P. 1
04-19-2013 Edition

04-19-2013 Edition

|Views: 76|Likes:
April 19, 2013 Edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal
April 19, 2013 Edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal

More info:

Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Apr 19, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

01/22/2014

www.smdailyjournal.

com
PLANT EXPLOSION
NATION PAGE 7
PANTHERS
BEAT DONS
SPORTS PAGE 11
CREWS SEEK SURVIVORS, BODIES AFTER TEXAS BLAST
By Denise Lavoie and Adam Geller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Plucking a couple of faces in
baseball caps out of a swarming crowd, the
FBI zeroed in on two suspects in the Boston
Marathon bombing and shared surveillance-
camera images of them
with the world
Thursday in hopes the
public will help hunt
them down.
The somewhat blurry
but still detailed photos
and video depict one
young man in a dark
cap and another in a
white cap worn back-
ward, both wearing backpacks and one walk-
ing behind the other on the sidewalk near the
finish line as marathoners run by.
The man in the white hat was seen setting
down a backpack at the site of the second
explosion, said Richard DesLauriers, FBI
agent in charge in Boston.
“Somebody out there knows these individu-
als as friends, neighbors, co-workers or fami-
FBI zero in on two suspects
Surveillance-camera images show people of interest in Boston bombing case
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe is asking
county supervisors to approve rehiring a just-
retired homicide prosecutor to aid in the trial
of William Hamilton Ayres, the former promi-
nent child psychologist whose prosecution for
molesting former patients has stretched over
several trials and led to a formal California
State Bar reprimand of the primary attorney.
On Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors will
consider Wagstaffe’s request for up to
$83,241.60 to re-employ
former deputy district
attorney Al Giannini as
second chair to prosecutor
Melissa McKowan in the
trial beginning May 13.
The rate is equivalent to
the hourly rate of his for-
mer position, according to
Wagstaffe.
The funds will come
from the already approved budget of the
District Attorney’s Office.
Giannini retired in
March after 34 years as a
prosecutor in San
Francisco and San Mateo
counties. Giannini
deferred comment on his
proposed return but, in a
report to the Board of
Supervisors, Wagstaffe
said his experience trying
“complicated and high-
profile” felonies and in jury selection necessi-
tates his participation in Ayres’ retrial.
The request is not a sign of any lack of faith
in McKowan, Wagstaffe said.
“This shows great confidence in her
because we are giving her assistance on the
collateral needs so she can focus on the pres-
entation of evidence,” Wagstaffe said.
Ayres, 81, is charged with molesting sever-
al former male patients under the guise of
medical exams between 1988 and 1996
although prosecutors alleged he abused many
more whose cases fell outside the statute of
DA wants just-retired prosecutor back for Ayres
REUTERS
A man moves flowers to the center of a makeshift memorial for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings, in an attempt to expand it,
on Boylston Street in Boston, Mass. Right: Surveillance-camera images of suspects wanted for questioning.
William Ayres
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A lawsuit stemming from a teacher abuse
case in the Redwood City Elementary School
District — a case the District Attorney’s
Office dropped last month — was filed against
the district, teacher and aides Wednesday.
Alexia Alika Bogdis, who was accused of
abusing two autistic boys in her care as a spe-
cial education teacher at Roosevelt
Elementary School, was arrested in February
2012. She faced five counts of child cruelty
and four counts of battery on school grounds
District, teacher, aides
sued over abuse case
Criminal charges dropped against
teacher, but parents file civil lawsuit
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Leo Padreddii, San Mateo County Harbor
Commission vice president and former South
San Francisco mayor, died Wednesday at the
age of 83.
Padreddii was reportedly hospitalized since
December due to illness and a head injury.
The Harbor Commission has exactly 60
days to fill Padreddii’s vacancy or the San
Mateo County Board of Supervisors will do so
after that time is up. If the
commission chooses to
appoint, as it did following
the 2012 death of commis-
sioner Sally Campbell, the
board will issue a request
for applications and con-
duct interviews. The board
could also call for a special
election.
Harbor commissioner, former
South San Francisco mayor dies
Leo Padreddii served on board since 1997
Leo Padreddii
See page 31
Inside
Obama honors
bombing victims
Steve Wagstaffe
See AYRES, Page 23
See LEO, Page 23
See BOGDIS, Page 31
See BOSTON, Page 31
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • April 19, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 210
‘OBLIVION’: SLEEK
SCI-FI THRILL RIDE
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18
DA offers deal in fatal fire
The San Gregorio father accused of
causing the 2004 house fire that killed
his two young sons nearly four years
ago pleaded no contest to involuntary
manslaughter the week of April 19,
2008 after prosecutors conceded they
could not prove beyond a reasonable
doubt the blaze was not caused by any-
thing other than human
hands.
Charles Edward
Schuttloffel, Sr., 37, took
the negotiated plea rather
than stand trial Aug. 28, 2008 on two
counts of first-degree murder and arson
plus the special allegations of commit-
ting multiple murder and arson causing
murder — charges that carried a manda-
tory sentence of life in prison without
parole.
Instead, Schuttloffel faced a maxi-
mum of four years in prison and was to
receive credit for time earned since his
arrest the prior March. Schuttloffel was
in custody on no-bail status since being
taken into custody following a criminal
grand jury indictment.
The afternoon of May 4, 2004,
Schuttloffel called 911 to report his
house on the 900 block of Seaside
School Road was up in flames. The fire
burned out after five hours and the bod-
ies of William Leonard “Billy”
Schuttloffel, 2, and Charles Edward
“Charlie” Schuttloffel Jr., 3, were found
inside after the collapsed house.
Schuttloffel allegedly told authorities an
explosion knocked him unconscious and
threw him from the house although
investigators later ruled out the possibil-
ity.
Google shares soar 20
percent, record one-day gain
Google Inc.’s stock
soared 20 percent April
18, 2008, restoring $28
billion in shareholder
wealth as Wall Street
renewed its love affair
with the Internet search
leader after weeks of worry about an
online advertising slowdown.
Driven by stellar first-quarter results
that surprised industry analysts, Google
shares surged $89.87 to finish at
$539.41. It marked the biggest one-day
gain since Google’s initial public stock
offering in August 2004, leaving the
shares at their highest closing price
since January 2008.
Google had lost favor with investors
as Web surfing data and the faltering
U.S. economy raised concerns that peo-
ple weren’t clicking as frequently on the
Internet advertising links that generate
most of the Mountain View-based com-
pany’s revenue.
Apartment rents stabilizing
The price of an apartment in San
Mateo County was stabilizing, it was
reported the week of April 19, 2008,
after months of turmoil that spiked rents
as people left their homes for more
affordable options.
The first look at the 2008 rental mar-
ket was mostly optimistic with rents
growing at a rate of .4 percent per quar-
ter, according to the RealFacts quarterly
report.
Both Daly City and Belmont had two
of the county's highest apartment occu-
pancy rates with some of the highest
rents. Daly City had a 98.8 percent
occupancy rate with an aver-
age rent of $1,591. Belmont
had a 97.4 occupancy rate
with an average rent of
$1,474, according to
RealFacts.
Students sue over
Belmont school crash
Two of the 13 students injured during
an accident at Ralston Middle School in
2007 filed lawsuits naming the driver
who lost control of his car, the city of
Belmont and the school district seeking
compensation for medical expenses and
grief among other things, it was revealed
the week of April 19, 2008.
At approximately 12:30 p.m. May 2,
2007 Redwood City resident Mauro Yan
lost control of his sport-utility vehicle
and plowed into a group of students
waiting to board a SamTrans bus.
The suit, filed April 9, 2008, alleged
barriers between the parking lot and stu-
dent loading area would have prevented
the tragedy.
From the archives highlights stories original-
ly printed five years ago this week. It appears
in the Friday edition of the Daily Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress Kate
Hudson is 34.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1993
The 51-day siege at the Branch Davidian
compound near Waco, Texas, ended as
fire destroyed the structure after federal
agents began smashing their way in;
dozens of people, including sect leader
David Koresh, were killed.
“There is a Law that
man should love his neighbor as
himself. In a few hundred years it should be as
natural to mankind as breathing or the upright
gait; but if he does not learn it he must perish.”
— Alfred Adler, Austrian psychoanalyst (1870-1937)
Actor James
Franco is 35.
Tennis player Maria
Sharapova is 26.
Birthdays
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A small group gathered on the campus of Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont yesterday to offer prayers for those
who were killed or injured at the Boston Marathon Monday.They met at the Peace Pole near the chapel.Students also signed
a card to be sent to the university’s sister school in Boston, Mass.
Friday: Sunny in the morning then becom-
ing partly cloudy. Highs in the lower to mid
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog.
Lows in the mid 40s. Northwest winds 5 to
15 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the lower 60s. Northwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear except patchy fog after mid-
night. Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs around 70.
Sunday night and Monday: Clear. Lows in the lower 50s.
Highs in the lower to mid 70s.
Monday night through Tuesday night: Mostly clear.
Local Weather Forecast
(Answers tomorrow)
GRAND FROND SCENIC FEWEST
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Tensions mounted between the lemonade sellers
when neither of them would — STAND DOWN
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CUDEN
LROTL
BURTAP
SAUCAB
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
” “
-
Print your
answer here:
In 1775, the American Revolutionary War began with the bat-
tles of Lexington and Concord.
In 1861, a week after the Civil War began, President Abraham
Lincoln authorized a blockade of Southern ports.
In 1912, a special subcommittee of the Senate Commerce
Committee opened hearings in New York into the Titanic dis-
aster.
In 1933, the United States went off the gold standard.
In 1943, during World War II, tens of thousands of Jews in the
Warsaw Ghetto began a valiant but ultimately futile battle
against Nazi forces.
In 1945, the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “Carousel”
opened on Broadway.
In 1951, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, relieved of his Far East
command by President Harry S. Truman, bade farewell in an
address to Congress in which he quoted a line from a ballad:
“Old soldiers never die; they just fade away.”
In 1960, South Korean students began an uprising that toppled
the government of President Syngman Rhee a week later. The
South West African People’s Organization (SWAPO) was
founded in Namibia.
In 1973, the science-fiction film “Soylent Green,” starring
Charlton Heston, was released.
In 1982, astronauts Sally K. Ride and Guion S. Bluford Jr.
became the first woman and first African-American to be
tapped for U.S. space missions.
In 1995, a truck bomb destroyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal
Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people.
Actor Hugh O’Brian is 88. Actress Elinor Donahue is 76. Rock
musician Alan Price (The Animals) is 71. Actor Tim Curry is 67.
Pop singer Mark “Flo” Volman (The Turtles; Flo and Eddie) is
66. Actor Tony Plana is 61. Former tennis player Sue Barker is
57. Former race car driver Al Unser Jr. is 51. Recording execu-
tive Suge Knight is 48. Singer-songwriter Dar Williams is 46.
Actress Ashley Judd is 45. Singer Bekka Bramlett is 45. Latin
pop singer Luis Miguel is 43. Actress Jennifer Esposito is 41.
Actress Jennifer Taylor is 41. Jazz singer Madeleine Peyroux is
39. Actress Catalina Sandino Moreno is 32. Roots rock musician
Steve Johnson (Alabama Shakes) is 28.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka,No.7,in
first place; Gold Rush,No.1,in second place; and
Hot Shot, No. 3, in third place.The race time was
1:46.07.
3 2 8
2 5 15 18 39 42
Mega number
April 16 Mega Millions
13 18 36 48 58 28
Powerball
April 17 Powerball
4 6 20 28 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 5 0 4
Daily Four
0 1 5
Daily three evening
1 3 5 23 29 15
Mega number
April 17 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
MILLBRAE
Disturbance. A person was detained for being
drunk in public on the 200 block of Taylor
Boulevard before 6:46 p.m. on Monday, April
15.
Arrest. A man was arrested for an outstanding
warrant for driving under the influence on
Aviador Avenue and Hillcrest Boulevard before
2:13 a.m. on Sunday, April 14.
Drugs. A person was cited for being in posses-
sion of a controlled substance on Millbrae
Avenue and Broadway before 7:25 a.m. on
Saturday, April 13.
Grand theft. A motorcycle was stolen on the
1100 block of Fernood Drive before 10:25 p.m.
on Friday, April 12.
Arrest. A woman was arrested for an outstand-
ing warrant on El Camino Real before 8:52 p.m.
on Friday, April 12.
Arrests. Two women were arrested for shoplift-
ing and being in possession of drugs on the 800
block of Broadway before 2:40 p.m. on Friday,
April 12.
Grand theft. A vehicle was stolen on the 1300
block of Vista Grande before 4:01 a.m. on
Friday, April 12.
BURLINGAME
Vandalism. A resident reported someone
scratched her vehicle on the 1700 block of Maro
Polo Way before 4:10 p.m. Sunday, April 14.
Suspicious activity. A student reported that a
man made an inappropriate sexual comment
toward her when she was off campus on the
1400 block of Howard Avenue before 2:32 p.m.
Wednesday, April 10.
Stolen vehicle. A gardening truck with the key
left in it was stolen on the 500 block of
Francisco Drive before 10:29 a.m. Wednesday,
April 10.
Police reports
A little squirrely
Someone reported three injured baby
squirrels at the intersection of California
Drive and Marquita Avenue in
Burlingame before 7:11 p.m. Wednesday,
April 10.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
San Bruno Park Elementary School District
will have an appointed trustee fill the vacancy
created when Trustee Skip Henderson exits
May 1.
Last week, Henderson announced plans to
retire from the board after 31 years due to
health issues. On Wednesday, the Board of
Trustees decided to fill the vacancy through a
provisional appointment through the rest of
Henderson’s term, which expires in
November, said Superintendent David Hutt.
The vacancy will soon be posted on the dis-
trict’s website, local cable television and local
media. To apply, a person must be at least 18,
a San Bruno resident, a registered voter and
not legally disqualified from holding office.
Those interested will need to complete a
board candidate information sheet, which is
available by contacting Jennifer Peponis at
624-3111 or at the dis-
trict’s website,
s b p s d . k 1 2 . c a . u s / .
Applications are due to the
district office no later than
4 p.m. Wednesday, May 8.
A subcommittee of board
President Henry Sanchez
and Vice President Jim
Prescott will verify the
prospective candidates
before interviews will be
conducted in later May.
At the same meeting, the board requested
that the a committee to research surplus prop-
erty, called a 7-11 Committee, be added to the
May 8 agenda as an action item. The group
would look at unused district property, such as
the soon-to-be closed Crestmoor Elementary
School. In addition, it will consider ways to
use the property to generate profit.
This is not the first time the district has stud-
ied surplus property. Such a committee was
established in late 2004. At the time, the com-
mittee found about 4 acres on the lower field
area of John Muir Elementary School and
about 5 acres at Portola Elementary School
could be considered surplus. The then closed
Carl Sandburg and Engvall school sites were
also considered surplus.
The former Engvall Middle School site at
Interstate 280 has been leased by VB Golf,
Inc. for a number of years. In 2003, a number
of trustees entertained the idea of developing
a big-box retailer on the site. In 2008, a
developer pitched building single-family
homes and a multi-unit housing component
on the 20-acre site. Neither idea came to
fruition.
The district sold the former Carl Sandburg
site for $30.5 million in 2005. A number of
single-family homes are now on the site.
San Bruno to appoint trustee
Decision comes after longtime board member announces retirement
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The Burlingame City Council will hold a goal setting study session
from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 20 at the Burlingame Recreation
Center, 850 Burlingame Ave.
Skip
Henderson
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The San Mateo County Elections Office
announced it found 65 provisional ballots from
the November election. Though they would
not change the result, Chief Elections Officer
Mark Church said it was unfortunate and com-
pletely unacceptable.
“There is simply no excuse for this type of
error in the elections process,” Church said.
“The importance and significance of each vote
cannot be understated. It is the cornerstone of
our democracy. While the misplacing of provi-
sional ballots is a rare incident, the misplacing
of even one ballot is shocking and inexcusable
to me as the chief elections officer. I am com-
mitted to ensuring that each and every vote
cast by our citizens is accurately processed.”
According to the Elections Office, a pre-
liminary review of election night procedures
determined that the provisional ballots from
the Redwood City Voting Center were sealed
in a Red Supply Case (RSC) and delivered to
the Elections Division in San Mateo. The
RSC was then placed in the security vault
and the ballots were transferred to a covered
bin that prevented the ballots from being
seen.
Of the 65 provisional envelopes found, only
35 contained ballots of eligible voters from 30
precincts. The remaining 30 provisional
envelopes were not eligible voters either
because they had already voted in the election
or because they were not registered. The pro-
visional ballots that were found came from the
Redwood City voting center, according to the
Elections Office.
“Proper steps will be taken to avoid inci-
dents of this nature from ever occurring again.
A thorough review of our Elections procedures
is being conducted, and additional training will
be provided to all elections staff,” Church said.
The 65 provisional envelopes will remain
sealed in accordance with Elections Code
Sections 17301 and 17032 requiring election
materials to be stored for 22 months, after
which they will be destroyed, according to the
Elections Office.
Elections Office finds 65 missing ballots
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
4
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACS Courier • Home Care
Assistance Peninsula
• Executives Association
• Retirement Administration, Inc.
• Technology Credit Union
• LegalShield
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
Small Business
Resource Fair
ATTENTION:
Tuesday, April 30
9am to 1pm
FOR COMPLETE SEMINAR INFORMATION
PLEASE VIEW THIS CODE OR VISIT:
SmallBusinessResourceFair.eventbrite.com
N
e
t
w
o
r
k
w
it
h
o
t
h
e
r
b
u
s
in
e
s
s

