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April 16, 2013 edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal
April 16, 2013 edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal

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11/25/2013

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 207
DEADLY DAY IN IRAQ
WORLD PAGE 28
DEATH TOLL FROM
BIRD FLU ON RISE
HEALTH PAGE 19
SERIES OF CAR BOMBS KILL 55 LESS THAN A WEEK BEFORE VOTE
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Non-violent theft, or larceny, is a crime on
the rise locally and police think they know
why — the perpetrators, even if caught, risk
light punishment.
The latest trend sweeping San Mateo
County is the so-called door-knock burglary in
which criminals simply canvas neighborhoods
and knock on doors to see if anyone is home.
If someone is home, they move on, but if not,
they find a way into the house through a rear
door or window and make off with jewelry,
electronic items or other valuables.
The crimes are taking place almost every
‘Door-knock’ burglaries on the rise
Light punishment, possibility of easy gains part of the cause
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The county’s pension plan may have
more than a $2 billion unfunded liability,
twice what the organization reports, and
elected leaders have failed to monitor or
significantly reduce retirement costs,
according to the civil grand jury.
In a document released yesterday, the civil
grand jury found that the San Mateo County
Employees Retirement Association lost more
than $11 million on its investments for fiscal
year 2012 and on average has failed to achieve
Grand jury knocks county pension plan
Report claims $2 billion in unfunded liability
By Dan McMenamin
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
In the wake of the deadly explo-
sions near the finish line of the
Boston Marathon Monday, San
Francisco’s mayor and police chief
said they are not aware of any
threats locally, but that authorities
will be reviewing security plans for
upcoming events that will draw
large crowds to the city.
The explosions, which occurred
around 2:50 p.m. Boston time, left
at least three people dead and
dozens more injured.
San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and
police Chief Greg Suhr spoke to
reporters Monday afternoon, saying
security measures will be scruti-
nized for all big events in the com-
ing months, including the Craigslist
Bay to Breakers race next month.
“We’re looking at every single
event that we have scheduled,” Lee
said.
The mayor said his office has
already been in contact with Bay to
Breakers organizers and that addi-
tional steps may be taken before the
Local event security under scrutiny
San Francisco police, mayor make plans for Bay to Breakers, other races
REUTERS
Clockwise from left: Runners continue to run toward the finish line of
the Boston Marathon after twin explosions erupted near the finish line
of the race.Bystanders tend to an injured man following the bomb blasts.
A woman is comforted near a triage tent set up for the marathon.
Terror in Boston
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Two bombs explod-
ed in the crowded streets near the
finish line of
the Boston
Marathon on
M o n d a y ,
killing at least
three people
and injuring
more than 140
in a bloody
scene of shat-
tered glass
and severed limbs that raised alarms
that terrorists might have struck
again in the U.S.
A White House official speaking
on condition of anonymity because
the investigation was still unfolding
said the attack was being treated as
Marathon attack
kills three, injures
more than 140
Loved ones seek
word on runners
after explosions
By Tammy Webber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Far-flung family
members, co-workers and friends
frantically used social media, cell-
phones and even a “people finder”
website Monday to try to learn the
fate of participants and spectators at
the Boston Marathon, where two
people were killed and dozens
injured after a pair of bombs explod-
ed near the finish line of one of the
world’s great races.
See page 11
Inside
Triumphant
turns to tragedy
See FAMILY, Page 20
See SECURITY, Page 20
See TERROR, Page 20
See CRIMES, Page 16 See PENSION, Page 16
DOW HAS WORST
DAY OF THE YEAR
BUSINESS PAGE 10
Rihanna cancels Houston
show because of illness
NEW YORK — Rihanna has canceled
another date on her latest tour because
she is ill.
Live Nation says the Grammy-win-
ning singer is unable to perform at
Monday’s concert in Houston “as a
result of illness.” The concert promoter
says fans should retain their tickets to
use at a rescheduled show.
Rihanna canceled shows in Baltimore
and Boston on her “Diamonds World
Tour” last month because she was sick.
The next date on the singer’s tour is
Tuesday in Dallas. She’s supporting her
seventh album, “Unapologetic,” which
features the hits “Diamonds” and
“Stay.”
Rapper A$AP Rocky is the opening
act on Rihanna’s tour.
Judge holds self in
contempt for his smartphone
IONIA, Mich. — A Michigan judge
whose smartphone disrupted a hearing
in his own courtroom has held himself
in contempt and paid $25 for the infrac-
tion.
Judge Raymond Voet has a posted
policy at Ionia County 64A District
Court stating that electronic devices
causing a disturbance during court ses-
sions will result in the owner being cited
with contempt, the Sentinel-Standard of
Ionia and MLive.com reported.
On Friday afternoon, during a prose-
cutor’s closing argument as part of a
jury trial, Voet’s new smartphone began
to emit sounds requesting phone voice
commands. Voet said he thinks he
bumped the phone, and the embarrass-
ment likely left his face red.
“I’m guessing I bumped it. It started
talking really loud, saying ‘I can’t
understand you. Say something like
Mom,”’ he said.
Voet has used a Blackberry mobile
phone for years, and said he wasn’t as
familiar with the operation of the new
touchscreen, Windows-based phone.
“That’s an excuse, but I don’t take
those excuses from anyone else. I set the
bar high, because cellphones are a dis-
traction and there is very serious busi-
ness going on,” he said. “The courtroom
is a special place in the community, and
it needs more respect than that.”
Over the years, the judge whose court
is about 110 miles northwest of Detroit
has taken phones away from police offi-
cers, attorneys, witnesses, spectators
and friends. During a break in the trial,
Voet held himself in contempt, fined
himself and paid the fine.
“Judges are humans,” Voet said.
“They’re not above the rules. I broke the
rule and I have to live by it.”
Woman cited for
calling 911 seeking divorce
GIRARD, Pa. — Police have cited a
42-year-old Pennsylvania woman for
disorderly conduct after she called 911
requesting a divorce and police assis-
tance to make her husband leave.
Troopers say the woman called just
after 1 a.m. Saturday asking that officers
be sent to her home in Girard Township
in northwestern Pennsylvania.
Police say they explained to the
woman, whom they are not identifying,
that a divorce is a civil matter and that
they could not make her husband leave
the residence because no crime had been
committed.
Instead, police have cited the woman
for disorderly conduct and misusing the
Erie County 911 system.
Weinstein, Chapman
welcome baby boy
LOS ANGELES — Harvey Weinstein
and Georgina Chapman have added a
baby boy to their family.
A spokeswoman for the 61-year-old
co-chairman of the Weinstein Co. said
Monday that Weinstein and his 37-year-
old fashion designer wife welcomed a
son Thursday in New York.
Weinstein and the Marchesa co-
founder are already parents to a 2-year-
old daughter. The Oscar-winning pro-
ducer of such films as “Silver Linings
Playbook” and “Django Unchained”
also has three daughters from his previ-
ous marriage to Eve Chilton.
Chapman and Weinstein married in
2007.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
NFL coach Bill
Belichick is 61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1963
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his “Letter
from Birmingham Jail” in which the
civil rights activist responded to a group
of local clergymen who’d criticized him
for leading street protests; King defend-
ed his tactics, writing, “Injustice any-
where is a threat to justice everywhere.”
“Chaos is the score upon
which reality is written.”
— Henry Miller, American author (1891-1980)
Pope Emeritus
Benedict XVI is 86.
Actor Martin
Lawrence is 48.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A Hindu devotee hanging from a rope throws offering toward other devotees during the ‘Chadak’ ritual in Kolkata, India.
Tuesday: Sunny. Highs in the upper
50s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday night: Clear. Lows in the
mid 40s. North winds 10 to 20 mph.
Gusts up to 35 mph in the evening.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the
lower 60s. North winds 10 to 20
mph.
Wednesday night: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds around 20 mph...Becoming north
around 10 mph after midnight.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Friday through Monday: Mostly clear. Highs in the
mid 60s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
FRONT SWEPT FICKLE RATHER
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The author’s expenses related to doing research
for a new book would be — WRITTEN OFF
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SOGEO
DYENE
CLUSPT
NOWWID
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
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e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
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w
.
f
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b
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Print answer here:
In 1789, President-elect George Washington left Mount Vernon,
Va., for his inauguration in New York.
In 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed
a bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia. The
Confederacy conscripted all white men between the ages of 18 to
35.
In 1879, Bernadette Soubirous, who’d described seeing visions
of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, died in Nevers, France.
In 1912, American aviator Harriet Quimby became the first
woman to fly across the English Channel, traveling from Dover,
England, to France in 59 minutes.
In 1917, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin returned to Russia after years of
exile.
In 1935, the radio comedy program “Fibber McGee and Molly”
premiered on NBC’s Blue Network.
In 1945, U.S. troops reached Nuremberg, Germany, during the
Second World War.
In 1947, the French ship Grandcamp blew up at the harbor in
Texas City, Texas; another ship, the High Flyer, exploded the fol-
lowing day (the blasts and fires killed nearly 600 people).
Financier Bernard M. Baruch said in a speech at the South
Carolina statehouse, “Let us not be deceived — we are today in
the midst of a cold war.”
In 1962, Bob Dylan debuted his song “Blowin’ in the Wind” at
Gerde’s Folk City in New York; Walter Cronkite succeeded
Douglas Edwards as CBS-TV’s principal anchorman.
In 1972, Apollo 16 blasted off on a voyage to the moon with
astronauts John W. Young, Charles M. Duke Jr. and Ken
Mattingly on board.
In 1996, Britain’s Prince Andrew and his wife, Sarah, the
Duchess of York, announced they were in the process of divorc-
ing.
In 2007, in the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. histo-
ry, student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people on the campus of
Virginia Tech before taking his own life.
Actor Peter Mark Richman is 86. Singer Bobby Vinton is 78.
Denmark’s Queen Margrethe II is 73. Basketball Hall-of-Famer
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is 66. Ann Romney is 64. Rock singer-
turned-politician Peter Garrett is 60. Actress Ellen Barkin is 59.
Rock musician Jason Scheff (Chicago) is 51. Singer Jimmy
Osmond is 50. Rock singer David Pirner (Soul Asylum) is 49.
Actor Jon Cryer is 48. Rock musician Dan Rieser is 47. Actor
Peter Billingsley is 42. Actor Lukas Haas is 37.
In other news ...
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in first place;No.11 Money Bags in second place;
and No. 10 Solid Gold in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:45.64.
1 0 8
1 10 13 19 21 28
Mega number
April 12 Mega Millions
10 12 31 56 57 33
Powerball
April 13 Powerball
1 2 3 15 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
3 9 6 4
Daily Four
8 2 5
Daily three evening
13 14 29 39 41 26
Mega number
April 13 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Public intoxication. An intoxicated person
was picked up by a family member after
being found walking on the 1100 block of
Capuchino Avenue before 11:15 p.m. on
Thursday, April 4.
Arrest. A man was arrested for shoplifting on
the 1400 block of Howard Avenue before
5:28 p.m. on Thursday, April 4.
Suspicious circumstance. An unoccupied
stolen vehicle was recovered on the 1200
block of Bayshore Highway before 2:19 p.m.
on Thursday, April 4.
Grand theft. A vehicle was stolen on the 800
block of Walnut Avenue before 6:12 a.m. on
Thursday, April 4.
Arrest. A man was arrested for public intox-
ication and bothering citizens downtown on
the 200 block of Lorton Avenue before 2:06
p.m. on Wednesday, April 3.
Accident. A street sign was damaged by a
hit-and-run on the first block of Peninsula
Avenue before 9:35 a.m. on Tuesday, April 2.
Accident. A parking meter was damaged by a
hit-and-run on the 1100 block of Chula Vista
Avenue before 5:20 a.m. on Tuesday, April 2.
REDWOOD CITY
Suspicious person. A man was going
through garbage cans on Bonita Avenue
before 9:54 p.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Suspicious person. A man wearing glasses
and a black sweatshirt was banging on resi-
dents’ doors on Union Avenue before 7:16
p.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on El
Camino Real before 4:07 p.m. Wednesday,
April 10.
Suspicious vehicle. A suspicious vehicle was
spotted on Brewster Avenue before 3:19 p.m.
Wednesday, April 10.
Vandalism. A motorcycle parked in a drive-
way was spray painted on Rosemary Lane
before 2:48 p.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Vandalism. Someone reported ongoing dam-
age to their yard by the gardener on Copley
Avenue before 2:13 p.m. Wednesday, April
10.
Suspicious person. Six men were loitering
and smoking marijuana on Redwood Avenue
before 12:24 p.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Vandalism. Someone reported their vehicle
was broken into but nothing was stolen on Iris
Street before 11:58 a.m. Wednesday, April
10.
SAN CARLOS
Suspicious person. A suspicious person was
seen at the 2200 block of Eaton Avenue
before 11:53 a.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Burglary. Someone reported a burglary on
the 1100 block of Industrial Road before
10:10 a.m. Wednesday, April 10.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen at the
1500 block of Cherry Street before 8:45 a.m.
Wednesday, April 10.
Hit-and-run. A hit-and-run accident
occurred on the 1100 block of Industrial
Road before 4:33 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9.
Burglary. A burglary occurred on the 900
block of Rosewood Avenue before 11:42 a.m.
on Monday, April 8.
Arrest. A man was arrested for driving with-
out a license at Eaton Park before 10:30 p.m.
on Thursday, March 28.
Police reports
Cleaned out
Someone reported their housekeeper stole
a jewelry box on Maple Street in
Redwood City before 4:51 p.m. Tuesday,
April 9.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Tres Amigos in downtown San Mateo
served its last tacos Christmas Day but the
owners were served with something a little
less tasteful Friday — a civil complaint
alleging sexual harassment by two former
female employees over four years.
Although the two women quit the taqueria
almost two years ago, they were cleared to
take action against the three owners and
seven other male employees after they
received a “right-to-sue” letter from the
California Department of Fair Employment
and Housing, their lawyer Rafael Crespo told
the Daily Journal yesterday.
The founding partners, or three amigos, are
being sued for subjecting both Reynabe
Mercado and Luz Maria Torrez to a hostile
work environment.
The Tres Amigos owners denied the allega-
tions during the DFEH process, Crespo said.
The owners could not be reached for com-
ment.
Mercado and Torrez quit Tres Amigos on
the same day in 2011, April 27, after several
male employees allegedly harassed them.
They both came to work for the taco shop in
2007.
The two women allege they were shown
pornographic images by three male co-work-
ers of a man having sex with a horse and
pornographic cartoons of men and women,
according to the complaint.
The women allege they were touched inap-
propriately; shown and encouraged to read
the Kama Sutra to learn about sexual posi-
tions; asked to simulate sex acts with a hose;
and subjected to co-workers who pretended
to masturbate.
The women were also told, according to
the complaint, that “if you don’t like it, well,
there are other people who need a job.”
Named in the civil complaint are owners
Adrian Valle, Salvador Valle and Pilar
Contreras. The employees named in the suit
are Gabriel Chaidez, Javier Rodriguez,
Almiku Lnu, Ricardo Chaidez, Antemio
Ramirez, Jose Fonseca and Adrian Fonseca.
The complaint, filed in San Mateo County
Superior Court, alleges that ownership
encouraged the hostile work environment
against women by its male employees.
The woman contend in the complaint that
they have suffered and continue to suffer
humiliation, emotional distress, mental and
physical pain and anguish and that the
harassment was done with intent.
They are seeking unspecified damages.
The downtown San Mateo taco shop is
closed now but the partners operate two other
restaurants in Half Moon Bay and San
Mateo.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Taco shop sued for
sexual harassment
Former female employees allege hostile work environment
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Awakening in a friend’s
bedroom after drinking too much at a
sleepover, 15-year-old Audrie Pott looked
down and realized she had been sexually
assaulted and her attackers had written
and drawn on intimate parts of her body,
her family’s attorney said Monday.
Over the next week, she pieced togeth-
er one horrifying detail after another. She
went online and tried to confront the three
boys she had known since junior high
who she believed had done it.
At school, she saw a group of students
huddled around a cellphone and realized
that at least one humiliating photo of her
was circulating.
“I have a reputation
for a night I don’t
even remember and
the whole school
knows,” she wrote in
one Facebook mes-
sage to a friend.
“I cried when I
found out what they
did,” she wrote in
another.
Eight days after the attack, she called
and asked her mother to pick her up at
school. She said she couldn’t deal with it
anymore but would not say what was
wrong. And then she hanged herself.
The Pott family disclosed the new
details of the ordeal at an emotional news
conference Monday in San Jose, dis-
cussing painful details of what their
daughter was put through and demanding
that three 16-year-old boys arrested eight
months after the assault be tried as adults
— a move that would be highly unlikely
under California law.
The family members also announced
plans to file a wrongful death lawsuit
against the suspects, their parents and the
family that owns the house where the
Labor Day party took place.
The boys arrested in the case are each
charged with sexual battery, dissemina-
tion of child pornography and possession
of child pornography. Under California
law, such less severe charges are filed if a
victim does not have the ability to fight
off a sexual assault because they are
unconscious.
Lawyer: Assaulted teen had drawings, name on body
REUTERS
Larry Pott,father of Audrie Pott,addresses a news conference
in San Jose.
Audrie Pott
5
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Tom Treanor
Caretaker arrested for fraud
A woman, who had been hired as
a caretaker for an elderly Belmont
couple was arrested Sunday for
financial elder abuse, according to
police.
