LEARN & PLAY

INSTRUCTIONAL BOOK

ROCK GUITAR
LEARN NOTES, CHORDS, RHYTHMS, LICKS, AND SONGS PLAY-ALONG AUDIO CD
WITH EXERCISES AND SONGS

LEARN & PLAY ROCK GUITAR
FOR

ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
BY DEBBIE CAVALIER

AND

First Act Inc. 745 Boylston Street Boston, MA 02116

First Act and the First Act logo are trademarks of First Act Inc. Copyright © 2009 First Act Inc. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the Publisher.

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CONTENTS
Meet your Guitar Holding the Guitar Getting In Tune Music Theory and Notation Rhythm Guitar Chords Strum This! The Open Position Chord Source Power Chords Power Chord Blues Power Chord Grooves More Power Chords Move It On Over! More Grooves The 6th Power “Boogie Blues” Lead Guitar Riff Blues MElodic Licks and Tricks It’s only Rock ‘n Roll

When you play along with these recordings. the accompaniment ranges from a click track to a full-on rock band with drums. go to the track shown to play along. and the Learn & Play Guitar method is a great way to get started. as well as the tools needed to play hundreds of popular music titles. The Learn & Play Guitar method will give you the skills to add music making to your life. You’ll learn the chords and melodies to lots of well-known songs. and guitar. About the CD The accompanying CD contains orchestrated playalong tracks to go along with the lessons.M E E T YO U R G U ITA R ! Introduction Playing the guitar is a lot of fun. bass. Parts of a Guitar Headstock Tuning Keys F I R ST A C T Headstock Tuning Keys Nut Neck Frets F I R ST A C T Nut Neck Frets Soundhole Pickguard Strings Pickup Bridge Tone/Volume Controls Input Jack Strings Bridge Electric Guitar 3 Acoustic Guitar . When you see the CD icon.

F I R ST ACT STANDING SITTING 4 .H O L D M E! Holding the Guitar Hold the guitar in a comfortable sitting or standing position. The neck of the guitar should be angled slightly upwards. Avoid slanting it to look over at the strings. Make sure the body of the guitar is not tilted.

Try not to let your left hand palm touch the back of the neck. The Pick Hold the pick firmly with your right hand. Use the tip of the pick to play the strings. 2nd 1st 3rd 4th 5 . between your thumb and your pointer finger.Your left hand thumb should rest comfortably behind the neck of the guitar. FINGER NUMBERS Your left hand or "fretting" fingers are numbered 1 though 4 from your pointer to your little finger.

4. Tune up with the tuning track on the CD. 6th 5th 4th 3rd 2nd 1st 1 E A D G B E MIDDLE C B C D E 6 F G A 5 B C D 4 E F G 3 A B 2 C D E 1 F G A B C D A STRING 3. A good tuning rule to remember: the tighter the string. tune the 6th string to an E on a piano or a keyboard. the higher the pitch. and indicates if the pitch is too high or too low. or any other instrument that is already in tune. Adjust the pitch by tightening or loosening the strings using the tuning keys located on the head stock. 2. Use an electronic tuner. E String Press the 2nd string behind the 5th fret and tune the open 1st string to it by turning the 1st tuning key. The recording on track 1 plays each string twice. B String Press the 3rd string behind the 4th fret and tune the open 2nd string to it by turning the 2nd tuning key. Play the keys one at a time. There are four ways you can tune your guitar: 1. D String Press the 5th string behind the 5th fret and tune the open 4th string to it by turning the 4th tuning key. Tune the instrument to itself. Adjust each string until it sounds the same as the recording. Tune up to a piano or keyboard. and tune each corresponding string. STRING from the lowest pitch to the highest. An electronic tuner detects the pitch of each string. Pitch means how high or low a musical sound is. this is called relative tuning: E String First. G String Press the 4th string behind the 5th fret and tune the open 3rd string to it by turning the 4th tuning key. A D G 6 E 5 A 4 D 3 G 2 B 1 E B E 6 . A String Press the 6th string behind the 5th fret and tune the open 5th string to it by turning the 5th tuning key until the two strings sound the same.G E T TI N G I N T U N E Tu n i ng Tip Tuning Tuning your guitar corrects the pitch for each string. Tune your guitar by playing the same string as the recording NOTE and adjusting your tuning keys.