p
r
o
f
e
s
s
io
n
a
ls
in
v
a
r
io
u
s
in
d
u
s
t
r
ie
s
M
e
e
t
r
e
p
r
e
s
e
n
t
a
t
iv
e
s
f
r
o
m
c
o
m
p
a
n
ie
s
t
h
a
t

c
a
t
e
r
t
o
y
o
u
r
b
u
s
in
e
s
s
a
n
d
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l n
e
e
d
s
F
R
E
E

F
O
R

O
U
R

F
I
R
S
T

2
0
0

A
T
T
E
N
D
E
E
S

If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
A
t
t
e
n
d
a
s
c
h
e
d
u
le
o
f h
e
lp
fu
l,
in
fo
r
m
a
t
iv
e
b
u
s
in
e
s
s
s
e
m
in
a
r
s
o
n
v
a
r
io
u
s

t
o
p
ic
s
t
h
a
t
w
ill h
e
lp
y
o
u
g
r
o
w
y
o
u
r
b
u
s
in
e
s
s
C
H
A
N
C
E

t
o

w
in

a

$
5
0
0
0

a
d

s
c
h
e
d
u
le

f
o
r

y
o
u
r

b
u
s
in
e
s
s
!
REGISTER TODAY AT:
smallbusinessresourcefair.eventbrite.com
Or call 650-344-5200 x 121
for more information
Continental breakfast will be provided
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
5
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
$12.00
Eat Lunch Downtown and
get your Hair Cut!
Open Everyday
SAIGON BARBER SHOP
35 South B Street / 1st Ave.
(Next to China Bee)
Downtown San Mateo 94401
(650)340-8848
Mention this ad- Daily Journal Special
MENS
HAIRCUT (reg.$14)
Craigslist armed robber
faces more than 20 years if convicted
A San Francisco man who allegedly arranged a phony
Craigslist sale in Daly City then robbed the would-be buyer at
gunpoint faces more than 20 years in prison if convicted, San
Mateo County’s district attorney said.
Rommel Narvaez, 19, pleaded not guilty Monday afternoon in
San Mateo County Superior Court to two counts of robbery and
two counts of assault with a firearm — crimes that carry a hefty
sentence under California’s 10-20-Life Law, District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe said.
“He is charged with two counts of robbery and two assaults
with a gun. He faces up to 22 years in prison on those charges,
and that doesn’t count if he had any priors,” Wagstaffe said.
The 10-20-Life Law, also known by the catch phrase “Use a
Gun and You’re Done” law, was enacted in 1997 with the intent
of maximizing prison sentences for those who use firearms to
carry out certain violent crimes.
Police say Narvaez responded to a Craigslist ad offering
money in exchange for iPhones, luring his victim to Lincoln Park
on Brunswick Street at Templeton Avenue on April 8. At the
park, he robbed the victim of money he brought to purchase the
phone, Daly City police Sgt. Michael Barton said. The victim
was not injured in the robbery.
Narvaez remains in custody on $150,000 bail. He is scheduled
to return to San Mateo County Superior Court in South San
Francisco for a preliminary hearing 9 a.m. April 26.
Local authorities assist federal
ICE agents in serving search warrants
Federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials
served search warrants in a Daly City neighborhood late
Thursday morning, according to authorities.
ICE spokeswoman Virginia Kice said search warrants were
executed this morning as part of an ongoing criminal probe not
related to immigration issues.
She said she could not comment about the location and nature
of the warrants, nor any details about yesterday’s enforcement
operation. Daly City police Sgt. Michael Barton said officers
were asked to assist San Mateo County Narcotics Task Force
officials in an operation in the area of Acacia Street, near Bay
Bridge Drive just before noon.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A family of seven displaced from their
San Mateo home due to a two-alarm fire
early Wednesday morning is staying
with family in Burlingame after losing
much of their belongings and sport utili-
ty vehicle.
The father woke his family and fled
the Bermuda Drive home before fire-
fighters arrived on scene at about 3:40
a.m. to battle the blaze for nearly an
hour.
The SUV was on fire and so was the
garage, which suffered the most damage.
The father was getting ready to go to
work when the fire was reported.
Friends are accepting donations for
the family. The family is in need of
mostly clothes and school supplies.
Donations can be dropped off at Ray
Park in Burlingame Saturday where the
Burlingame Softball League is holding a
fundraiser with proceeds from the Snack
Shack going to the family.
The family needs clothes for a 13-
year-old girl, 12-year-old boy, 11-year-
old girl, 6-year-old girl, two 5-year-old
girls and a toddler boy. The mother
wears small and the father wears large.
Anyone who wishes to assist the
family with monetary donations can
give to the following account:
42007213814 at the Citibank in
Burlingame. Drop off donations at the
fundraiser, 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.,
Saturday at Ray Park, adjacent to
Lincoln Elementary School at 1801
Devereux Drive, Burlingame.
Friends assist family of seven displaced by fire
Local briefs
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The California
agency overseeing the state’s effort to
build the nation’s first high-speed rail
line received a boost Thursday when a
judge approved a settlement in a major
lawsuit that sought to block the project.
However, the rail authority also faced
a setback that could delay work and add
to the project’s soaring costs.
The rail authority reached the settle-
ment with a group of Central Valley
farmers who sued to block the bullet
train on environmental grounds. The
approval by a Sacramento County
Superior Court cleared the last legal hur-
dle for the $68 billion project to break
ground this summer.
Getting the environmental lawsuit out
of the way is a significant win for Gov.
Jerry Brown, a Democrat, and other
allies of the ambitious, much-criticized
project. Brown said in a news release
that it is a “very solid settlement”
between farmers and the California
High-Speed Rail Authority.
Under the deal, the authority agreed to
establish a $5 million fund to preserve
farmland and pay nearly $1 million in
legal fees to the groups that filed the law-
suit, which include the Madera and
Merced county farm bureaus. It also
spells out how the authority will work
with landowners to acquire land along
the route.
Dan Richard, chairman of the rail
authority board, said the agreement
paves the way for construction to start
this summer on the first 30-mile segment
of track from Madera to Fresno.
The settlement also “shows that in
working together with the agricultural
community, we can build high-speed rail
and work toward preservation of agricul-
ture in the Central Valley,” Richard said.
Also Thursday, the federal Surface
Transportation Board ruled that it has
authority over the California project,
which could mean substantial delays and
cost overruns if the state is forced to
comply with federal railroad regulations.
The state has applied for an exemption
to that oversight, and Richard said he is
confident the board will approve its
request next month, as it did recently for
a Florida project.
Voters approved issuing $10 billion in
bonds for the project in 2008, but public
support has dwindled in recent years as
the project’s costs have soared.
Sacramento County Superior Court
Judge Timothy Frawley approved the
legal settlement a day before a scheduled
hearing on the merits of the case.
“We were able to achieve some signif-
icant additional protections for agricul-
ture in Madera and Merced counties,”
Tom Coleman, president of the Madera
County Farm Bureau, said in a news
release.
Settlement reached in high-speed rail suit
Rendering of a high-speed rail train.
6
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
Nikon Instant Savings Ends April 27, 2013
Digital SLR MAP Price Less Savings Price After Savings
D3100 with 18-55mm Lens $549.95 -$100.00 $449.95 D3200
D3100 w/18-55mm & 55-200mm Lens $799.95 -$200.00 $599.95 Video
D3100 w/18-55mm & 55-300mm Lens $949.95 -$250.00 $699.95 24 MP
D5100 with 18-55mm Lens $699.95 -$100.00 $599.95
D3200 with 18-55mm Lens $699.95 -$100.00 $599.95
D5200 with 18-55mm Lens $899.95 -$100.00 $799.95
Ultra Small
S01 w/Case & 3 Yr Warranty $229.95 -$100.00 $129.95
L 610 w/Case & 3 Yr Warranty $249.95 -$100.00 $149.95 All-in-one
AW110 w/Case & 3 Yr Warranty $399.95 -$70.00 $329.95 Zoom
S9500 w/Case & 3 Yr Warranty $399.95 -$70.00 $329.95
All Nikon Products Include Nikon Inc. USA Limited Warranty. 2007 Nikon Inc. www.nikonusa.com
154 West 25th Avenue San Mateo 650-574-3429 Hours: M-F 9-6, Sat 10-4
Beware Home Inspection Pitfalls
Before You Put Your Home Up for Sale
This report is courtesy of Nguyen Group 01900915.
Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2012
Advertisement
Peninsula- According to industry experts,
there are over 33 physical problems that
will come under scrutiny during a home
inspection when your home is for sale. A
new report has been prepared which
identifies the eleven most common of
these problems, and what you should
know about them before you list your
home for sale.
Whether you own an old home or a brand
new one, there are a number of things
that can fall short of requirements during
a home inspection. If not identified and
dealt with, any of these 11 items could
cost you dearly in terms of repair. That's
why it's critical that you read this report
before you list your home.
If you wait until the building inspector
flags these issues for you, you will
almost certainly experience costly delays
in the close of your home sale or, worse,
turn prospective buyers away altogether.
In most cases, you can make a reason-
able pre-inspection yourself if you
know what you're looking for, and
knowing what you're looking for can
help you prevent little problems from
growing into costly and unmanageable
ones.
To help home sellers deal with this
issue before their homes are listed, a
free report entitled "11 Things You
Need to Know to Pass Your Home
Inspection" has been compiled which
explains the issues involved.
To hear a brief recorded message about
how to order your FREE copy of this
report call toll-free – 1-866-257-4047
and enter 2003. You can call any time,
24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Get your free special report NOW
to learn how to ensure a home
inspection doesn't cost you the sale
of your home.
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Victor John Gaurniri
Victor John Gaurniri died of natural causes
early morning April 11, 2013 after a long ill-
ness at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City.
Victor was born in Detroit, Mich. Dec. 14,
1915. Victor, a World War II veteran and his
wife Hattie (Fran) moved to Redwood City
shortly after his discharge from the U.S.
Army, where he served as an officer.
In Redwood City, he worked as a mail man
at the Redwood City post office where he
worked until his retirement.
Victor and Hattie made their home on
Buckingham Avenue in Redwood City.
Victors ashes will be scattered on land adja-
cent to the Pacific Coast. A funeral mass will
be held at St Anthony’s Catholic Church in
Redwood City 10 a.m. Monday, April 22.
Following the funeral mass, there will be a
small ceremony at Skylawn where the ashes
will be spread.
Marie Antoinette Dempsey
Marie Antoinette Dempsey, age 88, died
comfortably in her sleep on April 15, 2013.
Mother, grandmother and great-grandmoth-
er, she is survived by her son, Dr. David
Dempsey of San Rafael, six grandchildren and
eight great-grandchildren. “May God Protect
her Loving Soul.”
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints
obituaries of approximately 200 words or less
with a photo one time on the date of the fami-
ly’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 200
words or without editing, please submit an
inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituaries
By Anne Flaherty
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Pro-business legislation
aimed at helping companies fend off sophisti-
cated foreign hackers sailed through the
House on Thursday despite a White House
veto threat and an outcry from privacy advo-
cates and civil liberties groups that say it
leaves Americans vulnerable to spying by the
military.
The House vote, 288-127, puts the spotlight
on the Senate, which hasn’t taken up the issue
and is consumed with other high-profile issues
such as gun control and immigration. The lack
of enthusiasm in the Senate and objections by
the White House mean that the legislation is in
limbo despite an aggressive push by lobbyists
representing nearly every corner of industry.
But supporters said they were gaining
momentum: Despite the White House veto
threat 92 Democrats voted for the measure,
compared to only 42 for a similar bill last year.
The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and
Protection Act, or CISPA, is widely backed by
industry groups that say businesses are strug-
gling to defend themselves against aggressive
and sophisticated attacks from hackers in
China, Russia and Eastern Europe.
Hackers haven’t been able to deliver crip-
pling blows to the U.S. economy or infra-
structure, but they have been able to wreak
