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THE KUMULIPO MIND:

A GLOBAL HERITAGE

In The Polynesian Creation Myth

Rubelite Kawena Kinney Johnson

Honolulu, Hawaii 2000 A.D.

The Kumulipo Mind: A Global Heritage

First Edition

2000

O 1981, 1999 Copyright Johnson, Rubelite K. All rights reserved

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number [applied for]

Fondly dedicated to the memory of my parents:

Ernest Kaipoleimanu Kinney Esther Kau’ikeaulani Ka’ulili

Contents

Contents

iii

Foreword

v

Acknowledgment

vi

Background

vii

Note on Orthography

viii

Ka Wa Akahi

First Age

1

Ka Wa Elua

Second Age

7

Ka Wa Ekolu

Third Age

13

Ka Wa Eha

Fourth Age

17

Ka Wa Elima

Fifth Age

21

Ka Wa Eono

Sixth Age

23

Ka Wa Ehiku

Seventh Age

24

Ka Wa Ewalu

Eighth Age

25

Ka Wa Eiwa

Ninth Age

27

Ka Wa ‘Umi

Tenth Age

28

Interpretation

Structure

29

Theme

Canto 1:

Canto 1:

Style

31

Levels of Meaning

32

Structure of Time and Space

32

Gender in Space

38

Evolution of the Species

39

Marine Invertebrates

40

Marine Invertebrates, Seaweeds and Land Plants

43

Epilogue

45

Canto 2:

Marine Vertebrates

48

List of Paired Species/Plants in the Refrain of Generation

51

Insects and Birds in Chant Three

53

Egg-Bearing Crawlers in Chant four

55

Summary

56

Land and Sea Interaction

59

Biology and Calendar: Adjustment to Seasonal Changes Above the Equator

61

Introduced and Economic Food Plants

62

Endemic (or Indigenous) Plants (inedible)

64

Native Hawaiian Incorporation of Indigenous and Utilitarian Plants

65

Biology and Time: Seasonal Migratory, Breeding and Nesting of Birds and Turtles

66

Biology and Calendar: Coordination of Seasons from Coral Reef and Open Sea

68

to Land and Wet Forest Biology in Religion: The Kinolau Concept of Akua and ‘Aumakua

71

Hawaiian Kinolau and Ancestral Polynesian Affinities

79

Summary

84

Wa ‘Umikumakahi

Eleventh Age

86

Canto 11: Ancestors in the Sky by Generations

105

Wa ‘Umikumalua

Twelfth Age

129

Wa ‘Umikumakolu

Thirteenth Age

133

Wa ‘Umikumaha

Fourteenth Age

136

Wa ‘Umikumalima

Fifteenth Age

145

Wa ‘Umikumaono

Sixteenth Age

150

iii

Comparative Kumulipo Genealogical Lists and Generation Count:

152

The Luanu’u Genealogy [David Malo Text]

153

Cantos 12, 13, and 14: Adjusting the Ancestry of Sky Father (Wakea and Earth

160

Mother (Papa) Canto 14: Timing the Rotation of the Sky

164

Summary and Theory

170

Geometric Shapes in the Kumulipo

182

The Cosmic Spider

183

The Celestial Spider in Polynesia

193

The Cord of the Celestial Spider in Hawaii

194

The Cord in the World

200

Theory of the Distribution of the Knotted Cord: A Study of the Process

206

of Tying and Knotting A Global Heritage of Wings, Feet, and Fins; Comparative Philology of

221

Pe’a,

the Bat, Bird, Kite, Sail, and Southern Cross

Conclusion

242

The Ritual Division of Time

An Abstract of Ritual Schedule

243

The Annual Makahiki Festival:

244

The Ku Ritual

250

Recapitulation: The Moon and Ritual Time

254

The Significance

256

The Ritual Numerology of Sacrifice and Position in Heiau Ceremony

258

(KË Ritual) The Tabu Pule Ritual Numbers

260

Summary of Hawaiian Ritual Sacrifice Numbers

266

Comparison of Hawaiian Heiau Ritual Ceremony with Elements of Ritual

267

in the Gilbertese maneaba Epilogue

271

Bibliography

272

Appendix :

278

Sidereal and Synodic Lunar Year Correlations with Tropic Years

279

Synodic Chart and Lunar Notation Sidereal Chart

288

Hawaiian Counting System

290

Comprehending the Metonic Cycle

293

Charts

Chart of Tropic Years

Sidereal Notation Hawaiian Tabu Nights Hawaiian Tabu Nights and Maximum/Minimum Moon Swing Micronesian and Hawaiian Decans Oriented to Rising and Setting Stars Kai a Kahinali’i [Capella in Auriga Cycle]

Johnson, Rubellite K. and Bryce G. Decker, “Implications of the Distribution of Names for Cotton (Gossypium spp.) in the Indo-Pacific”; Asian Perspectives,

XXIII (2), 1980: 249-307.

iv

FOREWORD

Na wai ho’i ka ‘ole o ke akamai, he alanui i ma’a i ka hele ‘ia e o’u mau makua? Who would not be wise on the road long-travelled by my ancestors?

Liholiho

There are times in our lives when we lose precious things. Kumulipo Hawaiian Hymn of Creation [1981] was lost in 1984.

the author has tried to rewrite that volume again, but came the moment when it seemed wiser to relinquish it.

The second volume of Between then and now

So the quote from Liholiho about the road to wisdom of his ancestors. It has comfort to it, perhaps too much. The pathway of our ancestors is a place of danger-- over water, thousands of miles of ocean, with no signposts written on the wind. The unmarked highway is charted, rather, through the sky, along tracks of stars at night and by the sun’s positions, rising and setting, along the otherwise empty horizon. Death is out there, waiting for the fool to challenge what he does not know or is unprepared to face.

This book is about the way the kahuna priests ordered the sky in space and time, How did the kahuna bring the cosmos down to earth?

He apparently did it in the heiau temple by aligning the structure to certain sky phenomena, but then, which ones? Such minutiae of time take generations to accumulate, and many hundreds of generations died long before survivors came here using that knowledge, such as the rate at which navigation stars shift position every 500 years. Without writing, they had passed this down under the guise of poetry, when it was actually a riddle of time, the answer to which was known, perhaps, only to a select few who were kahuna apprentices. It has eluded their descendants.

Where human feet have trod and canoes trampled (ke’ehi) over the equator, the “diaphragm of KÅne” [ka houpo o KÅne] or “navel of the earth” [ka piko o ka honua], is a long train of ancestry, memorization of which is an awesome feat. There are 2000 names in 812 generations to Wakea, who lived about the first century A.D., and 80 more generations after him, about 892 over these (soon to be) 2000 years. The sum of linear time in that history is about 22,300 years, or roughly one precession of the equinoxes, dating back to around 21,000 B.C. when there were yet no Polynesians in Polynesia, and the sun was in the constellation of Capricorn at the vernal equinox.

Who needs to know such things, except those whose purview, like the kahuna’s, is persistence in the pursuit of truth and knowledge. They chose to chant it in lists of names on the family tree. Who, or what, is on the tree? Where do those ancestors come from? Where the original pathway?

We need look no farther than a simple map of the world.