NOTES 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Whole Notes get four beats each Half Notes get two beats each 1 2 3 4 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & Quarter Notes get one beat each Eighth Notes get a half of a beat each RESTS RESTS Whole and half rests are attached to a bar on the staff.M US I C T H EO RY A N D N O TATI O N A Solid foundation The next few pages contain some important information about music notation you’ll want to refer to from time to time. 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Whole Rests get four beats each Half Rests get two beats each 1 2 3 4 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & Quarter Rests get one beat each Eighth Rests get a half of a beat each Music is written on a staff that contains five lines and four spaces. Here are the notes and rests you will be using. The whole rest usually sits in the middle of the measure. LINE 5 LINE 4 LINE 3 LINE 2 LINE 1 SPACE 4 SPACE 3 SPACE 2 SPACE 1 7 . LINE SPACE A clef indicates where notes appear on a staff. check it out and then come back whenever you have a question. Rhythm notation indicates how long to play a note or rest). So. Learning this language will help you become a better player. Guitar music begins with a treble clef. Music has its own language made up of notes (musical pitches) and rhythms (beats).

TREBLE CLEF BAR LINE DOUBLE BAR LINE MEASURE REPEAT SIGNS Notes and rhythms Music is made up of notes (pitches) and rhythms (length of notes). The first line on a treble staff is E. Means a quarter note gets one beat (see page 7). Means repeat everything in between the signs. . .. TIME SIGNATURE A time signature tells you how many beats are in each measure. Music notes appear on the staff in alphabetical order. For example: 8 . The notes that extend above and below the treble staff use ledger lines.. The notes are named after the first seven letters of the alphabet. A B C D E F G Means there are four beats to a measure. Means repeat from the beginning.M US I C T H EO RY A N D N O TATI O N Music is divided into measures by bar lines. A double bar line means the end of a song.. .

This is an A (2nd space) quarter note (one beat). E Every G Good B Boy D Does F Fine F A C E Line notes are easily remembered with sayings such as: Empty Garbage Before Dad Flips Every Good Boy Does Fine Space notes are best remembered with the word the letters spell from the lowest to the highest space: FACE RHYTHMIC NOTATION Common in guitar music. Memorize the note names and where they fall on the staff.NOTE NAMES The treble clef gives the staff lines and spaces the following note names. rhythmic notation contains slash marks for rhythms. This is a G (2nd line) half note (two beats). 9 . 4| &4 Count: 1 Whole Notes (4 Beats) Half Notes (2 Beats) | 1 | Quarter Notes (1 Beats) Û Û Û Û 1 2 3 4 ÛÛ Û Û Û ÛÛ Û 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & Eighth Notes (1/2 Beats) 2 3 4 2 3 4 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER This is a C (3rd space) whole note (four beats).

3 T A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 1ST STRING 2ND STRING 3RD STRING 4TH STRING 5TH STRING 6TH STRING T A B 5 3 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER TREBLE STAFF ND STRING RD STRING 4TH STRING 5TH STRING 6TH STRING The treble staff above the tablature indicates the notes and rhythms. A zero indicates that you OPEN should play the OPEN string “open. 1ST FRET 1ST STRING 2ND STRING 3RD STRING 4TH STRING 5TH STRING 6TH STRING 3RD FRET 0 OPEN OPEN 0 1ST FRET 1 3RD FRET 3 1 T A B T A B 3 10 . don’t press the 1ST STRING 0 0 string to the fretboard.” In other words. or tab notation. ® 1 2 3 4 5 6 T A B 6 5 4 3 2 1 1ST STRING 2ND STRING 3RD STRING 4TH STRING 5TH STRING 6TH STRING T A B 3 This indicates the 3rd fret of the 6th string. 1ST ST 2ND S 3RD S 4TH S 5TH S 6TH S 1ST STRING 2ND STRING 3RD STRING 4TH STRING 5TH STRING 6TH STRING T A B 5 3 1ST STRING 2ND STRING 3RD STRING 4TH STRING 5TH STRING 6TH STRING This indicates the 5th fret of the T 5th string and the 3rd fret of the A B 6th string. indicates where to place your fingers on the fretboard. Read the tablature from left to right. the note G.TA B L AT U R E Tablature.