K a t h l e e n
Susan Fortune,
44, was arrested
by Belmont
police as a result
of an investiga-
tion that began
two days earlier
when the cou-
ple, who are in
their 90s, report-
ed their car was missing.
Fortune, who has several aliases,
was booked into the San Mateo
County Jail in Redwood City for
identity theft, theft from an elder by
a caretaker, possession of stolen
credit/debit cards and possession of
narcotics, according to police.
The couple’s car, a white 2002
Buick Regal four-door, is still miss-
ing.
Fortune, a Foster City resident,
had used her sister’s name;
Kimberlie Marie McKean, when she
was hired by the Belmont couple.
She has also used the names of
Kathleen McKean, Kathleen Kean,
Kathleen Sanders and Kathleen
Flieger, according to police.
Belmont police believe that
Fortune may have secured employ-
ment with other elderly people
under one of her aliases or another,
as yet, unknown name.
“We are releasing her photo in the
hope that if there are other victims,
they might come forward,” Belmont
Police Chief Dan DeSmidt wrote in
a statement. “Often, elderly victims
of this type of fraud are reluctant to
come forward or may not have real-
ized that they have been victim-
ized.”
Anyone with information on
Fortune is asked to call Belmont
police at 595-7400 or the Belmont
crime tip line at 598-3000.
Suspects sought in
pair of tablet PC thefts
Belmont police are seeking sus-
pects in a pair of tablet PC thefts
from businesses that occurred with-
in minutes of each other Monday.
The first theft was reported at
about 3 p.m. from the Radio Shack
store at 870 Ralston Ave.
While officers were responding to
that crime, a second similar theft
was reported from the GameStop
store at 1200 El Camino Real.
In both cases, a single male sus-
pect entered the store, asked to see a
tablet PC and, as soon as the suspect
had it in his hands, he fled with it to
a waiting vehicle, according to
police.
There are three suspects in the
case but only one that witnesses
could describe. The suspect who
took the tablets is described as a
black man, late 20s to early 30s, 6
feet 1 inch tall, 200 pounds, shaved
head, wearing a blue T-shirt with a
white design and blue jeans.
The getaway driver and another
suspect in the vehicle were also
described as black males.
The vehicle they were driving was
a tan older model, 1990s minivan,
similar to a Toyota or Dodge, with
tinted windows, black tires/rims and
yellow paper plates.
The suspect vehicle was last seen
fleeing from the GameStop, south
on Fifth Avenue.
Anyone with information on these
crimes or these suspects is asked to
call Belmont police at 595-7400 or
the Belmont police crime tip line at
598-3000.
Pedestrian dies
after being struck in
Foster City last week
A 57-year-old San Mateo woman,
Esther Gonzalez, has died from her
injuries after being struck by a vehi-
cle at the intersection of Foster City
Boulevard and Bounty Drive in
Foster City Thursday morning,
according to police.
The accident took place at about
7:40 a.m. and Gonzalez was in the
crosswalk, although she was cross-
ing against traffic, according to
police.
The driver has not been cited,
according to police, although the
accident remains under investiga-
tion.
Local briefs
Kathleen
Fortune
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 50-year-old man accused of
prostituting a teenage girl on an
online escort site and brandishing a
gun last year because her friends
visited the San Bruno condominium
where she was being kept received
four years in prison and registration
as a sex offender.
David Blackwell, of San
Francisco, pleaded no contest in
November to felony pandering and
assault by force and was released on
$500,000 bail with the warning that
any new crimes would void the plea
deal. On Monday, Blackwell was
sentenced to prison for the negotiat-
ed term of four
years with credit
for 222 days. He
was immediate-
ly taken into
custody.
As part of the
plea deal, other
charges of pimp-
ing a minor and
assault with a
firearm were dropped. Counts of
human trafficking and kidnapping
were dismissed for insufficient evi-
dence after a preliminary hearing
earlier this year.
According to prosecutors,
Blackwell marketed the girl on the
escort review website
MyRedBook.com. He allegedly
allowed the 17-year-old girl to come
and go but she was required to
check in and out with him and be
“available on a moment’s notice to
service clients.”
Prosecutors say, on April 1, 2012,
Blackwell flashed the weapon
because she had friends over to the
condominium, which was against
his rules.
The victim was uncooperative
with Blackwell’s prosecution and
only testified at the preliminary
hearing after her own attorney was
appointed.
Man imprisoned for prostituting teen girl
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A postal worker helps customers at the post office on Delaware Street in San Mateo yesterday.A handful of Bay
Area post offices were open late yesterday to allow last-minute tax filers to turn in their paperwork.The tax day
lines at most post offices have shrunk in recent years because more people are filing their taxes online,according
to U.S. Postal Service officials.
A TAXING DAY
David Blackwell
6
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Donna Sartori
Donna Sartori, a resident of South San
Francisco, died April 14, 2013 in Pleasanton.
She was the wife of the late Nebby Sartori.
Donna is survived by her daughters, Judith
Trettenero (Stan) of Livermore and Linda
Homer (Dennis) of Belmont and grandmother
of Derrick (his wife Trudy) Homer.
She was a native of Crockett, Calif., age 87
years.
Family and friends are invited to visit from 4
p.m. until 8 p.m. Thursday, April 18 where the
vigil will begin at 7 p.m. The funeral mass will
be celebrated 10 a.m. Friday, April 19 at Mater
Dolorosa Church, 307 Willow Ave. in South
San Francisco. Committal will follow at Holy
Cross Cemetery in Colma. In lieu of flowers, the
family prefers memorial contributions be made
to the American Heart Association or the
American Cancer Society.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the family’s
choosing. To submit obituaries, email informa-
tion along with a jpeg photo to news@smdai-
lyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for
style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would
like to have an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our advertising
department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
Trial begins for Burlingame man charged with fatally beating roommate
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Burlingame man beat his roommate
to death with a mallet because the vic-
tim’s graphic and unexpected demand
for oral sex unleashed lifelong rage over
childhood molestation by his father and
his own sexual abuse of a younger
brother, according to his defense.
Lawrence Arthur Hoffman, 65, was
driven to nausea by the horror of what
he’d done to Joseph Consentino, 70, on
Dec. 5, 2011 but acted in self defense to
what he perceived as a threat because of
his experience, defense attorney Geoff
Carr told jurors during opening state-
ments yesterday morning.
Prosecutor Al Serrato painted a differ-
ent portrait of the fatal encounter which
he called “cold, violent and very per-
sonal” between the two men who he
characterized as “roommates but not
friends.” Hoffman, Serrato said, told a
friend days after the homicide that he
“just flipped out” because Consentino
was demeaning his wife and daughter
and that he “beat the f— so many f—
times” there was no way he could have
survived.
Following the beating, Hoffman cov-
ered the partially nude body with three
blankets and fled to Reno, San
Francisco and eventually Glendale
where he was arrested after the friend
contacted authorities.
Carr told jurors there was no dispute
his client caused Consentino’s death.
“That will not be
the question in this
case. That will be if
it’s murder,” Carr
said.
Hoffman is
charged with murder
and the use of a
deadly weapon,
either a mallet or
hammer although the
weapon was never
recovered. Consentino, who had no
defensive wounds, died from a massive
hole in the back of his head which
Serrato said was caused by at least nine
separate blows.
Carr suggested the jury could return a
lesser degree of homicide and that either
of the two admitted initial blows could
have killed Consentino before the several
others that Serrato said showed the mur-
der was “as intentional as it was swift.”
After meeting as acquaintances at the
American Bull Bar and Grill in
Burlingame, Hoffman moved into
Consentino’s Garden Drive apartment in
fall 2011 as a way to make ends meet
for both men and help Consentino sell
off his late wife’s accumulated knick-
knacks. Nearly immediately, the two
butted heads and Carr said Hoffman was
borrowing money from his estranged
wife to leave at the time of the beating.
Hoffman was also harboring a “very,
very dark family secret” that didn’t
come to light until after the arrest when
his estranged younger brother, Alvin,
told defense investigators their father
had likely molested Hoffman and in turn
Hoffman had molested him, Carr said.
Hoffman never told anybody, devel-
oping psychiatric problems that led to
his seeing a psychologist and psychia-
trist more than 300 times, feeling suici-
dal and having panic attacks that mani-
fested themselves with physical pain
and gagging, Carr said.
The night Consentino died, Hoffman
emerged from the bathroom where he
had gone to calm one such attack to find
his older roommate wearing nothing but
boxers, holding the mallet and demand-
ing oral sex, Carr said.
Hoffman allegedly reacted by grab-
bing the mallet and striking twice and,
after Consentino fell to the ground, con-
tinuing to strike “in a rage of fury.”
Carr said Hoffman vomited with dis-
belief, covered the man with the blan-
kets out of respect and was initially
uncertain whether to kill himself, sur-
render or flee.
He visited Greg Bailey, the friend
who would later turn him in, and
revealed “I killed my roommate,”
Serrato said.
In a recorded phone call later, Bailey
suggested maybe Hoffman wasn’t dead
but was told otherwise.
“I know what rigor mortis looks like
... I know the colors,” Serrato read from
the call transcript. “Parts of his head are
all over the f— floor. ... It’s bad.”
Hoffman remains in custody without
bail.
Defense:Childhood molestation
made murder defendant snap
Lawrence
Hoffman
A
lan Yan, a 15-
year-old sopho-
more at Carlmont
High School, found out that
he was selected to attend the
Junior Statesmen of
America Summer School
at Stanford University.
However, he has very little
time to raise the money to
pay for his room, board,
textbooks and meals. While
his parents have already
paid a portion, he needs to raise the remaining $1,000 to fill
the remaining balance.
Yan is now appealing to the local service clubs, and seek-
ing any other financial support he can get.
Anyone wishing to make an individual sponsorship to
help Yan can send a check to: Admissions Director, The
Junior Statesmen Summer School, 800 S Claremont St.,
Suite 202, San Mateo, CA 94402. Checks are to be made
payable to the Junior Statesmen Foundation and include a
note that Alan Yan is the intended beneficiary and to
include Stanford next to his name.
The 2013 Junior Statesmen Summer School will be held
from June 30 to July 21. While there, Yan will be taking a
college-level class covering constitutional law.
***
Continuing its dedication to exploring, creating and pre-
senting innovative works from a broad selection of musical
traditions, the Department of Music and Vocal Arts at
Notre Dame de Namur University invites the public to
explore the unique world of “Opera Rocks!” Drawing
from a 400-year tradition of operatic repertoire, and mixing
up familiar stories with their contemporary musical theatre
counterparts to create a fresh interpretation with an over-
arching narrative, “Opera Rocks!” seeks to entertain and
playfully challenge the audience to greater imagination.
Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 19 and 2
p.m. Sunday, April 21 at the Taube Center, Notre Dame de
Namur University, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. Tickets are
$10 and can be purchased at brownpapertickets.com.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by
education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 7
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Brigitte Patricia Diaz
Brigitte Patricia Diaz, born December 28, 1979 left us at
a young age of just 23 on April 16, 2003. Although it’s been
10 years in our hearts it feels like just yesterday. We miss her
just as much today, maybe even more than we did then. We
asked several of our friends what’s the first thing that comes
to mind when they think of Brigitte. It was her smile, her
energetic spirit, her love for life. Although she did not live
a full life, she lived life to the fullest. Today we remember
Brigitte, celebrate her life and are so thankful to have the
memories she continues to give to those she left behind.
In Memoriam
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A former custodian and coach at a Belmont
middle school pleaded no contest yesterday to
two counts each of falsely imprisoning and
annoying a child rather than stand trial on alle-
gations he molested two female students on
campus.
Andre Edward, 54, accepted the deal on the
two felonies and two misdemeanors with the
conditions prosecutors seek no more than nine
months in jail and he not be required to regis-
ter as a sex offender. His $50,000 bail bond
was converted to release on his own recogni-
zance pending a June 13 sentencing hearing.
The deal is off if he commits any new crimes
beforehand.
Edwards was accused of putting his hands
down the pants of a 13-year-old girl in 2001
and cupping the breast and buttock of a second
girl on Nov. 15, 2010 at
Ralston Middle School.
After the first alleged inci-
dent, the girl contacted
police but the case was not
prosecuted for lack of cor-
roboration. School offi-
cials reportedly cautioned
Edwards not to be alone in
the janitor office with any
student prior to the second
allegation.
After his arrest, Edwards reportedly accused
the girls of lying and claimed his accuser in
the 2001 case acknowledged to her friend that
the accusation was false.
Edwards worked at the school from
September 1987 until February 2011, when he
retired.
Bill seeks to ban
plastic bags at state stores
SACRAMENTO — Business groups are
supporting a bill that would ban California gro-
cery stores, convenience stores and pharmacies
from handing out single-use plastic bags.
Dozens of California cities have adopted
similar laws, but proposals for a statewide ban
have previously failed in the Legislature.
Sen. Alex Padilla, D-Los Angeles, said
Monday that the latest effort, SB405, has sup-
port from the California Grocers Association
and the California Retailers Association, as
well as from environmental groups.
The proposal would ban plastic bags in gro-
cery stores and pharmacies starting in 2015
and in convenience stores and liquor stores by
July 2016.
Former custodian and coach
takes deal in molestation case
Andre Edwards
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A bipartisan proposal
to expand background checks to more gun
buyers seemed in jeopardy Monday as a
growing number of Republican senators
expressed opposition to the proposal, perhaps
enough to derail it. But there was plenty of
time for lobbying and deal-making to affect
the outcome, which remained uncertain.
The White House said President Barack
Obama was calling lawmakers, as both sides
hunted support for a nail-biting showdown.
As of Monday evening, some senators were
saying the vote now appeared likely late this
week, rather than midweek as top Democrats
have hoped. Such a delay would give both
sides more time to find support.
“The game hasn’t even started yet, let alone
over,” said Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., who
reached a background check compromise last
week with Sen. Patrick Toomey, R-Pa., on
which the Senate was preparing to vote.
At stake is what has become the heart of
this year’s gun control drive in response to
December’s killing of children and staff at an
elementary school in Newtown, Conn.
Supporters consider a broadening of the buy-
ers subjected to background checks to be the
most effective step lawmakers can take, and
Obama urged near universal checks in the
plan he unveiled in January.
Sixteen Republicans voted last week to
reject an effort by conservatives that would
have blocked the Senate from even consider-
ing a broad bill restricting firearms. With that
debate underway, Democrats hope to win
enough supporters from this group to gain
passage of the first amendment to that bill —
the compromise between Manchin and
Toomey, which expands background checks
but less broadly than Obama has wanted.
By Monday evening, eight Republican sen-
ators from that group said they would oppose
the Manchin-Toomey plan and two were
leaning against it. Combined with the 31 sen-
ators who voted against debating the overall
gun bill last week, that would bring potential
opponents of expanding background checks
to 41 — just enough votes to block the
Senate from considering the compromise.
“I’m not going to vote for it. It’s not the
right thing to do,” said Sen. Saxby
Chambliss, R-Ga., who was among the 16
who voted last week to allow the debate to
begin.
But in the heated political climate and
heavy lobbying certain in the run-up to the
vote, it was possible that minds could change.
Opponents say expanded checks would
violate the Constitution’s right to bear arms
and would be ignored by criminals. They are
forcing supporters of the background check
plan to win 60 of the Senate’s 100 votes, a
high hurdle.
Fifty Democrats and two Democratic-lean-
ing senators voted last week to begin debate.
If all of them support the Manchin-Toomey
plan — which is not guaranteed — they
would still need eight additional votes.
So far, three Republicans who backed
beginning debate have said they will vote for
the Manchin-Toomey plan: Toomey and
Sens. Mark Kirk of Illinois and Susan Collins
of Maine. A fourth, John McCain of Arizona,
said he is strongly inclined to do so.
Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., missed last
week’s vote after saying he was suffering
from muscle weakness, but spokesman Caley
Gray said he hopes to be in the Senate for
votes this week.
Gun background check deal in jeopardy in Senate
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Brian O’Connor, left, of Newtown, Conn., fills out paperwork to purchase a Glock 10mm pistol
at Chris’ Indoor Shooting Range in Guilford, Conn.
Around the state
STATE/NATION 8
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so on…making a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope I’m right, so
let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Trends Indicate
Upswing in the Economy
Advertisement
By Jennifer Peltz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The Denver Post
won a Pulitzer Prize on Monday for
its coverage of the movie theater
massacre in Aurora, Colo., while
The New York Times captured four
awards for reporting on a harrow-
ing avalanche, the rise of a new
aristocracy in China and the busi-
ness practices of Apple and Wal-
Mart.
The Associated Press received the
award in breaking news photogra-
phy for its coverage of the civil war
in Syria.
In awards that reflected the rapid-
ly changing media world, the online
publication InsideClimate News
won the Pulitzer for national report-
ing for its reports on problems in the
regulation of the nation’s oil
pipelines.
The Sun Sentinel of Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., received the public
service award for an investigation of
off-duty police officers’ reckless
driving, and longtime Pulitzer pow-
erhouses The Wall Street Journal
and The Washington Post were rec-
ognized for commentary and criti-
cism, respectively.
The Star-Tribune of Minneapolis
captured two awards, for local
reporting and editorial cartooning.
