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LESSON PLAN

Author: Brittany Bootka School: ABC Elementary

Lesson Title: Short Vowel Sounds

Length: 45 minutes

Date: 3/11/2013

GLCE: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.4.3a Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context. OBJECTIVE: By June 2013, when given a list of ten words the student will be able to visually discriminate the CVC pattern in isolation (Label patterns; not reading word) with 85% accuracy. BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS: The Aric is expected to give his looking eyes, his listening ears, and his quiet mouth. I will explain that it is important for him to pay attention to the instructions. I will tell Aric that he is expected to follow along to the lesson, actively participate, and work really hard. OUTLINE OF LESSON: (As appropriate, use the Direct Instruction format & label the parts.) MATERIALS NEEDED Anticipatory set: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56k2Y0rXlFs Teacher Materials “Before we start today’s lesson we are going to watch a Computer YouTube video where you have to find the letter “A”. Do you think you Document camera can do it? Great let’s give it a go! White board Markers Objective: Paper for modeling “Today we are going to learn how to spot the consent, vowel, List one for guided practice consent pattern (CVC). We are going to be using the recognizing List two for independent syllable strategy". practice The letter ‘A’ for guided Rationale: practice “Knowing how to spot the CVC pattern will help you to know Glue when to make a short ‘A’ sound when you read”. Scissors Input: “We know that this letter is the letter ‘A’ and it makes the / ă/ sound (I will draw this on the board and say the sound). We also know how to spot an ‘A’ in a word like cat (I will write the word but not read it), the ‘A’ is in the middle (I will underline the ‘A’) and we know that it makes the / ă/ sound (I will say the sound). Now, I want you to look at this list of words and see if you can spot the consonant, vowel, consonant pattern or CVC pattern. First we are going to look for a consonant letter, followed by a vowel, followed by another consonant. The letters must go in that order consonant, vowel, consonant”. Student Materials Pencils

Modeling: (Using the recognizing syllables strategy on page 369, chapter 12, Lerner) Before we start let’s review what consonants and vowels are. Remember vowels are ‘A, E, I, O and U’ and consonants are the rest of the letters such as ‘B, C, D, G, and H’ (I will write these examples on the board). When we look at letters if it letter is a consonant we will write a ‘C’ under the letter because ‘C’ stands for consonant. Then when we look at the letter if it is a vowel we will write a ‘V’ under the letter because ‘V’ stands for a vowel. Now let’s look at this list of words. Watch me to see how I look for the consonant, vowel, and consonant pattern and how I write CVC under the letters. (I will put the list of words that we are going to be working on under the document camera) Here is the first one ‘bat’ (I will show the word but not read it), now I need to see if it follows the pattern. Does it start with a consonant? ‘B’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘B’ (I will show this on the document camera). Now, for the second letter ‘A’, remember in the pattern the next letter needs to be a vowel. Is it a vowel? ‘A’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a vowel, so I will write a ‘V’ under the letter ‘A’ (I will show this on the document camera). The last letter is ‘T’; the next letter in the pattern needs to be a consonant. ‘T’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘T’. Does ‘bat’ (I will point to the word) follow the CVC pattern? Let’s look back at our list (looking to see if we wrote CVC under the word) yes, it does. See how we wrote CVC under the word. That means the first letter is a consonant, the second letter is a vowel, and the third letter is a consonant. It follows the pattern we were looking for”. "Let’s do another ‘pad’ (I will show the word but not read it), now I need to see if it follows the pattern. Does it start with a consonant? ‘P’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘P’ (I will show this on the document camera). Now, for the second letter ‘A’, remember in the pattern the next letter needs to be a vowel. Is it a vowel? ‘A’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a vowel, so I will write a ‘V’ under the letter ‘A’ (I will show this on the document camera). The last letter is ‘D’; the next letter in the pattern needs to be a consonant. ‘D’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘D’. Does ‘bat’ (I will point to the word) follow the CVC pattern? Let’s look back at our list (looking to see if we wrote CVC under the word) yes, it does. See how we wrote CVC under the word. That means the first letter is a consonant, the second letter is a vowel, and the third letter is a consonant. It follows the pattern we were looking for”. “The next one is ‘gae’ (I will show the word but not read it), now I need to see if it follows the pattern. Does it start with a consonant? ‘V’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘G’ (I will show this on the document camera). Now, for the second letter ‘A’, remember in the pattern the next letter needs to be a vowel. Is it a vowel? ‘A’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a vowel, so I will write a ‘V’ under the letter ‘A’ (I will show this on the document camera). The last letter is ‘E’; the next letter in the pattern needs to be a consonant. ‘E’ (I will say the letter), no, it is a vowel so I will write a ‘V’ under the letter ‘E’. Does ‘gae’ (I will point to the word) follow the CVC pattern? Let’s look back at our list (looking to see if we wrote CVC under the word) no, it does not. See how we wrote CVV under the word. That means the first letter is a consonant, the second letter is a vowel, but the third letter was a vowel too. This means that it does not follow the pattern”. “Last one ‘ham’ (I will show the word but not read it), now I need to see if it follows the pattern. Does it start with a consonant? ‘H’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘H’ (I will show this on the document camera). Now, for the second letter ‘A’, remember in the pattern the next letter needs to be a vowel. Is it a vowel? ‘A’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a vowel, so I will write a ‘V’ under the letter ‘A’ (I will show this on the document camera). The last letter is ‘M’; the next letter in the pattern needs to be a consonant. ‘M’ (I will say the letter), yes, it is a consonant, so I will write a ‘C’ under the letter ‘M’. Does ‘ham’ (I will point to the word) follow the CVC pattern? Let’s look back at our list (looking to see if we wrote CVC under the word) yes, it does. See how we wrote CVC under the word. That means the first letter is a consonant, the second letter is a vowel, and the third letter is a consonant. It follows the pattern we were looking for. Checking for understanding: “Let’s try the next one together ‘sad’ (we will be looking at the word under the document camera). Can you tell me what pattern we are looking for? (The student will say consonant, vowel, consonant) Great, the first letter is ‘S’ (I will say the letter), is it a consonant? (The student will say yes) God job, the next letter is ‘A’ (I

