Feierbach said, and the city could use the money. Besides,
Feierbach added, the demographics of the city is changing
with more young people.
“Younger people want good schools,” she said, adding
that Ralston Middle School is crowded and this could offer
another option.
For those of you who may not remember, the renowned
high school was looking for a location for a middle school
since space was becoming an issue at its Hillsborough loca-
tion. The new campus would house 240 students and have a
52,000-square-foot building to replace 83,000 square feet
of office buildings there now. The school offered a one-
time $1 million payment and annual benefits worth more
than $250,000 since nonprofits don’t pay typical taxes to
municipalities. The saga began in April 2011 when
Belmont officials gave a general thumbs-up to the plans but
ended 18 months later with a contentious 3-2 vote to deny
the general plan amendment. At the time of the vote,
Feierbach denounced what she called “nasty” comments
made about her on online message boards as part of her
decision-making process.
About a month before that vote, I had written in this
space that maybe Belmont wasn’t the place for such a
school since the discussion was no longer productive and
had denigrated into a street brawl, or rather a “school
fight.”
However, Feierbach’s change of heart essentially means
it’s full speed ahead for the proposal as long as the school
ups the ante, agrees to preserve some trees on the site
(another important consideration for Feierbach) and limits
use of its facilities on the weekend to later morning hours.
“Congress has the right to change their mind, and no one
holds a gun to their head,” Feierbach said. “I had time to
cool off. I had time to think about it.”
So is it all’s well that ends well? It is estimated that a
new offer will be back on the table April 23. If it meets
snuff, it could be. But you never know in Belmont.
***
A television station’s online article based on information
from an East Bay newspaper that jumped to the wrong con-
clusion about the Sheriff’s Office’s possible use of drones
combined with a San Mateo mayor with a knack for getting
ahead of hot topics and fully aware of privacy issues stirred
by such drones meant a minor headache for some in law
enforcement this week.
San Mateo Mayor David Lim fired off a press release
expressing his concern about the county’s use of drones
after seeing the online article and Sheriff Greg Munks had
to explain that though the purchase was considered, it’s not
in the works.
Still, Lim wants assurances that the purchase be torpe-
doed for good. Maybe it will be, maybe it won’t, but it’s
interesting how a remote-controlled aerial camera can
cause such a stir. I’m not a huge fan of the idea, but then
I’m not a huge fan of ubiquitous cameras or Google satel-
lite images for that matter. Those, however, don’t seem to
create similar concerns in the general population. Maybe
it’s a Skynet thing.
And while this turned out to be a tempest in a teapot, the
lesson here is definitely don’t believe everything you read
on the Internet.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can
be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com. Follow Jon on
Twitter @jonmays.
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,865.14 +0.42% 10-Yr Bond 1.791 -0.78%
Nasdaq3,300.16 +0.09% Oil (per barrel) 93.45
S&P 500 1,593.37 +0.36% Gold -1.26%
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SALES
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Rite Aid Corp., up 33 cents at $2.12
Thanks to a rise in prescriptions and a drop in some costs, the drugstore
chain posted its second straight quarterly profit.
Hewlett-Packard Co., down $1.44 at $20.88
Research firm IDC said shipments of PCs worldwide fell 14 percent in
the first quarter, the sharpest plunge since tracking began in 1994.
Limited Brands Inc., up $2.08 at $50.25
The owner of Victoria’s Secret, Pink, and Bath and Body Works said that
sales in stores open a year rose 3 percent in March.
Nasdaq
Ross Stores Inc., up $3.56 at $63.80
The discount retailer said that it will likely surpass its current-quarter
profit forecast after better-than-expected March sales.
Fortinet Inc., down $2.86 at $18.99
The network security company cut its first-quarter forecast because a
number of expected U.S. service provider deals did not close.
Zumiez Inc., up $3.33 at $28.23
The action-sports clothing and equipment company said its sales
improved in March, topping Wall Street analyst’s expectations.
Perfumania Holdings Inc., up 23 cents at $5.55
The perfume and fragrance seller’s sales rose 12.6 percent in March,and
revenue at locations open at least a year rose 10 percent.
Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $5.13 at $13.10
The Food and Drug Administration said the drugmaker won’t have to run
Big movers
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Rite Aid, Ross
Stores and other retailers surged
Thursday after turning in better sales,
and major stock market indexes rose
for a fourth day straight.
The discount chain Ross Stores
jumped 6 percent, the best gain in the
Standard & Poor’s 500 index. The
company said stronger sales in March
will likely push profits above its previ-
ous estimate this quarter. The stock
jumped $3.56 to $63.80.
A surprising drop in claims for
unemployment benefits last week gave
investors more encouragement.
Analysts said it could mean a slow-
down in hiring last month may have
been temporary.
“The numbers today make it seem
like that March report was an anom-
aly,” said David Heidl, a regional
investment manager at U.S. Bank’s
wealth management unit. “It’s another
reason for optimism.”
The Dow Jones industrial average
gained 62.90 points to close at
14,865.14, an increase of 0.4 percent.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
5.64 points, also 0.4 percent, to
1,593.37.
Rite Aid soared 18 percent to $2.12
after the drugstore chain said higher
sales of generic drugs and lower costs
helped it post better earnings than ana-
lysts had expected.
Makers of computer hardware and
software sank following a report that
first-quarter shipments of PCs dropped
14 percent worldwide over the past
year. That’s the steepest fall since
International Data Corp. started track-
ing the industry in 1994.
“The IDC report is much worse than
anyone expected,” said David Brown,
director of Sabrient Systems, an
investment research firm. “That’s
obviously shaking up the tech sector,
but everything else is resuming the
climb.”
The three companies in the Dow that
deal in PCs held the index back.
Hewlett-Packard dropped 6 percent to
$20.88, Microsoft lost 4 percent to
$28.93 and Intel fell 2 percent to
$21.82. Without them, the Dow would
have gained 25 more points.
The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite
index rose 2.90 points to 3,300.16.
That’s just 0.09 percent, far behind the
Dow and S&P 500. Of the 10 industry
groups in the S&P 500, information
technology was the only one to fall.
It was a different story on
Wednesday, when technology stocks
surged on optimism that businesses
would step up spending on computer
systems. That pushed the Dow and the
S&P 500 index to their third straight
day of gains as well as record highs.
The stock market has soared this
year, clearing record highs and recov-
ering losses from the financial crisis
and Great Recession. For the year, the
Dow is up 13 percent, the S&P 500
index 12 percent.
Brown thinks the market can keep
climbing. Measured against earnings,
the stock market doesn’t look expen-
sive, he said. And compared to the
alternatives, like bonds or money-mar-
ket funds, stocks in many big corpora-
tions offer a better source of income.
The average stock in the S&P 500 pays
2.2 percent in dividends.
By comparison, the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury note was
1.79 percent Thursday, down slightly
from 1.80 percent late Wednesday.
Stocks rise for fourth day in a row, led by retail
“The IDC report is much worse than
anyone expected. ...That’s obviously shaking up the
tech sector, but everything else is resuming the climb.”
— David Brown, director of Sabrient Systems
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Facebook CEO Mark
Zuckerberg and other Silicon Valley leaders
have formally launched a political group
aimed at revamping immigration policy,
boosting education and encouraging invest-
ment in scientific research.
Zuckerberg announced the formation of
Fwd.us (pronounced “forward us”) in an op-
ed article in The Washington Post late
Wednesday night. In it, he said the U.S.
needs a new approach to these issues if it is
to get ahead economically. This includes
offering a path to citizenship for the 11 mil-
lion or so immigrants who now live in the
U.S. illegally.
“We have a strange immigration policy
for a nation of immi-
grants,” Zuckerberg
wrote. “And it’s a policy
unfit for today’s world.”
Zuckerberg, whose
great-grandparents were
immigrants, said he
wants “comprehensive
immigration reform that
begins with effective bor-
der security, allows a
path to citizenship and
lets us attract the most talented and hardest-
working people, no matter where they were
born.”
The move comes at an opportune time.
Zuckerberg’s goals echo a sweeping immi-
gration bill that a bipartisan Senate group is
expected to roll out in the coming days.
U.S. unemployment aid
applications plummet to 346K
WASHINGTON — The number of
Americans seeking unemployment benefits
fell sharply last week to a seasonally adjust-
ed 346,000, signaling that the job market
might be stronger than March’s weak month
of hiring suggested.
Applications for unemployment aid
dropped 42,000 last week, the Labor
Department said Thursday. The decline near-
ly reversed an increase over the previous
three weeks. The four-week average, a less
volatile measure, rose 3,000 to 358,000.
The number of unemployment applications
has been volatile in the past two weeks large-
ly because of the Easter holiday, a depart-
ment spokesman said. The timing of the hol-
iday changes from year to year.
LinkedIn to pay $90M
for e-reader company Pulse
MOUNTAIN VIEW — Professional net-
working website LinkedIn is paying about
$90 million to acquire Pulse, which makes an
e-reader platform used on mobile devices.
More than 30 million people worldwide
use Pulse’s e-reader applications on devices
running both Apple and Android-based oper-
ating systems. The San Francisco-based
company was founded in 2010 by Akshay
Kothari and Ankit Gupta while they were stu-
dents at Stanford University.
Google launches tool
to manage ‘digital afterlife’
NEW YORK — Google has launched a
tool that lets users decide what happens with
their email, Google Plus and other accounts
after they die — or become inactive online
for any other reason.
Called “inactive account manager,” the fea-
ture lets users of Google’s services tell the
company what to do with email messages
and other data if their account becomes inac-
tive.
Facebook’s Zuckerberg
launches political group
Mark
Zuckerberg
Business briefs
<< Garcia tied for Masters leader after 1st round, page 13
• A’s win eighth straight, sweep Angels, page 12
Friday, April 12, 2013
STAYING HOT IN CHICAGO: COMING OFF A SWEEP OF THE ROCKIES, THE GIANTS RALLY FROM 5-0 DEFICIT TO BEAT CUBS >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Peninsula Athletic League’s Bay
Division of softball gets three automatic bids
to the Central Coast Section. Carlmont is far
and away the favorite to win the league crown
and claim one of the automatic playoff bids,
but all seven remaining teams are still in the
running for one of the final two postseason
spots.
Both Sequoia and Aragon came into
Thursday’s showdown as two of four teams
with 2-3 records and tied for that third transfer
position. It appeared the Cherokees were well
on their way to reaching the .500 mark in the
standings as they held a 7-1 lead in the sixth
inning.
Six outs away from claiming their third PAL
victory of the year, things fell apart. Aragon
scored seven runs in the bottom of the sixth
inning and set the Cherokees down in order in
the top of the seventh to claim a stunning 8-7
victory.
“We said, ‘Just don’t give up.’ It’s not a sit-
uation where we can’t do it. We know we can
come from behind. We’re a come-from-
behind team. We’ve done it before,” said
Aragon coach Joe Sparaco. “But never any-
thing this dramatic.”
Aragon (3-3 PAL Bay) proved the old base-
ball/softball adage of put the ball in play and
see what happens. The Dons scored seven
runs on just four hits — only three of which
left the infield. But Sequoia (2-4) helped the
Aragon cause by committing three errors in
the inning and finishing with six on the after-
noon.
“Huge (gut punch). Gut wrenching,” was
how Sequoia coach Scott Reynick described
his feelings about the loss. “The wheels came
off and we couldn’t make a play to change it.”
Sophia Cerreta led off the sixth with an
infield hit that glanced off the glove of the
Sequoia third baseman. Kaylyn Mijasich then
hit a ball that went right through the short-
stop’s legs and Lila Dobroff had an infield hit
off the mitt of the Sequoia first baseman to
load the bases with no outs. Jessy Doss fol-
lowed with an RBI single, Nicole Bonfiglio
drove in the second run of the inning with a
fielder’s choice grounder. Nicole Briedis fol-
lowed with a comebacker to the pitcher, but
her throw for the force at home was wide and
the Dons’ third run crossed, cutting the
Sequoia lead to 7-4. Briedis would eventually
score on a wild pitch to close the Aragon
deficit to 7-5. Courtney Ching later drew a
bases-loaded walk to plate another run and
Nicole Horita hit a sacrifice fly to center to
drive in the tying run and bring Cerreta back
to the plate for the second time in the inning.
Cerreta was looking for some payback after
she surrendered five runs to the Cherokees in
Step forward,
step backward
Aragon beats Sequoia 8-7 with seven-run sixth
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Aragon freshman Sophia Cerreta hits a game-winning, RBI single during the Dons’seven-run
sixth inning in an 8-7 win over Sequoia.
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
There’s high-school young, and then there’s
Woodside young.
Woodside baseball returned just one player
from last year’s Peninsula Athletic League
Ocean Division championship team. Knowing
the 2013 team would be relying on a pair of
starting pitchers with no varsity experience,
Wildcats manager Tim Faulkner declined to
promote Woodside to the Bay Division.
But after this week’s two-game series with
Jefferson, Woodside’s youthful rotation of
junior John Mahoney and freshman Jamie
Kruger should be considered newbies no
more.
Mahoney allowed three hits through five
innings Tuesday in Woodside’s 10-2 victory
over Jefferson. The junior right-hander struck
out a career-high 10 to earn the win. But
Kruger did his rotation mate one better, as the
freshman fired a one-hit shutout yesterday to
lead the Wildcats to a 7-0 road win at
Jefferson. Kruger also notched a career-high
in strikeouts with 13 on the day.
“The way [Kruger has] been throwing, not
just lately, but this whole season, people have
no idea how young he is,” Woodside catcher
Shane Stafford said. “I’ve been back there
catching, and I’ve talked to some of the batters
— or I’ll mention he’s a freshman to the
umpire — and they’ll be baffled. … And
they’ll see [Mahoney] out there, thinking he’s
a senior because he’s throwing gas, and they
don’t expect it. They’re throwing like they’re
experienced. And it’s been good.”
It has likewise been good for Ocean
Division baseball, which currently boasts four
teams within two games of first place. Mills is
sitting atop the division with a 6-0 league
record, having downed El Camino 3-0 yester-
day behind a complete-game shutout by junior
right-hander Kyle Vallans. Sequoia is a game
out of first place with a 5-1 record, after blast-
ing South City yesterday 16-0. El Camino and
Woodside are currently tied for third place at
4-2 in league.
The breakout freshman
Amid the many teams battling for the Ocean
Division crown, there is only one Kruger. At
6-2, 160-pounds, he brings the presence and
composure of a college pitcher to the mound.
Woodside has weapons on the mound
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While the Peninsula was locked in on the
NCAA’s Final Four last week, a team of
young, local girls competed in their very own
version.
And the ride was just as thrilling.
Last weekend, an all-star basketball team of
fourth grade girls representing the Redwood
chapter of the Silicon Valley Section for
National Junior Basketball, competed in and
won the 2013 NJB National Tournament held
in Garden Grove.
They did so by running the table and going
undefeated and allowing no more than 21
points in a single game while averaging over
30 points a contest on offense.
“I think they really gelled at the right time,”
said Redwood Undisputed head coach Phillip
Trinidad. “It was just amazing to see the level
of heart and intensity they showed at such a
young age.”