Cheers erupted in the Denver
Post’s newsroom when word came
that the newspaper had won the
Pulitzer in the breaking news cate-
gory for its coverage — via text,
social media and video — of the
shooting that killed 12 people dur-
ing a midnight showing of a new
Batman movie last summer.
The honor was bittersweet for
some, and people teared up and
shared hugs.
Denver Post wins Pulitzer
for coverage of massacre
REUTERS
Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. holds up four fingers to indicate the four
Pulitzer Prizes won by the New York Times,as winners for the 2013 Pulitzer
Prize are announced at The New York Times newsroom.
By Jesse J. Holland
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Supreme
Court seemed worried Monday
about the idea of companies patent-
ing genes that can be found inside
the human body, as it heard argu-
ments in a case that could profound-
ly reshape U.S. medical research
and the fight against diseases like
breast and ovarian cancer.
The U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office has been awarding patents on
human genes for almost 30 years,
but opponents of Myriad Genetics
Inc.’s patents on two genes linked to
increased risk of breast and ovarian
cancer say patent protection should
not be given to something that can
be found inside the human body.
“Finding a new use for a product
of nature, if you don’t change the
product of nature, is not patentable.
If I find a new way of taking gold
and making earrings out of it, that
doesn’t entitle me to a patent on
gold. If I find a new way of using
lead, it doesn’t entitle me to a patent
on lead,” lawyer Christopher
Hansen said.
Allowing companies like Myriad
to patent human genes or parts of
human genes will slow down or
cripple lifesaving medical research
like in the battle against breast can-
cer, he said.
But companies have billions of
dollars of investment and years of
research on the line, with Myriad
arguing that without the ability to
recoup their investment through the
profits that patents bring, break-
through scientific discoveries need-
ed to combat all kind of medical
maladies wouldn’t happen.
That concerned several justices.
“Why shouldn’t we worry that
Myriad or companies like it will just
say, ‘Well, you know, we’re not
going to do this work anymore?”’
Justice Elena Kagan said.
Court: Can human genes be patented?
If I find a new way of taking gold
and making earrings out of it, that doesn’t
entitle me to a patent on gold. If I find a new way of
using lead, it doesn’t entitle me to a patent on lead.”
— Christopher Hansen, lawyer
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Legislation
that would provide funding for
California’s substance-abuse track-
ing system passed its first commit-
tee on Monday at the urging of
state Attorney General Kamala
Harris.
The state’s prescription drug
database allows doctors and phar-
macists to quickly review patients’
substance history as a way to deter
drug abuse and to make sure
patients aren’t taking harmful com-
binations of drugs. Harris wants
money to main-
tain and upgrade
the database and
to pay for teams
of agents that
would track doc-
tors who
improperly pre-
scribe large
quantities of
controlled sub-
stances.
The lack of funding for the sys-
tem has been a concern because of
the number of patient deaths linked
to doctors overprescribing certain
medications.
California attorney general
seeks drug database funds
High court rejects challenge
to New York gun law
WASHINGTON — The Supreme
Court is staying out of the gun debate
for now.
The justices on Monday declined to
hear a challenge to a strict New York
law that makes it difficult for resi-
dents to get a license to carry a con-
cealed handgun in public.
The court did not comment in turn-
ing away an appeal from five state
residents and the Second Amendment
Foundation. Their lawsuit also drew
support from the National Rifle
Association and 20 states.
The high court action comes amid
an intensifying congressional debate
on new gun control measures.
Around the nation
Kamala Harris
OPINION 9
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
High-density housing
Editor,
I agree wholeheartedly with Peter
Carey who wrote a letter in the April
15 edition of the Daily Journal “High-
density housing” that he hoped the new
residents in the higher density San
Mateo housing that is planned would
utilize Caltrain. From what I know of
San Mateo’s planning — they had just
this in mind when they did their exten-
sive “corridor planning.”
In addition to forsaking auto trips for
train trips, I also hope they walk and
bike for local trips that are close by.
Not only will it reduce traffic and con-
gestion, as Mr. Carey noted in his let-
ter, but it will also be better for the
planet — improving air quality and
fighting climate change, and even for
public health as carbohydrates are
burned rather than fossil fuels emitting
carbon dioxide.
Irvin Dawid
Burlingame
Dimitre Diatribe was bigoted
Editor,
I am loathe to reply to Dorothy
Dimitre’s Cathophobic “kick-the-pope”
column published in the April 10 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal in which she
wonders if Catholicism is “conductive
(sic) to democracy.” I fear I may
encourage her or draw attention to her
rants. This may be breaking news to
her, but she doesn’t have to support the
church. It’s a matter of choice, although
I realize the mass media has pretty well
limited “choice” to one subject. This is
not like government in which we are
forced to pay and obey. There is a
poem with a line that says, “I’ll believe
in separation of church and state when
my taxes are gathered in a collection
plate.”
I am perplexed by Dimitre’s anger.
After all, Americans allow the Supreme
Court to decide many important issues,
even by overriding the will of the peo-
ple. At least the pope was elected by
vote of the cardinals. I don’t see white
smoke billow when a Supreme Court
justice is appointed.
Her concern over “pope folderol”
makes sense, however. I think Pope
Francis could take a step toward bring-
ing the church into the modern world
by getting tattoos and wearing rings in
his nose.
James O. Clifford Sr.
Redwood City
Sing it, Dorothy!
Editor,
I always enjoy the columns from
Dorothy Dimitre, including her latest
column about all the “folderol” about
the new pope (“Iconic images” in the
April 10 edition of the Daily Journal).
Do we really need 24/7 news coverage
of the theatrical appointment of the
leader of an obsolete, greedy, misogy-
nistic and outrageously irresponsible
religion? As Dorothy eloquently states,
the pedophile priests must be thrilled
that “God is never tired of forgiving
us.” I would not even let a priest stand
close to my child.
Please Journal — more Dimitre, less
Foti.
Holly Bell
San Carlos
Background checks
Editor,
I must agree with letter writer
Gregory McCarthy who takes excep-
tion to doctors determining who is
mentally ill with regards to gun back-
ground checks (“Issues with gun con-
trol” in the April 15 edition of the
Daily Journal).
Doctors are not qualified to diagnose
mental health, including mental illness,
and if doctors are not qualified than no
other profession is either. No evaluation
can ever be accurate.
I join Mr. McCarthy is calling for an
end to evaluation of a potential gun
buyers mental health by background
checks. The individual is very capable
of determining whether or not he is
mentally fit enough to possess an AR
15 assault rifle. We must end this ero-
sion of rights of gun owners and not
insist on requirements like the laws that
insist on registration of your pets.
Don’t discount Mr. McCarthy and my
own paranoia on this matter. You’ve all
noticed the epidemic of pet confiscation
since those laws were enacted, if you
take guns away from the Jared
Loughners of the world, Mr.
McCarthy’s guns could be next.
John Dillon
San Bruno
Coming next
Editor,
“This year will go down in history,
for the first time in history a civilized
nation has full gun registration, our
streets will be safer, our police more
efficient and the world will follow our
lead into the future,” Adolf Hitler,
1935.
His “Brown Shirts” then rounded up
all the guns and the largest massacre in
history begins. I know, some will say,
“but that was a warring nation.” It did-
n’t start that way, Hitler was elected by
93 percent of the Germans and
Austrians. Freedom lovers, do your
homework.
Joseph Locasto
San Mateo
Healthcare
district public relations
Editor,
Your story “Carlmont High School
freshman trained in CPR” in the April
13-14 edition of the Daily Journal said
Woodside Fire Battalion Chief Emil
Picchi was happy about the grant-fund-
ed partnership with the Sequoia
Healthcare District but would like to see
the effort expanded throughout the
county.
As an elected member of the Sequoia
Healthcare District Board of Directors, I
have suggested that the Heartsafe
Program of the district should be turned
over to the County Emergency Medical
Services Department which maintains a
database of all publically accessible
AED devices. The district, which no
longer owns Sequoia Hospital, is redun-
dant and should be dissolved. They are
using the Heartsafe Program for PR
purposes, as is evidenced by the refer-
enced story.
Jack Hickey
Emerald Hills
The letter writer is a member of the
Sequoia Healthcare District Board of
Directors
America is not ready
Editor,
According to Gen Mike Hostage, who
is commander, Air Combat Command,
Joint Base Langley-Eustis: “The current
situation means we’re accepting the risk
that combat air power may not be ready
to respond immediately to new contin-
gencies as they occur.”
Our military leaders have informed us
that they are not ready to protect
America. So, what is the president
doing about this? President Obama has
sworn an oath to protect America, but
he is complacent. Some believe that
leadership starts from the ground up in
our country. In this case, they’re wrong.
We have but one commander in chief to
preserve, protect and defend America.
Yet, President Obama and his party,
including U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, can
rationalize the deterioration of our
national defenses by blaming others.
While the president is more concerned
with the next election, we are at greater
risk. How can he sleep at night?
Ethan E. Jones
San Bruno
Letters to the editor
North of reality
M
e thinks the North Korean dictator doth
protest too much. Leader Kim Jong Un has
been stomping his feet, telling South Korean
tourists to stop buying Gucci and Louis Vuitton knock-
off purses and get thee back to their own country
because gosh darn it he’s
going to go ahead and
fire off a nuke. Dang.
Filled with worry
Maybe the youngster
just wants to impress his
elder world leaders or
needs an excuse for
another Bill Clinton
intervention. Or, he’s
hoping for a real life
remake of “The Day
After.” Perhaps he’s try-
ing to impress new bestie
Dennis Rodman who
claims ol’ Kim “just
wants to be loved” —
because everybody knows
the best path to love is fear.
And anybody with more than a spoonful of common
sense or who holds an occupation with the fun byproduct
of anonymous mail and cryptic phone threats knows that
the world’s real scares rarely come from those who both-
er with an announcement. Individuals who whisper “I
know where you live” or “I’m going to kill you” aren’t
typically the ones who follow through with any actual
deeds. If someone wants somebody else taken care of or
some fill-in-the-blank action taken, the truly motivated
just do it without first whispering from the shadows or
shouting from the rooftops. There’s no warning, no cries
for help.
This is why the claims from Pyongyang of an immi-
nent attack are met by the average Jane and Joe with a
shrug and “Which Korea is the evil one?”
Even as the country ups the ante by now saying it
won’t give any notice before pulling the trigger — this
answers the question of what to get a 101-year-old coun-
try’s founder for his (albeit ceremonial) birthday — the
population majority still isn’t losing too much sleep.
There are far too many other pressing causes for concern
in the world or, more realistically, in one’s own back-
yard. How can anyone on the Peninsula worry about
international peace when there might someday be drones
at home? Or, at the very least, drones on somebody’s
government wish list? Convene a meeting! Write some
letters! Post on Facebook about the loss of privacy!
And yoga pants — there’s no time for North Korea
when yoga pants are poised to cause the fall of Western
Civilization. The situation with yoga pants has gotten so
dire manufacturers are recalling overly sheer apparel and
school districts are banning the gear for girls because
they are too distracting for boys. When so little is left to
the imagination, who needs drones?
Of course, homeowners could use personal drones to
help identify who might be knocking on their door. In
the wake of numerous midday shenanigans and so-called
door-knock burglars, some local law enforcement agen-
cies are warning people not to answer but instead loudly
ensure the visitor knows somebody is home. In other
words, greet every knock and doorbell by standing in the
hallway and telling then to go away, and if they don’t,
yell “I’m calling the police!” Of course, in all the spare
time created by the eventual lack of legitimate visitors
scared off by the paranoia, one can contemplate North
Korea.
Or bird flu. Rumor has it that’s making a comeback.
Let the fretting begin.
Entertainers Beyonce and Jay-Z went to Cuba amid
much brouhaha. President Obama dared call Kamala
Harris attractive. His wife referred to herself as a single
mother. More people undoubtedly worried about these
pressing social issues.
Saggy pants. Hoodies. Transgendered bathrooms. What
fashion hue is this season’s new black? These are real
problems, North Korea!
So until Kim Jong Un and his ilk have something real-
ly worth the gray hair and forehead wrinkles, hopefully
they will excuse the lack of attention. Of course, we may
be creating a self-fulfilling prophecy; if he becomes
frustrated, there’s no telling when he might go nuclear.
Or maybe he will fall quiet. Silence, after all, can be
deadly.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200
ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter
to the editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,599.20 -1.79% 10-Yr Bond 1.702 -1.10%
Nasdaq3,216.49 -2.38% Oil (per barrel) 87.39
S&P 500 1,552.36 -2.30% Gold 1,364.70
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Monday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Sprint Nextel Corp., up 84 cents at $7.06
Dish Network Corp.offered $25.5 billion in cash and stock for the wireless
carrier, which Dish says beats an offer from Softbank.
Alpha Natural Resources Inc., down 77 cents at $7.14
Shares of the coal company fell on concerns that a slowdown in China’s
growth could soften global demand for certain kinds of coal.
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc., down $2.65 at $29.27
Shares of the mining company fell as the price of gold plummeted below
$1,400 an ounce, its lowest level in more than two years.
Martin Marietta Materials Inc., down $5.17 at $93.56
Shares of the construction materials company fell after a report showed
homebuilder confidence fell on concerns about rising costs.
Citigroup Inc., up 9 cents at $44.87
The bank posted first-quarter earnings and revenue that beat analysts’
estimates, thanks to its investment banking business.
Nasdaq
Life Technologies Corp., up $5.11 at $73.11
Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. has offered to pay about $13.6 billion in
cash to buy the maker of genetic testing equipment.
Theravance Inc., up $4.60 at $28.36
The Food and Drug Administration released a review of the drugmaker’s
combination inhaler drug with GlaxoSmithKline to treat lung disease.
Discovery Laboratories Inc., down 54 cents at $1.85
The company said the launch of its respiratory drug Surfaxin will be
delayed about six more months, to the fourth quarter of this year.
Big movers
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Worries about an eco-
nomic slowdown in China fueled a steep
drop in commodity prices Monday,
spooking investors and giving the stock
market its worst day of the year.
The trigger for the sell-off came from
China, where the world’s second-largest
economy expanded 7.7 percent in the
first three months of the year, well below
forecasts of 8 percent or better. That
news pummeled copper, oil and other
commodities. Shares of oil and mining
companies fared the worst because
China is a huge importer of their prod-
ucts.
The decline came after a pile of nega-
tive economic reports. In addition to the
concerns about China, a separate report
showed weak manufacturing in the
Northeast, and a home builders’ survey
indicated housing activity isn’t going to
be strong, either, said Steven Ricchiuto,
chief economist for Mizuho Securities.
“People are realizing that the global
economy isn’t as strong as they expected
it to be,” he said.
The market began tumbling hours
before reports emerged of two bombs
exploding in the packed streets near the
finish line of the Boston Marathon. The
attack that killed two people and injured
more than 100 was just one more thing
to worry investors.
The pullback disrupted, at least for the
moment, the phenomenal rally that has
sent the Dow Jones industrial average up
13 percent and the Standard & Poor’s
500 index up 11 percent in 2013. Both
indexes marked record highs only last
Wednesday. But the market’s exception-
al performance has fueled widespread
speculation about an inevitable retreat.
Concerns that Cyprus and other trou-
bled European countries may sell gold to
raise cash have also weighed on prices
for precious metals, said Dan
Greenhaus, chief global strategist at the
brokerage BTIG.
The Dow tumbled 265.86 points to
close at 14,599.20, a decline of 1.8 per-
cent. Caterpillar, a maker of heavy
equipment used by miners, led the index
lower, falling 3 percent to $82.27. The
S&P 500 index slumped 36.48 points to
1,552.37, a loss of 2.3 percent.
The S&P was led by Freeport-
McMoRan Copper & Gold, which fell 8
percent to $29.27. Analysts at Citigroup
placed a “sell” rating on the mining giant
on the expectation that copper prices
will continue sliding.
The Nasdaq composite fell 78.46
points, or 2.4 percent, to 3,216.49.
It was the biggest drop for the stock
market since Nov. 7 — Election Day —
last year.
Of the 10 industry groups in the S&P
500, materials and energy stocks fared
the worst, losing 4 percent. Indexes of
small companies and transportation
stocks, which are more vulnerable to
swings in the economy, also fell 4 per-
cent.
Crude oil prices hit their lowest level
since mid-December, sliding $2.58 to
finish at $88.71 in New York trading.
And gold fell $140, plunging below
$1,400 an ounce for the first time in two
years as a sell-off in metals continued
from last week. Gold has now slumped
$203 an ounce over the past two days.
Frank Fantozzi, CEO of Planned
Financial Services, a wealth manage-
ment firm, says people had bought gold
since the financial crisis on the belief
that it was safe place to keep money. But
now that the metal has slid 20 percent
this year, they’re jumping out.
“I think you’re getting some panic
selling right now” in the gold market,
Fantozzi said. “People who have been
holding on to gold expecting a rebound
are now thinking, ‘I better get out.”’
Cetin Ciner, a finance professor and
expert in precious metal markets at the
University of North Carolina,
Wilmington, said gold had also offered a
protection against rampant inflation
when the economy recovered. That
helped push gold prices as high at
$1,900 in 2011, but the high inflation
they worried about still hasn’t hit.
Dow has worst day of the year
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The shine has come off the
gold market.
The price of gold logged its biggest one-day
decline in more than 30 years Monday, tum-
bling $140.30, or 9 percent, to $1,361. While
gold has been gradually falling since hitting a
peak of $1,900 in August 2011, the sell-off
accelerated late last week.
