You are on page 1of 4

Barberi - Unit Plan Day 2 Grade/Subject: 8th Grade English Teacher: Andria Barberi Number of Minutes: 50 minutes Lesson

Title/Topic: Following the Crowd Dates: 1/8/13 STANDARDS/BENCHMARKS/GLCE/HSCE addressed in this lesson: SL.8.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. RI.8.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text. L.8.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. L.8.4(d): Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). OBJECTIVES Through these learning activities, the student will demonstrate the ability to: Students will listen and following along to the reading of Chapter 2. Students will understand the notion of character, character traits, and the importance of character development within stories through a character map. Students will learn to distinguish between character traits that are explicitly called out in a story and character traits that they infer from a story through a character map. Students will determine the meaning of unknown words from context clues or in a dictionary. Time: ANTICIPATORY SET/INTRODUCTION: Admission Ticket: Students will answer the essential question of the day, which will be displayed on a screen using a document camera and projector, by writing in their journals. Essential question: "Have you ever followed the crowd when you knew it was not the best choice to make? Explain." Students will have 3-4 minutes to write, and another 3 minutes will be devoted to sharing. Volunteers will share the experience they wrote about. The teacher will tell students that most people have experiences like these because it's normal to follow the crowd, especially in middle and high school. Students will be asked to keep the idea of following the crowd in mind, when reading The Wave . INPUT Task Analysis 1.) Admission Ticket: Students will answer the essential question of the day, which will be displayed on a screen using a document camera and projector, by writing in their journals. Essential question: "Have you ever followed the crowd when you knew it was not the best choice to make? Explain." Students will have 3-4 minutes to write, and another 3 minutes will be devoted to sharing. Volunteers will share the experience they wrote about. The teacher will tell students that most people have experiences like these because it's normal to follow the crowd, especially in middle and high school. Students will be asked to keep the idea of following the crowd in mind, when reading The Wave.

7 min

3 min

2.) Books Distributed: The teacher will make a brief plea to take good care of our books because they are shared by all of the students throughout the day. Students will be asked not to write on, bend, or destroy the books in anyway. In the future students from each set of desks will get books for all of their group members to expedite the process.

Barberi - Unit Plan Day 2 3.) Back Cover: A student volunteer will read the blurb on the back cover aloud to the class. The text is as follows: The Wave is based on an incident that took place in a high school history class in Palo Alto, California, in 1969. Ben Ross and his history class are about to learn a lesson they will never forget. As they study World War II, Ben Ross' students can't seem to understand how the German people could have followed Hitler and the Nazis. So Mr. Ross creates an experimental movement called The Wave. What begins in a single classroom quickly gathers momentum. Before the end of the week, The Wave's motto, 'Strength Through Discipline, Strength Through Community, Strength Through Action,' governs the entire school. Only two students, Laurie Saunders and David Collins, recognize The Wave for what it is and set out to stop it before it's too late. But is history destined to repeat itself?" The students will then be asked what this back cover blurb reminds them of from the PowerPoint presentation they viewed the day before. Student answers could be: *Hitler Youth *Propaganda *How Germans could follow Hitler and the Nazis *An idea gathering momentum *Take place in the past 4.) Read Chapter 1: The teacher will read the Forward and Chapter 1 aloud while students follow along. Students will be asked to pay special attention to character traits, both elements of character description (external) and character development (internal). 5.) Character Maps: After reading the teacher will name each character presented in this chapter and will draw popsicle sticks to have students name characteristics of those characters. Characters in Chapter 1: Laurie Saunders, Amy Smith, Mr. Gabondi, Ben Ross, Christy Ross, Brian Ammon, Robert Billings, David Collins. Once something has been said about each student, the teacher will ask, "Out of all of these characters, who would you say the two most important characters in this chapter are?" Student responses should be "Laurie Saunders & Ben Ross." Some students may name David Collins because he is on the back cover. If students name David, the teacher will remind them that very little is mentioned of him in Chapter 1, but there are pages describing both Ben Ross and Laurie Saunders. Because these are two important characters, the class will create character maps of both of them. The teacher will model the character map for Laurie Saunders, and the students will need to fill out the character map for Ben Ross on their own. (Examples of completed character maps for both characters are attached.) The teacher will circulate the room while students are creating their character maps on their own to assess student understanding of the assignment. Once all students appear to be done, at their seats groups will share their maps and students can add additional information to their maps based on what others in their group had written. Volunteers from each group will then share a few examples with the class. Students will keep their character maps in the folders so they can continue to fill them out as the unit progresses.