havoc on some key commercial systems. Most
recently several news outlets including the
New York Times acknowledged that their sys-
tems had been penetrated, while banks are
said to be quietly fighting daily intrusions.
North Korea was recently held responsible for
a cyberattack that shut down tens of thousands
of computers and servers at South Korean
broadcasters and banks.
The bill, said House Intelligence Committee
Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., strikes
“that right balance between our privacy, civil
liberties and stopping bad guys in their tracks
from ruining what is one-sixth of the U.S.
economy.”
Under the legislation, businesses and the
federal government would be able to share
technical data without worrying about anti-
trust or classification laws. The bill also would
grant businesses legal immunity if hacked so
long as they acted in good faith to protect their
networks. The bill is sponsored by Rogers and
Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., the
panel’s top Democrat.
But privacy advocates and civil liberties
groups say the bill would open up Americans’
most private online records to the federal gov-
ernment. The bill doesn’t include a require-
ment that companies scrub data of sensitive
information like health or credit records
before sharing it with the government.
Audit finds problems with
California specialty plates
SACRAMENTO — State auditors reported
significant problems on Thursday in how
California agencies collect and spend money
from certain specialty license plate funds,
including the loss of more than $22 million in
revenue that could have been used for pro-
grams to help veterans, college students, fire-
fighters and others.
Gov. Jerry Brown and lawmakers sought the
audit after an investigation last year by the
Associated Press. In part, the AP found that
money in a Sept. 11 memorial license plate
fund that was intended to help victims’ fami-
lies and law enforcement had been diverted to
other programs.
In addition, Brown and former Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger diverted $3 million of the $15
million raised for the California Memorial
Scholarship Program to help close the state’s
budget deficit and never paid the money back.
The report was the first audit in the 20-year
history of California’s specialty license plate
program. It found accounting problems within
the Department of Motor Vehicles and prob-
lems in how money has been spent.
Assembly OKs money
for gun-seizure program
SACRAMENTO — California’s one-of-a-
kind program to seize guns from felons, the
mentally unstable and others prohibited from
owning them is close to receiving more money
after an Assembly vote Thursday.
A bill from state Sen. Mark Leno, D-San
Francisco, was approved on a vote of 57-10,
with all the opposition votes coming from
Republican lawmakers. It authorizes $24 mil-
lion over three years for the Armed and
Prohibited Persons program to hire more
agents to seize weapons.
The vote comes a day after the U.S. Senate
rejected a gun control package, including a
proposal to expand background checks.
The state program checks databases to iden-
tify people who bought guns legally but are no
longer permitted to own them because of a
felony conviction, a violent misdemeanor, a
determination that they are mentally unstable
or a domestic violence restraining order.
House passes pro-business cybersecurity bill
Around the state
NATION 7
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Nomaan Merchant and John L. Mone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WEST, Texas — Rescuers searched the
smoking remnants of a Texas farm town
Thursday for survivors of a thunderous fertil-
izer plant explosion, gingerly checking
smashed houses and apartments for anyone
still trapped in debris while the community
awaited word on the number of dead.
Initial reports put the fatalities as high as
15, but later in the day, authorities backed
away from any estimate and refused to elabo-
rate. More than 160 people were hurt.
A breathtaking band of destruction extend-
ed for blocks around the West Fertilizer Co. in
the small community of West. The blast shook
the ground with the strength of a small earth-
quake and crumpled dozens of homes, an
apartment complex, a school and a nursing
home. Its dull boom could be heard dozens of
miles away from the town about 20 miles
north of Waco.
Waco police Sgt. William Patrick Swanton
described ongoing search-and-rescue efforts
as “tedious and time-consuming,” noting that
crews had to shore up much of the wreckage
before going in.
There was no indication the blast, which
sent up a mushroom-shaped plume of smoke
and left behind a crater, was anything other
than an industrial accident, he said.
On Thursday evening, several hundred peo-
ple packed St. Mary of the Assumption
Catholic Church in downtown West for a non-
denominational church service. A victim
relief services chaplain said prayers and
hymns were offered in honor of blast victims.
The explosion was apparently touched off
by a fire, but there was no indication what
sparked the blaze. The company had been
cited by regulators for what appeared to be
minor safety and permitting violations over
the past decade.
The Wednesday night explosion rained
burning embers and debris down on terrified
residents. The landscape Thursday was
wrapped in acrid smoke and strewn with the
shattered remains of buildings, furniture and
personal belongings.
Firefighter Darryl Hall choked up as he
described the search.
Crews seek survivors, bodies after Texas blast
By Nedra Pickler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Four months ago,
President Barack Obama promised a grieving
nation he would do everything in his power to
change gun laws after 26 students and staff
were shot to death at Sandy Hook Elementary
School. Turns out his power and the impas-
sioned pleas of devastated families were no
match for the force of gun rights advocates in
Congress and across the nation.
The National Rifle Association and its ener-
gized supporters overcame national outrage
over the deaths of innocent first graders. The
Senate rejected expanded background checks
for gun buyers in the face of strong public
support for the change, pleas from a former
congresswoman still healing from bullet
wounds and a campaign bankrolled by a bil-
lionaire mayor. Foes of new controls were
stronger than Obama’s moral indignation
from the president’s “bully pulpit” and his
political machine that won two elections but
couldn’t translate its grass-roots power to win
the gun vote.
Obama, angry and defiant over the defeat, is
vowing to fight on. And the NRA says it is
taking him seriously. “We are prepared for a
very long war and a very expensive war,”
association spokesman Andrew Arulanandam
said Thursday.
The NRA’s success is built on the passion of
gun advocates, activists on both side of the
debate agree. That’s how they were able to
defeat expanded background checks despite
polling that shows up to 90 percent of
Americans support the idea.
“You know what I hear from the members
of Congress?” said Vice President Joe Biden.
“I just met with one. He says, ‘Well that may
be true, Joe, but that 10 percent who doesn’t
agree, they are going to show up. They’re
going to show up and vote. And that 90 per-
cent thinks it’s a good idea, but they’re not
going to vote for me or against me because of
how I vote on this,”’ Biden said during a
Google Plus online chat Wednesday.
Arulanandam said he refers to NRA mem-
bers as “super volunteers” who work on polit-
ical campaigns and get to know lawmakers
personally so their voices are even more pow-
erful in the debate. A Washington Post-ABC
News poll taken last week shows they are
more likely to speak up: 20 percent of gun
owners and 14 percent of people who live
with a gun owner said they contacted a public
official on gun control, compared to 10 per-
cent of adults with no gun in their home.
Obama, victims’ families overcome by gun owners
REUTERS
An aerial view shows the aftermath of a massive explosion at a fertilizer plant in the town of
West, near Waco,Texas.
LOCAL/NATION 8
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
T
he San Mateo County
Fair, slated for June 8-16,
just announced that R&B
fave The Whispers will perform
opening night. The Whispers are
known for their hits, “And the
beat goes on,” “Rock Steady,” “A
Song for Danny” and “Lady.”
They are joining a lineup that
includes Tower of Power, Three
Dog Night, Starship featuring
Mickey Thomas and Morris Day
and the Time.
***
Wisnom’s Hardware on First
Avenue in San Mateo has a new
name, one that reflects its owner-
ship — Hassett Ace Hardware.
The Hassett family purchased the
San Mateo institution in 2009
from Dick and Suzi Nelson, a
third generation Wisnom. Since
then, the Hassetts have updated
the store’s offerings, reconfigured
the aisles and expanded its week-
end hours.
Wisnom’s has long been known
for its ability to provide and find
unique items, impeccable atten-
tion to customer service and
incredibly friendly employees.
Though the Wisnom name has a
long San Mateo history, the
Hassetts have a strong hardware
history of their own. They’ve
been in the hardware business
since 1957 and operate three
other stores in Half Moon Bay,
Palo Alto and Willow Glen.
***
Donations are now being
accepted for the construction of a
Veterans Honor Wall in Foster
City’s Leo Ryan Park.
The Veterans Honor Wall will
be 4 feet by 50 feet cement wall,
with a 5 foot return at each end.
A 30-foot flag pole will also be
installed. Donations of all
amounts are welcomed with spe-
cial recognition for larger ones.
Construction is scheduled to
begin in April with a ribbon cut-
ting ceremony on July 4, 2013
and official dedication Nov. 11,
2013.
For more information, ques-
tions or concerns, please contact
Kevin Miller, director of Parks
and Recreation at 286-3388 or
kmiller@fostercity.org.
***
The Japanese diplomat convict-
ed in March of beating his wife
and sentenced to a year of jail
and domestic violence counseling
was also suspended from work as
vice consul at the consulate gen-
eral in San Francisco for six
months, according to the
Japanese Times. Yoshiaki
Nagaya, 33, was sanctioned
under the National Public
Service Law for “committing an
act that undermines the credibility
of national civil servants.”
Nagaya and his wife lived in San
Bruno.
***
Redwood City is gearing up to
celebration May as National
Historic Preservation Month.
The month-long celebration “See!
Save! Celebrate!” sponsored
locally by Redwood City’s
Historic Resources Advisory
Committee includes a walking
tour, Union Cemetery Historic
Site tour and field trip for mid-
dle-schoolers to see three down-
town buildings listed on the
National Register of Historic
Places. For more details visit
www.redwoodcity.org.
***
After building loyal following
in San Francisco, The Plant café
organic, is bringing its signature
haute organic fare to the south-
west corner of Burlingame
Avenue and Primrose Road in a
new restaurant offering health-
and-planet conscious cuisine
made with organic ingredients
completely free of GMOs and
chemicals.
The 3,200-square-foot restau-
rant will feature a bar and lounge,
an outdoor seating area and a pri-
vate dining space. It’s set to open
in May. Its address is 1395
Burlingame Ave.
***
Redwood Shores resident
Connor Abernathy, 16, just
reached two milestones in a week
— getting his driver’s license and
doing his first solo flight in a
Cessna 152 from San Carlos
Airport.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly
collection of facts culled from the
notebooks of the Daily Journal staff. It
appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Four
Democratic and four Republican
senators formally unveiled a sweep-
ing immigration bill Thursday at a
news conference attended by tradi-
tional opponents from big business
and labor, conservative groups and
liberal ones. The lawmakers argued
that this time, thanks to that broad-
based support, immigration over-
haul legislation can succeed in
Congress.
“Powerful outside forces have
helped defeat certain other initia-
tives in Washington, but on immi-
gration, the opposite is proving
true,” Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.,
said a day after senators under
intense lobbying pressure blocked a
major gun control package. “I am
confident this issue will not fall vic-
tim to the usual partisan deadlock.”
Support for the bill is already
being put to the test as conservatives
grow more vocal in opposition. Two
Republican senators held a dueling
news conference with law enforce-
ment officials to bash the bill’s secu-
rity provisions, and several conser-
vative bloggers seized on one provi-
sion of the legislation to falsely
claim that it would allow people
here illegally to get free cellphones.
The 844-page bill is designed to
secure the border, allow tens of