The Undisputed clinched a berth in the
national tournament after qualifying during the
sectional tournament held at the end of March.
All Stars capture national title
By Larry Lage
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Patrick Marleau scored the
winner in the shootout and had a short-hand-
ed goal early in the game, lifting the San Jose
Sharks to a 3-2 win over
the Detroit Red Wings on
Thursday night.
Antti Niemi made 27
saves through overtime,
while Jimmy Howard
stopped 28 shots for
Detroit. Niemi got his
glove on Niklas
Kronwall’s slap shot with
44 seconds left in the extra
period, giving the Sharks a chance in the
shootout.
San Jose, trying to earn home-ice advantage
in the first round of the playoffs, is in fourth
place in the Western Conference, one point
ahead of St. Louis and Los Angeles.
The Red Wings, clinging to the eighth and
final playoff spot in the West, are hoping to
extend the franchise’s streak of consecutive
Big road
win for
San Jose
SANDRA MADRIGAL
The Redwood Undisputed captured the NJB
National championship, going 4-0. See ALL STARS, Page 14
See DONS, Page 14
See SHARKS, Page 12
Sharks 3, Red Wings 2
Patrick Marleau
See WOODSIDE, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Bruce Bochy wasn’t tempted to take out
Ryan Vogelsong when he faltered early, and the pitcher
rewarded his manager’s confidence with a fine finish.
Vogelsong gave up five early runs before retiring his final
10 batters and helped his cause by walking with the bases
loaded as the San Francisco Giants ral-
lied for a 7-6 victory over the Chicago
Cubs on Thursday.
“He was out of sync, even said he was
having a hard time getting the ball where
he wanted,” Bochy said. “But he got in a
good groove there after that one inning
and started getting pitches where he
wanted and he got in a good rhythm
there.”
Vogelsong (1-1) yielded eight hits and
five runs in the first three innings before
going on a solid run in a foggy and damp, 40-degree day to
help the World Series champion Giants win their fourth
straight.
“I still don’t feel all that great after that,” Vogelsong said.
“I just was trying to throw the ball and hopefully things were
going to change, and they did. We started hitting the ball and
some people made some really good plays.”
Trailing 5-0 after three innings, the Giants got some help
in staging their comeback: Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro’s a
two-out fielding error spurred a four-run fourth.
With runners on first and third in the fourth, Castro
botched Vogelsong’s grounder, allowing the first run to
score. Scott Feldman (0-2) then gave up an RBI single to
Angel Pagan and hit Brandon Crawford with a pitch ahead of
Sandoval’s double that pulled the Giants to 5-4.
“I think that one is basically not understanding that the
pitcher hit the ball and you had plenty of time,” Cubs man-
ager Dale Sveum said about Castro’s error. “You didn’t have
to overcharge the ball and overcook that whole play.”
Added Castro: “It’s really frustrating. I feel bad myself
because that’s a routine play and that’s not supposed to hap-
pen. I tried to be too fast but I can learn; that play can’t hap-
pen again.”
Feldman allowed a single to Brandon Belt and walked
Gregor Blanco after getting one out in the fifth. Hisanori
Takahashi relieved and Nick Noonan singled to load the
bases. Vogelsong then walked to force in a run and Pagan put
the Giants ahead with a flyball to left field. Brandon
Crawford then singled in a run to make it 7-5.
Feldman lasted just 4 1-3 innings and gave up six runs —
two earned — on seven hits. He walked three and struck out
three.
“We came back yesterday against the Rockies,” Crawford
said. “We have a lot of good guys in our lineup, so we’ve bat-
tled back before. We did it last year in the playoffs and we
have a lot of similar players back this year, so we know how
to battle back, for sure.”
Jeremy Affeldt relieved Vogelsong after the sixth but he
faltered in the eighth and was lifted after Alfonso Soriano
doubled and Nate Schierholtz reached on a broken bat infield
single. Santiago Casilla came on and got Welington Castillo
to hit into a double play that scored Soriano to make it 7-6.
Luis Valbuena followed with a double to deep center, but
pinch-hitter Steve Clevenger ended the inning looking at a
third strike.
Giants’ offense hot in chilly Chicago
By Joe Resnick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM — Josh Donaldson hit a tiebreaking, two-run
homer in the sixth inning, Yoenis Cespedes also went deep and
A.J. Griffin pitched eight solid innings Thursday night, lead-
ing Oakland to an 8-1 victory over the Los Angeles Angels
and extending the Athletics’ winning streak to eight games.
This was the first time Oakland swept the Angels in the first
head-to-head series of a season since 2003, and the first time
the Athletics swept their first series at the “Big A” since 1996.
The defending AL West champions outscored the Angels 28-
11 and were retired in order in only three of the 27 innings.
Seth Smith had four hits for the A’s, who swept a road trip
of six or more games for only the third time since the fran-
chise relocated from Kansas City to Oakland in 1968. They
had a 10-0 trip in August 2002 and an 8-0 excursion in April
1981.
Griffin (2-0) allowed a run and five hits, struck out two and
walked one. The right-hander did not allow a hit after giving
up an RBI double by Howie Kendrick with one out in the
fourth.
Jason Vargas (0-1) was charged with five runs, 10 hits and
three walks over 5 2-3 innings and struck out four. The left-
hander yielded just one run over 5 2-3 innings last Friday at
Texas in his Angels debut, getting a no-decision in Los
Angeles’ 3-2 loss.
Vargas escaped a bases-loaded jam in the second when
Smith grounded into a double play. But he wasn’t as fortunate
in the sixth, when Derek Norris doubled with one out and
Donaldson drove his next pitch into the left-field bullpen after
going hitless in 11 previous at-bats against Vargas.
Smith followed Donaldson’s first homer of the season with
a double, and Chris Young greeted Kevin Jepsen with a two-
run double after Vargas intentionally walked his last batter,
Coco Crisp. Cespedes greeted Sean Burnett with a leadoff
homer to left-center in the seventh, and the A’s tacked on two
more in the ninth against Jerome Williams.
A’s pound Angels to finish sweep
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Kevin Durant had 31 points, 10 rebounds and
eight assists to help the Oklahoma City Thunder regain the
Western Conference’s best record with a 116-97 victory over the
Golden State Warriors on Thursday night.
Kevin Martin scored 23 points off the bench and Russell
Westbrook added 18 points and nine assists for the Thunder, who
moved a half-game ahead of idle San Antonio for the top seed.
The Spurs split the season series with Oklahoma City, but the
Thunder (58-21) own the tiebreaker because of its better confer-
ence record.
Stephen Curry scored 22 points and reserve Jarrett Jack had 19
points on a night the playoff-bound Warriors lost center Andrew
Bogut to another injury. The 7-footer left in the first quarter with
a sprained left ankle. His status is unclear.
The Warriors (45-34) are a mere half-game ahead of Houston
for sixth place in the West. The Rockets hold the tiebreaker after
winning three of four this season over Golden State, which
looked every bit like a team at the back of the playoff pack
against the defending conference champions.
At times, even in embarrassing fashion.
Serge Ibaka blocked Bogut’s dunk attempt at the rim in the first
quarter, then gave an extended finger wave that even drew roars
from Golden State’s 31st straight sellout crowd announced at
19,596. Ibaka ran down court to tip-back Durant’s miss, then hit
a 3-pointer and later dunked to put Oklahoma City ahead 22-15.
Ibaka finished with 17 points, seven rebounds and three blocks.
Durant was 10 for 16 from the floor, helping the Thunder out-
shoot the Warriors 50.6 to 44 percent.
Bogut exited with 2:55 remaining in the quarter, went to the
locker and did not return. The team said Bogut sprained his left
ankle, which he broke in January of 2012 and underwent
microfracture on last April.
It’s unclear how Bogut was injured and his status for Friday
night’s game at the Los Angeles Lakers was not immediately
clear.
In the meantime, Durant and Westbrook got rolling late in the
second half, including one series sure to fill the highlights:
Westbrook finished a layup over a defender, then blocked Curry’s
shot before Durant took the ball coast-to-coast for a soaring one-
handed dunk at full extension that again brought the road fans to
their feet once more.
Warriors can’t keep
up with Thunder
Ryan Vogelsong
postseason appearances to 22 but have lost five of their last
seven games.
The Sharks and Red Wings are the only teams who have
been in the playoffs every season since the 2004-05 lockout.
San Jose had lost two straight, including a 4-0 setback at
Columbus, after a seven-game winning streak.
Pavel Datsyuk scored for Detroit on a backhander to start the
shootout before Logan Couture slipped a shot between
Niemi’s pads. Damien Brunner then was stopped by Niemi
and Joe Pavelski got a shot past Howard, but hit the post.
Detroit’s Gustav Nyquist made a nifty spin move but was
stopped, and Marleau followed with the winner on a quick
wrist shot.
Marleau had a short-handed goal to put San Jose ahead 2:35
into the game. Detroit’s Justin Abdelkader tied it midway
through the second period.
The Red Wings took their first lead early in the third on
Jakub Kindl’s first power-play goal and quickly lost it. Couture
scored 1:31 later on a power play to make it 2-all.
The Red Wings start a four-game road trip Friday night at
Chicago and return home to play three of their last four games
of the regular season.
San Jose’s road trip continues Saturday at Dallas and
Phoenix before finishing the regular season with four of six
games at home.
Detroit had a shot to get off to a good start when San Jose’s
Tommy Wingels was called for boarding less than a minute
into the game, but the Sharks took advantage of a giveaway.
Henrik Zetterberg passed instead of shooting into a partially
open net, Pavelski got in front of it, carried the puck deep into
the Detroit on a 2-on-1 rush and perfectly set up Marleau for
his team-high 17th goal.
San Jose outshot the Red Wings 11-5 in the first period in
which they were held without a shot for nearly the first 8 min-
utes of the game.
Niemi made a key save from his left hip in the second peri-
od, getting enough of his glove on Cory Emmerton’s shot —
just outside of the goal line — to let San Jose keep its lead.
The Red Wings kept the pressure on San Jose and it paid off.
Johan Franzen had the puck behind the net and passed to
Abdelkader, who scored on a one-timer from the bottom of the
right circle to match his career high with an eighth goal and
suddenly Detroit was outshooting the Sharks 16-14.
Continued from page 11
SHARKS
SPORTS 13
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Paul Newberry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUGUSTA — Sergio Garcia is still
chasing that first major title.
It never figured to come at Augusta
National.
But there he was Thursday, after a
bogey-free opening round, sharing the
top spot on the leaderboard at the
Masters.
“Obviously, this is not my most
favorite place,” Garcia said, trying to be
diplomatic. “But we try to enjoy it as
much as we can every time we come
here. Sometimes it comes out better than
others. Today was one of those good
days. Let’s enjoy it while it lasts.”
Garcia’s 6-under 66 tied him with
Aussie Marc Leishman, on a cloudy day
that was made for going low. There was-
n’t much wind until late in the afternoon,
when a storm front approached Augusta.
There wasn’t a blistering sun to bake out
the greens, which were receptive to
accurate shots.
The Spaniard took advantage, rekin-
dling memories of the teen phenom
known as “El Nino,” who seemed certain
to win numerous major titles after he
battled with Woods at the 1999 PGA
Championship, losing by a single stroke.
Garcia has challenged in other majors,
but rarely at the Masters — a course that
doesn’t seem to fit his style or shaky put-
ter. In 14 previous appearances at
Augusta National, he has finished in the
top 10 only twice.
Last year, after a dismal third round
took him out of contention, he bluntly
conceded that he didn’t think he was
capable of winning a major.
Obviously, he feels different now —
though there’s still some trepidation in
his voice about what’s still to come.
“Every time I tee off in a tournament,
the goal is to play the best I can and have
a chance at winning. That doesn’t
change this week,” Garcia said. “Today
was a nice day, one of those days you
really enjoy. Hopefully I’ll have three
more of those and we’ll see what hap-
pens on Sunday night.”
With all eyes on Tiger Woods, the
overwhelming favorite, plenty of others
stood out amid the azaleas and towering
Georgia pines.
There was Leishman, who had played
two whole rounds at Augusta National.
There was David Lynn, a Masters
rookie who was just two strokes back.
Lynn was the early clubhouse leader,
then Leishman surged to the front with
four straight birdies on the back side
starting at No. 13. The Australian sure
didn’t play like someone who had
missed the cut in his only other Masters
appearance, in 2010.
“The first time I was here,” Leishman
recalled, “I was like a bit of a deer in
headlights, I guess. I found myself look-
ing around a little bit too much and not
concentrating on getting the ball in the
hole.”
He was hardly on a roll coming into
Augusta, having missed the cut in his
two previous PGA Tour events. But it all
came together, for one day at least.
“To be sitting here is pretty cool,”
Leishman said. “But it’s only Thursday
afternoon, so a lot of golf to play.”
No Australian has ever won the
Masters.
Lynn, a runner-up to Rory McIlroy in
last year’s PGA Championship, birdied
four of five holes around the turn and
rolled in a testy 15-foot putt at the final
hole to save par.
“It’s about playing the percentages,”
the Englishman said. “When I was on
the ninth, I turned to my caddie and said,
‘We’re leading the Masters.’ He just
looked at me and smiled. I told him, ‘I’d
rather be leading it Sunday afternoon.’
But it’s not a bad thing to see your name
up there leading the Masters. That’s
always something I can look back on.”
Lynn moved from the European to the
American tour this year, a change that
seems to have rejuvenated his passion
for the game.
“It’s given me a second wind,” Lynn
said. “Everything is new. I’m going to
different places every week, different
courses. It’s like I’ve started my career
again almost.”
Dustin Johnson was one shot off the
lead after a 67. Lynn was joined at 68 by
a group that included Rickie Fowler,
who went on the wildest ride of the day
— a 4-under score despite two double-
bogeys.
Jamie Donaldson turned in the shot of
the day, acing the 180-yard sixth for the
24th hole-in-one in Masters history. He
is only the fifth player to make a 1 at the
hole known as Juniper, with its towering
tee box and a green at the bottom of the
hill. Donaldson was the first to do it
since Chris DiMarco in 2004.
Woods was still the favorite after
opening with a 70.
But it appears he’ll have a lot of com-
petition.
Two shoot 66 for Masters lead
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The NFL will allow teams to use video
scoreboards to encourage crowd noise in stadiums during entire
plays.
Although the scoreboards can only use audio prompts until 20
seconds remain on the play clock — down from 30 seconds —
video prompts now can be used any time. Those videos also
were limited to the final 30 seconds on the play clock until the
2013 season.
That’s the latest change the league is allowing in an attempt to
enhance the fan experience in stadiums. Last week, teams were
notified they must place cameras in their locker rooms to pro-
vide video only, with the footage being displayed on the video
boards and also on team apps.
Teams have control over content.
Home teams also will be required to show replays on the
video boards after all scoring plays, turnovers, challenged plays,
first downs and receptions where the receiver ends up out of
bounds. Multiple replays of any play automatically reviewed
must be shown “with the very best camera angles available.”