Use a pick and strum downward over the strings until you get a clean clear sound. Practice playing the D chord. XX D 1 3 2 CHORD TIP If you get a buzz sound instead of a musical tone on a fingered string. so you can practice ‘grabbing’ the chord. Chords are a group of notes you strum together at the same time. D Chord T A B 2 3 2 0 D 2 XX 11 T A B 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 . take your fingers off of the fretboard in between notes. Follow the chord frames. An X above a chord frame tells you to avoid that string. Knowing just a few chords will enable you to play a large number of songs. FRETS 2 2 3 3 6 5 4 3 2 1 STRINGS Let’s play some chords. and music notation provided. tab. and dots with numbers are fretting finger positions. Just for this exercise. Practice each chord until you are comfortable playing it.R H Y T H M G U ITA R Don’t Play Play Open String playing chords A rhythm guitarist defines a song’s groove using chords. it means you either have to press the string harder or move your finger farther away from the fret. An O indicates an open string (no left hand fingerings). X 1 1 Fretting Finger CHORD FRAMES Chord frames (shown to the right) are pictures that tell you which notes to play and which strings to strum.

as shown in Practice B below.X C 1 2 3 2 1 G 3 C Chord G Chord T A B 0 1 0 2 3 T A B 3 0 0 0 2 3 Try playing a C chord. as shown in Practice A below. When you are comfortable with the C. D XX X PRACTICE A X C C C X C XX D D XX D XX X C X C 3 X T A B T A B 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 3 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 3 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 3 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 PRACTICE B G X C XX D D XX G G 4 G X C 12 T A B T A B 3 0 0 0 3 2 0 3 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 3 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 2 0 3 0 0 2 3 . Try switching between the three chords. Here’s the G chord. practice switching between the C and D chords.

Notice this progression sounds like the chords to the classic rock song “Sweet Home Alabama.” one sounds G T A B C 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 X D 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 XX X C 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 G 6 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 T A B 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 13 .” D C X G 5 XX D T A B 2 3 2 0 XX X C 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 G 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 G T A B 2 3 2 0 X C D 2 XX 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 groove. This X C 3 0 0 0 2 3 G 3 0 0 0 2 3 Try the same chord on another familiar like the chord progression to “Wild Thing.Play your new chords in the following progression using half notes (two beats eat).

the downstroke: The following strumming examples show the downstroke and the upstroke. G C X XX D G 7 the upstroke: G X C XX D G 8 14 G X C XX D G . striking all six strings. the songs and examples in this book use a downward strum. DOWNSTROKE UPSTROKE G X C XX D G Start with the 6th or heaviest string and strum downward. or downstroke. Start with 1st or thinnest string and strum upward.S T R U M T H IS! STRUMMING The guitar is strummed with the right hand. So far.

G X C XX D X C G the down-upstroke: G X C XX D G 9 T A B 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 STRUMMING PRACTICE C G This strumming pattern works well for many rock grooves. X D XX G G X C XX D X C G Let’s add chords to the strumming pattern you just practiced to play a groove used in many rock tunes including “Hang On Sloopy.” 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 T A B rock groove 3: G C X XX D X C G 10 T A B 15 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 3 2 0 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 2 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 .

Practice this rhythm on a single chord.A tie connects two of the same notes together to be played as one.” rock groove 4: G 11 G C X X C D XX XX D C X X C G G T A B 16 T A B 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 3 1 3 2 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 3 10 2 2 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 3 10 2 2 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 3 0 2 3 2 3 2 0 2 3 1 0 2 0 0 2 3 2 23 32 20 0 2 3 2 2 3 0 2 0 2 2 3 3 2 2 0 0 2 0 3 12 2 0 3 0 2 32 0 2 0 3 10 2 2 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 3 10 2 2 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 3 0 2 3 2 0 3 10 2 2 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 3 0 2 3 3 20 0 0 3 10 22 0 03 2 3 3 0 0 0 2 3 . Û Û The next rhythm and strum pattern is similar to the “Sloopy” groove with the addition of some ties and upstrokes. Now try the same rhythm and strum pattern in the style of the Beatles’ “Twist and Shout.