5 min

5 min

20 min

8 min

5.) Vocab: In their journals students will write each vocab word from Chapter 1 displayed on the screen. They will then use the book and/or a dictionary to write a definition of the word. The teacher will circulate during this activity to make sure student definitions are correct. If there are many with similar mistakes, the teacher will address the misunderstanding immediately. Chapter 1 Vocab: *dexterity (noun: Skill in performing tasks, esp. with the hands) *inept (adjective: Having or showing no skill; clumsy) *lackadaisical (adjective: Lacking enthusiasm and determination; carelessly lazy) *tittered (verb: Give a short, half-suppressed laugh; giggle [past tense of titter])

Barberi - Unit Plan Day 2 6.) Wrap Up: The teacher will remind students to think about who the central characters are as the book develops, and to pay attention to who becomes more or less important later on in the novel. Students from each group will collect books and return them to the bookshelf. THINKING LEVELS Understand: Students will understand what it means to follow the crowd through their quick write admittance slip. Apply: Students will classify character traits on their character maps. Knowledge: Students will relate the information on the back cover of the novel with the review of WWII completed the day before. Knowledge: Students will find and write definitions for their vocabulary words, using either a dictionary or context clues, in their journals. LEARNING STYLES Linguistic: Students will express themselves verbally during the reading and discussion of the back cover of the book, and in the final evaluation of character maps. Visual/Auditory: Students will see/hear the teacher modeling how to complete the character map and follow suit. Interpersonal: Students will interact with group members and will share their ideas through class discussion. Intrapersonal: Students will come to understand their own feelings about following the crowd through their admittance slip quick write and share. METHODS Inquiry Individual introspection and writing Graphic organizer modeling through document camera Individual writing and group collaboration Large group discussion INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES Presenting Information: The teacher will read Chapter 1 aloud. The teacher will model character mapping using a character mapping handout, document camera, and presentation screen. Checking for Understanding: The teacher will circulate around the room while students are completing their admittance tickets. Students will begin to make connections between their personal experiences and the text by examining a time they followed the crowd when they knew they shouldn't have. The teacher will discover whether students have captured details of the characters introduced in the first chapter of the novel through a quick question/answer session on character traits and in greater detail through their will character maps. The students outline character traits of the two main characters of the novel through their character map. Students will examine their own reactions to the circumstances that led up to WWII and Nazi control of Guided Practice:

2 min

Barberi - Unit Plan Day 2 The teacher will read Chapter 1 aloud to demonstrate fluid reading and intonation with dialogue. The teacher will instruct the students through modeling, how to fill out character maps using evidence from the text. Independent Practice: Students will work alone when writing their admittance slips and when working on their second character map. They will work with their groups once they've completed their character maps to the best of their abilities, and they will participate in a whole group discussion regarding characteristics of the characters in Chapter 1, while sharing their admittance slip stories, and in the final sharing of their character maps.

CONCLUSION/CLOSURE Wrap Up: The teacher will remind students to think about who the central characters are as the book develops, and to pay attention to who becomes more or less important later on in the novel. Students from each group will collect books and return them to the bookshelf. REFLECTION Do students understand the different between character description and character development? Should I have talked about foreshadowing? Should I have started the mapping by discussing setting? Will the students connect with the book?

ASSESSMENT Formative assessment will take place during discussion and group sharing, and the teacher's circulation of the room during individual work time. RESOURCES NEEDED: Copies of The Wave Character Map Handouts (boy & girl) Student notebook paper Pencils CLASSROOM SET-UP: Traditional group seating: groups have 4-6 desks per group. The white board will be clear, except for the agenda on the upper left hand corner.