The path of

human

migration is a story of all of our ancestors, truly, along many byways of a global heritage.

world. The path of human migration is a story of all of our ancestors, truly, along

v

Acknowledgment

The people to whom I owe the most gratitude are no longer alive, but I should still mention them. None of this work which I have done would have happened without Robert B. Goodman, former publisher of Island Heritage Company and Ruth Hanner Knudsen, benefactor. They took no financial reward for all of their help getting the first Kumulipo volume under way in the 1970s.

I briefly mention the support of Francis Damon Holt and the late John Dominis

Holt for the success of that first volume published in 1981 by Topgallant Publishing Company.

To former students and colleagues, Cy Bridges and Malcolm Naea Chun I owe thanks for the copies of the Luanu’u genealogy from the Kuluwaimaka and David Malo manuscripts which they gave to me twenty years ago and which have been included in this translation.

To Professor Joseph Ciotti at Windward Community College and Douglas Fernandez, I owe constructive scientific opinion and technical advice on astronomy and mathematics.

To Fred Kalani Meinecke, Emalia Keohokalole, Emil Wolfgram, Earl Pa Mai Tenn, Henry Iwasa, and Alyce Ikeoka, I owe constancy of friendship, and to Princess Abigail Kekaulike Kawananakoa, who employed me at Kawananakoa Foundation, I owe financial survival, as I also do to Thelma Parish, Lokelani Lindsey, Leo Tetsuo Orii and Tsuyoshi Ikuta for other financial assistance.

I thank Ted Gugelyk and Francis Warther for positive material promotion of this

translation, and to William Alexander McGehee I owe many years of moral support and encouragement.

Finally, I am especially grateful to Peter Kay of Cyber-Hawaii for shepherding this present work into publication.

vi

Background

The Kumulipo is a genealogical creation chant composed in Hawaii for the chief, Ka-’I-i-mamao, about the eighteenth century. It attracted attention in nineteenth-century Europe because of its rudimentary concept of evolution as a process in nature multiplying forms of life from simple to more complex types. Darwinian evolution was then an attempt to explain how species develop apart from others, or that nature encourages survival of certain species rather than others, or that species promoting their own survival represent those most fit to survive competition with other species in nature.

In the mid-nineteenth century Darwinian evolution was skeptically received following publication of Origin Of Species By Means of Natural Selection in 1859. Adolf Bastian’s interest in the Kumulipo was perhaps influenced by the debate between science and theology over Charles Darwin’s theory, which would be largely ignored by the general public until the famous John Scopes trial in Tennessee in 1925. It was at the point of human taxonomy where Darwin’s theory met the most opposition, not only from the established church but also from the lay public, which was basically opposed to the idea that man had descended from (or was related to) apes.

The Kumulipo is not a scientific study of speciation in nature, but it presents the origin of living forms as a continuing chain of births from one living creature into another. The life forms, however, are physical manifestations, or body forms (kinolau), of a single creator god (akua), incarnating from one being into another. This god is identified as masculine (kane) throughout a series of manifest forms which produce, eventually, the prevailing symbol of the male procreative vessel, the kane huawai water gourd. Symbolically, the water gourd holds the principal male element from which human life flows as seminal fluid. In the context of daily life it is the water gourd used to contain and to carry ordinary drinking water, wai, as the element in which the creator god, Kane, god of air and water, manifests in all life as well as human life the most basic need for continuation:

‘O ke kane huawai, akua kena The male gourd of water, that is a god [Kumulipo, Epilogue, Chant One].

Charles Darwin was not the originator of the theory of evolution. His forbear Erasmus Darwin had already championed similar ideas from Greek philosophers of the 6th century B.C. beginning with Thales. Lucretius, a Roman philosopher, also belonged to this school, which held that all matter, living or non-living, could be reduced to atoms, or that living matter was the accretion of atoms. In our own century this interest led to the splitting of the atom, as from non-living matter, uranium, through which the release of energy produced the atomic bomb. Thales and Lucretius may never be as famous as Albert Einstein, but they philosophically anticipated nuclear fission some 2,500 years before Darwin ever lived.

Darwin’s theory quickly gave ground to the studies of Gregor Mendel in genetics. The results of Mendel’s research proved by experiment the role of genetic transfer of inherited traits in reproductive cells and resulting offspring, thus limiting differentiation of species to inherited genetic traits and their limiting factors and subsequent mutations.

vii

It should not go unnoticed, therefore, Biblical account of Genesis:

that genetic limitation is stressed in the

“And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding ”

seed

[Genesis: 1:30].

Where Darwinian evolution treated the descent of related species as taxonomy, the Kumulipo is genealogy, preserving thousands of names in lists identifying the male and female parents of succeeding generations.

Hawaiian historian David Malo treated the subject of genealogical tradition in Moolelo Hawaii at Lahainaluna Seminary about 1835. This work was later translated by Dr. Nathaniel B. Emerson in 1898 within a year after Queen Lili’uokalani had also translated the KalÅkaua text of the Kumulipo into English (1897). Another David Malo manuscript was a separate Kumulipo genealogy containing only lists of names in papa helu recitations identical to the KalÅkaua text translated into English by Lili’uokalani.

The Queen’s translation was preceded by a translation into the German language by Adolf Bastian [Die Heilige Sage der Polynesier , 1881], but only in part. From the German text Joseph Rock made the first translation into English, whereas Lili’u’s was directly from the Hawaiian into English.

It is highly doubtful that the Kumulipo text was always, as in the Queen’s, and later, Martha Beckwith’s translation (1951), a chanted poem. The earlier Malo text from Lahainaluna predating his Mo’olelo Hawai’i lacks the poetry of the wÅ cantos in the Lili’uokalani (1897) and Beckwith (1951) translations. Kathleen Dickinson Mellen, historian, pointed out that the poem sections were reeled off by Moloka’i kahuna to the Hale Naua members who had been sent by King Kalakaua to Moloka’i to collect ancient traditions. They had used a hipu’u knotted cord during the recitations. Perhaps the Kalakaua text was created by putting the two together: the wa cantos from Moloka’i recitations from the knotted cord and the papa helu records written by David Malo. Even then, the Kalakaua text, which formed the basis of the Queen’s and Martha Beckwith’s translations into English, removed the Luanu’u genealogy, the text of which has always been intact in the Malo version. The present work has reincorporated the Luanu’u section.

and historically

recorded performances are found in Queen Lili’uokalani’s introduction to her work, An Account of the Creation of the World According to Hawaiian Tradition [1897]:

Historical details regarding

composition of the KalÅkaua text

“This is the very chant which was sung by Puou, the High Priest of our ancient worship to Captain Cook, whom they had surnamed Lono, one of the four chief gods, dwelling high in the heavens, but at times appearing on the earth. This was the cause of the deification of Captain Cook under that name, and of the offerings to him made at the temple or Heiau at Hikiau, Kealakekua, where this song was rendered.”

“The chanters of this great poem were Hewahewa and Ahukai, and by them it was originally dedicated to Alapai, our ancestress, a woman-chief of the highest rank, then at Koko, Oahu. Keeaumoku was lying on his deathbed. The Lonoikamakahiki, of whom this chant sings so eloquently in our native tongue, is none other than Kalaninuiimamao (Ka-I-i-mamao).”

viii

The Kumulipo was called the pule ho’ola’a ali’i prayer of dedication or sanctification of a chief (ho’ola’a ali’i ) chanted by the kahuna orders of KË and Lono for Captain Cook in January, 1779, two hundred years ago. The Ke’eaumoku mentioned by Lili’uokalani was the father of Ka’ahumanu and district chief of Kona. He died in 1804 at Kapokapo, Koko, O’ahu, after an active career as a general in Kamehameha’s army from 1782 (Battle of Moku’ohai) to 1795 (Battle of Nu’uanu).