thousands of new high- and low-
skilled workers into the country
while requiring employers to verify
their legal status, and put 11 million
people here illegally on a path to cit-
izenship, as long as certain border
security goals are met first.
“Yes, we offer a path to citizen-
ship to people who didn’t come here
legally,” said Sen. John McCain, R-
Ariz., anticipating opposition to that
provision. “They’re here, and realis-
tically there is nothing we can do to
induce them all to return to their
countries of origin.”
In addition to Schumer and
McCain, the members of the so-
called Gang of Eight are
Democrats Dick Durbin of
Illinois, Robert Menendez of New
Jersey and Michael Bennet of
Colorado, and Republicans Marco
Rubio of Florida, Lindsey Graham
of South Carolina and Jeff Flake
of Arizona.
Senators unveil sweeping immigration bill
By Holobrook Mohr
and Adrian Sainz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OXFORD, Miss. — A Mississippi
man charged with sending ricin-
laced letters to the president and
other officials was described
Thursday as a good father, a quiet
neighbor and an entertainer who
impersonated Elvis at parties. Other
accounts show a man who spiraled
into emotional turmoil trying to get
attention for his claims of uncover-
ing a conspiracy to sell body parts
on the black market.
Paul Kevin Curtis, 45, wrote
numerous Web posts over the past
several years describing the event
that he said “changed my life forev-
er”: the chance discovery of body
parts and organs wrapped in plastic
in small refrigerator at a hospital
where he worked as a janitor more
than a decade ago.
He tried to talk to officials and get
the word out online, but he thought
he was being railroaded by the gov-
ernment. Authorities say the efforts
culminated in letters sent to
President Barack Obama, a U.S.
senator and a judge in Mississippi.
“Maybe I have your attention now
even if that means someone must
die,” the letters read, according to an
FBI affidavit.
“He is bipolar, and the only thing
I can say is he wasn’t on his medi-
cine,” his ex-wife, Laura Curtis, told
the Associated Press.
Jim Waide, an attorney for the
Curtis family, said Paul Kevin
Curtis was prescribed medication
three years ago. “When he is on his
medication, he is terrific, he’s nice,
he’s functional,” Waide said. “When
he’s off his medication, that’s when
there’s a problem.”
Man charged in ricin letters
case described as troubled
REUTERS
Paul Kevin Curtis is seen dressed as an Elvis impersonator in this picture
taken in 1999. Federal prosecutors on Thursday charged Curtis with
threatening to harm President Barack Obama and making other threats
through the Postal Service.
OPINION 9
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Steve Okamoto
I
n a recent documentary on the
National Geographic Channel, Nat
Geo, there was a story about a floating
island of plastic and other debris floating
around in the North Pacific. The island of
junk was called “The Great Pacific Garbage
Dump.” The images from that show stayed
with me because I could not imagine an
island, some estimate to be as large as
North America, floating aimlessly while
creating havoc for birds and fish.
When the City Council started to deliber-
ate about adopting an ordinance to ban
plastic bags here in Foster City, the Great
Pacific Garbage Dump came into my mind.
Although we may be a small city in the
scope of a huge floating island, I still felt
that our small effort, along with other com-
munities in San Mateo County who also
adopted similar ordinances, could result in
somewhat reducing the size of that ugly,
floating debris of plastic bags and bottles.
Let me also tell you about other “green”
projects that we in Foster City are proud to
acknowledge. Let’s first talk about the new
LED street lights installed on our streets.
Not only do they provide better illumina-
tion, but they are saving the city around
$90,000 a year in energy costs. We’ve
installed synthetic turf baseball and soccer
fields in three of our parks and are design-
ing a synthetic turf field for a fourth park.
These synthetic turf fields have been
installed with park-in-lieu fees so our gen-
eral fund balances were not affected. They
have also saved millions of gallons of water
(which provides a savings to our general
fund).
Finally, we are in the early stages of
planning for solar panel installation on the
roof of the Library/Community Center and
on car shades in the adja-
cent parking lot. Early
estimates have said that
we could save in the life-
time of those panels more
than $800,000 in utility
bills.
The plastic bag ordi-
nance will become effec-
tive on April 22, which is
Earth Day. When that date arrives, you will
no longer be asked the question, “paper or
plastic?” If you choose to use the retailer’s
bag, your purchases will be put into a recy-
cled-content paper bag and the retailer will
be required to charge you 10 cents for each
bag you use. That charge will continue until
the end of the year 2014, and then the 10
cents charge will be increased to 25 cents.
As an alternative, you can avoid the bag
charge by choosing to bring your own bag.
The city has a fund called the
“Construction and Demolition Fund.”
Construction contractors pay a deposit to
the city that requires them to recycle 50
percent of the material they demolish as
part of a construction project. If they do not
reach that goal, the city gets to keep all or
part of that deposit. These unclaimed funds
are then used to pay for projects and pro-
grams that seek to reduce the amount of
waste that goes to our landfills. When I
learned of this fund, which is totally sepa-
rate from our general fund, I thought this
might be a wonderful opportunity to pro-
vide all residents with a free reusable bag
as this would further the city’s efforts
toward recycling and waste reduction, and
also save residents from having to pay the
10 cent fee.
With the assistance of staff and Chamber
of Commerce President/CEO Joanne
Bohigan, we researched reusable bags that
met several key factors. First, they must be
either biodegradable or made from recycled
material. Plus, we wanted to purchase them
locally and, if possible, to be manufactured
locally or at least in the United States as
well. Several bags met the criteria and, with
funding available from the construction and
demolition fund, the program was brought
to the City Council for final approval.
However, it was thought that providing
reusable bags for the residents was unnec-
essary because it was felt that everyone
already had their own bag. Also, some resi-
dents might get the wrong impression that
in today’s economy and budgetary chal-
lenges that we would be spending money
unwisely.
I understood all the comments and each
person’s objections, so I asked the council
if I personally approached and solicited the
business community for sponsorship of this
project, would they then reconsider my
original proposal. The council agreed.
Therefore, I am now reaching out to the
business community to ask for your sup-
port. I have already heard from a couple of
excited businesses ready to join me in this
effort. Please contact me if you would be
interested in sponsoring the project, which
would be a great way to promote and drive
customers to your local business, and sup-
port a worthwhile effort to create a more
sustainable Foster City.
Steve Okamoto is a member of the Foster
City Council. He can be reached at 468-8184
or at sokamoto@fostercity.org.
Go figure
Editor,
Every day, we read of special interest
groups that demand more funding for edu-
cation, child care, mental health programs,
prisoner rehabilitation, rebuilding infra-
structure, medical research ... you name it.
On the other hand, our friends in
Sacramento continue to pour money down
the drain for high-speed rail and Jerry
Brown’s pipe dream to Southern California.
You would think that all these special inter-
est groups would rally together and march
on Sacramento, demanding that these wast-
ed dollars on high-speed rail be better spent
on their favorite cause. Don’t you think the
elected representatives would listen if the
noise is loud enough? Or do these groups
just like to complain? I should assume that
most citizens are just trying to survive in
today’s economy and feel that they are
helpless to change the direction of events
unfolding in Sacramento.
On another topic, the general election is
long over, but President Obama made a
pass through the Bay Area recently to raise
funds for next year’s election of those in his
Democratic Party. Thirty-two thousand dol-
lars was a quoted figure for one to dine
with the president. If you have that kind of
money to throw around, I assume you are in
the famous “wealthy 1 percent.” As such,
your taxes have taken a substantial
increase, thanks to the wishes of the presi-
dent and fellow Democrats. Why would you
pay to allow them to raise your taxes?
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
FIghting for
gun control legislation
Editor,
President Obama is to be thanked and
commended for fighting passionately for
common sense gun control laws (“Gun con-
trol: No expanded background checks,” in
the April 18 edition of the Daily Journal).
Twenty years from now, when gun vio-
lence has been mercifully curtailed as a
result of his efforts, people will look back
at the contentious debates of the present
day and the obstructionists in Congress and
ask: What could they have possibly been
thinking?
Michael Traynor
Burlingame
Paper or plastic?
Everyone loses with
Belmont’s failure
T
he effort to lure Crystal Springs
Uplands School back to the table and
build a new middle school in Belmont
died fast and hard. Sad, but not really all that
unexpected considering the history of the pro-
posal.
Just a week after
Councilwoman Coralin
Feierbach changed her
mind and asked the
school to reconsider
after she and two other
councilmembers reject-
ed the proposal in
October, school officials
said they won’t reapply
because they don’t own
the property. It may
have been sold, but that is not known for sure.
Feierbach changed her mind because she
heard a developer was interested in building
housing at the Davis Drive site. She was also
seeking additional financial sweeteners from
the school on top of the $1 million one-time
payment and $250,000 a year school officials
offered to the city leading up to the 3-2 council
rejection in October.
In her reasoning, Feierbach said she’d rather
see a school than housing and this was a
chance to get some much-needed money for
the city.
The top-notch Hillsborough sixth- through
12th-grade school, known for its innovative
educational practices and small learning com-
munities, was seeking a leafy locale for a new
middle school since its current town has a limit
on enrollment. The new campus would have
housed 240 students and have a 52,000-square-
foot building to replace 83,000 square feet of
office buildings there now. But it was not to
be.
So, in essence, the city will not get what
would have been a huge benefit for its resi-
dents through the esteem of such a high-quali-
ty school and its offerings to local students. It
will also not get the original financial offer and
instead will be facing the prospect of a vacant
office building with the past potential to be
something noteworthy and possibly remark-
able now becoming housing, or perhaps
remaining vacant.
A more appropriate path for the city would
have been to approve the school in October
when it was before the council rather than tor-
pedoing the proposal because of what
Feierbach called “nasty” comments. Feierbach
didn’t like some of things said publicly about
her and the council and translated that into
umbrage with school officials and the project
overall. So everyone loses because of a coun-
cilwoman’s thin skin and a too-late, too-slow
attempt at reconciliation.
One thing is for sure, Feierbach’s unsuccess-
ful change of heart did little to placate those
who didn’t like the school because of its
potential traffic impacts while causing bewil-
derment and disgust in those who wanted it all
along.
Feierbach’s four-year City Council term is
up in November. She said she is 99 percent
sure she won’t be running again. With this fail-
ure, that’s probably a good idea.
***
SamTrans officials have asked for some-
where around $10 million to $15 million a
year from the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors from the approximately $60 mil-
lion a year in money generated by the voter-
approved half-cent sales tax in November to
fund county services. SamTrans justified the
request since its paratransit service, which
costs about $13.3 million a year, serves the
elderly, the young and the disabled. That’s the
same group the county sales tax campaign said
the revenue sought to assist. In January, I pre-
dicted that the board would look kindly on the
request, but not for the full amount. What will