Before the drop, gold had climbed every
year since 2001, as investors bought the metal
both as protection against inflation and as a so-
called safe haven. The precious metal peaked
as lawmakers wrangled over raising the debt
ceiling in the summer of 2011 and threatened
to push the U.S. into default.
But a slowdown in inflation, combined with
speculation the Federal Reserve is considering
winding down its stimulus program, prompted
investors to sell Friday. Reports that Cyprus
may sell some of its gold reserves to pay off its
debts, following its bailout, also rattled the
market. The selling then intensified Monday
as speculators dumped their holdings.
Here’s why gold is falling and what the
decline says about the economy:
INFLATION REMAINS LOW
Investors bought gold because they were
afraid that inflation would rise too fast as a
result of the Fed’s effort to stimulate growth
by driving down interest rates through pur-
chases of government bonds. The higher cost
of goods would erode the purchasing power of
dollars. So far, though, inflation has remained
under control, even as the economy has
improved. In fact, the value of the dollar has
risen recently relative to other major
economies. That makes gold a less attractive
investment.
FEAR FACTOR EASES
Investors also buy gold as a safe haven, a
kind of insurance when they are worried
about the possibility of some kind of a finan-
cial collapse. While there has been a lot to
worry about over the last six years — the
financial crisis, the threat of a U.S. default,
meltdown in Europe — none of those events
have led to financial Armageddon.
That fear factor has dissipated after central
bankers around the world have bailed out
one economy after the other.
“Gold is an insurance asset for when
things go very wrong,” says Nicholas
Brooks, head of research and investment
strategy at etf securities. “It’s just that people
don’t feel the need for insurance right now.”
STOCKS ARE RISING
Even with Monday’s stock market drop,
stocks have surged this year. Investors are
optimism that the U.S. economy is poised to
decisively pull out of its slump following the
Great Recession. That’s pushed the Dow
Jones industrial average and the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index to record levels.
The Dow is up 11 percent this year. Before
the big sell-off, gold was down almost seven
percent.
“In this world of hot money, ‘what have
you done for me lately,’ people have lost
patience. Especially when the Dow started
making new highs, they started thinking,
‘Why am I in gold? I’m missing all the
action,”’ says Peter Schiff, CEO of Euro
Pacific Capital.
The shine comes off the gold market
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — General Motors and
Ford are putting aside their longstanding
rivalry to work together to develop a new
generation of fuel-efficient automatic
transmissions.
The companies said Monday that their
engineers will jointly design nine- and
10-speed transmissions that will go into
many of their new cars and trucks.
When transmissions have more gears,
engines don’t have to work as hard. That
saves fuel. As long as the shifting is
smooth, most customers don’t give
much thought to their transmissions.
The fierce rivals, which rank first and
second in U.S. auto sales, say they’ll
save millions of dollars that can be spent
on areas that set them apart from other
automakers such as quieter rides and
nicer interiors.
Neither would estimate exactly how
much they’ll save, but each said trans-
missions cost hundreds of millions of
dollars to develop. The more gears a
transmission has, the more complex and
costly it is to develop and build.
“While we still can be really competi-
tive, we can collaborate where it makes
sense,” said General Motors Co.
spokesman Dan Flores. “We will still
fight every day in the marketplace over
every sale.”
The savings also will help the compa-
nies keep their prices competitive.
Neither would say when the new trans-
missions will show up in cars and trucks,
although design work already has begun.
A previous venture to jointly design six-
speed transmissions took about three
years.
The companies will manufacture
transmissions separately. They’ll likely
order parts from the same companies,
saving millions more dollars, said David
Petrovski, an analyst for IHS
Automotive who specializes in transmis-
sion forecasting.
GM, Ford to collaborate on new transmissions
By Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — As J.C. Penney Co.
burns through its cash after a disastrous
turnaround plan and taps almost half of
its credit line, the flailing department
store chain doesn’t only have to calm its
investors. It has to restore confidence
among its several hundred suppliers
whose constant flow of merchandise
must continue if the retailer is to survive.
Penney announced Monday that it
would draw $850 million from its $1.85
billion revolving credit line to pay for
replenishing inventory, particularly for
its overhauled home area. Some analysts
say the move shows that the Plano,
Texas-based company is burning
through cash faster than expected.
Penney is also looking for alternative
sources of funding.
It comes at a critical time. Penney is
wrapping up back-to-school orders and
is starting to order goods for the critical
holiday shopping season. Normally,
retailers order goods well in advance but
don’t pay for them until about 30 to 60
days until after goods are shipped. If
vendors start demanding to be paid in
advance, stores face a cash crunch when
they order goods for busy shopping peri-
ods.
J.C. Penney job No. 1: Calming vendors
<< Warriors beat the Spurs, page 12
• Sharks blank the Coyotes, page 12
Tuesday, April 16, 2013
ATHLETE OF THE WEEK: MILLS VIKINGS SHORTSTOP GETS THIS WEEK’S HONOR >>> PAGE 13
Triumphant to tragedy
At least three are
dead following
two explosions
at the Boston
Marathon
REUTERS
Approximately two hours after Lelisa Desisa,top left,and Rita Jeptoo,top right,celebrated victories in the Boston
Marathon, one of two explosions went off near the finish line — three are dead, over 100 are injured.
Baseball highlights this week’s Honor Roll
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
We’re just about halfway through
the league seasons in high school
baseball, and that means many of
the county’s best hitters are really
locking into their strokes at the
plate.
Brett Moriarty of Menlo-Atherton
went 3-for-4 with four runs RBIs
during the his team’s 9-1 win over
Terra Nova. Batting in the five hole,
he drove in one during M-A’s five-
run first inning, later stealing home
on the back end of a double steal.
He drilled a two-run double to right-
center field in the fifth and added
another RBI in the sixth.
Sean McHugh of Mills drove in
three runs and had three hits in the
Vikings’ 7-5 win over El Camino.
He hit a solo home run one pitch
after Mike McWhirter clubbed a
three-run shot in the top of the first.
McHugh legged out an infield hit to
drive in his second run in the fourth
inning and singled to center to drive
in the Vikings’ final run of the game
in the sixth inning.
Dominic Giuliani of El Camino
baseball went 2-for-4 with three
RBIs in the Colts’ 7-5 loss to Mills.
It was a solid two-win week for
T
he Peninsula Athletic
League’s Bay Division
baseball standings just got
a lot tighter following Burlingame’s
17-4 beating of Carlmont last
Friday, handing the Scots their first
division loss of the season and
earning a series split with the divi-
sion leaders.
Burlingame now finds itself,
along with Terra
Nova, a game
behind the Scots
with 4-2
records. The
Tigers could
have pulled into
a tie for first, but
lost 9-1 to
Menlo-Atherton
Friday as well.
Hillsdale was
probably the
biggest benefici-
ary of
Carlmont’s loss as it takes some of
the sting out of losing three of their
last four league games. At 3-3, the
Knights are still within striking dis-
tance of the teams above them.
Hillsdale had a huge test the next
two weeks, however, with Carlmont
this week and Terra Nova looming
the following week.
Capuchino, Menlo-Atherton,
Aragon and Half Moon Bay all
sport 2-4 league marks, but only
three games out of first, they are a
two- or three-game winning streak
from being right back in the mix.
In the West Catholic Athletic
League, Serra is primed to make a
run at a league crown. The Padres
and St. Francis are tied atop the
standings with 6-1 records and hold
a two-game lead over Valley
Christian and Bellarmine as the
second round of league play begins
today.
Right now, Serra would hold the
tiebreaker over the Lancers by
virtue of the Padres’ come-from-
behind 10-9 win over St. Francis
March 22.
They have a rematch next
Thursday, but the Padres can’t look
too far ahead. They have three
tough games before that — St.
Ignatius today, Valley Christian
Saturday and Mitty next Tuesday.
See ROLL, Page 13
Title races
developing
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Two bombs explod-
ed at the Boston Marathon finish
line Monday two hours after Lelisa
Desisa and Rita Jeptoo crossed it to
win the race. Two people were killed
and dozens injured, and authorities
said they were investigating another
blast at the John F. Kennedy Library
five miles away.
Race volunteers and public offi-
cials rushed to the aid of wounded
spectators, and the medical tent set
up to care for fatigued runners was
quickly converted to a trauma clinic.
Runners and spectators were crying
as they fled the billowing gray
smoke rising from a running gear
store overlooking the end of the
course.
The explosion sent some runners
tumbling to the pavement and oth-
ers, already unsteady from the 26.2-
mile run, were knocked down by
those rushing toward the scene. A
Rhode Island state trooper who ran
in the race the blasts tore limbs off
dozens of people.
The blasts shattered the euphoria
of what had been an uneventful
117th edition of the world’s oldest
and most prestigious annual
marathon. Runners still on the
course were diverted to the Boston
Common; race officials said 4,496
runners had crossed the checkpoint
at more than 24 miles but did not
make it to the finish line.
A year after record high tempera-
tures sent unprecedented numbers of
participants to the medical tent, tem-
peratures in the high 40s greeted the
field of 23,326 at the Hopkinton
starting line. It climbed to 54
degrees by the time the winners
reached Boston’s Copley Square.
See BOSTON, Page 14
Earthquakes’ Kaval ‘appalled’ by player’s slur
STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Following a 1-0 loss to the
Portland Timbers Sunday night, the
San Jose Earthquakes are the mid-
dle of some damage control that
involves something more serious
than soccer.
In Sunday’s defeat, Quakes for-
ward Alan Gordon was ejected
after receiving his second yellow
card of the match following a foul
on a Portland player.
But minutes earlier, Gordon was
seen on the television broadcast
using a slur toward Johnson.
After the match, Gordon released
a statement through the team.
“I would like to sincerely apolo-
gize to everyone who watched
tonight’s match on NBC Sports
Network. The language I used
came during a heated moment and
does not reflect my feelings toward
the gay and lesbian community. I
made a mistake and I accept full
responsibility for my actions,” the
statement read.
Will Johnson, the Portland player
who Gordon directed the slur to,
was diplomatic after the game.
“I think it’s probably better that I
don’t comment on that,” he said.
“It’s a very sensitive matter. I’d
prefer the league go through with
See SLUR, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A’s romp the Astros
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Jed Lowrie drove
in four runs, Tommy Milone won
his third straight start and the
Oakland Athletics beat the Houston
Astros 11-2 on Monday night.
Nate Freiman added a three-run
homer and Brandon Moss had three
RBIs for the A’s. Oakland also ben-
efited from eight walks - four in the
first inning by Houston starter Erik
Bedard.
Carlos Pena had two hits for the
Astros, who have lost three straight
following a three-game winning
streak.
Milone (3-0) had a season-high
six strikeouts and didn’t walk a bat-
ter for the eighth time in his career.
The left-hander, who won an
Oakland rookie record 13 games in
2012, pitched out of jams in the
fourth and sixth before leaving fol-
lowing Jose Altuve’s one-out RBI
single in the seventh.
The A’s, who swept the Astros in
Houston earlier this season, needed
it after Brett Anderson and Jarrod
Parker were roughed up by the
Detroit Tigers last weekend.
Sharks shut out Coyotes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLENDALE — Antti Niemi
stopped 35 shots for his fourth
shutout of the season, Logan
Couture scored two goals, and the
San Jose Sharks earned a key road
victory by racing past the Phoenix
Coyotes 4-0 on Monday night.
Needing a win after a rough
week, the Sharks overwhelmed
Phoenix in the second period to
move within a point of Los Angeles
for fourth place in the Western
Conference.
San Jose outshot Phoenix 24-7 in
the period, going up 3-0 on goals by
Tommy Wingels, Couture and Joe
Pavelski. Niemi made some tough
saves early and was steady after the
Sharks took the lead to earn his
23rd career NHL shutout.
Jason LaBarbera stopped 37 shots
for Phoenix, which remained 11th
in the West and four points out of
the final playoff spot with six games
left.
These two Pacific Division rivals
came in needing not just one win,
but several as the season winds
down in its final two weeks.
The Sharks put themselves in
good position for a playoff spot
with a seven-game winning streak,
but followed by losing three of four,
putting them just two points ahead
of the West’s final spot.
The Coyotes earned a point in
eight of their previous nine games
(5-1-3), but were still 11th. Phoenix
lost a big chance to gain ground in
its previous game, losing in over-
time to struggling Calgary.
The Coyotes had good pressure
against San Jose in the first period,
creating numerous quality scoring
chances.
Mikkel Boedker missed on one
when his shot from the crease hit
the crossbar, and another drive by
David Moss was turned away by
Niemi, who nearly did the splits to
make a pad save.
LaBarbera, starting after Mike
Smith sustained a lower body injury
and couldn’t go, made a similar leg-
splitting move in the closing sec-
onds of the first period to stop
Couture on a semi-breakaway.
Warriors pick up a big win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Stephen Curry
made seven 3-pointers to finish with
35 points, leading the Golden State
Warriors past the severely short-
handed San Antonio Spurs 116-106
on Monday night.
Curry hit 7 of 13 shots from
beyond the arc to move within one
of Ray Allen’s single-season record
of 269 3-pointers set in 2005-06
with Seattle. Curry added eight
rebounds and five assists to help the
Warriors pull away late and move a
game ahead of Houston for the
Western Conference’s sixth seed.
Gary Neal had 25 points and five
assists and Patty Mills scored 23
points for the Spurs, who rested
their key starters a night after losing
91-86 loss at the Los Angeles
Lakers. San Antonio still had the
Warriors on the brink until Curry
took control.
After the Spurs tied the game at
84 early in the fourth quarter, Curry
connected on three 3-pointers dur-
ing a run that gave Golden State a
107-87 lead with less than 5 minutes
remaining. The 32nd straight sellout
crowd announced at 19,596 chanted
“Curry! Curry! Curry!”
Warriors coach Mark Jackson
took his starting point guard out
with 3:51 remaining. Fans gave
Curry a standing ovation, and they
belted out another roar moments
later when the video board showed
the Rockets lost 119-112 at
Phoenix.
Klay Thompson scored 23 points
and David Lee added 12 points and
11 rebounds for the Warriors, who
finish the regular season at Portland
on Wednesday. Houston, which
would hold the tiebreaker over the
Warriors after winning the season
series 3-1, will visit the Lakers it its
finale Wednesday.
49ers, Raiders, close out
deals before 1st workout
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — San
Francisco 49ers cornerback
Tramaine Brock has signed his one-
year tender.
The team announced Monday that
Brock had signed the contract he
had been previously offered.
Brock had 16 tackles and a forced
fumble last season for the NFC
champions, who lost 34-31 to the
Baltimore Ravens in the Super
Bowl. He also shared the team lead
with 15 tackles on special teams.
Brock joined the 49ers as an
undrafted rookie free agent in 2010.
In 2011, he made two interceptions
in 11 games.
Three Raiders sign
Defensive back Brandian Ross,
offensive lineman Alex Parsons and
running back Jeremy Stewart all
have signed their exclusive rights
tenders with the Oakland Raiders.
The team announced the signings
on Monday, the first day of official
offseason workouts for the Raiders.
Ross started one game last season
and played both cornerback and
safety in 14 games.
Parsons played sparingly last sea-
son after starting in place of injured
center Stefen Wisniewski last sea-
son.
Stewart had 25 carries for 101
yards in four games last season.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Everybody in uni-
form at the Tampa Bay Rays game
Monday against the Red Sox at
Fenway Park wore the number “42”
as Major League Baseball celebrat-
ed its fifth annual Jackie Robinson
Day.
Fans will see more of that number
on jerseys before the next couple of
days are out. All the teams in action
— there were eight night games on
the schedule, in addition to the
Rays-Red Sox day game — were
asked to wear Robinson’s number
on the 66th anniversary of his break-
ing the color barrier with the
Brooklyn Dodgers. Teams that did-
n’t play on Monday planned to pay
tribute Tuesday.
The anniversary is drawing spe-
cial attention this year with the
release of the film “42” about
Robinson, which went into wide
release over the weekend.
“We had a screening down in
spring training,” Rays manager Joe
Maddon said. “It was open to all of
our personnel.”
More than 100 players and other
club employees watched the film at
a theater in Port Charlotte, Fla., the
Rays’ spring training site, “and I
think a lot of guys walked away with
a greater appreciation” of
Robinson’s contribution, Maddon
said.
Maddon said Robinson’s debut on
April 15, 1947, helped lead to the
broader civil rights movement.
“I still don’t think people under-
stand how much it plays into the
Martin Luther King situation,” he
said. “The revolution that occurred
at that particular moment, it mat-
tered. That had to happen first to set
that whole thing up.”
Baseball celebrates its fifth
annual Jackie Robinson Day
Jackie Robinson was the first African
American player to play in Major
League Baseball.
Warriors 116, Spurs 106
Sharks 4, Coyotes 0
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It isn’t often you see a lead-off hitter’s men-
tality embedded in the heart of a baseball
team’s order.
But that’s what you have in Mills High
School and Sereno Esponilla. After two years
servicing the Vikings in the No. 1 spot in the
lineup, 2013 marked the high school debut of
Esponilla in the 3-hole — and perhaps no one,
not even head coach Tony Adornetto, could
have expected these results.
“I knew he was going to hit well,”
Adornetto said. “I didn’t expect .440.”
Actually, it’s .443 to be exact. And not just
any kind of .443 — it’s an average that
includes an on-base percentage in the .580
realm and most importantly, a 6-0 mark in
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division
play.