Since 1779 when Captain Cook was deified into an ‘aumakua of the Hawaiian people by their priests, the society has crossed a bridge to the world of European, and later, Asian ideas. Now what has seemed to be an isolated Pacific tradition appears, instead, to trace farther back in time, and around the world, perhaps, into a region beyond Polynesia from which earlier embryonic ideas of the infant cosmos entered into sacred scripture or sacred chanting. We are, apparently, back again where we, through our ancestors, may seem to have been before.

Note on Orthography:

The Hawaiian orthography in the chant texts retain the glottal stops (‘) as used in the Martha W. Beckwith translation (1951). Macrons and other glottal stops added in the texts quoted in the interpretive chapters accord with current usage per the most recent edition of the Puku’i-Elbert Hawaiian Dictionary [1986]. No macrons are used over vowels in the chant texts with translation. Names in genealogies are sometimes followed by (k) if ‘male’ (kÅne) and (w) if ‘female’ (wahine). Kumulipo lines are referred to as line number prefixed by (K), i.e., K.880. Other standard abbreviations used are:

Cf.

cross-reference

Cp.

compare

spp.

species

intra

within

lit.

literal, literally

ed.

edited (by)

ibid.

cited before

ix

KUMULIPO

KA WA AKAHI

FIRST AGE

1

O

ke au i kahuli wela ka honua

1 When space turned around the earth

O

ke au i kahuli lole ka lani

heated,

O

ke au i kuka‘iaka ka la

When space turned over, the sky

E ho’omalamalama i ka malama

reversed, When the sun appeared standing in shadows To cause light to make bright the moon,

5

O

ke au o Makali’i ka po

5

When the Pleiades are small eyes in

O

ka walewale ho’okumu honua ia

the night,

O

ke kumu o ka lipo i lipo ai

From the source in the slime earth

O

ke kumu o ka po i po ai

formed

O

ka lipolipo o ka lipolipo

From the source in the dark, darkness formed From the source in the night, night formed From the depths of darkness, darkness so deep,

10

O

ka lipo o ka la

10

Darkness of day,

O

ka lipo o ka po

Darkness of night,

PØ wale ho’i.

 

Of night alone

Hanau ka po Hanau Kumulipo i ka po he kane

Did night give birth. Born Kumuliipo In the night, male;

15

Hanau Po’ele i ka po he wahine.

15

Born PØ’ele in the night, female;

Hanau ka ‘Ukuko’ako’a Hanau kana he ‘Ako’ako’a, puka

Born the coral polyp Born of him a coral colony emerged

Hanau ke Ko’e’enuhe ‘eli ho’opu’u honua Hanau kana he Ko’e, puka

Born the burrowing worm, hilling the soil Born of him a worm emerged

20

Hanau ka Pe’a, Ka Pe’ape’a kana keiki, puka

20

Born the starfish The small starfish his child emerged

Hanau ka Weli, He Weliweli kÅna keiki, puka

Born the sea cucumber A small sea cucumber his child emerged

Hanau ka ‘Ina ka ‘Ina

Born the coral-dwelling sea urchin

25

Hanau kana, he Halula, puka

25

Born of him a short-spiked sea urchin emerged

1

26

Hanau ka Hawa’e

26

Born the smooth-spined sea urchin

Born the unspiked sea urchin

O

ka Wana-ku kana keiki, puka

The sharp-spiked sea urchin his child

Hanau ka Ha’uke’uke

 

emerged

O

ka ‘Uhalula kana keiki, puka

The thin-spiked sea urchin his child emerged

30

Hanau ka Pi’oe

30

Born the barnacle

O

ka Pipi kana keiki, puka

The reef oyster his child emerged

Hanau ka Papaua

 

Born the large clam

O

ka ‘Olepe kana keiki, puka

The hinged mollusk his child emerged

Hanau ka Nahawele

 

Born the mussel

35

O ka Unauna kana keiki, puka

35

The hermit crab his child emerged

Hanau ka Makaiauli

Born the dark-fleshed limpet

O

ka ‘Opihi kana keiki, puka

The limpet his child emerged

Hanau ka leho

 

Born the cowry

O

ka puleholeho kana keiki, puka

The small cowry his child emerged

40

Hanau ka Naka

40

Born the naka shell

O

ke Kupekala kana keiki, puka

The chama shell his child emerged

Hanau ka Makaloa

 

Born the drupe

O

ka Pupu’awa kana keiki, puka

The bitter drupe his child emerged

Hanau ka ‘Ole

 

Born the triton

45

O ka ‘Ole’ole kana keiki, puka

45

The small triton his child emerged

Hanau ka Pipipi

Born the nerita snail

O

ke Kupe’e kana keiki, puka

The large nerita his child emerged

Hanau ka WÈ

 

Born the fresh-water snail

O

ke Kiki kana keiki, puka

The brackish-water snail his child emerged

50

Hanau kane iaWai’ololÈ

50

Born male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for broad waters;

2

Hanau ka ‘Ekaha noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Ekahakaha noho i uka

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

Born the coralline seaweed living in the sea Kept by the bird’s nest fern living on land;

It is a night gliding through the passage

55

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

55

Of an opening; a stream of water is

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

food for plants,

 

kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O

kane ia Wai ‘ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for broad waters;

Hanau ka ‘Aki’aki noho i kai

Born the ‘aki’aki seaweed living in the sea

60

Kia’i ‘ia e ka Manienie-’aki’aki noho

60

Kept by the manienie shore grass living

 

i

uka

on land;

 

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

It is a night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

Of an opening; a stream of water is

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

food for plants;

 

kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O

kane ia Wai ‘ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

65

O

ka wahine ia Wai ‘olola

65

Female for broad waters;

Hanau ka ‘A’ala-’ula noho i kai

Born the fragrant red seaweed living in

Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Ala’ala-wai-nui noho

the sea

 

i

uka

Kept by the succulent mint living on land

 

He po uhe’e i ka wawa He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

 

It is a night gliding through the passage Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants;

70

O

ke Akua ke komo ‘a’oe komo

70

It is the god who enters; not as a

 

kanaka

man does he enter

 

O

kane ia Wai ‘ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka Manauea noho i kai

Born the manauea seaweed living in

Kia’i ‘ia e ke Kalo-manauea noho

the sea

 

i

uka

Kept by the manauea taro living on land

75

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

75

It is a night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

Of an opening; a stream of water is

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

food for plants;

 

kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

3

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for broad waters;

80

Hanau ke Ko’ele’ele noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ke ko Punapuna, ko’ele’ele noho i uka

80

Born the kØ’ele’ele seaweed living in the sea Kept by the jointed sugar-cane living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

It is a night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

Of an opening; a stream of water

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

is food for plants; It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

85

O kane ia Wai’ololÈ

85

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai ‘olola

Female for broad waters;

Hanau ka Puaki noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Lauaki noho i uka

 