likely shake out is a $5 million annual contri-
bution once SamTrans provides solid data on
how exactly its service helps the same people
the county serves.
It won’t be enough to pay for the entire serv-
ice, but it might be enough, combined with
new revenue from ever-rising ridership, to
stave off an effort for a new tax to pay for
SamTrans and Caltrain service.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily
Journal. He can be reached at jon@smdai-
lyjournal.com. Follow Jon on Twitter @jon-
mays.
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis
and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state,
national and world news, we seek to provide our readers
with the highest quality information resource in San
Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and
we choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Charles Gould
Gale Green Kathleen Magana
Jeff Palter Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Elizabeth Cortes Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Natalia Gurevich
Ashley Hansen Tom Jung
Jason Mai Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner Sally Schilling
Kris Skarston Samantha Weigel
Chloee Weiner Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters will not
be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number where
we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred: letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and perspectives are
those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent
the views of the Daily Journal staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors. If you question the
accuracy of any article in the Daily Journal, please contact
the editor at news@smdailyjournal.com or by phone at:
344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,537.14 -0.56% 10-Yr Bond 1.685 -1.12%
Nasdaq3,166.36 -1.20% Oil (per barrel) 88.22
S&P 500 1,541.61 -0.67 Gold 1,388.00
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Pepsico Inc., up $2.40 at $81.25
With growth in emerging markets,the beverage and snack maker posted
a first-quarter profit that beat Wall Street expectations.
Nokia Corp., down 41 cents at $3.17
The Finland-based mobile phone maker said that sales of its products
fell by 20 percent during the first three months of the year.
Verizon Communications Inc., up $1.37 at $50.91
The New York-based phone company said its profit rose 16 percent in
the latest quarter as wireless revenue kept rising.
Peabody Energy Corp., up $1.44 at $20.46
The coal miner said that its profit fell in the first three months of the
year, but its results still beat analysts’ expectations.
Union Pacific Corp., up $5.52 at $142.46
The railroad company’s first-quarter profit surged 11 percent as higher
shipping rates offset ongoing weak demand for coal.
AutoNation Inc., up 82 cents at $43.30
The auto dealership chain said net income in the first quarter rose 14
percent as car and truck sales recovered.
Nasdaq
eBay Inc., down $3.28 at $52.82
The online retailer, which runs the eBay.com and PayPal.com, offered
an outlook for the current quarter that was below expectations.
Overstock.com Inc., up $4.24 at $15.70
The online discount site reported that its net income in the first-quarter
nearly tripled, as consumers spent more at its website.
Big movers
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Disappointing earn-
ings from a range of companies pushed
the stock market lower on Thursday, giv-
ing major indexes their third loss this
week.
The stock prices of Morgan Stanley,
UnitedHealth Group and others sank after
they turned in weaker quarterly results.
Prices of commodities held steady fol-
lowing a wild couple of days.
Government bond yields remained near
their lowest point of the year as investors
sought safety.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index lost
10.40 points to close at 1,541.61, a
decline of 0.7 percent.
Compared with the steep drops earlier
this week, the losses on Thursday looked
tame. The S&P 500 lost 2 percent on
Monday, its worst day of the year, when a
slowdown in China’s economic growth
set off a rout in prices for gold, oil and
other commodities and pummeled the
stocks of companies that make them.
After reaching a record high a week ago,
the index has now slumped 3 percent.
One reason behind the market’s sudden
turn might simply be that investors want-
ed to take some of their winnings off the
table, said Joseph Tanious, global market
strategist at J.P. Morgan Funds. At the
start of April, the S&P 500 was already
up 10 percent for 2013, more than
investors can expect to get in most years.
“For a while there, it seemed like all the
headlines were ‘stock market hits all-time
high,”’ Tanious said. “When they see
things like that, investors get nervous and
look for reasons to sell.”
Profit slipped at Morgan Stanley as the
bank made less money from trading
bonds and commodities, a common
theme for many investment banks this
earnings season. Morgan Stanley lost 5
percent to $20.31.
UnitedHealth’s profit fell short of ana-
lysts’ estimates, and the country’s largest
health insurer said it expects federal
budget cuts to pressure its earnings this
year. Its stock lost 4 percent to $59.69.
EBay fell 6 percent to $52.82 after the
online auction company cut its profit
forecast for this quarter.
The market didn’t get any help from
economic news Thursday. Investors
pointed to reports that more people
applied for unemployment benefits last
week and manufacturing slowed in the
mid-Atlantic region. Those reports fol-
lowed several recent signs of weakness in
the economy, including a sharp slowdown
in hiring last month and poor retail sales.
The market’s drop was tempered by
better profits at Verizon, Pepsi and Union
Pacific. Verizon Communications’ profit
beat analysts’ predictions as wireless rev-
enue kept rising at a rate of 9 percent, the
envy of the industry. Pepsi net income
and revenue also surpassed estimates.
Verizon’s stock gained 3 percent to
$50.91, while Pepsi’s climbed 3 percent
to $81.25.
Higher shipping rates pushed Union
Pacific’s profit up 11 percent, and the rail-
road said it expects to ship more goods
later this year. Union Pacific rose 4 per-
cent to $142.46.
Analysts have set a low bar for first-
quarter earnings. They predict that com-
panies in the S&P 500 will report that
earnings climbed just 1.5 percent in the
first quarter compared with the same peri-
od a year ago, a slowdown from the 7.7
percent growth in the fourth quarter,
according to S&P Capital IQ.
So far, companies are easily topping the
estimates of Wall Street analysts. Of the
61 companies that turned in results
through Wednesday, 39 of them have
exceeded forecasts.
Stock market slips on weak earnings
“For a while there, it seemed like all the headlines were
‘stock market hits all-time high.’ ...When they see things
like that, investors get nervous and look for reasons to sell.”
— Joseph Tanious, global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Funds
Yahoo adds two more
applications to mobile arsenal
SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo is taking the next step in its
effort to make some of its most popular services more
appealing and accessible to the growing audience connecting
to the Internet on smartphones and tablet computers.
The mobile push being orchestrated by CEO Marissa
Mayer has hatched Yahoo’s first email application for Apple
Inc.’s iPad and other tablet computers running on Google
Inc.’s Android software.
Yahoo Inc. also has created a new weather app for Apple’s
iPhone that will provide current temperatures and forecasts
on top of slideshows featuring pictures of landmarks and
other scenery in the cities chosen by a user.
The company, which is based in Sunnyvale released the
apps Thursday.
Like many other Internet companies, Yahoo Inc. is pouring
more engineering talent and money into developing mobile
applications as people spend more time consuming content
on smartphones and tablets.
Mayer has made mobile services one of her top priorities
since defecting from a top job at Google to become Yahoo’s
CEO nine months ago. She has already overseen a redesign
of Yahoo’s email app for smartphones, as well as the app for
its Flickr photo service on the iPhone and iPad.
Flight delays: Furloughs
begin at airports Sunday
WASHINGTON — Air traffic controller furloughs sched-
uled to kick in on Sunday could result in flight delays of
more than three hours in Atlanta, as well as significant delays
in Chicago, Los Angeles and New York-area airports, feder-
al officials said Thursday.
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and Federal
Aviation Administrator Michael Huerta said they have no
choice but to cut controller staffing by 10 percent, which will
reduce how many planes airports can handle. But a spokes-
woman for Airlines for America, a trade association for the
airline industry, said the furloughs are unnecessary and air-
lines are considering suing the government.
Without the furloughs, FAA officials could find no way to
cut $637 million from the agency’s budget as required by
automatic, across-the-board spending cuts approved by
Congress, LaHood and Huerta said at a media briefing.
Grants provide $9M for foreclosure assistance
SACRAMENTO — A fund that is distributing money
from a national settlement with mortgage lenders is giving
21 California organizations a total of $9.4 million to help
borrowers who face the loss of their homes to foreclosure.
The money comes from a settlement announced last year.
California secured more than $20 billion, the largest share of
any state.
The distributions from the California National Mortgage
Settlement Grant Program were announced Thursday.
Programs that provide free legal assistance and foreclo-
sure-intervention services will benefit.
Business briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The real estate
tracking firm DataQuick says San
Francisco Bay Area home sales
dipped in March compared to the
same period in 2012, but the median
price rose on a year-over-year basis
for the 12th consecutive month.
San Diego-based DataQuick said
Thursday that the March results were
due to demand continuing to outstrip
supply in many areas. DataQuick says
7,263 new and resale houses and condos
sold in the nine-county area last month,
up 34.4 percent from February but down
6 percent from March 2012.
The median price paid in March was
$436,000, an increase of 7.7 percent
from $405,000 in February and up 21.8
percent from $358,000 in March 2012.
DataQuick says transactions of
$500,000 or greater helped push the
median sale price up.
Supply affects Bay Area March home sales
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Google’s latest
quarterly results provided further proof
that the Internet search leader is figuring
out how to make more money as Web
surfers migrate from personal computers
to mobile devices.
The first-quarter numbers released
Thursday show that a recent decline in
Google’s average ad prices is easing.
That’s an indication that marketers are
starting to pay more for the ads that
Google distributes to smartphones and
tablet computers. The company expects
that trend to continue as it changes its pric-
ing system and as mobile devices emerge
as the most effective way to reach con-
sumers.
In another encouraging sign, the
Motorola cellphone business was less of a
burden than it has been since Google
bought it for $12.4 billion nearly a year
ago.
Meanwhile, Google’s core operations,
such as Internet search, maps, video and
email, remain reliable moneymakers.
Those factors, coupled with an unusual-
ly low tax rate, produced earnings that
exceeded analyst estimates and pleased
investors. Google’s stock gained $11.84,
or 1.6 percent, to $777.75 in extended trad-
ing Thursday after the report came out.
As with most major technology compa-
nies, Google’s future success is likely to
hinge on its ability to adjust to an acceler-
ating shift from computers controlled by
keyboards and mice to mobile devices that
respond to the touch of a finger and are
usually within a person’s reach.
Google has been among the companies
leading the transition, thanks to the
Android software that it has been giving
away to device makers since 2008.
Android is now the leading mobile operat-
ing system. Most device makers using
Android also prominently feature
Google’s services, giving the company
more opportunities to sell ads.
Even so, the mobile upheaval has pre-
sented Google with challenges that have
been worrying investors, despite the com-
pany’s steadily rising earnings.
Mobile ads so far have fetched less
money than those viewed on the larger
screens of laptop and desktop computers.
Google’s average price, or the “cost per
click” to advertisers, has fallen from the
previous year in six consecutive quarters,
including the first three months of the year.
Now, there are signs that marketers are