Visiting teams now must be introduced as a unit 10 minutes
before kickoff.
The NFL also says 98 percent of tickets for 2013 regular-sea-
son games already have been sold. That includes season tickets,
individual game seats and group sales.
NFL making more in-stadium changes
U.S., Iran & Russia to wrestle in New York City
NEW YORK — The United States is going to host Iran
and Russia in a wrestling exhibition in New York City next
month.
USA Wrestling says Thursday that the Iranians and
Russians will face off against the Americans in Grand
Central Terminal on May 15.
The event has been dubbed “The Rumble On The Rails.”
It’s the fourth straight year that a major international exhi-
bition has been held in New York.
The U.S. and Russians will wrestle under experimental
rules in response to the IOC’s recent recommendation that
the sport be removed from the 2020 Olympic program.
Iran hasn’t wrestled in the U.S. since the 2003 world
championships. They will face the Americans under current
freestyle discipline rules.
Oregon gets 2016 U.S.
Olympic track and field trials
SALEM, Ore. — The U.S. Olympic track and field trials
will return to Eugene, Ore., in 2016, USA Track & Field
announced Thursday at the Oregon state Capitol.
This will be Eugene’s sixth time hosting the Olympic
track trials.
“We believe bringing the trials back to Track Town will
prepare the team for an equally impressive performance in
Rio,” USA Track & Field chief executive officer Max
Siegel said at a news conference.
The city is known for its involvement with track and field,
earning it the moniker Track Town, USA.
Eugene has played host to the trials in 1972, 1976, 1980,
2008 and 2012.
Sports briefs
REUTERS
Sergio Garcia shoots himself out of a sand hazard en route to an opening round
6-under, 66 during the Masters Championships at Augusta.
Just a freshman, Kruger has the rare poten-
tial to become a bona fide frontline starter for
four varsity seasons. Yesterday’s gem marks
his second consecutive one-hitter, after his
dominant 2-1 win over Sequoia on April 4.
Kruger took a no-hitter into the seventh inning
against the Cherokees, only to surrender a
knock to junior Zane Gelphman in the final
frame.
“The last one was definitely more exciting
for me, personally,” Kruger said. “We were
playing (rival) Sequoia. It was my first real
Sequoia game. … So, I was kind of pumped,
ready to go on that Thursday. I came in throw-
ing strikes, had my stuff, and got the ‘W.’”
Kruger had quite an encore yesterday at
Jefferson. He retired the first 11 batters he
faced to take a perfect game into the fourth,
before Indians junior Vince Rosado reached
on an infield error. After losing the no-hitter in
the fifth on a single by Ivan Gomez, Kruger
locked it down by retiring the final eight bat-
ters he faced.
“We all knew [the no-hitter] was happen-
ing,” Stafford said. “But instead of a no-hitter
, a win, I’ll take it any day. But it’d be nice.
He’s gotten one batter away (in) two games
now, so I think he might be able to get it this
season.”
If Kruger isn’t able to get the no-hitter this
season, he potentially has three more varsity
years to try. Who knows how much better he
will get in that time? In just one-year’s time,
Kruger has grown three inches and gained 20
pounds. And he also boasts the lineage. His
older sister Emily is currently a standout goal-
keeper on the women’s soccer pitch at Cal.
Like her little brother, Emily also earned a
promotion to the varsity level as a freshman at
Woodside. She went on to earn PAL
Goalkeeper of the Year honors as a senior in
2009.
On the mound, Kruger features a one-two
punch with a heavy fastball and spike curve-
ball. Not to worry about the dramatic breaking
ball, said the freshman, who demonstrated
consistent repeatable mechanics yesterday
with the deuce.
“I’ve been blessed with pitching coaches
who have taught me how to throw the least
stressful curveball possible,” Kruger said. “So
I’m very comfortable throwing that pitch. We
stuck almost 95 percent fastball today. So it
was not a big deal at all, throwing that curve-
ball to change up the speed.”
The junior ace
Mahoney touts a deeper arsenal than his
freshman counterpart. While the right hander
relies on a blazing fastball to dispose of
opposing batters, he also features a slider and
a changeup.
This is essentially Mahoney’s first varsity
season. Although he was in the mix as a
midyear call-up as a sophomore, he did not
pitch at the varsity level until this year. He did,
however, spent the first half of the 2012 sea-
son as the ace starter for the frosh-soph squad.
Now as Woodside varsity’s Tuesday ace,
Mahoney is off to a splendid start, having
struck out 19 through 14 innings in Ocean
Division play. Kruger currently paces the
team with 25 strikeouts through 20 innings in
league.
“We feed off each other, and pump each
other up,” Mahoney said. “That’s how you
win games. You pump each other up.”
With its young one-two pitching punch,
Woodside is poised to do plenty of winning —
not just this year, but through next season as
well.
SPORTS 14
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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During the national tournament, Redwood
Undisputed first competed in pool play. On
Saturday, after winning their first game 26-11
over the Encinitas Storm and their second 30-
21 over Chino Valley Knock Out, Redwood
Undisputed advanced to the Sunday’s Final
Four.
“They have all have great individual talent,”
Trinidad said. “But when they played together
as team, it wasn’t just about going out there and
playing the game of basketball, it was like they
were other there for each other. They really
covered for each other. It was an environment
where they weren’t afraid to reach for the top
and were willing to stand on each other’s
shoulders to get there.”
Redwood faced the Gilroy All-Stars in the
semifinal game — having only beaten the
Gilroy team by one point in the sectional tour-
nament, Undisputed was prepared for a dog
fight.
“In the beginning of the game, you could tell
Gilroy came out not only expecting to compete,
but to win,” Trinidad said. “And we just shut
them down right out of the gate. By the end of
the game, they were tipping their hats to us.”
The Undisputed girls, having only played for
three weeks under Trinidad, showed great
improvement over their sectional tournament
play, defeating Gilroy 38-21.
On Sunday afternoon, with the champi-
onship on the line, Redwood Undisputed faced
the only other undefeated squad, Newport
Mesa.
Both teams came out strong but Undisputed
jumped out to an early lead and never looked
back they went on to capture the National
Championship title in a 29-15 victory.
Trinidad said the team got contributions from
every player: Georgia Paye, Tejal Gupta,
Natalia Hotovec, Alexis Jackson, Porsche
Trinidad, Nikki Yeh, Caitlin Dulsky, Jacqueline
Kurland, Sonia Goyle and Danielle McNair.
Youth gymnastics
The ascent up the gymnastics ranks for Accel
in Burlingame continues to be rapid one.
And leading that charge is the newly
crowned, Level 7 uneven bars state champion,
Rachel Burdick.
At the state championships last weekend,
Burdick put together her most complete per-
formance of the season, taking third in the all-
around while shining with a bar routine that
earned her a 9.5 and a gold medal finish.
“I think she did so well because she was con-
sistent on all four pieces throughout the day,”
said her long-time coach Kelly Alliger-Keane.
“We thought going in that she could hit her
very best routines and since we were at the
state championships and everyone brings their
‘A’ game, she knew she had to do her best.”
Burdick’s 9.35 on floor wasn’t perfect,
according to Alliger-Keane, but that didn’t
derail the gymnast. She bounced back nicely,
taking fourth on the vault with a 9.3 before
heading over to the uneven bars.
“It was the first time she hit all her hand
stands,” Alliger-Keane said. “She has three of
them [in her routine] and she hit them all
almost perfect. I don’t think she knew did as
good as good as she did, but you could tell she
was happy after the dismount because she had
done her best.”
Her best turned out to be better than anyone
else’s — the 9.5 was good
for first place.
The afternoon was
capped off with a 9.325 on
beam.
With her combined
scores, Burdick took third
place in the all-around
(37.475).
“We knew she had it in
her,” Alliger-Keane said.
“And she wanted to end the season with a
bang.”
Burdick is a third grade student at McKinley
Elementary School in Burlingame.
She was chosen to National Testing TOPS
Program at the USA Training Center in
Houston this past September and will bypass
the national championships in Henderson, Nev.
in three weeks to focus on TOPS, according to
Alliger-Keane.
Burdick was the highlight of a crazy year for
Accel. At the same time last year, the same
Level 7 gymnasts were at a Level 4.
“The rise was been really drastic,” Alliger-
Keane said, “because we have a group of kids
that decided to make gymnastics a priority.”
Continued from page 11
ALL STARS
the third inning. With runners at second and
third and two outs, Cerreta worked the count
full before she lined up a single up the middle
to drive in the go-ahead run.
“I felt like I was redeeming myself (with the
game-winning RBI),” Cerreta said. “We could
feel the pitcher was shaky and they were com-
mitting errors.”
Until that fateful sixth, Sequoia appeared to
have the game in the bag, scoring five runs in
the third inning. Allison Amaya led off the
inning with a single. Hannah Singh and
Caitlin Castagnola followed with back-to-
back bunt singles to load the bases and bring
up No. 3 hitter Mikayla Wilkes. After taking a
first-pitch strike, she hammered a shot center-
field, clearing the bases in the process and giv-
ing the Cherokees a 3-0 lead.
Two pitches later, Sequoia enjoyed a 5-0
lead as Claire Casey drilled a shot to the oppo-
site end of the softball complex at Aragon for
a two-run home run.
Aragon got on the scoreboard in the bottom
of the fourth when a Jessy Doss infield hit
drove in Horita, who had reached on an error,
but the Cherokees got the run right back in the
fifth. Wilkes legged out an infield and would
eventually score on an Alaina Woo infield hit
to go up 6-1.
The Cherokees tacked on another run in the
top of the sixth with Amaya coming home on
a Castagnola double.
Offensively, Sequoia did what it needed to
do, banging out seven runs on 11 hits —
including three doubles and a home run. The
Cherokees pitching and defense, however, let
them down.
“We talked about having a killer instinct
and putting the other team away,” Reynick
said. “Credit to [Aragon] for putting the ball
in play.
“Coming off the Hillsdale win (a 4-3 victo-
ry Tuesday), I think this was a bad loss.”
Continued from page 11
DONS
Rachel Burdick
TERRY BERNAL
Woodside’s young battery of junior pitcher John Mahoney, left, sophomore catcher Shane
Stafford middle, and freshman pitcher Jamie Kruger hooked up to notch 23 strikeouts in two
wins against Jefferson this week.
Continued from page 11
WOODSIDE
SPORTS 15
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
@Dallas
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Detroit
4:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
vs. Sharks
7 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Wild
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/18
vs.Columbus
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@Portland
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/17
PlayoffsTBD
vs. OKC
7:30 p.m.
TNT
4/11
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/15
@Phoenix
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
vs. Kings
7:30 p.m
CSN-CAL
4/16
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
4/17
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/10
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/16
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/14
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
@Cubs
10:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/13
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/14
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/16
vs. Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/10
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/11
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Tigers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/12
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Portland
7:30p.m.
NBCSPORTS
4/14
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
SOFTBALL
Aragon8, Sequoia7
Sequoia0050110— 7116
Aragon000107x—860
WP — Nelson. LP — Rodriguez. HR — Casey (S).
3B — Dobroff (A).2B — Wilkes,Castagnola,Singh
(S).Multiple hits — Singh 2,Castagnola 2,Wilkes 2,
Amaya 3 (S); Cerreta 2, Dobroff 2 (A). Multiple RBIs
— Wilkes 3, Casey 2 (S). Records — Aragon 3-3
PAL Bay; Sequoia 2-4.
BASEBALL
Sequoia16, SouthCity2
SouthCity0002000— 261
Sequoia301822x— 16130
WP— Gelphman(2-1).LP— Perez.HR— Gelph-
man,Clifford (S).2B — Greenough (S).Multiple hits
— Ortiz 2,Greenough 2,Clifford 2 (S).Multiple RBIs
— Gelphman 4, Clifford 3, Crowell 2, Leary 2 (S).
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
SacredHeart Prep17, Castilleja8
SHP goal scorers — White 8; Cunnings 4; Mayle 2;
Mel. Holland, Cacchione, Muir. Records — Sacred
Heart Prep 4-0 league, 10-0 overall.
BOYS’TENNIS
Aragon4, Mills 3
SINGLES — Hughes (A) d. Tanjuatco 6-4, 4-6, 7-5;
Wang (A) d. Liu 6-4, 6-1; Reyes (M) d. Liu 6-4, 4-6, 6-
4; Chau (M) d. Fowler 6-4, 6-4. DOUBLES —
Joshi-Ngirchemat (A) d.Louie-Johnson 6-1,7-5;Bel-
lon-Ilyin (A) d. Mitsuda-Hattori 6-1, 6-3; Chan-Ma
(M) d.Jain-Gallardo 6-4,6-3.Records — Aragon 10-
2 PAL Bay, 12-5 overall; Mills 5-7.
Woodside7, El Camino0
SINGLES— Jo.Lopez(W) d.Trau6-0,6-0;Tuttle(W)
d. Sisou 6-0, 6-0; Yuen (W) d. Chan 6-0, 6-0; P. New-
comb (W) d.Payson 6-1,6-2.DOUBLES — J.Lopez
(W)-T.Newcomb(W) d.Yu-Wong6-1,6-0;Martinez-
Trevino (W) d. Pacuanio-Duarte 6-2, 6-0;
Patch-Mendelsohn (W) d.Garacue-Castillo 6-0,6-0.
Carlmont 5, Burlingame2
SINGLES — Pang (C) d.Taggart 6-0,7-5;Miller (B) d.
Ahuja6-3,3-6,7-6(2);Soriano(C) d.Tsu1-6,6-0,7-6(4);
Anderson (B) d. Fedronic 6-3, 6-4. DOUBLES —
Knoot-Wu (C) ds. Stevenson-Yee 6-3, 6-1; Goldie-
Hutchaleelaha (C) d. Battat-Martinucci 7-6(3), 6-1;
Yang-Tzeng (C) d. Patel-Resnick 6-2, 6-1.
MenloSchool 7, Crystal Springs 0
SINGLES — A.Ball (MS) d.A.Buckley 6-0,6-0; D.Ball
(MS) d. Lingane 6-4, 6-2; Chari (MS) d. Soohoo 6-1,
6-0; Boyd (MS) d. P. Buckley 6-1, 6-1. DOUBLES —
Miller-Safran (MS) d. Hemeng-Smith 6-4, 6-2; Mor-
gan-Lam (MS) d. Chen-Chess 6-3, 6-0;
Neumann-Rudoulph (MS) d.Meridith-Tinaztepe 7-
5, 6-2. Records — Menlo School 9-0 WBAL, 16-1
overall.
WEDNESDAY
BASEBALL
MenloSchool 20, Crystal Springs 0
Crystal Springs 00000— 024
MenloSchool 42(14) 0x—20141
WP— Atkeson(4-3).LP— Bierman.HR— Green-
stein (MS). 3B — Diekroeger, Cozad (MS). 2B —
Bierman (SC); Farnham,Flippin,Stratford (MS).Mul-
tiple hits — Stratford 2,Cozad 2 (MS).Multiple RBIs
— Cozad 4, Stratford 3, Farnham 2, Greenstein 2
(MS). Records — Menlo School 1-0 WBAL, 11-6
overall; Crystal Springs 0-1, 4-3.