Born the puaki seaweed living in the sea Kept by the lauaki sugar cane living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

It is a night gliding through the passage

90

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

90

Of an opening; a stream of water

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

is food for plants; It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai ‘ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai ‘olola

Female for broad waters;

Hanau ke Kakalamoa noho i kai

 

Born the kakalamoa seaweed living in the sea

95

Kia’i ‘ia e ka Moamoa noho i uka

95

Kept by the moamoa plant living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

 

It is a night gliding through the passage

O

ke Akua ke komo ‘a’oe komo kanaka

Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants; It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

100

O ka wahine ia Wai’olola

100

Female for broad waters;

Hanau ka limu Kele noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Ekele noho i uka

Born the kele seaweed living in the sea Kept by the ekele taro living on land;

4

He po uhe’e i ka wawa He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

It is a night gliding through the passage Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants

105

O ke Akua ke komo ‘a’oe komo kanaka

105

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter

O

kane ia Wai ‘ololÈ

Male for the narrow

O

ka wahine ia Wai ‘olola

Female for broad waters

Hanau ka limu Kala noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Akala noho i uka

 

Born the kala seaweed living in the sea Kept by the ‘akala raspberry living on land

110

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

110

It is a night gliding through the

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

passage

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for broad waters

115

Hanau ka LÈpu’upu’u noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Lipu’u noho i uka

115

Born the Lipu’upu’u seaweed living in the sea

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

Kept by the Lipu’upu’u moss living on land

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

 

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It is a night gliding through the passage Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter

120

O kane ia Wai’ololÈ

120

Male for the narrow

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for broad waters

Hanau ka Loloa, noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ke Kalamaloloa, noho i uka

 

Born the long seaweed living in the sea Kept by the tall ebony living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

It is a night gliding through the passage

125

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

125

Of an opening; a stream of water

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

is food for plants It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter

5

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow

O

ka wahine ia Wai ‘olola

Female for broad waters

Hanau ka Ne, noho i kai

Born the ne seaweed living in the sea

130

Kia’i ‘ia e ka Neneleau noho i uka

130

Kept by the sumach tree living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

It is a night gliding through the

He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka la’au

passage

O

ke Akua ke komo ‘a’oe komo kanaka

Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

135

O ka wahine ia Wai’olola

135

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka Huluwaena, noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Huluhulu ‘ie’ie noho i uka

Born the hairy seaweed living in the sea Kept by the hairy pandanus vine living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wÅwÅ He nuku, he wai ka ‘ai a ka lÅ’au

It is a night gliding through the passage Of an opening; a stream of water is food for plants;

140

O ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

140

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

ke kane huawai, Akua kena

The male gourd of water, that is the

O

kalina a ka wai i ho’oulu ai

god

O

ka huli ho’okawowo honua

From whose flow the vines are

O

paia(‘a) i ke auau ka manawa

made vigorous; The plant top sprouts from the earth made flourishing To frame the forest bower in the flow of time,

145

O he’e au loloa ka po

145

The flow of time gliding through the long night;

O

piha, o pihapiha

Filling, filling full,

O

piha-u, o piha-a

Filling, filling out,

O

piha-e, o piha-o

Filling, filling up Until the earth is a brace holding

O

ke ko’o honua pa’a ka lani

firm the sky,

150

O lewa ke au, ia Kumulipo ka po Po no.

150

When space lifts through time in the night of Kumulipo, It is yet night.

6

KA WA ELUA

Hanau kama a ka Powehiwehi

Ho’oleilei ka lana a ka Pouliuli

O Mahiuma, o Ma’apuia

SECOND AGE

Born the child of Powehiwehi To grace the stature of PØuliuli with a wreath Of Mahiuma, of Ma’apuia,

155

O noho i ka ‘aina o Pohomiluamea Kukala mai ka Haipu-aalamea

155

Living in the land of Pohomiluamea, Proclaiming the fragrant stem of

O

naha wilu ke au o Uliuli

Mea,

O

ho’ohewahewa a kumalamala

The split elegance of the branch of

O

pohouli a poho’ele’ele

 

Uliuli, Unrecognized and splintered In the night that darkens and blackens;

160

O na wai ehiku e lana wale Hanau kama a hilu, a holo

160

Through seven currents he floats, Born child of the gentle wrasse he

O

ka hilu ia pewa lala kau

swims,

O

kau(l)ana a Pouliuli

 

The hilu whose tail fin marks

O

kuemiemi a Powehiwehi

The renown of PØuliuli; PØwehiwehi shrinks away in respect (from the presence of a chief);

165

O Pouliuli ke kane

165

PØuliuli the male,

O

Powehiwehi ka wahine

PØuliuli the female.

Hanau ka i’a, hanau ka Nai’a

Born the fish, born the porpoise

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

 

Hanau ka Mano, hanau ka Moano

Born the shark, born the goatfish

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

 

Hanau ka Mau, hanau ka Maumau

Born the mau, the maumau fish

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

170

Hanau ka Nana, hanau ka Mana

170

Born the spawn of yellowfin tuna,

 

i

ke kai la holo

born the small threadfin

 

Hanau ka Nake, hanau ka Make

swimming there in the sea,

 

i

ke kai la holo

Born the nake, born the make fish

 

Hanau ka Napa, hanau ka Nala

swimming there in the sea,

 

i

ke kai la holo

Born the napa, born the nala fish

 

Hanau ka Pala, hanau ke Kala

swimming there in the sea,

 

i

ke kai la holo

Born the yellow tang, born the

 

Hanau ka Paka, hanau ka Papa

surgeonfish swimming there

 

i

ke kai la holo

in the sea, Born the paka, born the papa(‘a) moray eels swimming there in the sea,

175

Hanau ke Kalakala, hanau ka Huluhulu i ke kai la holo, Hanau ka Halahala, hanau ka Palapala i ke kai la holo,

175

Born the porcupine fish, born the pufferfish swimming there in the sea, Born the young of the amberjack, born the young barracuda swimming there in the sea,

7

Hanau ka Pe’a, hanau ka Lupe

i ke kai la holo

Hanau ke Ao, hanau ke Awa

i ke kai la holo

Hanau ke Aku, hanau ke ‘Ahi

i ke kai la holo,

Born the stingray, born the manta ray swimming there in the sea, Born the dolphinfish, born the milk- fish swimming there in the sea, Born the skipjack tuna, born the yellowfin swimming there in the sea,

180

Hanau ka Opelu, hanau ke Akule

180

Born the mackerel scad, born the

 

i

ke kai la holo

big-eyed scad swimming

Hanau ka ‘Ama’ama, hanau ka ‘Anae i ke kai la holo

there in the sea, Born the young mullet, born the

Hanau ka Ehu, hanau ka Nehu

mature mullet swimming

 

i

ke kai la holo

there in the sea,

HÅnau ka ‘Iao, hanau ka ‘Ao’ao

Born the ehu fish, born the anchovy

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ka ‘Ono, hanau ke Omo

Born the silverside, born the damsel- fish swimming there in the sea, Born the wahoo, born the omo

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

185

Hanau ka Pahau, hanau ka Lauhau

185

Born the pahau, born the butterfly

 

i

ke kai la holo

fish swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ka Moi, hanau ka Lo’ilo’i