Here is a classic rock rhythm written in rhythmic notation. Notice the same two-bar strumming pattern is used throughout the entire groove. 12 G Old Time Groove C X D XX G XX D G | 17 .

Memorize these chords and work them into your playing. and D. X A X Am 1 X A7 2 34 23 2 3 X 2 B7 1 3 4 X C 1 2 3 X C7 1 2 3 4 XX D XX 2 3 Dm 1 XX D7 1 2 3 1 2 3 E 1 23 Em E7 1 23 2 XX F* 1 1 2 3 *Make a “bar” with your 1st finger across the 1st fret G G7 1 1 2 3 3 2 18 . but there are many more to learn.T H E O P E N P OS ITI O N C H O R D S O U R C E You’ve mastered three important open position chords: G. The following is a chart containing the other open position chords available.C.

Power Chords are made up of two or three notes. 13 A5 D5 E5 D5 T A B 7 5 7 5 9 7 7 5 19 . driving sound. A5 5th fret XXXX 7th fret X 1 E5 XXX 5th fret X 1 D5 XXX 1 3 3 3 A5 Chord E5 Chord D5 Chord T A B 7 5 T A B 9 7 T A B 7 5 Practice these power chords until you can comfortably change chords using half notes. fat.P OW E R C H O R DS One of the most important tools in a rhythm guitarist’s tool kit is the power chord. They are among the most common sounds in rock music providing a foundation and a big.

Check it out. Play the chord progression to “Baby Blue. But it is also a song form: 12 bars (measures) and three chords used in a very specific order.” 14 Baby Blue A5 T A B 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 D5 A5 T A B 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 E5 A5 T A B 9 7 9 7 7 5 7 5 20 .P OW E R C H O R D B LU E S You probably already know that the “blues” is a style of music.

but you have probably already heard these grooves for years.” 15 rock groove 5: A5 D5 E5 D5 A5 T A B A5 7 5 7 5 7 5 D5 7 5 7 5 E5 9 7 9 7 9 7 D5 7 5 7 5 A5 7 5 The following groove is in the style of Joe Jackson’s hit T A5 D5 A song. The rhythms might look fierce.P OW E R C H O R D G R O OV E S Let’s put these power chords to work and jam on some familiar rock grooves. Work through the TAB and the rhythm notation. This groove is in the style of “Louie Louie. “Is She Really Going Out With Him?” 7 7 9 9 B 16 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 5 7 7 9 7 E5 7 5 7 5 A5 7 5 rock groove 6: T A B A5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 D5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 E5 9 7 9 7 9 7 9 7 A5 7 5 T A B 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 9 7 9 7 9 7 9 7 7 5 21 .

M O R E P OW E R C H O R DS Here are some more power chords and rock grooves to try. G5 3rd fret XXXX 1st fret X XXX 1 3 1st fret F5 X 1 B5 XXX 1 3 3 G5 Chord F5 Chord B 5 Chord T A B 5 3 T A B 3 1 T A B 3 1 17 rock groove 7: G5 F5 B5 G5 G5 T A B 5 3 5 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 5 3 5 3 22 .

1 3 3 1 3 1 The shift slide lines mean to move smoothly from the first note to the next. T A B 7 9 F5 Sometimes songs begin after the first beat of a measure. For this example. slide your finger up two frets (7 to 9). Be sure to play both notes with you pick hand. The notes in an incomplete first measure are called pick-up notes. G5 F5 G5 F5 T A B 3 1 5 3 5 3 3 1 5 3 3 1 18 rock groove 8: F5 G5 F5 G5 F5 T A B 7 9 T A B 3 1 5 3 5 3 3 1 5 3 3 1 23 .

and you’ll have access to the whole world of power chords. or name of the power chord. That means you can play them on any fret. The root. Memorize the following names and positions.M OV E IT O N OV E R ! Power chords are movable. 6th string power chords: X XXX 1st fret F5 1 3 F5 Chord T A B ® 6th string 3 1 F F /G G G /A A A /B B C C /D D D /E E 5th string power chords: 6th string ® X 1 ® B5 F F /G G G /A A A /B B C C /D D D /E E XXX 3 A /B B C C /D D D /E E F F /G G G /A A 5th string ® 5th string A /B B C C /D D D /E E F F /G G G /A A 24 . is always played by the first finger.