starting to pay more for mobile ads. The
first-quarter decrease in average ad prices
was just 4 percent. By comparison,
Google’s average ad price fell by 6 percent
during the final three months of last year
and by 12 percent during last year’s first
quarter.
Google’s first quarter shows
more progress in mobile ads
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The head of the
International Monetary Fund says the
United States, Europe, Japan and China
all need to make adjustments to their cur-
rent economic policies in order to boost a
still-struggling global economy.
IMF Managing Director Christine
Lagarde says the United States and many
countries in Europe need to focus more on
growth and less on trimming budget bal-
ances this year. She said there was a criti-
cal need for policies focused on spurring
jobs. Lagarde told a news conference
Thursday that “we need growth, first and
foremost.”
Lagarde spoke to reporters to preview
upcoming discussions among finance
ministers and central bank governors of
the world’s 20 major economies plus the
spring meetings of the 188-nation IMF
and its sister lending institution, the World
Bank. Earlier this week, the IMF lowered
its outlook for the world economy this
year, predicting that government spending
cuts would slow U.S. growth and keep the
17-nation area that uses the euro currency
in recession.
Officials of the Group of 20, which
includes Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew
and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke, were scheduled to begin their
discussions over a working dinner
Thursday night and wrap up Friday with
the issuance of a joint communique. The
G-20 is composed of the world’s major
developed countries such as the United
States, Japan and Germany and fast-grow-
ing developing nations including China,
Brazil and India.
IMF chief says global pro-growth policies needed
<< Giants limp home after loss to Brewers, page 12
• Jeter out until after All-Star break, page 15
Friday, April 19, 2013
SOLID START: CSM SWIMMERS WIN NUMEROUS MEDALS ON FIRST DAY OF COAST CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With his top two starting pitchers unavail-
able, Sequoia baseball manager Corey Uhalde
called on Jarrett Crowell to make his first start
of the season at home against San Mateo.
Uhalde and the Cherokees may have found
a long-term solution to any kind of pitching
woes. Crowell pitched five innings of two-hit
ball, allowing one run while striking out five
and walking only one in a 17-3 Sequoia win.
Crowell gave up both hits in the first inning
and issued a walk to San Mateo pinch hitter
Ariel Tennenhouse in the fifth inning, retiring
11 in a row between the first inning and the
base on balls.
“We were confident because he throws
strikes and he’s not afraid of anyone,” Uhalde
said of Crowell. “It was big to know he could
go out and do the job.”
While Crowell was shutting down San
Mateo, the Sequoia (6-1 PAL Ocean, 11-8-1
overall) offense was getting enough key hits
to drive in runs as the Cherokees scored 17
runs on 12 hits. Occasionally, they didn’t even
need a hit to score. Four San Mateo pitchers
combined to walk 11 batters, with Eli Dugan
and Tyler Leary each drawing bases-loaded
walks to drive in runs.
All told, Sequoia sent eight batters to the
plate in each of the second, third and fourth
innings.
Sequoia trailed 1-0 after half an inning but
quickly tied the score in the bottom of the
frame on a Zane Gelphman double to drive in
Crowell, who led off the inning and doubled
on the first pitch he saw. From there, it was a
constant Cherokees procession across home
plate. They scored in every inning they batted,
taking the lead for good with a four-run
fourth. They added two more in the third and
put another four-spot on the scoreboard in the
fourth before scoring three runs in each of the
fifth and sixth innings.
Gelphman had a big day at the plate, going
San Mateo no match for Sequoia
See SEQUOIA, Page 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The most dangerous place to play a varsity
softball game in on paper.
Burlingame knows this very well. In a week
when the Panthers admittedly overlooked an
upstart Sequoia ball club (which shut out the
Panthers), Burlingame was in danger of doing
so again in their Peninsula Athletic League
showdown with Aragon Thursday afternoon.
Up just 1-0 in the bottom of the fourth,
Burlingame surrendered three runs to the
Dons on a Sophia Ceretta home run and a
couple of errors and found themselves down
3-1.
“I think there was a little bit of panic,” said
Panthers head coach Doug McKeever. “The
problem is, this team being relatively young
and me being a first-year head coach, I’ve
come to learn that you can’t overlook any-
body. It seems like we’re our own worst
enemy and the girls have such a high expecta-
tion of where we should be and it doesn’t
always pan out and I think they get impa-
tient.”
Luckily for Burlingame, Thursday was not
a day for total impatience. In fact, down 3-1,
the Panthers put the pedal to the metal, scor-
ing five runs in the last three innings to come
away with a 8-4 win.
“What was nice about today, we made a few
changes in the field and in the lineup,”
McKeever said. “And the girls stepped up.
And that’s what we’re looking for.”
“I think at first we panicked and that’s why
the errors kind of continued,” said
Burlingame shortstop and offensive cataylst
Nicki Lunghi. “But, once we got back in the
dugout we just kind of settled down. We know
we could hit the ball, we know this is a hit-
table pitcher and I think we had to regroup,
make adjustments and finally at the end we
did that.”
The first half of the game was a nice little
pitcher’s duel between Aragon’s Sarah
Nelson and Meagan Ailand.
Nelson allowed one run in the first on an
RBI single by Kacy Edwards. But from there,
Nelson was solid until she came out of the
game following a shoulder injury in the sixth.
“Sarah is a real trooper,” said Aragon head
Panthers rally for win
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame shortstop Nicki Lunghi fires to first during the Panthers’ 8-4 win over Aragon. See BGAME, Page 16
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — David Lee has worked for
eight seasons to be in the NBA playoffs. The
last time he even attended a postseason game
was between the Bulls and Wizards in
Chicago before the 2005 draft.
“It’s been a long time to wait,” said Lee,
who spent his first five seasons with the New
York Knicks. “I’m having
to do more to calm myself
down than to get hyped to
be ready for it.”
A lot of Lee’s team-
mates can relate.
Andrew Bogut is the
only Golden State
Warriors starter who has
ever been to the playoffs.
Only five players have
been to the postseason.
Heck, only five players on the current roster
were even in the NBA the last time the fran-
chise made the playoffs in 2007.
When the sixth-seeded Warriors begin their
first-round series at third-seeded Denver on
Saturday, it will be uncharted territory for
most involved, including second-year coach
Mark Jackson. For the first time, the former
NBA point guard will be in a suit on the bench
instead of a jersey on the court when the ball
is thrown up for the first time.
Jackson was adamant after the team’s light
practice Thursday that playoff experience
matters little. He also recalled when the
Boston Celtics — led by Larry Bird, Robert
Parish, Kevin McHale and Dennis Johnson —
knocked his Knicks out in the first round his
rookie year in 1987-88 in four games.
“Experience didn’t send us home,” Jackson
said. “The Boston Celtics, with four Hall of
Famers, sent us home.”
Denver’s George Karl has Jackson well out-
numbered on the NBA sidelines. Karl will be
coaching his 22nd squad in the playoffs.
Jackson, who had never coached at any
level when the Warriors hired him two years
ago, deflected the attention to his players
when pressed about how his abilities will be
tested.
Warriors take on
Denver without
playoff experience
Andrew Bogut
See WARRIORS, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We are so confident that our Personalized Martial Arts Instruction will
immediately change your life, we are making you an offer you simply
can’t refuse- FREE 30 DAY TEST DRIVE!!
1100 Park Place, suite 50 • San Mateo, CA 94403
650.286.0105 • www.zultimate.com
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The College of San Mateo swim team went
into the 2013 Coast Conference champi-
onships expecting a dog fight.
And it would appear, they bit first.
In what CSM head coach Randy Wright
called, “a fine first day of competition,” CSM
won eight medals in 10 events.
“We had some great swims on day one,”
Wright said via email.
On the men’s side, CSM was highlighted by
Derek Koo, who had a tremendous 200-meter
individual medley race.
What was supposed to be a close race on
paper, Koo pulled away on the breaststroke
and never looked back. He finished in 1:58.38.
On the women’s side, All-American super-
star Miya Oto finished nearly a second ahead
of the field in winning the 50-meter freestyle.
Also strong, according to Wright, was
CSM’s relay teams. The women’s 400-meter
medley relay team (Oto, Rachel Rosas,
Kellsey Mercado, Kelly Dwyer) took first in
4:14.34. The same team took silver in the 200-
meter freestyle relay.
The men’s 400-meter medley relay team
(Koo, Jason Wong, Alvaro Andaluz, Richard
Gonzalez) also picked up silver.
Mercado took bronze in the 100-meter IM.
Andaluz picked up a third-place finish in the
50-meter freestyle and so did the men’s 200-
meter freestyle team.
The Coast Conference championship action
resumes Friday at DeAnza College in
Cupertino with trials at 10 a.m. and finals at 3
p.m.
“Today all four relays were really strong
and won medals,” Wright said. “We need
great swims by all four members to win a
medal. Today it happened. This is only day
one, we need to continue to have great swims
and build momentum for the next two days.”
College baseball
The College of San Mateo baseball team is
going to need some serious help.
By virtue of its most recent loss, a 12-2 drub-
bing at the hands of Chabot College, CSM finds
itself two games out of first place with just
three left on the Coast Conference schedule.
The climb towards another division title just
got a whole lot harder.
Worse for the Bulldogs, the Gladiators plated
eight runs (six of them earned) against CSM
ace Zac Grotz, who only went 2 1/3 innings in
the loss. CSM used seven different pitchers in
the game. Grotz surrendered those runs on five
hits and four walks. He struck out four.
On the other side, Matt Narahar pitched a
gem for Chabot. Narahar went eight innings
and pitched around three hits and six walks. He
struck out nine.
Brandon San came in and worked a one-hit,
one-walk ninth inning.
The Gladiators jumped all over CSM in the
first three innings. They scored twice in the top
of the first and sent 10 men to the plate in the
third when they scored six runs on just three
hits. Chabot was the beneficiary of a pair of
CSM errors in that frame.
Chabot went up 9-0 before the Bulldogs got
a run home. A Trevin Craig walk started things
off and he went to third on a Brandon Defazio
ground-rule double. CSM loaded the bases on a
walk but would only get the one run after a
Kailen Robinson sacrifice fly and a Jarrett
Costa strikeout.
The Bulldogs scored once more in the bot-
tom of the ninth on a Dane Vande Guchte sac-
rifice fly, but not before Chabot scored another
three runs in the top of the ninth.
Chabot’s remaining three games are against
West Valley, City College of San Francisco and
Mission colleges, which have a combined win-
ning percentage of .432.
In other local college baseball action, Cañada
beat rival Skyline College 11-3 to keep pace
with first-place Cabrillo College — the team
that currently owns the Pacific Division’s top
spot by a game.
The Colts are schedule to meet Cabrillo in
the last game of the regular season, at Cabrillo,
on April 25.
CSM swimmers off to strong start
By Dave Boehler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE — Matt Cain’s struggles continued against
the Milwaukee Brewers.
Yovani Gallardo homered and struck out six in his first start
since being arrested on a drunken driving charge, and the
Brewers beat San Francisco 7-2 Thursday for a three-game
sweep.
“We knew how good these guys are,” San Francisco man-
ager Bruce Bochy said.
“They will get back on track. It’s baseball. We came in here
and (Milwaukee) played well. They swung the bats well and
they pitched well. These last two games we faced pretty good
pitchers and they did a good job on us.”
San Francisco lost for the fourth time in six games and fell
to 0-4 when Cain pitches.
Cain (0-2) gave up seven earned runs and seven hits while
striking out four without a walk in six innings. The Brewers
led 7-0 after three innings.
“It didn’t really matter what pitch it was in those three