Born the threadfin, born the damsel-

 

i

ke kai la holo

fish swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ka Mao, hanau ka Maomao

Born the mao, born the maomao

 

i

ke kai la holo

fish swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ke Kaku, hanau ka ‘A’u’a’u

Born the barracuda, born the marlin

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ke Kupou, hanau ke Kupoupou i ke kai la holo

Born the kupou wrasse, born the kupoupou swimming there in the sea,

190

Hanau ka Weke, hanau ka Lele

190

Born the mullet, born the lele

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ka Palani, hanau ka Nuku- momi i ke kai la holo

Born the surgeonfish, born the jackfish swimming there

Hanau ka Ulua, hanau ka Hahalua

in the sea,

 

i

ke kai la holo

Born the jack crevally, born the

Hanau ka ‘Ao’aonui, hanau ka Paku’iku’i i ke kai la holo

young crevally swimming there in the sea, Born the young damselfish (kupipi), born the Achilles tang swimming there in the sea,

Hanau ka Ma’i’i’i, hanau ka Ala’ihi

Born the young of the surgeonfish, born the squirrelfish swimming there in the sea,

 

i

ke kai la holo

195

Hanau ka ‘O’o, hanau ka ‘Akilolo

195

Born the O’o fish, born the wrasse

 

i

ke kai la holo

swimming there in the sea,

8

Hanau ka Nenue, noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Lauhue noho i uka

He po uhe’e i ka wawa He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Born the rudderfish living in the sea Kept by the gourd-leaf living on land

A night gliding through the passage

Of an opening; seawater is the food of fish;

200

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

200

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for broad waters;

Hanau ka Pahaha noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Puhala noho i uka

 

Born the young of the mullet living in the sea Kept by the pandanus tree living on land;

205

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

205

A night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

man does he enter;

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Male for the narrow, Female for the broad waters;

210

Hanau ka Pahau noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Lauhau noho i uka

210

Born the pahau fish living in the sea Kept by the hau-leaf living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

A

night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

215

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

215

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka He’e noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Walahe’e noho i uka

Born the octopus living in the sea Kept by the canthium shrub living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

A

night gliding through the passage

220

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

220

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

man does he enter;

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Male for the narrow Female for broad waters;

9

Hanau ka ‘O’opukai noho i kai

Born the ‘o’opu living in the sea

225

Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘O’opuwai noho i uka

225

Kept by the fresh-water goby living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

 

A

night gliding through the passage

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

Of an opening; seawater is the food of fish;

 

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

230

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

230

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka puhi Kauwila noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Uwila noho i uka

Born the kauila eel living in the sea Kept by the buckthorn living on land

 

A

night gliding through the passage

 

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

Of an opening; seawater is the food

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

of fish,

235

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

235

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka Umaumalei noho i kai Kia’i ’ia e ka ‘Ulei noho i uka

 

Born the umaumalei surgeonfish living in the sea Kept by the ‘ulei shrub living on land;

240

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

240

A

night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

245

Hanau ka Paku’iku’i noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka la’au Kukui noho i uka

245

Born the paku’iku’i surgeonfish living in the sea Kept by the kukui candlenut living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

A

night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

250

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

250

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

10

Hanau ka Laumilo noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka (la’au) Milo noho i uka

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

Born the laumilo eel living in the sea Kept by the milo hibiscus living on land.

A night gliding through the passage

255

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

255

Of an opening; seawater is the food of fish;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ke Kupoupou noho i kai

 

Born the kupoupou wrasse living in the sea

260

Kia’i ‘ia e ke Kou noho i uka

260

Kept by the kou tree livinig on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

A

night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

265

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

265

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka Hauliuli noho i kai

Born the snake mackerel living in the sea

Kia’i ‘ia e ka Uhi noho i uka

Kept by the yam living on land;

 

A

night gliding through the passage

 

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

Of an opening; seawater is the food

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

of fish;

270

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

270

It is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka Weke noho i kai Kia’i’ia e ka Wauke noho i uka

 

Born the weke mullet living in the sea Kept by the paper mulberry living on land;

275

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

275

A night gliding through the passage

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe

of fish;

 

komo kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

man does he enter;

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Male for the narrow, Female for the broad waters;

280

Hanau ka ‘A’awa noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Awa noho i uka

280

Born the ‘A’awa wrasse living in the the sea

11

280

Hanau ka ‘A’awa noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Awa noho i uka

Kept by the kava plant living on land

 

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka,

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololi,

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

285

Hanau ka Ulae noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Mokae noho i uka

285

Born the lizardfish living in the sea Kept by the mokae sedge living on land;

 

A

night gliding through the passage

 

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

Of an opening; seawater is the food

He kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

of fish;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka,

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

290

O

kane ia Wai’ololi,

290

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for the broad waters;

Hanau ka Palaoa noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Aoa noho i uka

 

Born the sperm whale living in the sea Kept by the sandalwood living on land;

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

A

night gliding through the passage

295

He nuku, he kai ka ‘ai a ka i’a

295

Of an opening; seawater is the food

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo

of fish;

 

kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a man does he enter;

 

O

ke ka’ina a palaoa e ka’i nei

In

the lead the whales proceed,

E kuwili o ha’aha’a i ka moana

 

Mingling and submerging beneath

O

ka opule ka’i loloa

the sea; The ‘opule advance in the distance;

300

Manoa wale ke kai ia lakou

300

The deep ocean is filled with them;

O

kumimi, o ka lohelohe a pa’a

Like kumimi crabs clustered on the

O

ka’a monimoni i ke ala

reef, They swallow on the way,

O

ke ala o Kolomio o miomio i hele ai

Along the path of Kolomio, swiftly darting;

Loa’a Pimoe i ke polikua

 

Pimoe is found at the bosom of the horizon

305

O

Hikawainui, o Hikawaina

305

Of Hikawainui, the strong current,

O

pulehulehu hako’ako’a

Of Hikawaina, the calm current,

Ka mene ‘a’ahu wa’awa’a

 

Where spire myriad corals

O

holi ka poki’i i ke au ia Uliuli

From the hollows of blunted reef;

Po’ele wale ka moana powehiwehi

The youngest are carried by the the current into darkness Black as night the opaque sea,

310

He kai ko’ako’a no ka uli o Paliuli

310

Coral sea in dark cliffs of Paliuli,

O

kaha uliuli wale i ka po--la Po no.

Land that slid away from them, Dark shore passing into night-- It is yet night.

12

KA WA EKOLU

THIRD AGE

O

kane ia, o ka wahine kela

Male this, female that,

O

kane hanau i ke auau po-

Male born in the time of passing

‘ele’ele

darkness,

315

O ka wahine hanau i ke auau po- haha, Ho’ohaha ke kai, ho’ohaha ka uka

315

Female born in the night feeling through, The sea reaching on, spreading

Ho’ohaha ka wai, ho’ohaha ka mauna

apart the upland; Streams coursing, mountains rising

Ho’ohaha ka po-niuauaeaea

In a time of groping for the way through darkness,

Ulu ka haha na lau eiwa Ulu nioniolo ka lau pahiwa

The obscure uncertain; The reaching stalk grew nine leaves, Grew dark leaves straight upward

320

O ho’oulu i ka lau palaiali’i

320

Like regal ferns unfolding.