“He’s a three-year starter, so he knows
everything — as much as he can,” Adonetto
said. “He knows how we like to do things, so
it’s good to have him as a leader on the field.”
Esponilla’s leadership at the plate and in the
shortstop position was on display last week in
the Ocean’s first major showdown of the sea-
son. With the Vikings and El Camino Colts at
4-0, No. 3 was the motor that made Mills go.
Esponilla went 3-for-4 in the series and was
on base six times — wracking havor on El
Camino to help the Vikings in a huge two-
game sweep.
For his efforts, Esponilla is the Daily
Journal Athlete of the Week.
“It gave us confidence that we can play
against anybody,” Adornetto said of those two
wins. “We had a rough non-league schedule.
We played some good games, but the record
didn’t show in terms of the wins and losses.
But it was good experience getting us ready
for the league schedule.”
In a lot of ways, the non-league portion of
the schedule was rougher because of
Esponilla’s absense. But once the shortstop
returned, it shored up MIlls’ offense and
defense. Playing at the 6, Esponilla has just
one error all season long. And at the dish, his
experience in the lead off role gives him the
foresight to understand baseball situations and
help his team out.
“If we’re in a situation where we need a guy
on, he isn’t afraid to take pitches,” Adornetto
said. “He can work counts and hit the ball all
over the field. It’s only helped him the last
couple of years coming into this year.”
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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190 Primrose Road,
Burlingame, CA 94010
the Padres of Serra High School.
Serra beat the Fighting Irish of Sacred Heart
Cathedral 9-0 in Friday’s West Catholic
Athletic League matchup. The Padres were led
by senior center fielder Jordan Paroubeck who
had four hits, including a home run, two dou-
bles, four RBIs, two runs scored and a stolen
base.
Earlier in the week, a player who’s been in a
groove since the beginning of the season con-
tinued his winning ways. Orlando Razo led the
Padres to a 7-0 win over Archbishop Riordan.
Razo pitched a shutout, allowing just two hits
while striking out four.
Mickey McDonald racked up three RBIs on
three hits, singling in the third and fifth innings
along with doubling in the sixth.
Sequoia swept South San Francisco last
week in a pair of blowouts. Spencer Smith and
Zane Gelphman combined for a couple of
complete games on the bump for the
Cherokees. Marcus Avelar, Chris Ortiz, Liam
Clifford and Gelphman had big weeks at the
dish. The quartet combined for 10 RBIs.
Other standout baseball performances
include: Sacred Heart Prep’s Cole March, who
hit two home runs in the same inning —
including a grand slam — in a win against
Pinewood. ... Aldo Severson pitched his way to
a victory and hit a home run in a loss to Half
Moon Bay. ... Is anyone swinging a hotter stick
than recently called up from Carlmont’s
frosh/soph outfielder Aaron Albaum? The
sophomore had another big hit in the Scots’
Wednesday win over Burlingame. ... The
Panthers returned the favor though. In a 17-run
barrage, Jian Lee and Vince Arobio drove in
three runs. ... Menlo got off to a 2-0 start in
WBAL play. ... Adam Greenstein led the way
with the Knight’s first home run of the year, a
solo shot in the third that started a 14-run
inning. Other key hits in the inning were a
two-run double by Graham Stratford and a
three-run triple by Brock Cozad. ... Days later,
Menlo’s Mikey Diekroeger who went 3-for-3
with two RBIs and a stolen base in a win
against The King’s Academy.
On the softball field, Sophia Cerreta of
Aragon came through with the go-ahead RBI
as the Dons rallied from a 7-1 deficit to beat
Sequoia 8-7. Cerreta, who was on the hook for
the loss, drove home Courtney Ching with a
single to right during the Dons’ seven-run
sixth.
Rebecca Faulkner of Carlmont played the
two-way hero in a win over Burlingame. She
pitched a complete game and then hit the
game-winning, three-run home run, to keep
the Scots undefeated in league play.
Burlingame bounced back in emphatic fash-
ion. Nicki Lunghi led the way, driving in five
of the Panthers’ 11 runs in a blowout of Terra
Nova.
In boys’ lacrosse, Nick Schlein of Menlo-
Atherton, scored four goals in the Bears’ 10-8
over rival Sacred Heart Prep. The win keeps
M-A unbeaten in Santa Clara Valley Athletic
League De Anza Division play, and 3-0
against the Gators and Menlo School.
The Sacred Heart Prep girls lacrosse team
remained undefeated after a 17-8 league win
against Castilleja. Brigid White led SHP with
eight goals. Caroline Cummings added four. ...
White and Cummings scored six goals apiece
in another win over Burlingame.
The Serra varsity swim team defeated the
Archbishop Mitty Monarchs by the score of
115-67 last week. Double winners were Joe
Kmak — 200 individual medley and 100
breaststroke — and Zack Zamecki — 200 and
100 freestyles.
Bradley Jerome qualified for the Central
Coast Section meet in the 500 meter freestyle.
Crystal Springs Uplands School swimmer
Leila Schneider made history, becoming the
first CSUS swimmer to qualify for CCS in
nine years for the Gryphons — in the 100
meter butterfly.
Continued from page 11
ROLL
MENLO SPORTS
Graham Statford had a big opening week for
the Menlo baseball team.
Esponilla’s play driving Mills Vikings to victories
Athlete of the Week
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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their protocol.”
It’s standard procedure for Major League Soccer to review
the video of matches that involve a red card.
Gordon was escorted from the locker room after the game
by team personnel and did not speak with reporters after
match.
The loss dropped the Earthquakes to 2-3-2.
On Monday, San Jose President David Kaval issued a state-
ment.
“We are working hand in hand with the league right now on
this very serious matter,” the statement read. “Alan’s com-
ments do not reflect the views or beliefs of our organization.
We have always promoted an atmosphere of acceptance and
equality in our stadium and amongst our diverse and passion-
ate fans.
“I am appalled by the use of the hurtful language on the
pitch last night. We will use the collective energy and
resources of our club to foster an inclusive environment for all
of our fans. I hope to use this deplorable incident as a tool to
help eradicate offensive language of this kind.
“For our fans, I know the organization has let you down. I
will do my best to take the necessary actions to make sure we
once again can be viewed as a beacon of diversity, communi-
ty, and equality.”
Portland is 2-0-4 against the Earthquakes. Sunday’s game
was the first of a home-and-home with San Jose.
Continued from page 11
SLUR
How good is the Carlmont softball
team? A freshman, Jacy Phipps, cur-
rently leads the Scots in RBIs with 18.
The Scots have four players on pace to
drive in 20 runs or more and have a
chance to have eight, and as many as
10, players finish with 10 RBIs or
more.
Carlmont is threatening to go unde-
feated in Peninsula Athletic League
Bay Division play and has only two
losses on the year, to Soquel and San
Benito — a pair of Central Coast
Section powers. The Scots have since
avenged their loss to San Benito with a
convincing 9-1 win April 6. The
Haybalers have won the last seven
Division crowns in a row, beating
Carlmont twice in the finals, including
last year.
The Scots will be, once again, a
favorite to win a section title — some-
thing that has evaded the seven-time
champs since 2004.
Even more scary? The Scots have a
chance to be even better next year.
They will return their starting pitcher,
shortstop, first baseman and outfield.
***
Despite being upset by Carlmont
April 4, it looks like the Menlo-
Atherton boys’ tennis team will capture
its fourth-straight PAL Bay Division
title.
The Bears lost a pair of starters to
grades going into the match against the
Scots, but have won their last two
matches, including a big 5-2 win over
Burlingame last week. With matches
against the bottom two teams in the
division — Woodside and El Camino,
which are a combined 2-20 in Bay
Division — it would take a monumen-
tal stumble to be denied the league’s
automatic spot into the CCS tourna-
ment.
Carlmont, on the other hand, is surg-
ing right now. The Scots still have a
shot at second place as they face
Aragon today. A win by the Dons
would lock up second place in the
standings as well as the top seed in the
PAL tournament — which is used to
determine the league’s second automat-
ic CCS berth. The top seed in the
league playoffs will take on Ocean
Division champion Hillsdale.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
344-5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed
on Twitter @CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Desisa, of Ethiopia, won a three-way sprint
down Boylston Street to finish in 2 hours, 10
minutes, 22 seconds and snap a string of three
consecutive Kenyan victories.
“Here we have a relative newcomer,” said
Ethiopia’s Gebregziabher Gebremariam, who
finished third
In just his second race at 26.2 miles, Desisa
finished 5 seconds ahead of Kenya’s Micah
Kogo to earn $150,000 and the traditional
olive wreath. American Jason Hartmann fin-
ished fourth for the second year in a row.
“The Ethiopians run very good tactical
races,” defending champion Wesley Korir, a
Kenyan citizen and U.S. resident, said after
finishing fifth. “One thing I always say is,
‘Whenever you see more than five Ethiopians
in a race, you ought to be very careful.’ As
Kenyans, we ought to go back to the drawing
board and see if we can get our teamwork
back.”
Jeptoo, 32, averted the Keynan shutout by
winning the women’s race for the second
time. Jeptoo, who also won in 2006, finished
in 2:26:25 for her first victory in a major race
since taking two years off after having a baby.
After a series of close finishes in the
women’s race — five consecutive years with
3 seconds or less separating the top two —
Jeptoo had a relatively comfortable 33-sec-
ond margin over Meseret Hailu of Ethiopia.
Defending champion Sharon Cherop of
Kenya was another 3 seconds back.
Shalane Flanagan, of nearby Marblehead,
was fourth in the women’s division in her
attempt to earn the first American victory in
Boston since 1985. (Two-time winner Joan
Benoit Samuelson, running on the 30th
anniversary of her 1983 victory, finished in
2:50:29 to set a world record for her age
group.)
“The hardest part about Boston is the
Bostonians want it just as bad as we do,
which really tugs at our heart,” said Flanagan,
a three-time Olympian. “We all want it too.
We want to be the next Joanie.”
Kara Goucher, of Portland, Ore., was sixth
for her third top 10 finish in Boston as many
tries. The last American woman to win here
was Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach in ‘85; Greg
Meyer was the last U.S. man to win, in 1983.
“There’s just more pure numbers of African
runners,” said Goucher, who noted that the
field of five American women with personal
bests under 2:30 was the strongest in years.
“That’s a good team of American women,”
she said. “One day the opportunity is going to
be there.”
This year it was the men’s race with the
sprint to the finish.
Desisa, 23, was among a group of nine men
— all from Kenya or Ethiopia — who broke
away from the pack in the first half of the
race. There were three remaining when they
came out of Kenmore Square with a mile to
go.
But Desisa quickly pulled away and
widened his distance in the sprint to the tape.
It’s Desisa’s second victory in as many
marathons, having won in Dubai in January
in 2:04:45.
Continued from page 11
BOSTON
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 7 4 .636 —
Baltimore 6 5 .545 1
New York 5 5 .500 1 1/2
Toronto 5 7 .417 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 4 7 .364 3
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 7 5 .583 —
Kansas City 7 5 .583 —
Cleveland 5 6 .455 1 1/2
Chicago 5 7 .417 2
Minnesota 4 7 .364 2 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 9 4 .692 —
Texas 8 5 .615 1
Seattle 6 8 .429 3 1/2
Houston 4 8 .333 4 1/2
Los Angeles 4 8 .333 4 1/2
Monday’sGames
Boston 3,Tampa Bay 2
Toronto 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 8, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 11, Astros 2
Tuesday’sGames
Arizona (McCarthy 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 0-1),
4:05 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 0-0) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez 0-
1), 4:05 p.m.
TampaBay(Ro.Hernandez0-2) at Baltimore(Arrieta
0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1) at Toronto
(Jo.Johnson 0-1), 4:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0) at Atlanta (Medlen 1-1),
4:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 0-1) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 1-0),
5:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 0-1) at Minnesota (Pelfrey 1-1),
5:10 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 1-1) at Oakland (Griffin 2-0),7:05
p.m.
Detroit (Fister 2-0) at Seattle (Harang 0-0), 710 p.m.
Wednesday’sGames
Kansas City at Atlanta, 9:10 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 12:35 p.m.
Arizona at N.Y.Yankees,4:05 p.m.
Boston at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Texas at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 11 1 .917 —
New York 7 4 .636 3 1/2
Washington 8 5 .615 3 1/2
Philadelphia 6 7 .462 5 1/2
Miami 2 11 .154 9 1/2
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 8 5 .615 —
Cincinnati 6 7 .462 2
Pittsburgh 6 7 .462 2
Chicago 4 8 .333 3 1/2
Milwaukee 3 8 .273 4
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 9 4 .692 —
Arizona 8 4 .667 1/2
Colorado 8 4 .667 1/2
Los Angeles 7 5 .583 1 1/2
San Diego 2 10 .167 6 1/2
———
Monday’s Games
St. Louis 10, Pittsburgh 6
Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 2
Washington 10, Miami 3
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, ppd., snow
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, late
Tuesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets (Gee 0-2) at Colorado (Nicasio 1-0),
12:10 p.m., 1st game
Arizona (McCarthy 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 0-
1), 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 1-1) at Pittsburgh
(J.Sanchez 0-2), 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0) at Atlanta (Medlen 1-1),
4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 1-1) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 1-1), 4:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 1-1) at Miami (Sanabia 1-1),
4:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 0-1) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 1-
0), 5:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 2-0) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta
0-1), 5:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Laffey 0-0) at Colorado (Francis 1-1),
5:40 p.m., 2nd game
San Diego (Marquis 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers
(Capuano 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Kansas City at Atlanta, 9:10 a.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Texas at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Pittsburgh 42 32 10 0 64 141 102
N.Y. Islanders 42 21 16 5 47 119 122
N.Y. Rangers 41 21 16 4 46 100 96
New Jersey 42 15 17 10 40 96 115
Philadelphia 42 18 21 3 39 115 129
Northeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
x-Montreal 42 26 11 5 57 131 107
Boston 41 26 11 4 56 116 91
Toronto 42 24 13 5 53 130 113
Ottawa 41 21 14 6 48 101 89
Buffalo 43 18 19 6 42 111 128
Southeast Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Washington 42 23 17 2 48 129 118
Winnipeg 42 21 19 2 44 109 123
Tampa Bay 42 17 22 3 37 133 131
Carolina 41 17 22 2 36 107 131
Florida 41 13 22 6 32 99 142
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
y-Chicago 42 33 5 4 70 139 87
St. Louis 41 23 16 2 48 110 104
Detroit 42 20 15 7 47 106 107
Columbus 43 20 16 7 47 106 110
Nashville 44 15 21 8 38 100 123
Northwest Division
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 42 24 12 6 54 117 102
Minnesota 42 23 16 3 49 109 106
Edmonton 41 16 18 7 39 103 115
Calgary 42 16 22 4 36 113 145
Colorado 43 14 22 7 35 103 135
PacificDivision
GPW L OT Pts GF GA
x-Anaheim 42 27 10 5 59 125 105
Los Angeles 42 24 14 4 52 120 104
San Jose 42 22 13 7 51 106 102
Dallas 42 21 18 3 45 118 126
Phoenix 42 18 17 7 43 110 114
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
Monday’sGames
Toronto 2, New Jersey 0
Philadelphia 7, Montreal 3
Chicago 5, Dallas 2
Vancouver 5, Nashville 2
Columbus 4, Colorado 3, OT
Minnesota 4, Calgary 3
San Jose 4, Phoenix 0
NHL GLANCE
TUESDAY
SOFTBALL
Mercy-Burlingame at Notre Dame-Belmont, 3:30
p.m.; King’s Academy at Menlo School, Aragon at
Hillsdale,TerraNovaat Carlmont,Capuchinoat Half
Moon Bay, Burlingame at Sequoia, Latino College
Prep at Crystal Springs, 4 p.m.
BASEBALL
Crystal Springs at Priory, 3:30 p.m.; Bellarmine at
Serra, 4 p.m.; Woodside at Westmoor, Jefferson at
Mills,Sequoiaat SanMateo,SouthCityat El Camino,
4 p.m.
BOYS’TENNIS
Mitty vs. Serra at CSM, 3 p.m.; Crystal Springs vs.
Harker at DecathlonClub,3:30p.m..;Aragonat Carl-
mont, El Camino at Burlingame, Menlo-Atherton
at Woodside, Mills at San Mateo, Hillsdale at Se-
quoia, Oceana at Westmoor, Capuchino at Half
Moon Bay, 4 p.m.
BADMINTON
Capuchino at Burlingame, Woodside at Crystal
Springs, Terra Nova at Hillsdale, San Mateo at Jef-
ferson, Aragon at El Camino, Carlmont at
Menlo-Atherton, Westmoor at Mills, South City at
Sequoia, 4 p.m.
SWIMMING
St. Ignatius at Sacred Heart Prep, South City at
Woodside,Hillsdale at Jefferson,San Mateo at Half
Moon Bay, Capuchino at Westmoor, 4 p.m.
BOYS’VOLLEYBALL
Sacred Heart Prep at Los Altos, 5 p.m.; St. Ignatius
at Serra, 6:30 p.m.