BOYS’ GOLF
MenloSchool 191, King’sAcademy221
At Sunnyvale Muni, par 35
MS — Buchanan 31;Wong 35; Garnick 38; Burgess
41; Stone 47; Kim 46
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 8 1 .889 —
Washington 7 2 .778 1
New York 5 4 .556 3
Philadelphia 4 5 .444 4
Miami 1 8 .111 7
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 5 4 .556 —
St. Louis 5 4 .556 —
Chicago 3 6 .333 2
Pittsburgh 3 6 .333 2
Milwaukee 2 6 .250 2 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
SanFrancisco 7 3 .700 —
Arizona 6 3 .667 1/2
Los Angeles 5 3 .625 1
Colorado 5 4 .556 1 1/2
San Diego 2 6 .250 4
———
Thursday’s Games
San Francisco 7, Chicago Cubs 6
Washington 7, Chicago White Sox 4
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, late
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 5 4 .556 —
Boston 5 4 .556 —
New York 4 4 .500 1/2
Tampa Bay 4 5 .444 1
Toronto 3 6 .333 2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 6 3 .667 —
Detroit 5 4 .556 1
Chicago 4 5 .444 2
Minnesota 4 5 .444 2
Cleveland 3 5 .375 2 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 8 2 .800 —
Texas 7 3 .700 1
Seattle 4 7 .364 4 1/2
Houston 3 6 .333 4 1/2
Los Angeles 2 7 .222 5 1/2
Thursday’sGames
Detroit 11,Toronto 1
Washington 7, Chicago White Sox 4
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland, ppd., rain
Baltimore 3, Boston 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
FRIDAY
BASEBALL
Menlo School at King’s Academy, Priory at Sacred
Heart Prep, Sacred Heart Cathedral at Serra, Terra
Nova at Menlo-Atherton,Aragon at Half Moon Bay,
Hillsdale at Capuchino, 4 p.m.; Carlmont at
Burlingame, 7 p.m.
SOFTBALL
Valley Christian at Notre Dame-Belmont,3:30 p.m.;
Crystal Springsat ICA,El CaminoatWoodside,South
City at Jefferson, Menlo School at Alma Heights,
King’s Academy at Mercy-Burlingame, 4 p.m.
BOYS’TENNIS
Sacred Heart Prep at Cupertino, 3:30 p.m.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
Sacred Heart Prep at Burlingame, 7 p.m.
BOYS’ LACROSSE
Sacred Heart Prep at Los Gatos, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASEBALL
Serra at Monte Vista-Danville, 7 p.m.
TRACKANDFIELD
Serra Top 7 Invitational, all day
MONDAY
SOFTBALL
El Camino vs. South City at Ponderosa, San Mateo
at Mills, 4 p.m.
BADMINTON
Crystal Springs at Jefferson, 4 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORT WORTH, Texas — One of
the key moments in the development
of NASCAR’s new Sprint Cup car
came in a multicar test at Texas last
fall.
Now six races into the first season
with the new model cars, they get to
race on that 1 1/2-mile high-banked
track Saturday night.
“Texas really was one of the pivotal
moments of the development of this
car and the package that we handed
off to the teams to race this year, ‘’
Robin Pemberton, NASCAR vice
president of competition, said
Thursday.
“I think we’re off to a pretty good
start for the year for the package that
we have. ‘It seems to me that the
teams are pretty happy with what they
have been handed off to start with.”
The new models look more like
their passenger car counterparts. And
each of the three manufacturers has a
car in the top four of the Sprint Cup
standings.
Hendrick Motorsports teammates
Jimmie Johnson and Dale Earnhardt
Jr. are first and third, respectively, in
Chevrolets. Defending Sprint Cup
champion Brad Keselowski is second
in a Ford, and Kyle Busch fourth in a
Toyota.
“Every weekend is a big weekend
right now for our sport and this new
car. We have been very fortunate over
the last two or three races to have
great runs. Not just as the 2 team, but
as the sport,” Keselowski said. “I
think we have seen compelling racing
and great battles. I think the car is
doing as well as you can expect it to
coming out of the gate.”
NASCAR’s gets
Texas test next
16
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
BMW adds small crossover, the X1
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Finally, American car shoppers can get a
small crossover sport utility vehicle from
BMW that has a starting retail price of less
than $32,000.
In fact, the new-for-2013 BMW X1 five
door has the lowest starting retail price of any
BMW car or SUV — $31,695. The well-pro-
portioned X1 looks pricier on the outside than
it is and has great cargo- and people-hauling
functionality.
The X1 even comes standard with two fuel-
saving mechanisms. An automatic stop/start
system turns off the engine when the vehicle
is stopped at stoplights, while the other sys-
tem called Eco Pro is driver activated and
optimizes engine operation and transmission
gearing, among other things, for maximum
fuel economy.
The federal government mileage ratings for
the base X1 with turbocharged, four-cylinder
engine are 22 miles per gallon in city driving
and 33 mpg on the highway. These ratings are
on par with those for Honda’s popular CR-V
SUV that has a 185-horsepower, naturally
aspirated four cylinder under the hood.
BMW has been selling the X1 in Europe
since 2009. Demand has been so strong that
the U.S. market was left out until this model
See BMW, Page 17
BMW has been selling the X1 in Europe since 2009. Demand has been so strong that the U.S. market was left out until this model year, when
BMW added production capacity.
AUTO 17
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
year, when BMW added production capacity.
Now, the X1 with 240-horsepower, tur-
bocharged four cylinder, eight-speed automat-
ic transmission and rear-wheel drive for the
United States is priced $400 less than the
manufacturer’s suggested retail price, includ-
ing destination charge, of a 2013 BMW 128i
Coupe here, which was the previous lowest-
priced BMW. The X1 also is lower priced than
the starting MSRP, including destination
charge, of $39,745 for BMW’s next-largest
SUV, the X3.
The 2013 X3 uses the same 240-horsepow-
er, turbo four cylinder that’s in the X1.
No manual transmission is offered in the
X1. But four-wheel drive is available, and the
lowest starting retail price for a 2013 X1 with
four-wheel drive is $33,395. A second engine
— a 300-horsepower, turbocharged six cylin-
der — comes at a starting MSRP, including
destination charge, of $39,495.
The base X1 doesn’t have a lot of luxury
features. For example, it does not include
leather-trimmed seats or metallic exterior
paint. Everything from rearview camera and
automatic dimming rearview mirror to power-
adjustable front seats and USB adapter are
extras.
So, it is easy to load up the X1 and get to a
much higher sticker price. The test X1
xDrive28i topped out at more than $45,000,
and at that price, a shopper can look at larger
and more sumptuous SUVs.
Competitors to the X1 are wide-ranging.
Acura’s 2014 RDX comes standard with a
273-horsepower V-6, automatic transmission
and a starting retail price of $35,415 with two-
wheel drive. Meantime, the 2013 Mercedes-
Benz GLK starts at $37,995 with 302-horse-
power V-6, automatic transmission and two-
wheel drive.
The not quite 15-foot-long X1 has exterior
dimensions that are similar to those of some of
America’s best-selling compact crossover
SUVs. For instance, the X1 is within 2 inches
in length and nearly the same width as the CR-
V. But it’s the much lower height — some 4
inches shorter than the CR-V — that helps dif-
ferentiate the X1.
The test X1 seemed to meld the concept of
station wagon and SUV successfully, while
other crossover SUVs take a higher stance and
a more SUV orientation.
Still, front seat riders, in particular, have
decent views out the front of the X1, and head-
room of 41.3 inches is accommodating. In the
back seat, headroom is cut to 39.7 inches, and
back seat passengers can feel cramped with
three adults sitting closely, but two adults back
there do fine.
The test X1 had a lot of hard plastic inside.
Even with textures put into the plastic, the
vehicle inside didn’t exude the same kind of
pricey look that the exterior, with big BMW
badges, did.
But the 2-liter, double overhead cam, turbo
four cylinder provided plenty of good power.
The X1 tester moved quickly to pass other
vehicles on highways, and it efficiently zipped
into open spots in traffic.
The engine delivers a healthy 260 foot-
pounds of torque starting at a low 1,250 rpm
and continuing to 4,800 rpm, so the X1 always
felt responsive.
That is, unless the auto stop/start had
engaged. Sitting at a stoplight in silence, con-
serving gasoline, was fine. But every time the
driver took the foot off the brake to get going
again, the test car shuddered and sort of rum-
bled to life.
This was not the kind of refined stop/start
mechanism that’s in some gasoline-electric
hybrid vehicles.
In addition, there were more than a few
times — particularly with air conditioning
going — that the stop/start didn’t engage, so a
driver can’t count on this to get every bit of
mileage savings.
Indeed, in combined city and highway trav-
el, the test X1 averaged just under 23 mpg,
which is barely above the federal govern-
ment’s mileage rating for city travel only.
Worse, the X1 uses premium gasoline, so fill-
ing the 16.6-gallon tank can cost more than
$60, and it may not last much beyond 375
miles.
Continued from page 16
BMW
By Yuri Kageyama and Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Six automakers, including
Toyota, Honda and Nissan, are recalling
nearly 3.4 million older-model vehicles
worldwide because of defective air bags that
can send shrapnel flying into the passenger
compartment.
The recall mainly affects cars sold by
Japanese automakers in North America,
Europe and Japan. A small number of cars
made by Germany’s BMW AG and General
Motors Co. and also involved.
The front passenger air bags all were made
by the same parts supplier, Japan’s Takata
Corp. They have faulty inflator mechanisms
that don’t route gas into the air bags. Instead,
the high-pressure gas can launch plastic and
metal parts from the air bags into the cars’
passenger areas. Takata says no one has been
hurt, but there have been six incidents of the
air bags deploying improperly on roadways.
The recall, announced Thursday in Japan,
is so large because many automakers use
common parts on multiple models to cut
costs and simplify manufacturing. This
approach was pioneered by Japanese
automakers.
The recall will bring a great deal of unwel-
come publicity for automakers, especially
Toyota Motor Corp., said IHS Automotive
analyst Paul Newton. The world’s top-selling
car company is trying to rebuild a reputation
for quality that was hurt by previous big
recalls.
The latest recall is the fourth for Toyota
since October that involves more than one
million vehicles, Newton wrote in an email.
And the company endured a series of huge
recalls in 2009 and 2010 for faulty braking,
sticky gas pedals and defective floor mats.
Toyota will have to inspect or fix 1.7 million
vehicles worldwide, including about 580,000
in North America, 490,000 in Europe and
320,000 in Japan. The models include the
Corolla company, Matrix hatchback, Sequoia
SUV, and Tundra pickup, as well as the Lexus
SC 430 sports car. All the vehicles were man-
ufactured from 2001 to 2003.
Automakers hit with air bag recall
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Wonder” has always been the
word with Terrence Malick.
He might be the most sought-
after, high-budget art-house film-
maker on the planet, a director
whose talent for cinematic poetry
and freeform improvisation gives
him virtually the pick of
Hollywood’s A-list litter. But for all
his voice-over philosophizing, his
movies are completely guileless.
He makes simple films beautifully,
with a childlike sense of wonder.
Even if his films fail to leave you
elated, you can’t help but feel
cleansed by their innocent purity.
A new Malick masterwork is
always an event, but as the releases
have grown more commonplace,
so, too has the feeling that his
movie world — so separate from
others — has developed its own
systematic clichis. There may be, it
turns out, only so much inner-
monologue questioning about love
and nature from a barefoot, long-
haired lass in the sun-lit grass that
we can take.
Such has been the reception to
Malick’s latest, “To the Wonder,” a
film that more than any other of the
director’s, distills his distinctive
approach. There’s hardly any dia-
logue at all, just the story of a
French-speaking Ukrainian single
mother, Marina (Olga Kurylenko),
and her up-and-down romance with
Neil (Ben Affleck). He’s a kind of
sample-taking environmental scien-
tist of polluted blue-collar areas
who brings Marina and her 10-year-
old daughter, Tatiana (Tatiana
Chiline), from vibrant, sundrenched
Paris to his home in an austere sub-
urban development in Oklahoma.
Dichotomy has always been the
real narrative propellant for Malick
(war and peace in “The Thin Red
Line”; the disciplinarian father and
graceful mother of “The Tree of
Malick’s latest
film is heavenly
By Natalie Rotman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Ben Affleck
took home the best picture Oscar at
this year’s Academy Awards for his
Iran hostage drama “Argo.” But
what everyone really remembers is
that emotional, slightly uncomfort-
able acceptance speech. Everyone,
apparently, except Affleck.
“I barely remember the Oscar
speech,” the actor-director said
when asked about it at Tuesday’s
premiere of his latest film.
“Certainly, the most important
thing for me, in a way, was to honor
my wife and to let people know
how much I love her.”
During his speech Affleck choked
up while thanking his wife, Jennifer
Garner, for working on their “mar-
riage for 10 Christmases.”
“I think you can tell what people
care about really by their actions —
by what they invest in, by what they
work on,” he explained. “It’s hard
to tell somebody that you care
about them when you’re never
around them and you don’t see
them and talk to them. So that was
what I was trying to get across.
Although I don’t know how articu-
late I was.”
Affleck was joined by co-stars
Olga Kurylenko and Rachel
McAdams for the Los Angeles pre-
miere of Terrence Malick’s roman-
tic rumination “To the Wonder,”
which opens Friday.
Affleck, 40, admitted that seeing
the celebrated director in action was
indeed a wonder to behold.
Affleck reflects
on Oscar speech
See WONDER, Page 22
See AFFLECK, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: April 30, 2013
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O
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-F 4-7pm
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Noon-7pm
2011
B E ST OF
2011-2013
By Jake Pearson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Every week, a group
of teenagers and 20-somethings dressed
in hoodies gets together in a tiny room
on a college campus and plug in their
laptops. They turn up pulsing electron-
ic funk music, order pizza and begin
furiously hacking into computer net-
works.
But they’re not shadowy criminals:
They’re students training to become
“white-hat” hackers, experts to help
business and government agencies pro-
tect their data from cyberattacks that
have become an almost daily occur-
rence.
“It’s the new espionage. Spies oper-
ate from behind keyboards now,” says
Evan Jensen, a senior at the Polytechnic
Institute of New York University and
one of the leaders of the Hack Night
events where about two dozen students
hone their hacking skills.
Since actual hacking is illegal, the
students can’t just sneak into a webpage
and poke around for learning’s sake. So
industry experts, professors and the
school’s very own “Hacker In
Residence,” Dan Guido, collaborate to
create exercises that expose the stu-
dents to real-world hacking scenarios.
Guido, who runs his own cybersecuri-
ty firm, will walk students through one
of the most common means hackers use
to gain access to a computer network —
attacks on the software of a browser like
Internet Explorer. In June 2011, Google
said it had traced to China a cyberattack
that attempted to access hundreds of
Google email accounts.
Guido uses the case, much of which
has been made public, to recreate the
exploit, having students map out step
by step how the hacker was able to
access a desktop computer and infiltrate
the company’s network.