HÅnau o Po-’ele’ele ke kane Noho ia e Pohaha he wahine Hanau ka pua a ka Haha Hanau ka Haha

Born black night the male Espoused by dim night, a female; Born the blossom on the unfolding stem, Born the single stem spiral;

325

Hanau ka Huhu he makua Puka kana keiki he Huhulele, lele

325

Born the woodborer parent, Came his child a flying insect, flew;

HÅnau ka Pe’elua ka makua Puka kana keiki he Pulelehua, lele

Born the caterpillar parent; Came his child a butterfly, flew;

Hanau ka Naonao ka makua

Born the ant parent;

330

Puka kana keiki he Pinao, lele

330

Came his child a dragonfly, flew;

Hanau ka Unia ka makua Puka kana keiki he Uhini, lele

Born the cricket parent, Came his child a katydid, flew;

Hanau ka Naio ka makua Puka kana keiki he Nalo, lele

Born the larva parent, Came his child a fly, and flew;

335

Hanau ka Hualua ka makua Puka kana keiki he Manu, lele

335

Born the egg parent Came his child a bird and flew;

Hanau ka Ulili ka makua Puka kana keiki he KØlea, lele

Born the wandering tattler parent Came his child a plover, flew;

Hanau ke A’o ka makua

Born the shearwater parent

340

Puka kana keiki he A’u, lele

340

Came his child an a’u bird, flew;

13

Hanau ka Akekeke ka makua Puka kana keiki he Elepaio, lele

Hanau ka Alae ka makua Puka kana keiki ka Apapane, lele

Born the akekeke parent, Came his child an ‘elepaio, flew;

Born the mudhen parent, Came his child the apapane, flew;

345

Hanau ka Alala ka makua Puka kana keiki he Alawi, lele

345

Born the crow parent, Came his child an alawi bird, flew;

Hanau ka ‘E’ea ka makua Puka kana keiki he Alaiaha, lele

Born the ‘e’ea bird parent, Came his child an ‘alaiaha bird, flew

Hanau ka Mamo ka makua

Born the mamo honeycreeper parent

350

Puka kana keiki ‘O’o, lele

350

Came his child an ‘o’o honeyeater. flew;

Hanau ka Moho ka makua Puka kana keiki he Moli, lele

Born the rail parent, Came his child an albatross, flew;

Hanau ke Kikiki ka makua Puka kana keiki he Ukihi, lele

Born the creeper parent Came his child an ‘ukihi bird, flew

355

Hanau ke Kioea ka makua

355

Born the curlew parent,

Puka kana keiki he Kukuluae’o,

Came his child a stilt and flew;

 

lele

 

Hanau ka ‘Iwa ka makua Puka kana keiki he Koa’e, lele

 

Born the frigate bird parent, Came his child a tropic bird, flew;

HÅnau ke Kala ka makua

Born the tern parent,

360

Puka kana keiki he Kaula, lele

360

Came his child a ka’ula bird, flew;

Hanau ka Unana ka makua Puka kana keiki he Auku’u, lele

Born the Unana parent, Came his child a night heron, flew;

O

ka lele anei auna

They have flown here in flocks,

O

kahakai a lalani

Lining the seashore,

365

O ho’onohonoho a pa’a ka pae

365

Crowding in settlement the beaches,

Pa’a ka ‘aina o Kanehunamoku Hanau manu ka ‘aina Hanau manu ke kai

Clutching the land of KÅnehuna- moku; The land gives birth to birds, The sea gives birth to birds.

Hanau kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Born male for narrow,

370

O ka wahine ia Wai’olola

370

Female for wide streams.

HÅnau ka Lupe noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Lupeakeke noho i uka

14

Born the stingray living in the sea Watched by the storm petrel living

He po uhe’e i ka wawa He hua, he i’o ka ‘ai a ka manu

on land,

A night gliding through the passage;

Fruit and flesh are food for birds;

375

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

375

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

HÅnau ka Noio noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Io noho i uka

 

Born the white-capped noddy living at sea Watched by the hawk living on land

380

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

380

A night gliding through the passage;

He hua, he i’o ka ‘ai a ka manu

Fruit and flesh are food for birds;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It

is the god who enters, not as a person does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

385

Hanau ke Kolea-a-moku noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ke Kolea-lele noho i uka

385

Born the glaucous gull living at sea Watched by the migratory plover living on land.

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

A

night gliding through the passage;

He hua, he i’o ka ‘ai a ka manu

Fruit and flesh are food for birds;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It

is the god who enters, not as a person does he enter;

390

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

390

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

Hanau ka Hehe noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Nene noho i uka

 

Born the Hehe living at sea Watched by the n‰n‰ goose living on land.

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

A

night gliding through the passage;

He hua, he i’o ka ‘ai a ka manu

Fruit and flesh are food for birds;

395

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

395

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter;

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

Hanau ka ‘Auku’u noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka ‘Ekupu’u noho i uka

 

Born the black-crowned night heron Watched by the ‘ekupu’u living on land.

400

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

400

A night gliding through the passage;

He hua, he i’o ka ‘ai a ka manu

Fruit and flesh are food for birds;

O ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

15

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter;

 

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

405

Hanau ka Noio noho i kai Kia’i ia e ka Pueo noho i uka

405

Born the white-capped noddy living at sea Watched by the owl living on land.

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

A

night gliding through the passage;

He hua, he i’o ka ‘ai a ka manu

Fruit and flesh are food for birds;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It

is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

410

O ka leina keia a ka manu o Halulu

410

This the perch of the bird Halulu,

O

Kiwa’a, o ka manu kani halau

Of Kiwa’a, bird crying over the canoe house;

O

ka manu lele auna a pa’a ka la

The flight of birds shuts out the sun,

Pa’a ka honua i na keiki manu a ka Pohaha

 

Fledglings who cover the land with growth bursting from night,

He au pohaha wale i ka mu-ka

A

time of yielding to those who sip

 

nectar;

415

O ka haha ‘ape manewanewa

415

The ‘ape taro stalk spirals upward,

O

ka holili ha’ape lau manamana

Thrusting forth tender leaves

O

ka manamana o ka hanau po

Branching in the night of birth

O

po wale kela

It

is that night still

O

po wale keia

It

is this night still

420

O po wale ke au ia Po’ele’ele

420

It

is still night in the time of

O poni wale ke au ia Pohaha, ka po Po no.

16

Po’ele’ele, black night, Purple-black Pohaha, night of groping through; Still night.