BOYS’ LACROSSE
Palo Alto at Sacred Heart Prep, 4 p.m.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
Sacred Heart Prep at Menlo School, 4 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
vs. Sharks
7 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Wild
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/18
vs.Columbus
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@Portland
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/17
PlayoffsTBD
vs. Kings
7:30 p.m
CSN-CAL
4/16
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
4/17
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/16
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/17
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/16
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
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@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
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vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Former pro-
fessional athletes who have battled
countless injuries since they left the
game on Monday criticized a bill in
the state Legislature that would
restrict players from collecting
workers’ compensation benefits in
California.
Two dozen former players,
including San Francisco 49ers
defensive player Dana Stubblefield
and Reggie Williams of the
Cincinnati Bengals, appeared at the
state Capitol to speak against
AB1309, which they said was an
effort by team owners to avoid pay-
ing them for legitimate injuries.
“(Players) paid into the system
and now they want to take the sys-
tem away from us,” said Ickey
Woods, who grew up in Fresno and
was a running back for the Bengals.
California is one of nine states
that allow professional athletes from
out-of-state teams to seek workers’
compensation awards, which are
paid by their employers. A bill by
Assemblyman Henry Perea, D-
Fresno, would allow only players
from California teams to claim
workers’ compensation and would
shorten the filing period for claims.
Proponents of AB1309 say out-
of-state players abuse California’s
broad workers’ compensation rules
by filing claims here even when they
have received awards elsewhere.
Allowing non-residents to use the
system increases costs for state tax-
payers, they say.
“Professional athletes have every
right to file for workers’ comp bene-
fits — but they should do so in their
home state or in the state where they
were principally employed,” Perea
said in a news release promoting the
bill.
The California Labor Federation
and Consumer Attorneys of
California are backing the players
and opposing the legislation.
They argue that some injuries ath-
letes suffer while playing may not
be apparent for years, particularly
ailments resulting from repeated
stress or injury.
California law has broad limits on
filing workers’ compensation
claims, based on when a player
knew of the injury and whether they
were properly notified of their com-
pensation rights when they retired.
Under Perea’s bill, workers’ com-
pensation claims would have to be
filed within a year of an athlete’s
final game or of a physician diag-
nosing the condition, whichever is
later.
Opponents said narrowing
California’s rules is unfair to players
who paid income taxes for games
played within the state and should
be allowed access to California’s
compensation system.
“What we want is a fair look at
where the injury took place and
Pro athletes fight limits on Calif. workers’ comp
16
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
its assumed rate of return over the past one-,
five- and 10-year periods. SamCERA’s antic-
ipates a 7.5 percent annual return but its
investment performance ranks in the bottom
20 percent, according to the civil grand jury.
SamCERA CEO David Bailey said its esti-
mate of the unfunded liability is specific to
its fund investments while the civil grand
jury’s higher estimate is not. Bailey said the
jury also estimates as if SamCERA’s entire
fund is invested in bonds rather than a more
diversified portfolio.
Bailey also disagrees with the rate of
return noted in the report, saying as of March
31, 2013, the fund had earned 7.7 percent
over the prior 10 years.
The jury report “SamCERA’s funded lia-
bility: The elephant in the room” recom-
mends the county prioritize paying down the
debt over new or expanded programs and that
the pension plan improve its financial disclo-
sures.
The county has been trying to highlight the
pension challenge and “does not disagree
with the grand jury’s conclusion,” said
spokesman Marshall Wilson.
However, he said, the individual pensions
have to be put in perspective.
The average retiree from San Mateo
County receives an annual pension of
$33,876, or $2,823 a month, Wilson said.
The county budgeted a $92.5 million con-
tribution to SamCERA as partial payment on
the liability which is more than allocated for
each of the Sheriff’s Office, capital projects,
road construction and maintenance, library
system or parks, the report stated.
The use of Measure A sales tax revenue to
cut down on the liability has been suggested
but nothing has yet been approved and the
issue won’t be discussed by the Board of
Supervisors until June.
Even if SamCERA’s reported $1 billion
unfunded liability is accurate, the figure still
breaks down to $1,500 for every man,
woman and child in San Mateo County, the
report concludes.
The county’s taxpayers pay the price rather
than pension recipients through slashed serv-
ices, higher taxes or both, the report stated.
Over the past four years, the county has
already slashed employees, frozen pay and
restricted hiring along with trying to contain
retirement costs through new benefit formu-
las and establishing a higher age of receipt.
Most county employees have not had a pay
raise since 2008 and the Board of
Supervisors is taking concrete steps and
hearing regular updates from SamCERA,
Wilson said
But the jurors say that rather than mean-
ingfully addressing SamCERA’s problem,
the Board of Supervisors opted for a strategy
of “hope” — hope that they don’t need to
increase its contribution, hope the 7.5 per-
cent rate of return is met, hope the new pen-
sion changes will drop the liability and hope
they don’t need to make changes unpopular
with employees.
The civil grand jury reports are not legally
binding but recipients are required to
respond in writing within 90 days. In July
2012, the jury addressed the county’s esca-
lating retirement costs which touched on the
unfunded liability and rate of return assump-
tions. The current grand jury decided to dig
deeper into this aspect because of the “dra-
matic” impact both can have on the county’s
financial well-being.
To read the full report visit www.sanmateo-
court.org/grandjury.
Continued from page 1
PENSION
day now in every part of San Mateo County.
Affluent neighborhoods, however, such as in
San Mateo or Hillsborough are targeted even
more by criminals.
In the past couple of months, door-knock
burglaries in both cities have sent police on
high-speed chases that ended in multiple
arrests in Belmont and the arrest of another
man who robbed a Hillsborough home who
was nabbed later in San Francisco.
The San Mateo County Police Chiefs and
Sheriffs Association has noted a great uptick
in property crimes starting around the holi-
days in December, said San Mateo Police
Chief Susan Manheimer, also president of
the local chiefs association.
In San Mateo, the city’s burglary rate was
up 34 percent for January and February of
this year, according to uniform crime report-
ing statistics sent to the FBI.
The year-to-year numbers are climbing as
well as larceny spiked upward 12 percent
from 2011 to 2012 and auto thefts climbed 4
percent during the same period, according to
the San Mateo Police Department.
In 2010, the FBI estimates larceny alone
cost its victims across the United States $6.1
billion.
Manheimer and other local police officials
recently addressed the San Mateo Council of
Cities to brief municipal elected officials on
some of the reasons for the crime trends.
The reasons include:
• What were once brief spikes in crime are
now longer trends of criminal activity;
• What used to be small suspect groups has
now expanded to multiple “crews” working
larger geographic areas such as multiple
cities or the entire county;
• Low risk of long-term incarceration —
since the change in realignment sentencing
guidelines, property crimes such as vehicle
and residential burglary only result in being
sentenced to county jail rather than state
prison;
• Ease of monetary return on small
portable items — the price of gold is high
and electronics items such as mobile phones,
tablet computers and laptops are easily
resold online;
• The Peninsula is a “target rich” environ-
ment with many upscale neighborhoods
where both parents work, the children go to
school and homes are unoccupied during the
entire day.
The most disturbing trend, however, is the
recruitment of juveniles, Manheimer said.
Crime crews are routinely using juveniles,
such as high school dropouts, to commit
crimes under the tutelage and direction of an
adult, Manheimer said.
There is almost no risk of juvenile incar-
ceration due to realignment, Manheimer
said.
Police are taking a countywide look at the
problem and in San Mateo they have saturat-
ed some neighborhoods with extra patrols to
curb the activity or catch the crooks.
Police have enacted regional and county-
wide responses to the trend, Manheimer said.
There are also a number of shopping cen-
ters, theaters and downtown areas where
expensive vehicles are parked and often
leave valuable electronic items in plain view,
Manheimer said. These become easy targets
in unlocked vehicles and are visible enough
to prompt a window-smash to locked vehi-
cles, she said.
Continued from page 1
CRIMES
HEALTH 17
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By David Crary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — They look intent-
ly at the camera, some impassively,
some with smiles, all of them aware
that they’ve just shared with an
online audience a most personal
story: Why they tried to kill them-
selves.
By the dozens, survivors of
attempted suicide across the United
States are volunteering to be part of
a project by a Brooklyn-based pho-
tographer, Dese’Rae Stage, called
“Live Through This” — a collection
of photographic portraits and per-
sonal accounts.
It’s one of several new initiatives
transforming the nation’s suicide-
prevention community as more sur-
vivors find the courage to speak out
and more experts make efforts to
learn from them. There’s a new sur-
vivors task force, an array of blogs,
some riveting YouTube clips, all
with the common goal of stripping
away anonymity, stigma and shame.
“Everyone feels like they have to
walk on egg shells,” says Stage,
who once tried to kill herself with
self-inflicted cuts. “We’re not that
fragile. We have to figure out how to
talk about it, rather than avoiding
it.”
Such conversations are proliferat-
ing.
In January, the American
Association of Suicidology
launched a website called “What
Happens Now?” — described as the
first sustained effort by a national
prevention organization to engage
survivors in a public forum. It fea-
tures a blog, updated weekly, with
contributions from survivors shar-
ing their experiences and often
using their real names.
In one of the latest posts, the
founder of a respite home for suici-
dal people writes powerfully about
her own suicide attempt eight years
ago, involving both pills and a
kitchen knife, and about the contri-
butions that survivors can bring to
prevention efforts.
“Survivors have a unique perspec-
tive on what life’s like down in the
deep, dark hole,” writes Sabrina
Strong, executive director of
Waking Up Alive in Albuquerque,
N.M. “We found our way out ...
We’re not afraid to crawl down in
the dark hole with someone else.”
Seeking to encourage those types
of contributions, the National
Action Alliance for Suicide
Prevention — a federally funded
public-private partnership — has
formed a first-of-its-kind task force
comprised of prevention experts and
Suicide survivors help to shape prevention efforts
Dese’Rae Stage said only one of her subjects has had a change of heart and
asked not to be publicly identified.
See SUICIDE, Page 18
18
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HEALTH
From providing more ways to connect
with your doctors, to designing birth
centers that keep families in mind, we
work in partnership with you. It’s how
you plus us. And we plus you.
mills-peninsula.org
survivors. It plans to issue recommendations
this fall for how practitioners and organizations
in the prevention field can “engage and
empower suicide attempt survivors.”
One of the task force co-chairs is psycholo-
gist John Draper, project director of the
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a net-
work of centers that field calls from emotional-
ly distressed and potentially suicidal people.
According to studies cited by Draper, about 7
percent of survivors later kill themselves, a far
higher rate than for other groups.
“Yet that means 93 percent go on to live out
their lives,” he said. “We’ve got to talk to them,
engage then, find out what is bringing them
hope and keeping them alive.”
The other co-chair is Eduardo Vega, the sur-
vivor of a suicide attempt who is now executive
director of the Mental Health Association of
San Francisco.
“Nobody can speak to the issues, the sort of
agony, even the decision-making that goes on
when you’re actively suicidal so much as some-
body who’s been there, and can relate to all
that’s going on in a nonjudgmental way,” Vega
says in a recent video. “That’s the sort of magic
that will make a difference.”
In past decades, the stigma surrounding sui-
cide was intense, and most people who tried to
kill themselves avoided any public disclosures
about their experiences. There was far more
involvement in the prevention movement by
bereaved relatives of people who completed a
suicide.
Among them was Michelle Linn-Gust,
whose sister killed herself at 17 and who, in her
current role as president of the American
Association of Suicidology, helped launch the
“What Happens Now?” website.
“The bereaved, the people who’ve lost some-
one, like me, that movement has taken off,”
Linn-Gust said. “But the attempt survivors
have not had a voice. Nobody has given them a
home.”
Over the years, individuals who had
attempted suicide would surface occasionally,
writing books or going on the public-speaking
circuit to share their experiences. One such
communicator is Kevin Hines, who became a
prolific writer and speaker after surviving a
jump from the Golden Gate Bridge in 2000. A
survivor in Canada, David Granirer, has carved
out a specialty as a stand-up comedian whose
monologues address depression and mental ill-
ness.
Among Granirer’s routines is a feigned
phone conversation in which he unsettles a
smarmy telemarketer. “I’m so depressed,” he
says. “If you hang up, I’ll kill myself.”
What’s new in the past couple of years is a
broader phenomenon — a surge of collective
projects by survivors, corresponding with a
keener and more systematic interest by preven-
tion experts in their potential contributions.
“The voices of people who have thought
about suicide and possibly attempted suicide
have been largely absent from public conversa-
tions about suicide and what should be done
about it,” says Karen Butler Easter, president of
National Association of Crisis Center
Directors. “They know what hurts, and they
know what helps.”
One asset that survivors say they can supply
is candor.
“We are willing to speak truthfully, even if
others are afraid to,” writes Sabrina Strong in
her recent blog post. “We understand that we
do others a disservice by providing generic and
whitewashed advice from the school of magi-
cal thinking — `Things will get better.’
`Everything’s all right.’
“Sometimes things don’t get better, at least
not right away.”
Historically, prevention specialists made rel-
atively little effort to seek input from people
who tried to kill themselves. Experts say treat-
ment often was — and in some cases still is —
condescending, and at times harsh and puni-
tive.
“The attitude was that if a person tried to kill
themselves, they were irresponsible, they were
not people we could trust, and we knew what’s
better for them,” said John Draper. “There also
was some concern that they might kill them-
selves if we engaged them.”
Those attitudes have evolved in recent years,
with more interest in collaborative treatment.
Yet prevention experts say many therapists lack
specialized training in how to deal with sur-
vivors and balk at treating them because their
above-average rate of eventually killing them-
selves prompts fear of malpractice suits by
their families.
Among those serving with Draper and Vega
on the new task force is Heidi Bryan of
Neenah, Wis., who survived a suicide attempt
in the 1980s and whose brother did kill himself.
Bryan, 55, has been active for more than a
decade in suicide-prevention initiatives, and
has observed notable changes in how experts
view survivors.
“I remember sitting at a conference when
speakers were talking about survivors — it was
like we were lab rats,” she said. “Now they’re
finally realizing maybe we should be brought
in on this. We need to erase the misperceptions
that people have about us, so we’re treated with
the respect we deserve.”
Continued from page 17
SUICIDE
HEALTH 19
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — Two more people have
died in China from a new strain of bird
flu, raising the death toll from the virus
to 13, state media reported Sunday.
The official Xinhua News Agency said
the two deaths were reported in
Shanghai and that three new cases were
also confirmed in the financial hub. A
total of 11 new cases were reported
Sunday — including two in a central
province that previously had been unaf-
fected. In all, 60 cases of the virus,
known as H7N9, have been reported in
China.
The two cases reported Sunday in cen-
tral Henan province, which is next to
Beijing, followed an announcement
Saturday that a 7-year-old girl had
become the first person in the capital to
be infected with the virus. All previous
reported cases were in Shanghai and
other eastern areas of China.
A World Health Organization official
said Sunday that it wasn’t surprising that
the virus had spread to Beijing.
Michael O’Leary, head of WHO’s
office in China, said it’s not the case that
everyone confirmed to be infected with
H7N9 was “clustered in one small area
with the same source of exposure.”
“So we’ve been expecting new cases
to occur. ... Furthermore, we still expect
that there will be other cases,” he said.
Four new cases were reported Sunday
in eastern Zhejiang province and two
more in Jiangsu.
Health officials believe the virus,
which was first spotted in humans last
month, is spreading through direct con-
tact with infected fowl.
O’Leary said “the good news” was
that there was still no evidence that
humans had passed on the virus to other
humans.
“As far as we know, all the cases are
individually infected in a sporadic and
not connected way,” he said, adding that
the source of infection was still being
investigated.
The girl from Beijing, whose parents
are in the live poultry trade, was admit-
ted to a hospital Thursday with symp-
toms of fever, sore throat, coughing and
headache, the Beijing Health Bureau
said.
Death toll from bird flu in China rises to 13
REUTERS
Officials from the Center for Food Safety get blood and swab
samples from chickens imported from mainland China at a
border checkpoint in Hong Kong.
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, APRIL 16
Organizing and Executing Strategy:
Jim Kouzes on Leadership
Challenge. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Stanford Research Institute, 333
Ravenswood Ave., Menlo Park.
Advance registration is $25 for
students, affiliates and members, $35
non-members, at the door prices are
$35 for members, students and
affiliates and $45 non-members. For
more information contact
nancy_tubbs@fullcalendar.com.
SanMateoCountyNewcomers Club
Luncheon. Noon. Luceti Restaurant,
109 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo. $25.
Installation of officers for 2013-14 by
Donna Chambers and Round Square
Table discussion about new and
current activities. Deadline to RSVP was
April 10. For more information call 286-
0688.
Teen Movie: ‘Life of Pi.’ 3:30 p.m. to
5:40 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Free.
For more information call 591-8286.
Go Green For Earth Day at
Serramonte Center. 5:30 p.m.
Serramonte Center, Grand Court,
Serramonte and Gellert Blvd., Daly City.
Free. For more information call 301-
3360.
Travel Wizards Hosts Indulge-Your-
Passion Travel Expo. 5:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. Foster City Recreation Center, 650
Shell Blvd., Foster City. Free. For more
information and to RSVP call 696-6900.
Wellness Lecture: Say Goodbye to
Allergy Season. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Half Moon Bay Library, 620 Correas St.,
Half Moon Bay. Dr. Shannon Wood,
naturopathic doctor and licensed
midwife, will discuss natural allergy
remedies and solutions for relief. Free.