Keep your fingers on the strings so that they don’t ring open. A muffled string sound is produced by the fret hand pressing lightly while the pick hand plays. but don’t press so hard as to fret them! These are sometimes called “chucks” or “cuts.” T A B Muffled string practice T A B 19 rock groove 9: F5 T A B B5 A5 F5 D5 B5 A5 T A B F5 3 1 3 1 B5 T A B A5 3 1 3 1 6 4 6 4 D5 6 4 Use the muffled string technique and your new power 5 of Nirvana.M O R E G R O OV E S Let’s use the new power chord positions to play some more familiar rock grooves. A5 chords to play F5 a groove in theB style T A B D5 6 F5 4 F5 B5 6 4 20 3 1 3 1 A5 rock groove 10: T A B F5 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 T A B B5 A5 3 1 6 4 6 4 6 4 6 4 D5 3 1 3 1 3 1 F5 6 4 6 4 3 1 T A B 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 6 4 6 4 6 4 6 4 3 1 25 .

21 rock groove 11: G5 D5 B5 C5 D5 G5 T A B 5 3 5 3 5 3 7 5 7 5 7 5 4 2 4 2 4 2 5 3 5 3 5 3 7 5 5 3 G5 D5 B5 C5 D5 G5 T and A B last Create your own rock grooves with the power chords the classic rock grooves you’ve learned so far.Use your new power chords to play a rhythmic groove in the style of Green Day. The 4 7 7 7 page of the book has 5 5 5 more 2 5 space5for you 5 to write 3 3 3 T own grooves. your A B 4 2 4 2 5 3 5 3 5 3 7 5 5 3 MY ROCK GROOVE: T A B 26 .

Used in combination with the standard power chord. Chuck Berry. the sixth chord gives you a “boogie” sound made famous by such artists as The Rolling Stones. as shown below. Van Halen.B 7 5 5th fret T H E 6T H P OW E R Power chords can be altered to create a sixth chord by lifting the third finger and adding the fourth. and more. A5 Chord A5 XXXX T A B A6 Chord A6 XXXX 5th fret 5th fret T A B 7 5 (Make this stretch with your 4th fretting finger) T A B 9 5 22 rock groove 12: A5 A6 A5 A6 A5 A6 A5 A6 A5 T A B 7 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 Chord A5 X XXX D5 A6 D5 A5 D6 D5 Chord A6 D5 D6 A5 D5 5th fret A6 X A5 D6 D5 A6 D6 D6 Chord A5 X D6 XXX D5 5th fret 5th fret T A B T A B 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 9 5 T A B 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 23 T A B rock groove 13: D5 D6 5th fret A6 XXXX A6 Chord D5 A5 Chord D6 D5 D6 D5 D6 D5 A5 XXXX T A B A5 XXXX 5th fret T A B 7 5 T A B 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 5th fret 27 7 5 . Eric Clapton.

M. -----------------------T A B 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 G5 E5 E6 E5 E6 A5 E5 T A B 25 9 7 11 7 P. ------------------------ 28 T A B 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 ------------------------ ------------------ A5 5 6 7 8 9 rock groove 15: G5 5 6 7 8 9 -----------------------7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 9 7 9 7 11 7 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 ------------------ 7 5 7 5 5 3 7 5 11 7 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 A5 7 5 7 5 5 3 7 5 .M. ----------------. This signature sound can E6 E5 “My Best E6 be heard inE5 a variety of songs including Friend’s Girl” by The Cars. ----------------.E5 Chord X E6 Chord X E5 E6 XXX XXX 7th fret 7th fret T A B 9 7 T A B 11 7 24 rock groove 14: E5 E6 E5 E6 E5 E6 E5 E6 E5 T A B 9 7 11 7 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 Palm muting is a common rock guitar technique. under the notes. and many others. Use the heel of your picking hand to mute the strings and get A5a thicker.P. P. “Barracuda” by Heart.P.M.M. more percussive sound.M. Use this technique when you see the abbreviation P.