will say the letter), is it a vowel? (The student will say yes) okay last letter to check to see if it follows the pattern, it is a ‘D’ (I will say the letter), is it a consonant? (The student will say yes) Now, let’s look over it again did we decide if it follows the CVC pattern? (Looking at the board to see if we wrote CVC under the word) (The student will say yes it does follow the pattern) How do you know it follows the consonant, vowel, consonant pattern? (The student will say because we wrote down CVC under the letters)”. Guided Practice: “Now I am going to give you a list of words and I want you to find the ones that follow the consonant, vowel, consonant pattern. Once you find a word that does follow the pattern I want you to cut it out and glue it to the ‘A’ on your desk. The teacher will be talking and listening to the student explains why he is cutting the word out and gluing it on the letter ‘A’. The teacher will also clear up any misconceptions and reteach if necessary”. (The list of words will be: cab, sae, cap, oat, fad, ask, gas, gap, hat, mat, map, any, mae, tap, zap) (Words from http://www.scrabble.org.au/words/3sdefs.htm) Independent Practice: “I am going to give you a list of words and I want you to write CVC under the word if it follows the consonant, vowel, consonant pattern. Take your time and really look at each word on the list”. (The list of words will be: bat, pad, gae, ham, arm, nap, ate, bar, cab, ark) (Words from http://www.scrabble.org.au/words/3sdefs.htm) Closure: You learned how to spot a consonant, vowel, consonant (CVC) pattern. Thank you for working so hard today! Evaluation: I will be using the independent practice to evaluate my lesson objective EVALUATION OF OBJECTIVE: By June 2013, when given a list of ten words the student will be able to visually discriminate the CVC pattern in isolation (Label patterns; not reading word) with 85% accuracy.
*This lesson could be used for all of the short vowels (A, E, I, O, and U)

References: Information from: Lerner, J. W., & Johns, B. H. (2012). Reading difficulties (12th ed.). Wadsworth Cengage Learning. Lits of words from: Waterworth, M., & Kalayzich, T. (2012, May 14). Three letter words defined. Three Letter Words with Definitions. Retrieved March 11, 2013. Video from: S. (Director). (2011, December 6). Sesame street: Find the letter a [Video]. Retrieved March 10, 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56k2Y0rXlFs