KA WA EHA

E kukulu i ke ‘ahi’a a la’a la

O ka ‘ape aumoa ka hiwa uli

FOURTH AGE

Set up the ‘ohi’a to be sacred there Black sacredness of the ‘ape taro

425

O ho’okaha ke kai i ka ‘aina

425

The flowing sea cuts the shoreline

O

kolo aku, o kolo mai

Where they crawl away and crawl

O

ho’ohua ka ohana o kolo

here,

O

kolo kua, o kolo alo

Family of crawlers increasing

O

pane’(e) ke alo, o ho’ohonua ke kua

their kind, Crawling backward or forward, On their front and on their backs,

430

O ke alo o ku’u milimili nanea

430

Bosom of those cherished ones

O

pani’ia, o panopano

with whom they play,

O

kane o ka Popanopano i hanau

Dark ones, distinctly black

O

Polalowehi ka wahine

Male of the night born in

HÅnau kanaka ho’olu’a hua

 

PØpanopano jet black, Female of the night below adorned black Born those who deposit eggs in the earth

435

Ho’ohua a lau i ka po a’e nei

435

Increasing four-hundred-fold their

Ia

nei la ho’oku’uku’u

young by night

Ia

nei la ho’oka’aka’a

Released here,

Kaka’a kamali’i he’e pu’eone

 

Roll about here,

O

kama a ka Popanopano i hÅnau

On dunes of sand little ones slide, Children born sons of PØpano- pano

440

Hanau ka po Hanau ka po ia milinanea Kuka’a ka po ia ki’i nana’a Hanau ka po ia kua nanaka Kulia ka po ia kua neneke

440

The night gave birth The night gave birth to the playful The night swelled with big-bellied ones The night gave birth to carapaced turtles The night strove to deliver the hawkbill

445

Hanau ka po ia ka ‘ula maku’e

445

The night gave birth to the dark-red

Kula’a ka po ia ‘ula li’i

lobster The night expelled the small red

Hanau ka po ia mo’onanea

lobster The night gave birth to the lizard

Kukele ka po ia mo’oni(a)nia

at rest The night slithered with the lizard

Hanau ka po ia pilipili

of smooth skin The night gave birth to those that cling

450

Kukala ka po ia kalakala

450

The night proclaimed those with rough skin

17

Hanau ka po ia ka’uka’u Kuemi ka po ia palaka Hanau ka po ia ka ihu kunini Ku’eli ka po ia kupelepele

The night gave birth to the hesitant; The night shrank with those indifferent; The night gave birth to the sharp- nosed; The night dug out the indolent;

455

Hanau ka po ia kele Kali ka po ia mehe(u)he(u)

455

The night gave birth to mud- dwellers; The night paused for track leavers.

Hanau kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Born male for the narrow

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams

Hanau ka Honua noho i kai

 

Born the turtle living in the sea

460

Kia’i ‘ia e ke Kuhonua noho i uka

460

Kept by the maile vine living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

 

It is a night passing through;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

Quiet the feeding of crawlers; It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

465

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

465

Female for wide streams.

Hanau ka Wili noho i kai Kia’i’ia e ka Wiliwili noho i uka

Born the teredo worm living in the sea

He po uhe’e i ka wawa He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

Kept by the wiliwili tree living on land.

 

It is a night passing through; Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

470

O

ke akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

470

it is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

Hanau ka Aio noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Naio noho i uka

 

Born the sea worm living in the sea Kept by the wiliwili tree living on land

475

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

475

It is a night passing through;

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

480

Hanau ka Okea noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Ahakea noho i uka

480

Born the okea living in the sea Kept by the ahakea tree living

18

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

O ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

on land.

It is a night passing through; Quiet the feeding of crawlers; It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

485

O kane ia Wai’ololi

485

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

Hanau ka Wana noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Wanawana noho i uka

Born the sea urchin living in the sea Kept by the wanawana plant living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

It is a night passing through;

490

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

490

Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olol

Female for wide streams.

HÅnau ka N‰n‰ noho i kai

 

Born the nene living in the sea

495

Kia’i ‘ia e ka Manene noho i uka

495

Kept by the manene living on land

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

It is a night passing through;

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololÈ

Male for the narrow,

500

O ka wahine ia Wai’olola

500

Female for wide streams.

HÅnau Liko noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Piko noho i uka

Born the liko living in the sea Kept by the piko taro living on land.

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

It is a night passing through;

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

505

O ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

505

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

HÅnau ka Opeope noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Oheohe noho i uka

 

Born the jellyfish living in the sea Kept by the oheohe tree living on land

510

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

510

It is a night passing through;

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It is the god who enters; not as a person does he enter.

O

kane ia Wai’ololi

Male for the narrow,

O

ka wahine ia Wai’olola

Female for wide streams.

19

515

Hanau ka Nananana noho i kai Kia’i ‘ia e ka Nonanona noho i uka

515

Born the sea spider living in the sea Kept by the spider living on land.

He po uhe’e i ka wawa

 

It is a night passing through;

He nuku, he la’i ka ‘ai a kolo

Quiet the feeding of crawlers;

O

ke Akua ke komo, ‘a’oe komo kanaka

It is the god who enters, not as a person does he enter.

520

O

hulahula wale ka ne’e [a]na a kolo

520

Dancing the movement of crawlers Swinging the length of the tail,

O

ka maewa huelo ka loloa

Unfriendly and threatening,

O

kukonakona o kukonakona

Shaking as they settle into mud,

Hele lu wale i ki’o [a]na

 

Dust of earth the food to eat,

O

ka lepo hune ka ‘ai, ‘ai--a

525

‘Ai a kau, ‘ai a mu-a Ka ‘a [a]na a kauwa hewahewa

525

To eat and settle, eat in silence, Eating like condemned kauwÅ

A

pilihua wale ka ‘ai [a]na

outcasts, To eat in confusion their meals,

O

kele a hana ha-na

To bask in warm mud,

O

hana mai ulu kunewanewa

Reeling, unsteady,

530

Ke newa nei ka hele

530

Staggering in the land of Kolo,

O

hele i ka ‘aina a Kolo

Born the family of Kolo in the night,

Hanau ka ohana o Kolo i ka po Po no.

 

Still night.

20

KA WA ELIMA

O kuhele ke au ia Kapokanokano

FIFTH AGE

Time goes on into night extremely dark

535

O ho’omau i ke ahu o Polalouli

535

Continues into density of dark night

O

ka uli ‘iliuli makamaka hou

below Dark surfaces renew acquaintance

‘Iliuli a ka hiwahiwa Polalouli

 

again Dark skin of sacred black esteems

Moe a wahine ia Kapokanokano

Polalouli To mate with Kapokanokano in the very dark night

O

ke kanokano o ka ihu nuku ‘eli honua

Dark black the earth-digging snout

540

E‘eku i ka moku e kupu a pu’u E ho’opalipali (a)na ke kua Ho’opalipali ke alo

540

Uprooting the district into hills Making cliffs in the back Making cliffs in the front

O

ke kama a pua’a i hanau

Child of a pig born

Ho’ohale uka i ka nahelehele

 

Creates from the bush a dwelling

545

Ho’omaha i ka lo’ilo’i o Lo’iloa

545

To repose in the fields of Lo’iloa

O

umi he au ka moku

Tenfold the yield of the district

O

umi he au ka ‘aina

Tenfold the tribute from the land

Ka ‘aina a Kapokanokano i noho ai Oliuliu ke ala i ma’awe nei

 

Land where the Kapokanokano descendants lived A while, through which their tracks made a path,

550

O ka ma’awe hulu hiwa o ka pua’a Hanau ka pua’a hiwahiwa i ke au Ke au a Kapokanokano i noho ai Moe a poe ia Polalouli Hanau ka po

550

Faint tracks of the elders of the pig; Born the sacred black pig in the time When Kapokanokano’s descendants lived, When night reposed in PØlalouli The night gave birth.