Using the blues form and sixth chords. try a boogie blues.) under the first measure. 26 Boogie Blues A5 A6 A5 A6 P.M. Throughout T A B 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 D5 D6 D5 D6 A5 T A B 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 E5 A5 A5 T A B 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 9 11 11 7 7 7 9 7 9 7 11 7 11 7 9 7 9 11 11 7 7 7 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 7 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 7 5 9 9 5 5 7 5 29 .M. Notice the call for palm muting (P.

27 T A B 3 0 3 0 G X C Here is that same riff with notes that can be played over the C chord. solos. or riffs while the rest of the band keeps the rhythmic groove going.L E A D G U ITA R The lead guitarist’s role is to play melodies. G (Each riff is played four times) Here is a riff that can be played over a G chord. A riff is a pattern of notes that can be repeated. 28 0 T A B 0 3 1 3 0 3 3 C X XX D Here is that same riff with notes that can be played over the D chord. 29 0 3 1 3 T A B 2 0 1 3 30 .

Have a keyboard player or guitarists play the chords to accompany you. 30 G Riff Blues T A B 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 C X G T A B 0 3 1 3 3 0 1 3 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 D XX X C G G T A B 2 0 1 3 3 0 1 3 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 31 .R I F F B LU E S Let’s put them together and play this riff over a blues progression.

The following grooves contain licks. Find a guitar teacher who can coach you along your path to becoming an accomplished rock guitar player. 32 rock groove 17: T A B 3 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 2 3 1 2 0 0 3 3 2 0 3 0 2 0 0 2 3 1 2 0 0 Congratulations! You’ve made it to the end of the book! You can play chords. riffs. Pick up more instructional guitar books and DVDs. grooves. Good luck! 0 0 3 3 2 0 3 0 2 0 0 2 3 1 2 0 0 32 . and power chords. riffs. 1 T 2 2 0 and licks.IT ’ S O N LY R O C K ‘ N R O L L ! Let’s put all of your new rock tools to work. There is so much more to know. Here’s a groove that is in the style of The Rolling Stones. 31 rock groove 16: T A B 2 2 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 2 T A B 2 2 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 0 2 2 2 Here’s one in the style of Ritchie Valens.0 Listen to A 3 2 0 B 3 2 0 recordings of your3favorite guitarists and try to figure out what they are playing. power chords.

T A B T A B T A B T A B T A B 33 .

As a guitarist. picks. tuning instructions. printable guitar chord charts. You are reading music. and more! LEARN & PLAY 34 . Visit our website for guitar tips and tricks. is committed to providing quality musical instruments. You are well on your way to having lots of fun learning and playing the guitar. First Act. and learning methods. tuners.CONGRATULATIONS FOR FIRST ACT COMPLETING THE ® ROCK GUITAR METHOD You have learned the basics of your instrument and how to tune the guitar.com. playing notes and chords and understanding music notation. First Act products are available at retailers worldwide and online at FirstAct. you may be interested in our First Act line of guitar accessories including strings. the publisher of the First Act Learn & Play Rock Guitar method. cables and more. straps. accessories.

© 2009 First Act Inc. . Patent pending. All rights reserved. Model no. First Act Consumer Relations Toll Free (888) 551-1115 First Act Inc. YOU CAN: LEARN TO PLAY CHORDS AND MELODIES TO MORE THAN 15 SONGS PLAY ALONG WITH A GREAT-SOUNDING BACK-UP BAND ON CD LEARN CHORDS USED IN THOUSANDS OF POPULAR SONGS Colors and speci cations depicted on packaging may vary from product.390. MA 02116 USA rstact. You’ll be jamming in no time! WITH THE FIRST ACT® LEARN & PLAY GUITAR METHOD. 745 Boylston Street Boston. D496.com Made in China First Act and the First Act logo are trademarks of First Act Inc. : M2-LPG11000 Art : M2-LPG11000. US Pat Nos. Ages 14+ This product is not a toy.LEARN & PLAY ROCK GUITAR The First Act ® Learn & Play Rock Guitar method is an easy and enjoyable way to learn to play the guitar.387 and D496.01 . Teach yourself how to play by following the method s step-by-step approach.

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