While bigger schools such as Georgia
Tech, Purdue and Carnegie Mellon are
known for their cybersecurity pro-
grams, experts say Brooklyn-based
NYU-Poly is now considered among
the best schools for training students
with hands on, mission-critical cyberse-
curity skills. That’s due in part to Hack
Night, an active cybersecurity club and
an annual hacking competition each fall
that the school bills as the largest in the
country.
“Every one of the faculty, every one
of the undergraduates and every one of
the graduate students is engaged in
real-world exercises,” says Alan Paller,
director of the SANS Institute, a cyber-
security training organization. “They
come out having actually developed
and tested their skills.”
Paller says the need for cybersecurity
experts with real world training is
severe — a 2012 report he co-authored
found that the Department of Homeland
Security alone needs 600 such experts.
Last month, the Defense Department
announced it is establishing a series of
cyber teams charged with carrying out
offensive operations to combat threats
of cyberattacks aimed at disrupting the
country’s vital infrastructure.
And just this week, the House
Intelligence Committee voted in favor
of a bill proposing a new data-sharing
program that would give the federal
government a broader role in helping
banks, manufacturers and other busi-
nesses protect themselves against
cyberattacks.
“The only defense against these
things are skills,” Paller says. “We have
too many people in the cybersecurity
field that don’t have the hands-on skills.
We call them frequent fliers. We don’t
have enough pilots.”
In the last few years, some companies
have staged “bug bounty” programs,
paying cash or other prizes to cyberse-
curity researchers in controlled situa-
tions who are able to breach their sys-
tems and expose flaws in their software.
Students, hackers train for cybersecurity jobs
Hack Night events are where about two dozen students hone
their hacking skills.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
CONDUCTOR LAUREATE HERBERT
BLOMSTEDT LEADS THE SAN FRAN-
CISCO SYMPHONY IN CONCERT
WITH VIOLINIST AUGUSTIN
HADELICH, APRIL 17 TO 20 AT DAVIES
SYMPHONY HALL. San Francisco
Symphony Conductor Laureate Herbert
Blomstedt returns to the San Francisco
Symphony to conduct concerts April 17, 19
and 20 at Davies Symphony Hall. The per-
formances feature German violinist Augustin
Hadelich’s debut with the Orchestra, in
Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D major, Opus
61, and Blomstedt leading the SFS in Nielsen’s
Symphony No. 5., Opus 50.
HERBERT BLOMSTEDT was the
Symphony’s 10th Music Director from 1985-
1995 and is currently its Conductor Laureate.
Under his leadership, the Orchestra won its first
Grammy award, for a recording of Orff’s
Carmina Burana; greatly expanded its interna-
tional profile with numerous acclaimed per-
formances on tour in Europe and at festivals,
including those of Edinburgh, Salzburg,
Munich and Lucerne; and launched its
Adventures in Music program. Blomstedt cele-
brated his 85th birthday in May 2012.
AUGUSTIN HADELICH, 28, the winner
of the 2006 International Violin Competition of
Indianapolis, gave his first concert at 7. After
receiving a diploma from the Istituto Mascagni
conservatory in Livorno, Italy, Hadelich stud-
ied composition at the Hanns-Eisler Academy
of Music in Berlin and graduated from
Juilliard, where he studied with Joel Smirnoff.
He has performed with the New York
Philharmonic and The Cleveland Orchestra, the
Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the Atlanta and
Houston Symphony Orchestras, among others,
and has given solo recitals at Carnegie Hall and
the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.
Hadelich plays on the 1723 “Ex-Kiesewetter”
Stradivarius violin. (More on the violin,
below.)
PERFORMANCE INFORMATION.
Wednesday April 17 at 10 a.m. (Open
Rehearsal); Wednesday April 17 at 8 p.m.;
Friday April 19 at 8 p.m.; and Saturday
April 20 at 8 p.m.
TICKETS. Open Rehearsal tickets for April
17 are $22-$40. All other Davies Symphony
Hall concert tickets are $15-$150, and are
available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at (415)
864-6000 and at the Davies Symphony Hall
Box Office.
PRE-CONCERT TALK. There will be an
“Inside Music” talk by Scott Foglesong from
the stage one hour prior to each concert. Free to
all concert ticket holders; doors open 15 min-
utes before.
HOW ABOUT A GLASS OF BUBBLY?
Share two glasses of bubbly, two chocolate
covered strawberries and two delectable truf-
fles for just $21 at your concerts at Davies
Symphony Hall. Call (415) 252-1937 to pre-
order for intermission. Orders must be placed
by 3:30 p.m. the day before the concert. Pick-
up is available on all levels except the first tier.
BROADCAST. The April 17 through April
20 concerts will be broadcast on Tuesday, April
30 at 8 p.m. on Classical 89.9/90.3/104.9
KDFC and kdfc.com.
CD SIGNINGS. Augustin Hadelich will
sign CDs at the Symphony Store following the
performances on April 17, 19 and 20.
STAGE DIRECTIONS. The San Francisco
Symphony performs at Davies Symphony Hall,
201 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco. The
Performing Arts Garage is on Grove between
Franklin and Gough syreets, one block away.
The Civic Center BART Station is three blocks
away.
DO YOU KNOW ABOUT “THE INDI-
ANAPOLIS”? The International Violin
Competition of Indianapolis, which Augustin
Hadelich won in 2006, was founded in 1982
under the artistic leadership of Josef Gingold to
discover major violin talent and nurture the
careers of those identified. Every four years,
music lovers from around the world focus their
attention on “The Indianapolis.” The winner of
the competition is awarded the use of the “ex-
Gingold” Stradivarius of 1683 for four years,
until the next competition, at which time the
instrument is awarded to the next winner. 2006
winner Hadelich returned it in time for the
2010 competition and then began with the
Kiesewetter he now uses. The Ninth
Quadrennial International Violin Competition
of Indianapolis takes place Sept. 5 to 21, 2014.
AND CONCERNING THE VIOLIN
THAT HADELICH USES ... The
Kiesewetter Stradivarius of circa 1723 that
Hadelich plays was made by Antonio
Stradivari of Cremona (1644–1737) and
derives its name from a previous owner,
German composer and violinist Christophe
Gottfried Kiesewetter (1777–1827). In 2006,
the Stradivari Society brokered an agreement
between Clement and Karen Arrison, current
owners of the Kiesewetter, and Russian violin-
ist Philippe Quint for Quint to use the instru-
ment. On April 20, 2008, Quint accidentally
left the Kiesewetter in the back of a taxicab in
New York City. The violin was found and
returned to Quint the next day. The cabdriver,
Mohamed Khalil, was presented with a medal-
lion by the city of Newark, the highest honor
awarded by the city. Since August 2010,
Augustin Hadelich has played the Kiesewetter
on extended loan from the Arrisons.
Susan Cohn is a member of the American Theatre
Critics Association and the San Francisco Bay Area
Theatre Critics Circle. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
COURTESY OF SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
German violinist Augustin Hadelich makes his San Francisco Symphony debut performing
Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D major,April 17 to 20 at Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
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By W. Wayt Gibbs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nothing is more frustrating than finding the
perfect cucumber or head of lettuce at the
farmers market, paying top-dollar for it, and
then ... tossing it out a week later when it has
gone moldy or slimy in the refrigerator.
No doubt one reason so many of us eat too
many convenience
foods and too few
fruits and veg-
etables is that it
can be hard to
get our busy
schedules in sync
with the produce
we bring home with
the best of intentions.
Food scientists, how-
ever, have discovered a
remarkably effective way
to extend the life of fresh-
cut fruits and vegetables
by days or even a
week. It does-
n’t involve
the chlo-
rine solu-
t i o n s ,
irradi-
a t i o n
o r
p e r -
oxide
bat hs
some-
t i mes
u s e d
by pro-
duce pack-
agers. And
it’s easily
done in any
home by anyone.
This method, called
heat-shocking, is 100 percent organic
and uses just one ingredient that every cook
has handy — hot water.
You may already be familiar with a related
technique called blanching, a cooking
method in which food is briefly dunked in
boiling or very hot water. Blanching can
extend the shelf life of broccoli and other
plant foods, and it effectively reduces con-
tamination by germs on the surface of the
food. But blanching usually ruptures the cell
walls of plants, causing color and nutrients to
leach out. It also robs delicate produce of its
raw taste.
Heat-shocking works differently. When the
water is warm but not scalding — tempera-
tures ranging from 105 F to 140 F (about 40
C to 60 C) work well for most fruits and veg-
etables — a brief plunge won’t rupture the
cells. Rather, the right amount of heat alters
the biochemistry of the tissue in ways that,
for many kinds of produce, firm the flesh,
delay browning
and fading, slow wilt-
ing, and increase mold resistance.
A long list of scientific studies published
during the past 15 years report success using
heat-shocking to firm potatoes, tomatoes,
carrots, and strawberries; to preserve the
color of asparagus, broccoli, green beans,
kiwi fruits, celery, and lettuce; to fend off
overripe flavors in cantaloupe and other mel-
ons; and to generally add to the longevity of
grapes, plums, bean sprouts and peaches,
among others.
The optimum time and temperature combi-
nation for the quick dip seems to depend on
many factors, but the procedure is quite sim-
ple. Just let the water run from your tap until
it gets hot, then fill a large pot of water about
two-thirds full, and use a
thermometer to measure
the temperature. It
will prob-
ably be
b e t we e n
105 F and
140 F; if not, a
few minutes on
the stove should do
the trick. Submerge the produce and hold it
there for several minutes (the hotter the
water, the less time is needed), then drain, dry
and refrigerate as you normally would.
Researchers still are working out the
details of how heat-shocking works, but it
appears to change the food in several ways at
once. Many of the fruits and vegetables you
bring home from the store are still alive and
respiring; the quick heat treatment tends to
slow the rate at which they respire and pro-
duce ethylene, a gas that plays a crucial role
in the ripening of many kinds of produce. In
leafy greens, the shock of the hot water also
seems to turn down production of enzymes
that cause browning around wounded leaves,
and to turn up the production of heat-shock
proteins, which can have preservative effects.
For the home cook, the inner workings
don’t really matter. The bottom line is that
soaking your produce in hot water for a few
minutes after you unpack it makes it cheap-
er and more nutritious because more fruits
and veggies will end up in your family
rather than in the trash.
HEAT-SHOCKING GUIDELINES
The optimal time and tempera-
ture for heat-shocking fruits and
vegetables varies in
response to many
factors — in par-
ticular, whether
they were
already treated
before pur-
chase. Use
these as
g e n e r a l
guidelines.

Asparagus: 2
to 3 min-
utes at
131 F
(55 C)

Broccoli:
7 to 8 min-
utes at 117 F (47 C)
• Cantaloupe (whole): 60 minutes at 122 F
(50 C)
• Celery: 90 seconds at 122 F (50 C)
• Grapes: 8 minutes at 113 F (45 C)
• Kiwi fruit: 15 to 20 minutes at 104 F (40
C)
• Lettuce: 1 to 2 minutes at 122 F (50 C)
• Oranges (whole): 40 to 45 minutes at 113
F (45 C)
• Peaches (whole): 40 minutes at 104 F (40
C)
Shocking tip for preserving produce
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Life”) and that’s true here. The particular
events and ruptures in Neil and Marina’s rela-
tionship aren’t closely followed, only the
familiar tidal swells of love and loneliness.
During a separation, a local former flame
(Rachel McAdams) also drifts in, forming an
evanescent triangle.
What this is, then, is a straightforward,
abstractly rendered rumination on love, most-
ly from Marina’s perspective. “What is this
love that loves us?” she wonders. The state of
bliss she finds with Neil — on a train to Paris,
on the shores of Mont Saint-Michel, on the
plains of Oklahoma — is inevitably, mysteri-
ously fleeting. She ponders, in French:
“Where are we when we’re there?” “Why
doesn’t it last?”
The film creates other questions, too, none
more than: Ben Affleck can speak French??
But the actor’s character hardly talks at all,
and he moves hulkingly through the film,
mostly leaving the meditations to Marina.
Malick gives his actors wide berth to
explore their characters, shaping his films
largely in editing. (Performances by Rachel
Weisz, Michael Sheen and others didn’t make
it into the final cut, a not unusual fate for
members of a Malick cast.) But the perform-
ances in “To the Wonder” aren’t quite up to
the task. Affleck is sensitive but zombie-like.
Kurylenko, a gorgeous former model who
played a Bond girl in “Quantum of Solace,” is
a captivating, lithe presence but her playful
improvising veers too close to precious (a
danger for any Malick player). Perhaps their
characters were too thinly scripted by Malick,
if “scripted” is even a relevant word.
Whereas “The Tree of Life” put its charac-
ters in a cosmic, mythical context (oh, yes,
there were dinosaurs), “To the Wonder” places
its characters’ deliberations on love in the
spiritual realm. Javier Bardem plays a
Catholic priest undergoing a crisis of faith. He
meanders morosely among the town’s poor
and imprisoned in what feels like — com-
pared to the lengthy, dreamy intimacy with the
likes of Kurylenko, McAdams and Affleck —
token slumming with less physically blessed
humanity.
When the papal concave gets a look at the
regal Bardem robed in vestments, they may
wonder if perhaps they missed the boat. His
priest is a tangential character with little con-
necting him to the couple, but his role is to, by
association, bond their earthly affection with
God’s love. One wide-eyed bit character
exclaims to him at a window: “I’m feeling not
just the natural light. That’s the spiritual
light!”
Cinema is a cathedral for Malick, and in it,
light is heavenly. Much of the film, with cine-
matography by Emmanuel Lubezki, was shot
in the golden glow of “magic hour.” You will
seldom see a more majestically shot movie,
one both impressionistic and detailed, sensual
and grounded. Even if other elements of the
film are lacking, the sheer inventiveness and
variety of the contrasting images keeps you
riveted.
“To the Wonder” isn’t the finest Malick
film. But if it’s a failure, it’s the best kind. It
strives, in a superficial medium, to communi-
cate something universal about our inner
nature. It seeks beauty in the world and finds
it everywhere, from the shores of Normandy
to the grocery store aisles of Oklahoma.
It may be easy to laugh at, but wherever the
love that loves us is, it’s in this movie.
“To the Wonder,” a Magnolia Pictures
release, is rated R for some sexuality and
nudity. Running time: 113 minutes. Three
stars out of four.
Continued from page 18
WONDER
California community college students to
study in China beginning in 2014. At its out-
set, the program, which is made possible
through a gift from the Florence Fang Family
Foundation, will send dozens of students from
the San Mateo County Community College
District to China.
District Chancellor Ron Galatolo said being
tapped to be the first college partner is a
unique opportunity, particularly for students
who wouldn’t traditionally have the chance to
study abroad.
The study abroad program is expected to
grow thorough the state. The initial grant was
made in support of 100,000 Strong
Foundation, an initiative launched by Hillary
Clinton to diversify and expand the number of
U.S. students learning Mandarin and studying
in China.
Galatolo will work with the 100,000 Strong
Foundation to create the three- to five-week
programs, called a mini-mester, that will
immerse students and faculty in the culture.