555

Hanau ke Po’owa’awa’a, he wa’awa’a kona Hanau ke Po’opahapaha, he pahapaha laha Hanau ke Po’ohiwahiwa, he hiwahiwa luna Hanau ke Po’ohaole, he haole k‰lÅ Hanau ke Po’omahakea, he keakea ka ‘ili

555

Born the head furrowed, his the strong; Born the head broad, his the proud; Born the shiny-black head, he was sacred black above; Born the white head, that was a foreigner; Born the white faced; he was reserved for breeding;

560

Hanau ke Po’oapahu, he huluhulu kala Hanau ke Po’omeumeu, he meumeu kona Hanau ke Po’oauli, he uliuli kona Hanau ka Hewahewa,

560

Born the receding forehead, he had sharp bristles; Born the flat-head, of dull disposition his; Born the dark-head, his were dark; Born the defective, his were flawed;

21

he hewahewa kona Hanau ka lawalawa, he lawalawa kona

Born the strong, he had the competent;

565

Hanau ka Ho’oipo, he ho’oipoipo kona Hanau ka Hulu, a he ‘a’aia kona Hanau ka Hulupi’i, he pi’ipi’i kona Hanau ka Meleoli, he melamela kona

565

Born the affectionate, he had the more beloved; Born the hairy, his were vivid; Born the stiff-haired, his the ambitious; Born the melodious voice, his the idle;

570

Hanau ka Ha’upa, he ha’upa nuinui Hanau ka Hilahila, he hilahila kona Hanau ke Kenakena, he kenakena ia Hanau ka Luheluhe, he luheluhe kona Hanau ka Pi’i’awa’awa, he ‘awa’awa kona

570

Born the heavy eater, he had big eaters; Born the shy, his the timid; Born the pessimist, his the nervous; Born the sagging, his the heavy; Born the sour, his the bitter;

575

Hanau ka Li’ili’i, he li’ili’i kona Hanau ka Makuakua, he kuakua kona Hanau ka Halahala, he lei hala kona Hanau ka ‘Ewe’ewe, he ‘ewe’ewe kona Hanau ka Huelo-maewa, he aewe kona

575

Born the small, his the tiny; Born the provider, his the dependable; Born the juvenile, a pandanus lei for him; Born the lineal descendant, for him the heirs; Born the end of the tail, of junior rank;

580

Hanau ka Hululiha, he lihelihe kona Hanau ka PËkaua, he kaua hope kona Hanau ka Mehe’ula, he ‘ula’ula ia Hanau ka Pu’uwelu, he weluwelu kona

580

Born the lice-infested, his the infected; Born the champion, after him comes war; Born the ruddy, of reddish hair, red one(s) Born the straggler, of him the poor.

O

kana ia welu k‰ia

Scarcely clothed is this one,

585

Laha ai kama o Lo’iloa

585

Who as son of Lo’iloa extends

O

ululoa ka ‘Åina o Mohala

Productive land into cultivated

E ku’u mai ana i ka ipu makemake

 

bloom,

O

makemake kini peleleu

Letting into the calabash of want

O

mele ke amo a Oma kini

Satisfaction of increasing needs; Ripe yellow the carrying pole of Oma’s descendants,

590

A

pili ka hanauna a Kapokanokano

590

Generations closely related

I ka po nei la-- PØ no.

through Kapokanokano In the night now here-- Still night.

22

 

KA WA EONO

 

SIXTH AGE

O

kupukupu kahili o Kua-ka-mano

Countless generations grew up as

O

kuku ka mahimahi, o ka pihapiha kapu

kinsmen Organized in farming, the quantity of law

595

O ka holo (a)na kuwaluwalu ka linalina Holi (a)na, ho’omaka, ho’omakamaka ka ‘ai

595

Running eight eight-fold the assessment, Requesting that taxing of the yield begin;

Ka ‘ai ana ka pi’ipi’i wai Ka ‘ai ana ka pi’ipi’i kai

Eating the gain from wetland cultivation, Eating the gain from salt pond

Ka henehene a lualua

aquaculture; On slopes and in hollow places

600

Noho po’opo’o ka ‘iole makua

600

The rat parent lives in furrows

Noho pupi’i ka ‘iole li’ili’i

Where little mice crowd together;

O

ka hulu ai malama

Caretakers of seasons by moonlight;

‘Uku li’i o ka ‘aina ‘Uku li’i o ka wai

 

Small levies on land use, Small levies on water use,

605

O mehe(u) ka ‘aki’aki a nei(a) ha’ula

605

Bite marks left by brown creatures, Whiskered ones

O

lihilihi kuku

Crouched on their chests;

O

pe’epe’e a uma

A rat for the upland, a rat for the shore,

He ‘iole ko uka, he ‘iole ko kai He ‘iole holo i ka uaua

 

A determined rat running tough.

610

Hanau laua a ka Pohiolo Hanau laua a ka Pone’eaku

610

They two born in night declining; They two born in night moving

He nene’e ka holo a ka ‘iole uku He mahimahi ka lele a ka ‘iole uku

away; Swift the running of a small rat, Dolphin-like leap the jump

He lalama i ka ‘ili’ili

of a small rat To thieve at the rind,

615

Ka ‘ili’ili hua ‘ohi’a, hua ‘ole o ka uka He pepe kama a ka po hiolo i hanau

615

Mountain apple rind, the tree left bare; The spoil of children born in night’s decline,

He lele kama a laua o ka po ne’e aku

A

child of theirs leaping in the night departing,

O kama a uli a kama i ka po nei la Po no.

23

Children of darkness and children of night now here-- Still night.

 

KA WA EHIKU

 

SEVENTH AGE

620

O

kau ke anoano ia’u kualono

620

Awe comes over me on the

He ano no ka po hane’e aku He ano no ka po hane’e mai He ano no ka po pihapiha He ano no ka ha’iha’i

mountaintop Awe of the night moving away from me Awe of the night moving toward me Awe of the night completed Awe of the breaking apart

625

He weliweli ka nu’u a ho’omoali He weliweli ka ‘ai a ke’e koe koena

625

Dread of the oracle tower and sacrifice

He weliweli a ka po hane’e aku He ‘ili’ilihia na ka po he’e mai He ‘ili(hia) ‘ilio kama a ka po h(an)e’e aku

Dread of the offering and imperfect remains Dread of the night departing Terrified of night returning Dog child revered by night receding

630

He ‘ilio kama a ka po he’e mai

630

Dog child of the night returning

He ‘ilio ‘i’i, he ‘ilio ‘a’a

A reddish-brown dog, a short-legged dog

He ‘ilio ‘olohe na ka lohelohe

A hairless dog for the service

He ‘ilio alana na ka ‘a’alua

A dog sacrifice for underground fires,

He manu ke ha’i o Pulepule

An animal to offer up in prayer;

635

O

mihi i ka anuanu, huluhulu ‘ole

635

Pity him in the cold, with no

O

mihi i ka welawela i ke ‘a’ahu ‘ole

body hair, Pity him in the heat, with no

Hele wale i ke ala o Malama Kanaha’i a ka pØ i na kama

 

covering, Going alone on the moonlit path Among the youth who by night

Mai ka uluulu a ka welewele--a

vanished From the tangle to the clearing

640

Mai ka nahu (a)na a ka nenehe

640

From the stinging and the rustling

O

Hula ka makani kona hoa

Of the piercing wind his companion

O

A

younger brother of obedient ones;

ke kaikaina muli o ka Lohelohe no