For more information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
CommunityMeeting for Teen Input
of New Burlingame Community
Center.6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Food will
be provided and attending counts
toward community service. Free. To
RSVP email jhelley@burlingame.org.
League of Women Voters Meeting
on ‘Oversight of Special Districts.’ 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Chetcuti Room, Library
Plaza, 540 poplar Ave., Millbrae. Free.
LAFCo Executive Martha Poyatos and
County Supervisor Don Horsley will
explain the structure, duties and
limitations of the commission which
oversees the 23 districts in San Mateo
County. For more information call 342-
5853.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17
AARP Sponsored Driver Safety
Class. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.The San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $12 AARP
members, $14 non-members. For more
information call 616-7150.
Beginning Word Processing. 10:30
a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Free. Learn the
basics of Microsoft Word 2007. For
more information call 591-8286.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Speido Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free admission, lunch
$17. For more information call 430-
6500.
Portola Art Gallery’s Jan Prisco
Offers Weekly Pastel Plein Air
PaintingClasses.1:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor Road, Menlo
Park. $30 per class. Classes will be
available weekly through August. For
more information contact
frances.freyberg@gmail.com.
OfficeHourswithSanMateoCounty
Supervisor Warren Slocum. 5 p.m. to
8 p.m. Fair Oaks Community Center,
Conference Room B, 2500 Middlefied
Road, Redwood City. Supervisor
Slocum is on hand to meet with
constituents; no appointment is
necessary. Bilingual Spanish speaking
staff will be available. For more
information call 363-4570.
Youth Advisory Committee
Spaghetti Feed.6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Foster
City Recreation Center, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Tickets are $5 and $10. All
proceeds will benefit Samaritan
House’s Safe Harbor Shelter. For more
information call 286-3395.
Bettman and Halpin LiveinConcert.
7 p.m. Downtown Library Fireplace
Room, 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to redwoodcity.org.
The Club Fox Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11
p.m. The Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information go to
www.rwcbluesjam.com.
Bonsai and Dwarf Conifers.7:30 p.m.
Room 12, Hillview Community Center,
97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos.The De Anza
Chapter of the American
Rhododendron Society will feature a
program by the certified arborist Ted
Kipping on bonsai and dwarf conifers.
Kipping, who works for Tree Shapers,
studied natural history at Columbia
University and has been involved in
horticulture for 35 years. Free. For more
information go to
www.treeshapers.com.
THURSDAY, APRIL 18
Kid’s Club Woodshop Workshop.
Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st Ave.,
San Mateo. Free for all kids ages 12 and
younger who sign up with their
parents online. For more information
call 345-8222.
4C’sAnnual FamilyTeaParty.10 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Sobrato Center for
Nonprofits, 350 Twin Dolphin Drive,
Redwood City. Tea times will be at 10
a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 4 p.m.
and 5:30 p.m. Reservations required.
Suggested donation of $5 for a family
of two to three or $10 for a family of
four to six. For more information call
517-1400 or go to
4csteaparty.brownpapertickets.com.
San Mateo Chapter 139 AARP
Meeting.11 a.m. Beresford Recreation
Center, 2720 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Social hour is at 11 a.m. and
business meeting is at noon. Following
the meeting we will be entertained by
Beverly McSween playing the piano.
For more information call 345-5001.
Weigh Less, Live More Workshop.
Noon. 981 Industrial Road suite C., San
Carlos.There will be a lecture on weight
loss problems in America, why diets
don't work, healthy recipes, quick tips
and more.There will be also be snacks.
Free. To RSVP or for more information
call 224-7021.
Film Noir Movie Series: ‘Touch of
Evil.’1 p.m. to 3 p.m. City of San Mateo
Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 522-7490.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Hotel Transylvania.’ 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Movie is rated PG and lasts
91 minutes. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Burlingame Library Foundation
Spring Book Sale. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Lane Community Room, Burlingame
Main Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. There will be a wide
variety of books available and new
stock will be added daily.There will also
be various media for sale. All proceeds
will support library programs. $5
admission fee. For more information
call 558-7474.
Meet the Artists Evening Reception.
5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Free. Reservations are
required. The Annual Botanical Art
Exhibition will run until June 16, and is
open weekdays 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For
more information call 364-8300.
An Evening with Judy Grahn and
Friends. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sofia
University, 1069 E. Meadow Circle, Palo
Alto. Join Judy Grahn in a celebration
of her latest book, A Simple Revolution,
which details her life and career
dedicated to social justice, the Gay
Women’s Liberation movement, LGBTQ
activism and celebration of women in
the arts. Grahn will speak, answer
questions and engage in conversation
with panelists. For more information
contact sofia_events@sofia.edu.
Earth Day Celebration — Organic
Sustainable Gardening Workshop.
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. There will be
information, a hands-on planting
project, a raffle of a compost bin and
other Earth Day items, a workshop by
Alane O’Rielly-Weber and more. Co-
sponsored by the city of Millbrae,
Millbrae Library and Friends of the
Millbrae Library. Free admission. For
more information and to RSVP call 259-
2339.
Les Liaisons Dangereuses: Pay-
What-You-Can Preview. 8 p.m.
Dragon Productions Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City.The show will
run until May 12. For more information
call 493-2006.
FRIDAY, APRIL 19
AARP Sponsored Driver Safety
Class. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.The San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $12 AARP
members, $14 non-members. For more
information call 616-7150.
Special Presentation at Filoli: Tony
Duquette — LegendaryDesigner. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Hutton Wilkinson will speak.
$25 for members and $30 for non-
members. For more information and
for tickets go to www.filoli.org.
Keeping KidsSafeProject.3 p.m. to 7
p.m. Autobahn Motors, 700 Island
Parkway, Belmont. Free FBI digital
fingerprint and photographs from one
of the top child safety programs in the
country.The Keeping Kids Safe Project
will take a child’s fingerprints and sent
them home with parents. Parents can
use the records to turn directly over to
authorities anywhere in the world to
instantly aid in an investigation.There
will also be community organizations
present to provide safety information
and entertainment for families. For
more information email
Danielle@sipkids.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
May 19 race.
“We have time to figure some things
out,” Lee said.
He added that details about the Boston
explosions remain unclear and may
affect what additional security measures
are taken.
Lee noted that preliminary reports
indicated the bombs may have been
inside trashcans, and said, “we’re look-
ing and are sensitive to that.”
Suhr said police and other city depart-
ments held a conference call after the
bombing and that the Police
Department’s command staff will be
walking along Market Street to ensure
public safety.
The police chief encouraged anyone
who sees anything suspicious to alert
authorities.
“Err on the side of caution,” Suhr said.
“Better it be nothing and we dispense
with it quickly than it be something that
we don’t know about and somebody gets
hurt.”
He said police aren’t the only source
of security in a large event such as a
race, which spans several miles in a city.
“If there’s going to be 50,000 people
in the Bay to Breakers ... that’s 50,000
sets of eyes and ears that listen and see,
and if you see something, say some-
thing,” Suhr said.
A smaller race is scheduled for this
weekend in Golden Gate Park, and
organizers of that race, the Playworks
San Francisco Run for Recess 5K, are
also in communication with the city,
Playworks executive director Ellen
Goodman said.
Goodman said it is still too early to tell
what security changes could be made
until more information comes to light
from Boston.
Another big event coming up in San
Francisco is the America’s Cup, for
which preliminary races begin in July.
Continued from page 1
SECURITY
an act of terrorism.
President Barack Obama vowed that
those responsible will “feel the full weight
of justice.”
As many as two unexploded bombs
were also found near the end of the 26.2-
mile course as part of what appeared to be
a well-coordinated attack, but they were
safely disarmed, according to a senior
U.S. intelligence official, who also spoke
on condition of anonymity because of the
continuing investigation.
The fiery twin blasts took place about
10 seconds and about 100 yards apart,
knocking spectators and at least one run-
ner off their feet, shattering windows and
sending dense plumes of smoke rising
over the street and through the fluttering
national flags lining the route. Blood
stained the pavement, and huge shards
were missing from window panes as high
as three stories.
“They just started bringing people in
with no limbs,” said runner Tim Davey of
Richmond, Va. He said he and his wife,
Lisa, tried to shield their children’s eyes
from the gruesome scene inside a medical
tent that had been set up to care for
fatigued runners, but “they saw a lot.”
“They just kept filling up with more and
more casualties,” Lisa Davey said. “Most
everybody was conscious. They were very
dazed.”
As the FBI took charge of the investiga-
tion, authorities shed no light on a motive
or who may have carried out the bombings,
and police said they had no suspects in cus-
tody. Officials in Washington said there
was no immediate claim of responsibility.
WBZ-TV reported late Monday that
law enforcement officers were searching
an apartment in the Boston suburb of
Revere. Massachusetts State Police con-
firmed that a search warrant related to the
investigation into the explosions was
served Monday night in Revere but pro-
vided no further details.
Police said three people were killed. An
8-year-old boy was among the dead,
according to a person who talked to a
friend of the family and spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity. The person said the
boy’s mother and sister were also injured
as they waited for his father to finish the
race.
Hospitals reported at least 144 people
injured, at least 17 of them critically. The
victims’ injuries included broken bones,
shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.
At Massachusetts General Hospital,
Alisdair Conn, chief of emergency servic-
es, said: “This is something I’ve never
seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of
carnage in the civilian population. This is
what we expect from war.”
Some 23,000 runners took part in the
race, one of the world’s oldest and most
prestigious marathons.
One of Boston’s biggest annual events,
the race winds up near Copley Square, not
far from the landmark Prudential Center
and the Boston Public Library. It is held
on Patriots Day, which commemorates the
first battles of the American Revolution, at
Concord and Lexington in 1775.
Boston Police Commissioner Edward
Davis asked people to stay indoors or go
back to their hotel rooms and avoid
crowds as bomb squads methodically
checked parcels and bags left along the
race route.
Continued from page 1
TERROR
The search was made more difficult
because heavy cellphone use caused slow
and delayed service. In an age connected
by everything digital, the hours after the
blasts produced a tense silence.
At the race, 51-year-old Julie Jeske of
Bismarck, N.D., had finished about 15
minutes before the explosions and was
getting food about two blocks away
when she heard two loud booms. She
immediately tried to call her parents, but
could not place the call. A friend was
able to post on Facebook that they were
OK, but reaching her parents was anoth-
er worry.
“I wasn’t able to call and I felt so bad,”
Jeske said. “When I was finally able to
reach them, my mom said she was just
absolutely beside herself with fear.”
Tim Apuzzo of Seattle said he spent an
agonizing 10 minutes frantically trying
to call his girlfriend, Quinn Schweizer,
who was watching the marathon with her
friends at the finish line. But when he
kept getting a recording saying there was
no service, he started to worry “because
you know you have a group of people in
this generation all wired in ... and quick
to respond.”
Finally, she was able to call him to say
she was safe and that her group had left
the finish line just minutes before the
blast to walk to a cafe for lunch.
Google stepped in to help family and
friends of runners find their loved ones,
setting up a site called Google Person
Finder that allows users to enter the name
of a person they’re looking for or enter
information about someone who was
there. A few hours after the explosion,
the site indicated it was tracking 3,600
records.
Mary Beth Aasen of Shorewood, Wis.,
and her husband were using an app to
track their daughter Maggie’s progress
along the marathon route. They didn’t
realize anything was wrong until a wor-
ried friend texted Aasen and asked if
Maggie was OK.
The app indicated that Maggie was still
moving, a relief for her parents. Mary
Beth Aasen tried in vain to call her
daughter for about 30 minutes before
Maggie called her.
“When I talked to her she was pretty
upset,” Aasen said. “Physically she said
she felt great but she was upset because
she hadn’t been in contact with her
friends.”
Aasen said she was waiting for Maggie
to call her back with an update, but knew
cellphone service was slow in the area.
“I just feel terrible for the people who
haven’t been in contact with their family
and friends who are there,” she said. “I’m
praying for everyone who hasn’t heard
yet.”
David Meixelsperger, who owns the
Berkeley Running Company in Madison,
Wis., finished the race about 90 minutes
before the explosion. He sent an email to
customers of his store and friends in the
running community letting everyone
know he was safe, but that he couldn’t
send or receive calls on his cellphone.
Continued from page 1
FAMILY
COMICS/GAMES
4-16-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
PreViOus
sudOku
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Minister, for short
8 Play list
12 Approve
13 Boxing’s greatest
14 Urges
15 Hires new workers
17 Harvest haul
18 Elev.
19 Wings it (hyph.)
21 Artist’s plaster
24 Denials
25 Employ
26 Berlin native
30 Swedish auto
32 Want ad abbr.
33 Joule fractions
37 Ballet costume
38 “-- -Tiki”
39 Chop --
40 Squabble
43 Family room
44 Dateless
46 Actress Witherspoon
48 Transforms
50 Online info
51 Old canal
52 Spoke softly
57 Golf pegs
58 “Son -- -- gun”
59 Charged particles
60 Helper, briefy
61 Acquired
62 Nosy neighbor
dOwn
1 In favor of
2 DDE nickname
3 Refrain syllables
4 Tales
5 River foater
6 Brownie
7 Customs request
8 Tornado relatives
9 Eagle’s nest
10 Uppity folks
11 Recipe amts.
16 Excited
20 Forensic ID
21 Blow hard
22 Genesis twin
23 Pants part
27 Shrill cries
28 Tree anchor
29 Bill of fare
31 Danube city
34 Impolite
35 Mild expletives
36 “Auld Lang --”
41 “Gross!”
42 London buggy
44 Tender spots
45 Attempts
47 Furnish
48 “I -- -- man with seven
wives”
49 Urban blight
50 Greek grp.
53 ET craft
54 Lobster eggs
55 USN offcer
56 Summer hrs.
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
future sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
Get fuZZy®
tuesday, aPriL 16, 2013
aries (March 21-April 19) -- To achieve some of
your bigger objectives, you might have to do things
in a circuitous way. Just be sure not to charge into
walls, hoping they will crumble on impact.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Argumentative
individuals will frustrate you, but the solution is
obvious. Don’t involve yourself with companions
who overreact to a difference of opinions.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Take nothing for
granted in both your commercial and personal
dealings. If you play things too loose, you might
think you have an agreement, when all you’ve got is
a maybe.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- To get along well with
someone who is pertinent to your plans, it might
be necessary for you to make some concessions.
Failing to do so could bring things to a halt.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- When sharing a job with
others, be sure that no one person has more work to
do than the others. Each must do his or her share.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be prepared to operate
on your own if it becomes necessary. A friend upon
whom you can usually depend might let you down.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be a good sport and
pick up all the pieces after someone’s temper
tantrum. This person needs to be consoled, not
chastised.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- It’s rarely a good idea
to get angry with someone just because he or she
disagrees with you. It’s important to keep an open
mind and a forgiving heart.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Guard against
inclinations to suddenly change course, especially
when your goal is within reach. A shift in direction
will do nothing except take you off track.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If you are not
successful, it isn’t due to a lack of good ideas.
Although your imagination is excellent, your
implementation might not be.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be careful that
you do not trip over your own shoelaces. The only
obstacles in your path are the ones you put there
yourself.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If it’s up to you to
make plans for a get-together with friends, give
thought to who is involved. Don’t invite anyone who
hasn’t been getting along with everyone else.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday • Apr. 16, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
JOB TITLE:
ENGINEERING MANAGER
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS, Engg,
etc.+ 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5). Exp.
w/ VoIP, Oracle SQL, ASP, C/C++, Java
& Javascript reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc. Attn: HR
Dept.1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404.
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
TRADES -
Structured Cabling Technicians,
and Electricians wanted
All Levels Needed
San Jose, Bay Area
Start Immediately
Contact: Holly Andrews
415-513-4187
We pay for referrals
110 Employment
SOFTWARE ENGINEER @ MasterCard
(San Carlos, CA) F/T. Develop, create &
modify computer applications software &
specialized programs. Deliver strategic &
innovative products for MasterCard. Con-
duct proof of concepts for new technolo-
gies for use in merchant applications.
Position req’s Mast or foreign equiv in
Engg (any), IS, IT or rel & 3 yrs experi-
ence as Software Engr, Software Dvpr or
rltd. Alternatively, employer will accept
Bach + 5 yrs progressively resp exp. 2
yrs exp w/ the following req’d: Program-
ming in Java & J2EE; Requirements
Analysis & Documentation; Spring, Mav-
en & Eclipse frameworks; Payment, Fi-
nancial & Deals industry exp; Data Mod-
eling for offers information system; Mer-
chant Classification through Radix parser
& Offer targeting based on user spend
profiles; MySql, HSQL & PostgreSQL da-
tabases; Implement scalable & distribut-
ed cache using EHCache & Memcache;
Writing web apps using Resin & Web
Servers; PERL, Ruby, Python & Hadoop
scripting languages; & HTTP, FTP, TCP,
IP, Jetty & Tomcat. Emp will accept any
suitable combo of edu, training & exp. To
apply mail resume to Jay Miller, Global
Talent Acquisition, 2200 MasterCard
Boulevard, O’Fallon, MO 63368. Ref
MC3-2013.