When asked why San Mateo County was
tapped as the first partner, Galatolo said the
district has created unique partnerships with
noteworthy universities allowing students a
guaranteed path to transfer.
In a press release, Carola McGiffert, presi-
dent of the 100,000 Strong Foundation, said
of the community college program: “This
pilot program with San Mateo is so critical to
the mission of the 100,000 Strong Foundation.
Approximately 43 percent of American
undergraduates are enrolled in community
colleges, but community college students rep-
resent less than 3 percent of those who study
abroad. We must ensure that this important
part of our future workforce is prepared to
engage constructively with China, our fastest
growing trade partner.”
Brown’s announcement was during a week-
long visit to China to promote the country’s
investment in California.
Continued from page 1
CHINA
“I think that you know he’s a director who
does really unusual stuff, really interesting
stuff, and somebody who works outside the
typical Hollywood norm. And that’s interest-
ing to other directors, certainly to me, because
you go like `wow, what would happen of you
experiment with this?’”
The film stars Affleck as an American
whose relationship with a woman he met over-
seas turns cold, leaving him drifting back
toward a childhood love.
“To the Wonder” was the last review written
by celebrated film critic Roger Ebert, who
died Tuesday, and it sent “shivers” down
Affleck’s spine.
“I thought it was a profound honor,” he
said. “To have this be the last movie that he
reviewed and to have it viewed through this
sort of transcendental lens of a man at the
end of his life is as important as anything
that’s ever happened around movies in my
career.”
Continued from page 18
AFFLECK
two three-story buildings on 2.4 acres with
subgrade parking and a fitness center with
space for yoga, a resident lounge and club
room with expansive decks.
“This new project will provide transit-ori-
ented housing to an area that has seen only one
new apartment community since the early
2000s,” Brian Pianca, a development director
in the firm’s San Francisco office wrote in a
statement. “There is strong job growth in the
area but a significant lack of new apartments.”
Units will average 970 square feet and offer
hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances and
solid surface countertops in one-, two- and
three-bedroom units.
In other housing news: Verona Ridge,
perched atop the San Mateo hills, offers 23
lots with views of the San Francisco Bay with
sales starting this month. The community fea-
tures three- and- four-bedroom home designs
with up to 3,100 square feet, and may include
a bonus room or deck.
Continued from page 1
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WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Passenger Arrival and
Naturalization Workshop. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive,
San Bruno. Genealogical workshop on
how to locate passenger arrival and
naturalization records. $15 payable in
advance. For more information or to
reserve a space call 238-3488.
Variety Show with Emcee Raoul
Epling & a Baked Lunch. 10:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. The San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Tickets available. For more
information call 616-7150.
Reservation Deadline for Meet the
Artists Evening Reception at Filoli.
4 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Free. Reservations are
required for this event, which will take
place on April 18 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
For more information call 364-8300.
Tennis Clinics for Juniors and
Adults. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Highlands Park, 2600 Melendy Drive,
San Carlos. Free. The clinic takes place
every Monday and Friday in April. You
must call 752-8061 to reserve a spot in
the clinic. For more information
contact
adminsupervisor@kimgrattennis.com.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Sign up for a
20 minute appointment with a
member of the San Mateo County
Library Association. Lawyers’ speciality
will be small claims and civil litigation.
For more information email
figard@smcl.org.
Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. 7:30
p.m. Notre Dame de Namur University,
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. $10. For more information
or for tickets call 508-3456.
‘Opera Rocks!’ 7:30 p.m. Taube
Center, Notre Dame de Namur
University, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The Department of Music and Vocal
Arts at Notre Dame de Namur
University invites you to explore the
unique world of ‘Opera Rocks!’ Draws
from 400-year tradition of operatic
repertoire and mixes up familiar
stories with their contemporary
musical theatre counterparts. General
admission $10. Tickets can be
purchased online at
brownpapertickets.com.
Broadway By the Bay Presents
‘Cats.’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Starting
ticket price $35. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Fox
Theatre Box Office, 2219 Broadway St.,
Redwood City. Tickets may also be
ordered by phone at 369-7770. For
more information go to
www.broadwaybythebay.org.
Diablo Ballet performs at Hillbarn
Theatre. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre, 1285
E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Diablo
Ballet presents classical and
contemporary dance works including
the Web Ballet, the world’s first ballet
created online. For more information
call 349-6411 or go to
www.hillbarntheatre.org.
SATURDAY, APRIL 13
Foster City Multi-Family Garage
Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 299 Beach Park
Blvd., Foster City. Bowditch Middle
School students will be holding the
sale to fund their trip this summer to
the nation’s capital. For more
information call 468-6483.
2013 Tomato and Pepper Sale
Hosted by the UCCE Master
Gardeners of San Mateo and San
Francisco counties. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Redwood High School, 1968 Old
County Road, Redwood City.There will
be more than 35 varieties of tomatoes
and more than 15 varieties of
peppers, herbs and more. For more
information go to
http://ucanr.org/sites/MGsSMSF/Spec
ial_events/Tomato_sale/.
Skills Development and
Application Class. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. Skyline College, 3300 College
Drive, San Bruno. Free. Please wear
comfortable shoes and clothing. For
more information call 616-7096.
Non-violent Parade for Peace and
Justice. 10 a.m. Our Lady of the Pillar
Catholic Church, 400 Church St., Half
Moon Bay. Pablo Paredes, immigration
reformer, peace activist and Oakland-
based youth organizer, will give the
keynote speech. The event will begin
at Our Lady of the Pillar Catholic
Church and the parade will continue
down Main Street, cross Cabrillo
Highway and to the Coastside
Lutheran Church for a tamale lunch.
Registration is $40. For more
information go to www.kacw.org.
Author Patricia Schultz. 10 a.m. to
noon. 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. $35. This special event
features author Patricia Schultz, who
wrote ‘1000 Places to See Before You
Die.’ For more information contact
www.braunercompany.com.
Buckeye and Owl Canyon Hike.10
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 44 Visitacion Ave.,
Suite 206, Brisbane. Free. Dress for
varied weather and wear long pants.
For more information contact
sanbruno@mountainwatch.org.
City of San Carlos’ Second Annual
Volunteer Expo. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
San Carlos Adult Community Center,
601 Chestnut St., San Carlos. More
than 30 local nonprofit
organizations will be present to
showcase volunteer opportunities
within the community. All ages
welcome. Free. For more information
call 802-4218.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Encore
Books on the Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Half off sale. All sales
benefit the programs of the San
Mateo County History Museum. For
more information call 299-0104 ext.
234.
FML Outdoor Bargain Book/Media
Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. All adult books
will be 50 cents and children’s books
will be 25 cents (including foreign
language books and media). Bag of
Books will be $5 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information call 697-7607.
An Evening with Deborah Tannen.
Noon to 2 p.m. UU Fellowship of
Redwood City, 2124 Brewster Ave.,
Redwood City. $20. All proceeds go
toward CORA (Community
Overcoming Relationship Abuse.) For
more information call 367-9183.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. $1
paperbacks, $2 and up hardbacks and
25 cents for children’s books. All
proceeds benefit the Belmont Library.
For more information call 593-5650.
There Was Something About
Agnes. 1 p.m. 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. The lecture is free with
admission to the museum, $5 for
adults and $3 for seniors and
students. Joanne Garrison will present
a talk about the life of Agnes Poett.
For more information call 299-0104.
Seabird and SongbirdWorkshop. 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sea Crest School, 901
Arnold Way, Half Moon Bay. Presenter
Alvaro Jaramillo will lead workshop
suitable for the beginner and
advanced birder. Light refreshments
served. Suggested donation of $15 for
adults, $5 for seniors, kids and
students free. Bird walk from 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. See below for more
information. For more information go
to http://coastsidelandtrust.org.
Assistance League of San Mateo
County Celebrates Its 60th
Anniversary. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Assistance League Chapter
Headquarters, 528 N. San Mateo Drive,
San Mateo. Honoring Mr. Les Williams,
Tuskegee Airman, Congressional Gold
Medal recipient, former Dance Studio
owner and instructor and
distinguished resident of San Mateo
County. Building Plaque Unveiling to
celebrate the historical significance
of the site as the former dance studio
Mr. Williams owned and operated for
22 years. Book signing of ‘Victory: Tales
of a Tuskegee Airman’ following
comments by Mr. Williams. Public
invited to attend. For more
information go to
sanmateocoutny.assistanceleague.or
g.
Rembrandt’s Century. 3 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. This exhibition
examines a wide range of artworks
from the 17th century. For more
information call 591-8286.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Derby is to allow the parents and the child to
bond through a physical, hands-on, do-it-
yourself kind of project, because most kids
today don’t have shop class and they don’t
have an opportunity to use any tools and
materials and work with their hands,”
Newton said.
This second annual pinewood car derby is
hosted by the Pacific Skyline Council of the
Boy Scouts of America, and helped in large
part by volunteers such as Newton and his
sons, Greg and Nick.
From 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., everyone can
compete in the Outlaw division to win prizes.
“(The Outlaw division) is for siblings and
parents who want to make their own cars, it’s
sort of to discourage parents from building a
car completely by themselves, instead of let-
ting their kid do it … also we can put cars
(with machined wheels) into the Outlaw divi-
sion, so the kids can still race, even if they
don’t have a car for the (standard) race,”
Greg Newton said.
A free Pinewood Derby car or kit will be
given to the first 25 boys who sign up for
Cub Scouts, according to Brian Curtis, scout
executive and CEO of the Pacific Skyline
Council. Membership into the Cub Scouts is
open to boys from grades one to five.
Afterwards, the top cars from the local
Cub Scout packs (approximately the fastest
10 percent of the field) will compete in the
district finals for a trophy from noon to 3
p.m.
“What’s great about the Pinewood Derby is
that it is one the most memorable activities
that a young boy will have … of all the trips
and campouts and hikes, and things that they
get to do in Cub Scouting, this one will
always stand out and a lot of kids will keep
their cars for years,” Curtis said.
For the cars built by Cub Scouts, there are
several ironclad rules that each derby partic-
ipant must adhere to: a mass no more than 5
ounces, a length no longer than 7 inches and
unaltered wheels.
“If you have a heavier weight than other
cars, then you will have a speed advantage …
I’m looking to see that the wheels haven’t
been machined down or modified at all,
because sometimes, what they’ll do is
ground down the wheels, so there’s less con-
tact between the wheels and the track … also
there’s this (hollowed-out woodblock) to
make sure the cars adhere to the dimensions
(in the rules),” Greg Newton said.
During the entrant registration process, if
the car is too long and/or heavy, the partici-
pants are allowed to make impromptu adjust-
ments to the car — with pliers, hot-glue guns
and whatever resourcefulness they have.
Even with the methodical attention to
detail that characterizes pinewood cars, there
are many factors and bits of conventional
wisdom that foster skepticism.
“There’s enormous amounts of junk sci-
ence (in pinewood car culture) — ‘Should
you put the weight on the back (of the car)
or the front? ‘Should you make it so one
wheel is off the deck a little bit?’ ‘Should it
be aerodynamic, or does that really matter?’
… nobody quite knows what the truth is,
because no one’s really done empirical tests
on it or that I’m aware of,” Jim Newton said.
Continued from page 1
DERBY
Henderson has had three strokes in the last
year, making it difficult to serve at the same
level, he said. In the last couple meetings
alone, Henderson said he had a difficult time.
Henderson’s current term expires in
November. There are generally two options
for filling such a vacancy: appointing a per-
son to fill the remainder of the term or hold-
ing a special election, which comes at an
additional cost to the district. Given the tim-
ing, there’s a chance the election could be
held in November — when the district would
most likely hold one anyway.
During his tenure, Henderson said he was
most proud of standing up for everyone who
needed him to do so. He also pointed to the
state creating challenges for schools as the
most difficult thing he dealt with during that
time.
Henderson has not been a quiet figure
throughout his tenure. And San Bruno has
struggled with a variety of issues from eti-
quette to finances. Regardless the topic,
Henderson was never shy to share his feel-
ings.
While Henderson was on the board, the
district sold the former Carl Sandburg
Elementary School, which has since been
developed into single-family homes.
In 2007, Henderson was investigated and
cleared of violating the California open
meeting law by asking the board to make him
vice president prior to a meeting. In the same
year, the board held a special meeting to
review board etiquette and open meeting
laws after Henderson brought up allegations
of derogatory names being used to describe
current Trustee Jennifer Blanco, who was
then an active parent volunteer within the
community.
In an open letter to the public, dated Oct. 5,
2007 and hand-delivered to the Daily
Journal, Henderson announced he had
learned he owed the district $8,166.33 for
benefit payments dating back to Jan. 1, 2004.
He also provided copies of the invoice dated
Oct. 1 and a check for the full amount dated
Oct. 3. The announcement came after the
district discovered it was owed money by
two former trustees for health benefits.
Over the past six years, the district studied
school configuration and considered school
closure on more than one occasion before
making the decision to shutter Crestmoor
Elementary School this spring.
Continued from page 1
SKIP
COMICS/GAMES
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tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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12 Rural structure
13 Galleon cargo
14 Missing
15 Employees
16 Kind of orange
18 Ambush
20 Scholarly org.
21 Heel
22 Vintage
23 Request urgently
26 Pina --
29 Flue
30 Dandies
31 KLM destination
33 Coral islet
34 Purple fower
35 Tex. neighbor
36 Wrapped package
38 Glove leather
39 Come to the rescue
40 Survey choice
41 Hartford’s st.
43 Act servile
46 Keeping an online journal
48 Branding --
50 Level
51 Caesar’s 1002
52 Basilica area
53 Whiskey grains
54 Qt. parts
55 Delight
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1 Bonfre remains
2 Look at
3 She, in Seville
4 Mimic
5 Wanderer
6 Busboy’s load
7 Sweetie pie
8 Kampala’s nation
9 -- d’oeuvres
10 Appliance
11 Cackler
17 Some pickles
19 Aberdeen kid
22 Sorry about that!
23 Floor tile material
24 Mimic a kangaroo
25 Gaelic singing star
26 Roll of stamps
27 Hockey feint
28 New Year’s Eve word
30 Astaire or Rogers
32 “The Facts of Life”
Charlotte
34 Cake decoration
35 Banishing
37 Grazing lands
38 Embroider
40 Hindu mystics
41 Kind of pot
42 Exude moisture
43 Furrowed
44 By mouth
45 Used a loom
46 “It’s cold!”
47 Little rascal
49 Society column word
diLBErt® CrOsswOrd PuZZLE
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friday, aPriL 12, 2013
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- Commercial
involvements continue to look pretty good for you,
so give this area top priority, even if you have other
developments calling for your attention.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t let a project of
personal importance be taken out of your hands.