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation
Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520163
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nandkumar Gopalkrishnan
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Nandkumar Gopalkrishnan
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name:
Nandkumar Gopalkrishnan
Proposed name: Jayesh Gopal Krishnan
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 21,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/29/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 3/27/13
(Published, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 4/23/13,
04/30/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255208
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: John J. Olcese Family Partner-
ship, 1720 Sweetwood Drive, DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Elsie L. Schenone,
Trustee of the Elsie L. Schenone Revo-
cable Trust, same address, Mary Virginia
Beroldo, Trustee of the Mary Virginia
Beroldo Revocable Trust, 2832 Brittan
Ave., San Carlos, CA 94070, and
Jeanne Monsour & John David Olcese,
Co-Trustees of the John Frank olcese
Revocable Trust, 468 Missippi St., San
Francisco, CA 94107. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Mary V. Beroldo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520183
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nahla Hedayet
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Nahla Hedayet filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Nahla Hedayet
Proposed name: Natalie Drozinski
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 7, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/29/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/27/13
(Published, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 4/30/13,
05/07/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255400
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Low Ltd., 2615 S. El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Na-
nette 1) Low Lew, same address, 2) Le-
slie Low, 961 Cape Buffalo Dr., San
Jose, CA 95133, 3) Murray Low, 240 S.
Humboldt St., San Mateo, CA 94401, 4)
Raymond Low, 1394Stanton Way, San
Jose, CA 95131. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Nanette Low Lew /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/13, 04/20/13, 04/27/13, 05/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254868
The following person is doing business
as: Cityworld Wholesaler, 1325 Howard
Ave., #423, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Selami Gundogdu 1501 Ralston Ave,
#304, BURLINGAME, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Selami Gundogdu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/26/13, 04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254729
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Eden Records, 2)Slospeak Re-
cords, 2049 Rockport Avenue, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Eden Re-
cords, LLC., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/01/2008.
/s/ James Cross /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/26/13, 04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255215
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Expedia CruiseshipCenters,
901 Angus Ave. W., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Steven R. Kuhner & Ione M.
Kuhner, same address. The business is
conducted by Co-Partners. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 04/01/13.
/s/ Steven R. Kuhner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255359
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Speedy Spot, 701 Jenevein
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ase-
faw Hagos and Norma C. Madayag 1875
Paradise Valley Ct., Tracy, CA 95376.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Asefaw Hagos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 252986
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name:
Dream Tree Builder, 1319 S. Railroad
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 11/01/2012. The
business was conducted by: Yonghee
Ahn, 405 Serrano Dr., #94, San Francis-
co, CA 94132.
/s/ Yonghee Ahn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 04/15/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 03/16/13,
03/23/13, 03/30/13, 05/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255128
The following person is doing business
as: Phyziquest Vitality Sciences Institute,
407 N. San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Phyziquest Enterprizes, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2005.
/s/ Aaron Parnell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255170
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Biagino Shoes, 2)Biagino.com, 425
Larch Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Jehu Organization by Jon-
athan Yamauch, Trustee, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by Trust. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Jonathan Yamauchi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255253
The following person is doing business
as: Shane’s Barbershop, 302 E. Fifth
Avenue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Shane Thomas Nesbitt, 1000 Foster City
Blvd., #4301, Foster City, CA 94404.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Shane Thomas Nesbitt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
t
23 Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255287
The following person is doing business
as: Minix Computing, 1461-2 San Mateo
Drive, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: OEM Production Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
04/01/2013.
/s/ Sam Chu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255236
The following person is doing business
as: Kenta Ramen, 1495 Beach Park
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Kent Kam Piu Wong, 1736 Ruus Ln.,
Hayward, CA 94544. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN onN/A.
/s/ Kent Kam Piu Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255009
The following person is doing business
as: Michelle Morgan, 215 El Camino Re-
al, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: April
Lee, 853 Commodove Dr., Apt #132,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ April Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255382
The following person is doing business
as: Intelligent Association, 1818 Gilbreth
Rd., Ste. 103, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Linda Tong. 12545 Quito Rd.,
Saratoga, CA 95070. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on. .
/s/ Linda Tong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255392
The following person is doing business
as: Intelligent Association, Marjorie An-
derson, 542 Fairfax Ave., SAN MATEO,
CA 94402 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Carroll Avenue Investors,
CA. The business is conducted by aLim-
ited Partnership. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/24/2000. .
/s/ Marjorie Anderson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254955
The following person is doing business
as: Parakletes Church, 234 9th Avenue,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Parakletes,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
03/03/2013.
/s/ Victor Lo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/26/13, 04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255131
The following person is doing business
as: Firehouse Notes, 1449 Balboa Ave-
nue, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Fire-
house Notes, CA. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Kenneth M. Bucho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/26/13, 04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255023
The following person is doing business
as: Swivl, 1354 El Camino Real, SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Satarii, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
03/07/2013.
/s/ Vladimir Tetelbaum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/26/13, 04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255232
The following person is doing business
as: Zucca Marketing Associates, 1721
Robin Whipple Way, BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Michelle Zucca, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Michelle Zucca /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254805
The following person is doing business
as: One Ocean Seafood, 507 Davey
Glen Road, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Patrick Guyer, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Patrick Guyer/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255234
The following person is doing business
as: Cakeart by Gracie, 1303 Whipple
Avenue, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Graciela M. Navarrete, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Graciela M. Navarrete /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255155
The following person is doing business
as: Fringe, 1405 Burlingame Avenue,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Johnny
Awwad, 530 Elm Ave., San Bruno, CA
94066. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Johnny Awwad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/02/13, 04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254760
The following person is doing business
as: Winco Investments, 116 N. Mayfair
Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Winnie
Kwong, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Winnie Kwong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255356
The following person is doing business
as: Guardian Termite Inspection, 554 7th
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: John
Van De Groenekan, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ John Van De Groenekan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255211
The following person is doing business
as: The Lunchmaster, 601 Taylor Way,
SAN CARLOS, CA, 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Nobhill
Catering, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/19/2005.
/s/ Marie Giouzelis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255279
The following person is doing business
as: Spa In The Park, 103 Gilbert Ave.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Joan Mar-
ie, LLC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liability Company. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 04/15/2013.
/s/ Christopher Mascarin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255222
The following person is doing business
as: Portaas 119 Highcrest Ln., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Por-
taas, Inc., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Karen Jane Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/09/13, 04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255212
The following person is doing business
as: Caitlin Perry Angell, 100 Duane St.,
Apt. 8, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Caitlin Perry Angell, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Caitlin Angell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255221
The following person is doing business
as: Vivan Liu Photography 800 Sea
Spray Ln., #115, SAN MATEO, CA
94404 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner:Vivan Liu same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual,.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Vivan Liu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255387
The following person is doing business
as: California Concierge 650420, 110
Park #310, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Patrick John McErlain, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual,. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Patrick John McErlain /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255399
The following person is doing business
as: A. G. Berini Enterprises, 1202 Valota
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Anthony Steven Berinin, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual,. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Anthony Berinin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/16/13, 04/23/13, 04/30/13, 05/07/13).
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
TS No. 12-0070696
Title Order No. 09-8-345127
APN No. 034-332-100
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/14/2007.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby giv-
en that RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant
to the Deed of Trust executed by MI-
CHAEL B GUESS AND FELICITAS
SOLZER-GUESS, HUSBAND AND
WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, dated
03/14/2007 and recorded 3/21/2007, as
Instrument No. 2007-042603, in Book
N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the
office of the County Recorder of San Ma-
teo County, State of California, will sell
on 05/14/2013 at 1:00PM, San Mateo
Events Center, 2495 S. Delaware Street,
San Mateo, CA 94403 at public auction,
to the highest bidder for cash or check as
described below, payable in full at time of
sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed
to and now held by it under said Deed of
Trust, in the property situated in said
County and State and as more fully de-
scribed in the above referenced Deed of
Trust. The street address and other
common designation, if any, of the real
property described above is purported to
be: 715 FOOTHILL DRIVE, SAN MA-
TEO, CA, 944023319. The undersigned
Trustee disclaims any liability for any in-
correctness of the street address and
other common designation, if any, shown
herein. The total amount of the unpaid
balance with interest thereon of the obli-
gation secured by the property to be sold
plus reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$1,030,858.42. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state. Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand
that there are risks involved in bidding at
203 Public Notices
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on a property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to in-
vestigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county record-
er's office or a title insurance company,
either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware
that the lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 1-800-281-
8219 or visit this Internet Web site
www.recontrustco.com, using the file
number assigned to this case 12-
0070696. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled
sale may not immediately be reflected in
the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify
postponement information is to attend
the scheduled sale. DATED:
11/11/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-
01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063
Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219
By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECON-
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt col-
lector attempting to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose. FEI # 1006.171092 4/09, 4/16,
4/23/2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
296 Appliances
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
24
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Soccer officials
5 “You __ dead!”:
“I’m telling mom!”
10 Location
14 Berry in healthy
smoothies
15 “No way!”
16 Jazz classic
“Take __ Train”
17 Lost color in one’s
cheeks
19 Greasy spoon
grub
20 Hit hard
21 Like blue hair
22 “Faust” dramatist
24 Fred’s dancing
sister
26 Bartender’s twist
28 Beer to drink on
Cinco de Mayo
30 Four quarters
31 Tax agcy.
32 Archaic “once”
33 Talk show
pioneer Jack
36 Residential bldg.
units
38 Stack of
unsolicited
manuscripts
41 Bush secretary of
labor Elaine
43 Madeline of
“Blazing
Saddles”
44 Emails the wrong
person, say
48 U.S./Canada’s __
Canals
49 Sunrise direction,
in Köln
51 Buyer’s “beware”
53 Tribal carving
57 Go
58 City on the Rio
Grande
59 Feed the kitty
61 “Cool” monetary
amt.
62 Even-handed
63 It may be filled
with a garden
hose
66 Helsinki resident
67 Actress Burstyn
68 Hip-swiveling
dance
69 Vexes
70 Extremely poor
71 Ruin Bond’s
martini
DOWN
1 Daily grind
2 Besides Chile, the
only South
American country
that doesn’t
border Brazil
3 __ market
4 Break a
Commandment
5 “Toy Story” boy
6 Fend off
7 Dance around
8 Somme salt
9 Where Nike
headquarters is
10 Considerable, as
discounts
11 Terse critical
appraisal
12 Ties to a post, as
a horse
13 Art gallery props
18 Delightful spot
23 “Paper Moon”
Oscar winner
Tatum
25 Many, informally
27 Change from
vampire to bat, say
29 Kwik-E-Mart
owner on “The
Simpsons”
34 Extend an
invitation for
35 “I knew it!”
37 Thorn in one’s side
39 Appears strikingly
on the horizon
40 Co. letterhead
abbr.
41 Welcome
summer forecast
42 Noticeable lipstick
color
45 Come down hard
on
46 Filled pasta
47 Top-notch
48 Golden Slam
winner Graf
50 Said
52 Away from the
wind
54 Takes home
55 Punch bowl
spoon
56 Over and done
60 Hard to see
64 French landmass
65 Acidity nos.
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/16/13
04/16/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
y p
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
303 Electronics
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) , SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
304 Furniture
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 (650)393-5711
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
UNDER FURNITURE: chairs (2), with
arms, Italian 1988 Chateau D'Ax, solid,
perfect condition. $50 each or $85 for
both. (650)591-0063
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
306 Housewares
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
310 Misc. For Sale
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 (415)585-3622
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
25 Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
316 Clothes
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 (650)591-0063
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800, Per month, Near Shop-
ping center, (650)697-4758
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1989 CHEVY L10 Tahoe - 4w/d, Pick-Up
$2500., (650)341-7069
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL OR
ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry Cleaning Concrete
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
26
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Hauling
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S
INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
Insurance
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
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Marketing
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Foot/Body $40/hr
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(650)261-9200
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New Customers Only
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Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
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(650)556-9888
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ASIAN MASSAGE
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Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
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7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
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Water Lounge Day Spa
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(650)571-9999
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WORLD 28
Tuesday • April 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
ACS Courier • Home Care
Assistance Peninsula
• Executives Association
• Retirement Administration, Inc.
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Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
ATTENTION:
Small Business
Resource Fair
Tuesday, April 30 •
9 am to 1 pm
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
SEMINAR TOPICS INCLUDE:
*Practical Social Media for the Small
Business, presented by Right Mix Marketing
*Guerrilla Marketing Strategies for the Small
Business, presented by Speak Well and Sell
*How Online Backup Can Save Your Business,
presented by Backblaze
*Increase Customer Loyalty through SMS / Text
Message Marketing, presented by Discount Loyalty
MORE seminars will be added!!!
N
etw
ork w
ith other business
professionals in various industries
M
eet representatives from
com
panies that cater
to your business and personal needs
F
ree FO
R
O
U
R
FIR
ST
200 ATTEN
D
EES
If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
Attend a schedule of helpful,
inform
ative business sem
inars on various
topics that will help you grow your business
C
H
A
N
C
E
to
w
in
a

$5000 ad schedule for your business!
REGISTER TODAY AT:
smallbusinessresourcefair.eventbrite.com
Or call 650-344-5200 x 121
for more information
Continental breakfast will be provided
By Adam Schreck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — Insurgents in Iraq
deployed a series of car bombs as part of
highly coordinated attacks that cut across
a wide swath of the country Monday,
killing at least 55 on the deadliest day in
nearly a month.
The assault bore the hallmarks of a
resurgent al-Qaida in Iraq and appeared
aimed at sowing fear days before the first
elections since U.S. troops withdrew.
There was no immediate claim of
responsibility, but coordinated attacks
are a favorite tactic of al-Qaida’s Iraq
branch.
Iraqi officials believe the insurgent
group is growing stronger and increasing-
ly coordinating with allies fighting to top-
ple Syrian President Bashar Assad across
the border. They say rising lawlessness on
the Syria-Iraq frontier and cross-border
cooperation with a Syrian group, the
Nusra Front, has improved the militants’
supply of weapons and foreign fighters.
The intensifying violence, some of it
related to the provincial elections sched-
uled for Saturday, is worrying for Iraqi
officials and Baghdad-based diplomats
alike. At least 14 candidates have been
killed in recent weeks, including one
slain in an apparent ambush Sunday.
“Of course we are concerned about the
violence in the country that has been
increasing in the last weeks,” United
Nations envoy Martin Kobler told the
Associated Press. He condemned the
bloodshed and urged Iraqi officials to
push ahead with the elections.
“They should be free and fair, and
every voter should go to the polls free of
intimidation and fear,” he said.
Iraqi Army Maj. Gen. Hassan al-
Baydhani, the No. 2 official at Baghdad’s
military command, said authorities man-
aged to defuse three car bombs in
Baghdad before they could go off.
He described the violence as an
attempt to derail the elections and intim-
idate voters.
“The terrorists want to grab headlines
as we approach election day,” he said.
Monday’s attacks — most of them car
bombings — were unusually broad in
scope. Among the places where attacks
erupted were the Sunni-dominated west-
ern Anbar province and Saddam
Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit, the ethni-
cally contested oil-rich city of Kirkuk
and towns in the predominantly Shiite
south.
The deadliest attacks hit Baghdad,
where multiple car bombs and other
explosions killed 25 people.
In one attack, a parked car bomb
exploded at a bus station in the eastern
suburbs of Kamaliya, killing four and
wounding 13. Qassim Saad, a teacher in
a nearby school, said his pupils began
screaming as the explosion shattered
windows.
He described a chaotic scene where
security forces opened fire into the air
upon arrival to disperse onlookers as
overturned vegetable carts sat stained
with blood amid wrecked storefronts.
Saad blamed politicians and security
forces for lapses that led to the attacks,
saying that elected officials “are doing
nothing to help the people and are only
looking out for their benefits.”
Series of Iraqi car bombs kill 55
Maduro certified as election winner amid protests
CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuela’s government-friendly
electoral council quickly certified the razor-thin presidential
victory of Hugo Chavez’ hand-picked suc-
cessor Monday, apparently ignoring oppo-
sition demands for a recount as anti-gov-
ernment protests broke out in the bitterly
polarized nation.
People stood on their balconies in
Caracas apartment buildings banging pots
and pans in protest as the electoral coun-
cil’s president proclaimed Nicolas Maduro
president for the next six years.
Across town, thousands of students
clashed with National Guard troops in riot gear who fired tear
gas and plastic bullets to turn the protesters back from march-
ing on the city center. Students threw stones and pieces of con-
crete.
The city was otherwise peaceful, although protests were
reported in provincial cities. There were no immediate reports
of injuries.
Maduro was elected Sunday by a margin of 50.8 percent to
49 percent over challenger Henrique Capriles — a difference
of just 262,000 votes out of 14.9 million cast, according to an
updated official count released Monday.
Boston blasts prompt
U.K. review of London Marathon
LONDON — British police are reviewing security plans for
Sunday’s London Marathon, the next major international
marathon, because of the bombs that killed two people at the
race in Boston. But there is no known specific or credible
threat against the British race as of yet, a security official said.
The London Marathon is a hugely popular race. Last year,
some 37,500 athletes competed, with many more watching the
springtime event.
London has long been considered a top target for interna-
tional terrorists, with the government saying the threat level is
“substantial.” In 2005, a series of suicide attacks on the public
transport system in the British capital killed 52 people.
London and mainland Britain also face a moderate threat
from Northern Ireland-related terrorism, according to the gov-
ernment.
Two bombs exploded near the finish of the Boston Marathon
on Monday, killing two people, and injuring at least 22 others,
race organizers and police said.
Around the world
REUTERS
Residents gather at the site of a car bomb attack in the Kamaliya district in Baghdad,
Iraq.
Nicolas Maduro

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