If your leadership is challenged, try to make your
antagonist work with you.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- Although your
ambitions will be easily stimulated, the urge to
achieve them might be lacking. Chances are this will
be due to a lack of self-confdence.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- If you want your
friends to treat you well, you must frst project
warmth toward them. They’ll be analyzing your level
of commitment, as you’ll be checking out theirs.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- The best way to enhance
your image is by letting others know how easygoing
you are. One way to do that is not to take life too
seriously.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You’re likely to fnd an
opening to discuss a serious matter with a close
pal. It’ll be an issue that demands attention, so you
shouldn’t miss this chance.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Someone you’ve helped
in the past has been looking out for your interests,
even though you’ve said nothing to him or her about
your troubles. Prepare for some pleasant surprises.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- This can be a very
pleasant day if you take a middle-of-the-road
attitude and allow destiny to take its course. You’ll
know how to adjust to new circumstances with ease.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Try to spend
a little time outdoors, engaging in an activity that
stimulates you mentally and physically. You don’t
have to engage in anything that is too strenuous,
just make sure it’s fun.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- One of your
greatest attributes is an ability to effectively manage
others. Your pure motives and impeccable skill will
be clear to your colleagues.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Associates will be
impressed by the example you set: self-assured,
calm and at peace with the world. It will help put
others in the same frame of mind.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If you are restless, a
change of scenery could help immensely. Strolling
through places where you can unobtrusively observe
others might fll the bill.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc
24 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TRABAJO INMEDIATO
Esta buscando excelentes
Personas de limpieza.
Horas y buenas condiciones
de trabajo.
Buen pago!!
Uso de carro de compania.
MOLLY MAIDte puede
Ofrecer esto y mucho mas!
Bi-linque. Por favor llamar al
(650) 837-9788
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #320
San Mateo, CA 94402
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255043
The following person is doing business
as: Estereo Revelacion, 610 Indian Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Fredy Ro-
mero, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Fredy Romero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520928
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vidit Martin Khilani
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anil Khilani filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Vidit Martin Khilani
Proposed name: Marty Vidit Khilani
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 17,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/03/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 4/03/13
(Published, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 4/19/13,
04/26/13)
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR CHANGE IN
OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
LICENSE
Date of Filing Application:
March 29, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the
Applicant(s) is/are:
ALL FOR DESSERT, INC.
The applicants listed above
are applying to the Depart-
ment of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic bever-
ages at:
550 MASONIC WAY
BELMONT, CA 94002-2703
Type of license(s) applied for:
41 - On-Sale Beer And Wine -
Eating Place
DEPARTMENT OF ALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE CON-
TROL
33 NEW MONTGOMERY
STREET
SUITE 1230
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94105
(415) 356-6500
4/12/13
CNS-2470541#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255032
The following person is doing business
as: Abravo Trading, 719 Coronado Ln.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Abravo
Bioscience, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Lin Ge /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255044
The following person is doing business
as: Johnny’s Shell, 248 South Airport
Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hampton’s Service, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Jonny’s Shell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255022
The following person is doing business
as: DHZ Phillips Wealth Management,
400 S. El Camino Real, Ste. 800, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Hewins Financial
Advisors, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Diane Kelvie /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255039
The following person is doing business
as: CUE Wealth Management, 400 S. El
Camino Real, Ste. 800, SAN MATEO,
CA 94402 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Hewins Financial Advi-
sors, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Diane Kelvie /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254750
The following person is doing business
as: Boudoir By Lily, 1214 Burlingame
Ave., Ste. 2, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Pooi Li Yip, 89 Teresa St., Daly
City, CA 94014. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 04/01/2011.
/s/ Pooi Li Yip /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255167
The following person is doing business
as: Pfeifer Insurance Brokers, 533 Air-
port Blvd. 4th Flr., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Alexander Pfeifer, 835 N.
Humboldt St., #309, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Alexander Pfeifer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255140
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Express Moving Co, 337 S.
Fremont #304, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Xiao Feng Xu, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Xiao Feng Xu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255114
The following person is doing business
as: Ferrari Investment Co., 1054 Arbor
Rd. Unit A, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
David Ferrari, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ David Ferrari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255151
The following person is doing business
as: Custino, LLC, 2133 Pullman Ave.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Custino,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Mayya Bruisilovskaya /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254974
The following person is doing business
as: Pillar Point Inn, 380 Capitrano Rd.,
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Dover
Crest, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/01/2007.
/s/ Keet Nerhan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255312
The following person is doing business
as: Sheehy Contractor Services, 456
Moana Way, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kyle James Sheehy, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kyle Sheehy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255135
The following person is doing business
as: LaMond Interiors, 122 Walnut St.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Gabrielle
Marie LaMond, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Gabrielle Marie LaMond/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254723
The following person is doing business
as: Niles College, 553 Pilgrim Dr., Ste B
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Niles Col-
lege. LLC., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ FE B. Borrillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255122
The following person is doing business
as: Bayshore Plumbers, 3158 Rolison
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Miguel L. Moreno, 2224 Menalto Ave.,
East Palo Alto, CA 94303. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Miguel Moreno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255091
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Magic Labyrinth, 724 Laurel
Ave., #401, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Bogdan Zayats and Ana Maria Gon-
zalez, same address. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Bogdan Zayats /
/s/ Ana Maria Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255037
The following person is doing business
as: Ethelbop5016 230 San Antonio Ave.,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ma-
ria Alma O. Poblete, and Pepito Joves,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/10/2012.
/s/ Maria Alma Poblete /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255428
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: New World Beauty Salon, 410
A-E 1st Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Susana Flores, and Cesar Brandan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susana Flores /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
26 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
BURLINGAME SCHOOL District
REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS AND PROPOSAL
FOR
BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE AND SUPERVISION SERVICES
The Burlingame School District is requesting the submission of a statement of qualifications and
proposals from firms interested in providing before and after school child care and supervision
services at six (6) District elementary school sites.
Interested firms must submit a Proposal as described, with one (1) original and nine (9) copies
of requested materials to:
Burlingame School District Office
1825 Trousdale Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010
ATTN: Assistant Superintendent / Chief Business Official
FAX OR EMAIL PROPOSALS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
All Statements of Qualifications and Proposals must be received at the District Office at
the address above on or before May 10, 2013, no later than 2:00 p.m.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Statement or Qualifications and Proposal, contact Dr.
Robert Clark, Assistant Superintendent/Chief Business Official at rclark@bsd.k12.ca.us, or
interested firms may stop by the District Office at the address above to pick up a paper
document.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, April 5 and 12, 2013
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255339
The following person is doing business
as: 002Design 2038 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kurin Vi Tu,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/05/2009.
/s/ Kurin Vi Tu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255115
The following person is doing business
as: NK International Trading Company
USA, 37 Cymbidium Cir., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jiun Zhou,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Jiun Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255412
The following person is doing business
as: Kristen Turner, 851 Old County Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Kristen
Turner, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Kristen Turner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255434
The following person is doing business
as: JF Consulting, 1035 Woodland Dr.,
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: BE
HATA YOGA, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jordan Funk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255385
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Coastside Legal Research, 2)
DMV For You, 8231 Pescadero Creek
Rd., LOMA MAR, CA 94021 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ria
Gomes, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Ria Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Lois Loretta Burton
Case Number: PRO123215
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Lois Loretta Burton. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by Ri-
chard C. Harrington. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that Ri-
chard C. Harrington be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
203 Public Notices
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 1, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Ctm 2F, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Robert C. Borris Jr., Esq., 85415
21550 Foothill Blvd.,
HAYWARD, CA 94541
(510)581-7111
Dated: March 28, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 12, 19, 29, 2013.
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
File No. 7037.99289
Title Order No. 7466241
MIN No. APN 094-271-440-3
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/06/10.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. A public auction
sale to the highest bidder for cash,
cashier's check drawn on a state or
national bank, check drawn by state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, or savings association, or sav-
ings bank specified in §5102 to the Fi-
nancial code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state, will be held by du-
ly appointed trustee. The sale will be
made, but without covenant or war-
ranty, expressed or implied, regarding ti-
tle, possession, or encumbrances, to sat-
isfy the obligation secured by said Deed
of Trust. The undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness
of the property address or other com-
mon designation, if any, shown herein.
Trustor(s): SARA MOGOS OGBAMI-
CHAEL, A MARRIED WOMAN AS
HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROP-
ERTY Recorded: 06/01/10, as Instru-
ment No. 2010-059264,of Official Re-
cords of SAN MATEO County, California.
Date of Sale: 04/25/13 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: At the Marshall Street en-
trance to the Hall of Justice, 400 County
Center., Redwood City, CA The purport-
ed property address is: 1299 MARLIN
AVE, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 Asses-
sors Parcel No. 094-271-440-3 The to-
tal amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligation secured by the property
to be sold and reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of the Notice
of Sale is $380,280.66. If the sale is set
aside for any reason, the purchaser at
the sale shall be entitled only to a return
of the deposit paid, plus interest. The
purchaser shall have no further re-
course against the beneficiary, the
Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks
involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
203 Public Notices
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the
property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder
at the auction, you are or may be respon-
sible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You
are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or
a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this infor-
mation. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 877-484-9942
or 800- 280-2832 or visit this Internet
Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com using the file number
assigned to this case 7037.99289. Infor-
mation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: April 3, 2013 NORTHWEST
TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee
Bonita Salazar, Authorized Signatory
1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa
Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website:
www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auc-
tion.com Automated Sales Line: 877-
484-9942 or 800-280-2832 Reinstate-
ment and Pay-Off Requests: 866-387-
NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER #
7037.99289:04/05/2013,04/12/2013,
04/19/2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
296 Appliances
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
27 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Least ancient
7 Some TVs
11 This second,
briefly
14 Forward, to
Fiorello
15 City SW of
Buffalo
16 Christian sch.
since 1963
17 Extra effort
19 Shoofly __
20 Skittish NBC
show?
21 “That’s rich!”
evoker
23 Jellied item in
British cuisine
25 “Days of Grace”
memoirist
26 Relaxed
27 GRE components
30 Doubter’s question
32 Note promising
notes
33 Letter-routing
letters
36 Big-eared flier of
film
40 Take on
responsibility
43 Finish
44 It may be spare
45 “Progress through
Technology”
automaker
46 “Awesome!”
48 Original Speed
Stick maker
50 Awesome, in a
way
53 Used to be
56 Giant of note
57 It usually involves
rapping
60 Rock’s __
Fighters
63 Maker of SteeL
kitchen products
64 Filing option, or
what can be
found in four long
answers?
66 Beret, e.g.
67 __ Accords: 1993
agreement
68 Having trouble
69 Charles V’s
domain: Abbr.
70 Light submachine
gun
71 Forgetful, maybe
DOWN
1 Murphy’s and
Godwin’s, for two
2 Shakespeare’s
flower?
3 Carving area
4 It’s bigger than
the neg.
5 Unwavering
6 Buster Brown’s
dog
7 Causes a stink
8 Collide with
9 Where the slain
roll?
10 “I __ beautiful
city ...”: Dickens
11 Dad
12 Preserves, in a
way
13 Editor’s request
18 Genetic letters
22 Prone to snits
24 Grab a sandwich,
perhaps
27 65-Down shade
28 Women
29 __ Miguel:
Azores island
31 Suffix with ox-
34 Like many a
brisk 45-minute
walk
35 General on a
menu
37 View from Tokyo
38 Wished
39 Valhalla chief
41 Reuters
competitor
42 “I wonder ...”
47 Breakfast cereal
magnate
49 With 50-Down,
when modern
mammals
emerged
50 See 49-Down
51 “Brave” studio
52 “Fingers
crossed”
54 Bad sentence
55 Round no.
58 Parts of la cara
59 1978 Booker
Prize recipient
Murdoch
61 Kind of exam
62 “I got it”
65 Darken in a
salon
By Julian Lim
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/12/13
04/12/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) , SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
304 Furniture
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
304 Furniture
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8’ BY 11’ CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy, SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
310 Misc. For Sale
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
28 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00 SOLD!
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
318 Sports Equipment
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE & MOVING
SALE
BURLINGAME
18-20 Clarendon Rd.
(x-st. Peninsula)
Sat. & Sun.
April 13 & 14
8 am - 4 pm
No Early Birds!
Furniture, clothing,
housewares, music
equipment, handmade
china pieces & much
more!
GARAGE &
BAKE SALE
Fundraiser for local
baseball team!
Belmont
1250 Avon St.
(off Ralston, just east of Barrett Park)
Sat., April 13th
9am-3pm
Sports equipment, furniture,
electronics, toys, dishes, books,
DVDs, costume jewelry and
more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money,
make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Furniture,
Dishes, Art,
Tools, Books,
& More
no kids stuff
April 13th & 14th
9am-3pm
At the corner of
Carmellita
&
Armsby
in Hillsborough
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER
READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800, Pre month, Near Shop-
ing center, (650)697-4758
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
620 Automobiles
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1989 CHEVY L10 Tahoe - 4w/d, Pick-Up
$2500., (650)341-7069
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND
OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL OR
ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry
Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry • Drywall • Tile
Painting • Exterior/Interior
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
29 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.solleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH &
BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Dental Services
30 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Body $40/hr
Open 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
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Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
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650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
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Lic.#4105088251/
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LASTING IMPRESSIONS
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STERLING COURT
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Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
25 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TRABAJO INMEDIATO
Esta buscando excelentes
Personas de limpieza.
Horas y buenas condiciones
de trabajo.
Buen pago!!
Uso de carro de compania.
MOLLY MAIDte puede
Ofrecer esto y mucho mas!
Bi-linque. Por favor llamar al
(650) 837-9788
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #320
San Mateo, CA 94402
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255043
The following person is doing business
as: Estereo Revelacion, 610 Indian Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Fredy Ro-
mero, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Fredy Romero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520928
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vidit Martin Khilani
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anil Khilani filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Vidit Martin Khilani
Proposed name: Marty Vidit Khilani
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 17,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/03/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 4/03/13
(Published, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 4/19/13,
04/26/13)
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR CHANGE IN
OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
LICENSE
Date of Filing Application:
March 29, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the
Applicant(s) is/are:
ALL FOR DESSERT, INC.
The applicants listed above
are applying to the Depart-
ment of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic bever-
ages at:
550 MASONIC WAY
BELMONT, CA 94002-2703
Type of license(s) applied for:
41 - On-Sale Beer And Wine -
Eating Place
DEPARTMENT OF ALCO-
HOLIC BEVERAGE CON-
TROL
33 NEW MONTGOMERY
STREET
SUITE 1230
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94105
(415) 356-6500
4/12/13
CNS-2470541#
SAN MATEO DAILY
JOURNAL
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255032
The following person is doing business
as: Abravo Trading, 719 Coronado Ln.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Abravo
Bioscience, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Lin Ge /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255044
The following person is doing business
as: Johnny’s Shell, 248 South Airport
Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hampton’s Service, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Jonny’s Shell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255022
The following person is doing business
as: DHZ Phillips Wealth Management,
400 S. El Camino Real, Ste. 800, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Hewins Financial
Advisors, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Diane Kelvie /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255039
The following person is doing business
as: CUE Wealth Management, 400 S. El
Camino Real, Ste. 800, SAN MATEO,
CA 94402 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Hewins Financial Advi-
sors, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Diane Kelvie /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254750
The following person is doing business
as: Boudoir By Lily, 1214 Burlingame
Ave., Ste. 2, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Pooi Li Yip, 89 Teresa St., Daly
City, CA 94014. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 04/01/2011.
/s/ Pooi Li Yip /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255167
The following person is doing business
as: Pfeifer Insurance Brokers, 533 Air-
port Blvd. 4th Flr., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Alexander Pfeifer, 835 N.
Humboldt St., #309, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Alexander Pfeifer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255140
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Express Moving Co, 337 S.
Fremont #304, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Xiao Feng Xu, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Xiao Feng Xu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255114
The following person is doing business
as: Ferrari Investment Co., 1054 Arbor
Rd. Unit A, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
David Ferrari, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ David Ferrari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255151
The following person is doing business
as: Custino, LLC, 2133 Pullman Ave.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Custino,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Mayya Bruisilovskaya /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254974
The following person is doing business
as: Pillar Point Inn, 380 Capitrano Rd.,
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Dover
Crest, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/01/2007.
/s/ Keet Nerhan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255312
The following person is doing business
as: Sheehy Contractor Services, 456
Moana Way, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kyle James Sheehy, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kyle Sheehy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255135
The following person is doing business
as: LaMond Interiors, 122 Walnut St.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Gabrielle
Marie LaMond, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Gabrielle Marie LaMond/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254723
The following person is doing business
as: Niles College, 553 Pilgrim Dr., Ste B
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Niles Col-
lege. LLC., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ FE B. Borrillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255122
The following person is doing business
as: Bayshore Plumbers, 3158 Rolison
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Miguel L. Moreno, 2224 Menalto Ave.,
East Palo Alto, CA 94303. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Miguel Moreno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255091
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Magic Labyrinth, 724 Laurel
Ave., #401, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Bogdan Zayats and Ana Maria Gon-
zalez, same address. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Bogdan Zayats /
/s/ Ana Maria Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255037
The following person is doing business
as: Ethelbop5016 230 San Antonio Ave.,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ma-
ria Alma O. Poblete, and Pepito Joves,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/10/2012.
/s/ Maria Alma Poblete /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255428
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: New World Beauty Salon, 410
A-E 1st Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Susana Flores, and Cesar Brandan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susana Flores /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
26 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
BURLINGAME SCHOOL District
REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS AND PROPOSAL
FOR
BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE AND SUPERVISION SERVICES
The Burlingame School District is requesting the submission of a statement of qualifications and
proposals from firms interested in providing before and after school child care and supervision
services at six (6) District elementary school sites.
Interested firms must submit a Proposal as described, with one (1) original and nine (9) copies
of requested materials to:
Burlingame School District Office
1825 Trousdale Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010
ATTN: Assistant Superintendent / Chief Business Official
FAX OR EMAIL PROPOSALS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
All Statements of Qualifications and Proposals must be received at the District Office at
the address above on or before May 10, 2013, no later than 2:00 p.m.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Statement or Qualifications and Proposal, contact Dr.
Robert Clark, Assistant Superintendent/Chief Business Official at rclark@bsd.k12.ca.us, or
interested firms may stop by the District Office at the address above to pick up a paper
document.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, April 5 and 12, 2013
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255339
The following person is doing business
as: 002Design 2038 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kurin Vi Tu,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/05/2009.
/s/ Kurin Vi Tu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255115
The following person is doing business
as: NK International Trading Company
USA, 37 Cymbidium Cir., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jiun Zhou,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Jiun Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255412
The following person is doing business
as: Kristen Turner, 851 Old County Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Kristen
Turner, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Kristen Turner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255434
The following person is doing business
as: JF Consulting, 1035 Woodland Dr.,
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: BE
HATA YOGA, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jordan Funk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255385
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Coastside Legal Research, 2)
DMV For You, 8231 Pescadero Creek
Rd., LOMA MAR, CA 94021 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ria
Gomes, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Ria Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Lois Loretta Burton
Case Number: PRO123215
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Lois Loretta Burton. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by Ri-
chard C. Harrington. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that Ri-
chard C. Harrington be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
203 Public Notices
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 1, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Ctm 2F, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Robert C. Borris Jr., Esq., 85415
21550 Foothill Blvd.,
HAYWARD, CA 94541
(510)581-7111
Dated: March 28, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 12, 19, 29, 2013.
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
File No. 7037.99289
Title Order No. 7466241
MIN No. APN 094-271-440-3
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/06/10.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. A public auction
sale to the highest bidder for cash,
cashier's check drawn on a state or
national bank, check drawn by state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, or savings association, or sav-
ings bank specified in §5102 to the Fi-
nancial code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state, will be held by du-
ly appointed trustee. The sale will be
made, but without covenant or war-
ranty, expressed or implied, regarding ti-
tle, possession, or encumbrances, to sat-
isfy the obligation secured by said Deed
of Trust. The undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness
of the property address or other com-
mon designation, if any, shown herein.
Trustor(s): SARA MOGOS OGBAMI-
CHAEL, A MARRIED WOMAN AS
HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROP-
ERTY Recorded: 06/01/10, as Instru-
ment No. 2010-059264,of Official Re-
cords of SAN MATEO County, California.
Date of Sale: 04/25/13 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: At the Marshall Street en-
trance to the Hall of Justice, 400 County
Center., Redwood City, CA The purport-
ed property address is: 1299 MARLIN
AVE, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 Asses-
sors Parcel No. 094-271-440-3 The to-
tal amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligation secured by the property
to be sold and reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of the Notice
of Sale is $380,280.66. If the sale is set
aside for any reason, the purchaser at
the sale shall be entitled only to a return
of the deposit paid, plus interest. The
purchaser shall have no further re-
course against the beneficiary, the
Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks
involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
203 Public Notices
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the
property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder
at the auction, you are or may be respon-
sible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can
receive clear title to the property. You
are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or
a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this infor-
mation. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 877-484-9942
or 800- 280-2832 or visit this Internet
Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com using the file number
assigned to this case 7037.99289. Infor-
mation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: April 3, 2013 NORTHWEST
TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee
Bonita Salazar, Authorized Signatory
1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa
Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website:
www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auc-
tion.com Automated Sales Line: 877-
484-9942 or 800-280-2832 Reinstate-
ment and Pay-Off Requests: 866-387-
NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER #
7037.99289:04/05/2013,04/12/2013,
04/19/2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
296 Appliances
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
298 Collectibles
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
28 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Least ancient
7 Some TVs
11 This second,
briefly
14 Forward, to
Fiorello
15 City SW of
Buffalo
16 Christian sch.
since 1963
17 Extra effort
19 Shoofly __
20 Skittish NBC
show?
21 “That’s rich!”
evoker
23 Jellied item in
British cuisine
25 “Days of Grace”
memoirist
26 Relaxed
27 GRE components
30 Doubter’s question
32 Note promising
notes
33 Letter-routing
letters
36 Big-eared flier of
film
40 Take on
responsibility
43 Finish
44 It may be spare
45 “Progress through
Technology”
automaker
46 “Awesome!”
48 Original Speed
Stick maker
50 Awesome, in a
way
53 Used to be
56 Giant of note
57 It usually involves
rapping
60 Rock’s __
Fighters
63 Maker of SteeL
kitchen products
64 Filing option, or
what can be
found in four long
answers?
66 Beret, e.g.
67 __ Accords: 1993
agreement
68 Having trouble
69 Charles V’s
domain: Abbr.
70 Light submachine
gun
71 Forgetful, maybe
DOWN
1 Murphy’s and
Godwin’s, for two
2 Shakespeare’s
flower?
3 Carving area
4 It’s bigger than
the neg.
5 Unwavering
6 Buster Brown’s
dog
7 Causes a stink
8 Collide with
9 Where the slain
roll?
10 “I __ beautiful
city ...”: Dickens
11 Dad
12 Preserves, in a
way
13 Editor’s request
18 Genetic letters
22 Prone to snits
24 Grab a sandwich,
perhaps
27 65-Down shade
28 Women
29 __ Miguel:
Azores island
31 Suffix with ox-
34 Like many a
brisk 45-minute
walk
35 General on a
menu
37 View from Tokyo
38 Wished
39 Valhalla chief
41 Reuters
competitor
42 “I wonder ...”
47 Breakfast cereal
magnate
49 With 50-Down,
when modern
mammals
emerged
50 See 49-Down
51 “Brave” studio
52 “Fingers
crossed”
54 Bad sentence
55 Round no.
58 Parts of la cara
59 1978 Booker
Prize recipient
Murdoch
61 Kind of exam
62 “I got it”
65 Darken in a
salon
By Julian Lim
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/12/13
04/12/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) , SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
304 Furniture
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
304 Furniture
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8’ BY 11’ CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy, SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
310 Misc. For Sale
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
29 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00 SOLD!
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
318 Sports Equipment
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE & MOVING
SALE
BURLINGAME
18-20 Clarendon Rd.
(x-st. Peninsula)
Sat. & Sun.
April 13 & 14
8 am - 4 pm
No Early Birds!
Furniture, clothing,
housewares, music
equipment, handmade
china pieces & much
more!
GARAGE &
BAKE SALE
Fundraiser for local
baseball team!
Belmont
1250 Avon St.
(off Ralston, just east of Barrett Park)
Sat., April 13th
9am-3pm
Sports equipment, furniture,
electronics, toys, dishes, books,
DVDs, costume jewelry and
more!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money,
make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Furniture,
Dishes, Art,
Tools, Books,
& More
no kids stuff
April 13th & 14th
9am-3pm
At the corner of
Carmellita
&
Armsby
in Hillsborough
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER
READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800, Pre month, Near Shop-
ing center, (650)697-4758
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
620 Automobiles
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1989 CHEVY L10 Tahoe - 4w/d, Pick-Up
$2500., (650)341-7069
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND
OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL OR
ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry
Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry • Drywall • Tile
Painting • Exterior/Interior
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
30 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.solleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH &
BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Dental Services
31 Friday • Apr. 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Body $40/hr
Open 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 31
Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Syrian troops launch
counterattack on south
BEIRUT — Syrian government forces
launched a counteroffensive in the south,
capturing a town and killing at least 45
people including women and children,
opposition activists said Thursday.
The attack on the town of Sanamein
followed a rebel advance in the area in
recent weeks. They opposition fighters
captured army bases and a major town in
the strategic province of Daraa along the
border with Jordan.
“They slaughtered any person they
found,” an activist in the nearby town of
Busra al-Harir who goes by the fake
name of Hamza al-Hariri told the
Associated Press via Skype. He would
not give his real name for fear of govern-
ment reprisals.
“This is the ugliest massacre since the
one in Houla,” he added, referring to a
region in the central province of Homs
where more than 100 civilians were killed
by government forces in May last year.
Rebels advancing in the south in recent
weeks have been aiming to secure a cor-
ridor from the Jordanian border to
Damascus about 60 miles away in prepa-
ration for an eventual assault on the capi-
tal. Regional officials and military experts
note a sharp increase in weapons ship-
ments to opposition fighters by Arab gov-
ernments, in coordination with the U.S.,
in the hopes of readying a push into
Damascus — the ultimate prize in the
civil war that has killed more than 70,000
in two years.
Around the world
By Robrt Burns and Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A U.S. intelligence
report concludes that North Korea has
advanced its nuclear knowhow to the point
that it could arm a ballistic missile with a
nuclear warhead, a jarring revelation in the
midst of bellicose threats from the unpre-
dictable communist regime.
President Barack Obama urged calm, call-
ing on Pyongyang to end its saber-rattling
while sternly warning that he would “take all
necessary steps” to protect American citi-
zens.
The new American intelligence analysis,
disclosed Thursday at a hearing on Capitol
Hill, says the Pentagon’s intelligence wing
has “moderate confidence” that North Korea
has nuclear weapons capable of delivery by
ballistic missiles but that the weapon was
unreliable.
Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-Colo., read aloud
what he said was an unclassified paragraph
from a secret Defense Intelligence Agency
report that was supplied to some members of
Congress. The reading seemed to take Gen.
Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, by surprise, who said he had-
n’t seen the report and declined to answer
questions about it.
In a statement late Thursday, Pentagon
press secretary George Little said: “While I
cannot speak to all the details of a report that
is classified in its entirety, it would be inac-
curate to suggest that the North Korean
regime has fully tested, developed or demon-
strated the kinds of nuclear capabilities refer-
enced” in Lamborn’s remarks.
“The United States continues to closely
monitor the North Korean nuclear program
and calls upon North Korea to honor its inter-
national obligations,” Little added.
The DIA conclusion was confirmed by a
senior congressional aide who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because the Pentagon
had not officially released the contents. The
aide said the report was produced in March.
Since the beginning of March, the Navy
has moved two missile defense ships closer
to the coast of the Korean peninsula, in part
to protect against a potential missile launch
aimed at Guam, a U.S. territory in the Pacific.
The Pentagon also has announced it will
place a more advanced land-based missile
defense on Guam, and Hagel said in March
that he approved installing 14 additional mis-
sile interceptors in Alaska to bolster a portion
of the missile defense network that is
designed to protect all of U.S. territory.
Pentagon: North Korea could launch nuclear missile
By Raphael Satter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — It’s a promising form of elec-
tronic cash free from central bankers and
beloved by hackers. It — Bitcoin — may also
be in trouble, registering catastrophic losses
that have sent speculators scrambling.
Although the cybercurrency has existed for
years as a kind of Internet oddity, a perfect
storm of developments have brought it to the
cusp of mainstream use.
As currency crises in Europe piqued
investors’ interest, a growing number of busi-
nesses announced they were accepting bit-
coins for an ever-wider range of goods and
services. The value of a single bitcoin began
racing upward amid growing media attention,
smashing past the $100 mark last week before
more than doubling again in just a few days.
Then came the crash.
The price of Bitcoin has imploded, falling
from around $266 on Wednesday to just
above $40 on Thursday, according to bitcoin-
charts.com, which tracks trades across the
Internet. The best-known exchange, Tokyo-
based Mt. Gox, has suspended trading for
what it described as a 12-hour “market
cooldown.” By late Thursday, the currency
was back up to just more than $100.
Nicholas Colas, chief market strategist for
the ConvergEx Group, said it was a “great
question” whether the currency could survive
the wrenching ups and downs.
“At this point I would say yes, since it has
before,” Colas wrote in an email. But he noted
that, unlike previous oscillations, Thursday’s
collapse was taking place in the full glare of
international media attention.
“A lot more people know about Bitcoin than
during the prior problems,” he said.
To its supporters — tech-savvy libertarians,
currency geeks, and online speculators —
Bitcoin has enormous promise.
Bitcoins are created, distributed, and
authenticated independently of any bank or
government. The currency’s cryptographic
features make it virtually immune from coun-
terfeiting, and its relative anonymity holds out
the promise of being able to spend money
across the Internet without fear of censors,
regulators or nosey officials.
Bitcoin bursts: Hacker currency gets wild ride
REUTERS
A South Korean soldier walks along a barbed wire fence at a checkpoint on the Grand
Unification Bridge, which leads to the demilitarized zone separating North Korea from South
Korea, in Paju, north of Seoul.
32 Friday • April 12, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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