innings,” Cain said. “Everything was coming back to the
middle. Right in the middle. I was just not executing the
pitches at all.”
Gallardo (1-1) was arrested early Tuesday morning. The
right-hander allowed five hits, one walk and one earned run
in six innings to give his team its season-high fourth victory
in a row after a 1-8 skid.
“It was tough,” Gallardo said. “It’s obviously something
you don’t want to ever run into or happen.
“There’s different things we all go through, different situa-
tions. We all have stuff off the field.
“Something like that is a big deal. It’s serious. I apologize.
I’m just going to do everything possible and everything I
have to do so something like that doesn’t happen again.”
Ryan Braun and Jonathan Lucroy also homered for
Milwaukee, which swept San Francisco for the first time
since July 18-20, 2008.
“I think Yo had something to prove and obviously wasn’t
happy with what happened a few days ago,” Milwaukee man-
ager Ron Roenicke said. “And he was determined to go out
there and do whatever he could to pitch well, and he did.
“Yo is really well-liked here. And they know how hard it is
on him, and what he’s going through. I think this is a tight
bunch of guys and I think they really pull for each other.”
Gallardo’s two-run homer was his first of the season and
11th of his career, the most by a Milwaukee pitcher.
Braun hit his third homer of the year, a two-run shot in the
first. He had been in a 1-for-18 slump in which he struck out
11 times.
In the second inning, Carlos Gomez was hit with a pitch,
stole second and scored on a single by Yuniesky Betancourt.
Gallardo’s homer to left made it 5-0.
Lucroy added his two-run homer in the third for a 7-0 lead.
Gallardo had allowed 12 earned runs in his past three
starts, but his only blemish came in the fourth. He gave up a
leadoff double to Brandon Crawford, who scored on a sacri-
fice fly by Brandon Belt.
Cain shelled, Giants swept
Brewers 7, Giants 2
2004 Olympic 200 champ
Crawford gets 2-year ban
Olympic gold medalist Shawn Crawford was suspended for
two years by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency on Thursday for
not giving full information about his whereabouts for out-of-
competition drug testing, although his coach said he retired
after the trials last summer and U.S. Track and Field said he
filed retirement papers this year.
Bobby Kersee was caught off guard by the ban on Crawford,
the 2004 Olympic 200-meter champion. At 35 years old, this
suspension would all but end Crawford’s career, but Kersee
insisted he has already stepped away.
“I don’t understand this. He hasn’t put on spikes all year,”
Kersee told The Associated Press in a phone interview. “I just
don’t understand how this is allowed to happen? I think it’s
wrong. Eventually, the truth has to come out.
“A person who hasn’t put on spikes all year, a married man
trying to take care of his family and what does he get for the
end of his career — a two-year ban? I don’t understand.”
There is paperwork an athlete needs to fill out in order to
officially retire and be removed from the out-of-competition
testing pool. U.S. Track and Field spokeswoman Jill Geer said
Crawford filed his retirement papers this year.
Sports brief
SPORTS 13
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-365-1668
Active Independent Senior Living
• Day trips & 50+ activities every week
•Two blocks from Burlingame Avenue
• Secured underground parking
• Luxurious apartments with full kitchens
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — The Oakland Raiders spent this offseason
getting rid of almost all of the remaining high-profile players
brought in by the previous regime.
One of the few still around in Oakland is running back
Darren McFadden. McFadden is entering the final season of
his rookie contract hoping a new offense that better suits his
talents will help revive his game after a disappointing 2012
season.
General manager Reggie McKenzie cut
three former top 10 picks this offseason
when he let go of defensive back Michael
Huff, receiver Darrius Heyward-Bey and
linebacker Rolando McClain. But he
remains confident McFadden can regain
the game-breaking ability he showed when
healthy in 2010 and ‘11 under former
coach Hue Jackson’s offense.
“It’s a great feeling that they have that
confidence in me so I just want to go out
there and prove to them on the field that I
can do that, and just show them that I’m the type of player they
think I’m capable of being,” McFadden said Thursday.
The Raiders officially returned to work this week with plen-
ty of new faces from the team that went 4-12 in the first sea-
son under coach Dennis Allen and a brand new offense under
new coordinator Greg Olson.
Olson replaced Greg Knapp, who was fired after last season
when his offense didn’t fit the personnel in Oakland. The
biggest mismatch was McFadden, who had struggled in a
zone-running scheme early in his career before thriving in a
more power-based system.
After averaging more than 5 yards per carry in each of his
two seasons in Jackson’s offense, McFadden averaged just 3.3
yards per carry last season — the lowest ever for a Raiders
back with at least 150 carries in a season.
“I came in last year with my hopes super high,” McFadden
said. “They were just crushed. So I just wanted to put that
behind me and move forward.”
While McFadden said his problems were about execution
not scheme, his pleasure with the change was evident in his
big smile when asked about what he liked about Olson’s
offense.
“It’s a downhill offense,” he said. “That’s one of the main
things I like about it. I’m the type of guy, I like to get going
downhill off the back so I’m looking forward to it. I think it’s
going to be a great fit for our team.”
When McFadden ran in a similar offense in 2010 and ‘11, he
was one of the game’s best big-play backs, gaining at least 20
yards on one of every 15 runs when he could mostly focus on
running straight ahead.
Last year when the offense called for him to run outside and
look for a hole to cut through, he had only four long runs in
216 carries.
“I think it will help him a ton,” center Stefen Wisniewski
said. “I would expect a lot more production out of him for
sure. I’m not going to guess how much, but I really think he’ll
thrive in this.”
McFadden is one of the few high-priced players remaining
in Oakland after Huff, Heyward-Bey, McClain, quarterback
Carson Palmer and defensive linemen Richard Seymour and
Tommy Kelly all left this offseason.
McFadden is one of only two former first-round picks
remaining and is the longest-tenured position player along
with safety Tyvon Branch still on the roster.
“I can honestly say I knew about 20 people,” he said. “So it’s
part of football, guys are going to come in and out and you’ve
just got to keep pushing forward and I feel like everybody’s
doing a great job of putting the team together and I’m looking
forward to the season.”
McFadden said he has not talked with the Raiders about
extending his contract and is keeping his focus for now on
playing football.
McFadden survives purge
Darren
McFadden
Giants WR Cruz still not with team for program
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Even as the deadline for
restricted free agents to sign offer sheets with other teams
approached, Giants general manager Jerry Reese was making
no assumptions about the future of Victor Cruz.
The team’s top pass-catcher of 2012 — still unsigned to a
one-year, first-round tender worth $2.879 million — remained
absent from the team’s voluntary offseason conditioning pro-
gram Thursday. Reese had no idea if he’d see the Pro Bowl
standout during the program, training camp, or even into the
season.
Cruz caught 86 passes for 1,092 yards and 10 touchdowns
last season.
The Giants started voluntary the workouts Monday. New
York placed the first-round tender on Cruz a little more than a
month ago. It allowed the popular receiver to enter restricted
free agency, but it also gave the Giants the right to match any
offer he received.
If the Giants allow him to leave, they will get a first-round
draft choice as compensation.
Cruz was signed as an undrafted free agent in 2010. The
salsa-dancing University of Massachusetts player has 168
receptions for 2,628 yards and 19 touchdowns. He made the
2012 Pro Bowl and is considered one of the league’s best slot
receivers.
Sports brief
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A Pilot Flying J employee told
investigators that CEO Jimmy Haslam, who is also the
owner of the Cleveland Browns, knew about rebate fraud at
the truck stop chain his family owns, according to an FBI
affidavit unsealed Thursday.
The 120-page document filed in federal court in
Knoxville, where Pilot is based, alleges that members of the
company’s sales force preyed on smaller trucking compa-
nies by reducing the amount of rebates they were owed for
buying certain amounts of fuel.
Special Agent Robert H. Root alleged a “conspiracy and
scheme to defraud executed by various Pilot employees to
deceptively withhold diesel fuel price rebates and discounts
from Pilot customers ... for the dual purposes of increasing
the profitability of Pilot and increasing the diesel sales com-
missions of the Pilot employees participating in the fraud.”
The affidavit was filed to secure the search warrants used
in Monday’s raid on the Pilot Flying J headquarters.
One employee identified only as a confidential source told
investigators that the rebate scheme was discussed during
sales meetings attended by Haslam and Pilot President
Mark Hazelwood.
The informant said the practice was known by a variety of
euphemisms ranging from “manual rebates” to “screwing.”
Haslam denied wrongdoing in a news conference earlier
this week. He said in a statement Thursday that “the foun-
dation of this company is built on its integrity and that any
willful wrongdoing by any employee of this company at any
time is intolerable.”
He said the company would continue to cooperate with
authorities and conduct its own investigation.
Informants secretly recorded conversations among Pilot
employees holding frank -and often profane - discussions
about the rebate scheme, and agents interviewed current and
former members of the sales team.
The investigation began after agents were contacted in
May 2011 by a confidential informant who said they had
been told about the scheme by a Pilot Flying J employee.
The investigation continued through this month. Jimmy
Haslam bought the Cleveland Browns in a $1 billion deal
last summer.
Haslam was in Cleveland on Thursday to help prepare for
next week’s NFL draft. League spokesman Greg Aiello
declined to weigh in on whether the investigation would
affect Haslam’s role as team owner.
FBI: Browns’ owner
aware of rebate fraud
SPORTS 14
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes • Multi-Family • Mixed-Use • Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance / Cash Out
Investors Welcome • Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Marty Havlat scored twice
against his former team and the San Jose
Sharks closed in on a ninth straight playoff
berth, beating the Minnesota Wild 6-1 on
Thursday night for their most lopsided win of
the season.
Logan Couture added two goals and two
assists, and Raffi Torres and Joe Pavelski also
scored for the Sharks, who have won three
straight games to remain tied for fourth place
with Los Angeles in the race for home-ice
advantage in the first round of the Western
Conference playoffs. Antti Niemi made 26
saves in his 22nd straight start.
Pierre-Marc Bouchard scored the lone goal
for the Wild, who dropped behind St. Louis
into seventh place in the conference.
Minnesota has a four-point lead over ninth-
place Dallas and Detroit in the battle for the
final playoff spot in the conference but has
one fewer game remaining.
There was little carry-over from the nasty
finish to the last meeting between these teams
two weeks ago in San Jose. Sharks defense-
man Marc-Edouard Vlasic was fined for slash-
ing former teammate Dany Heatley at the final
whistle. Vlasic then took Heatley to the ice in
an ensuing scrum and Heatley suffered a sea-
son-ending shoulder injury. But with both
teams fighting for playoff position, this was
not the time for retribution.
Havlat has struggled to produce in his two
seasons in San Jose since being acquired in a
deal for Heatley in July 2011. But he has
excelled against the Wild this month with
three goals and two assists. He has no points
in his last 10 games against the rest of the
league.
Along with the two goals, Havlat also drew
the penalty that set up Couture’s power-play
tally when he was held by Clayton Stoner
early in the second.
The Sharks capitalized on a nifty passing
sequence when Joe Thornton fed Patrick
Marleau behind the goal line and Marleau set
up Couture in the slot for a one-timer that
made it 2-0.
Bouchard brought the Wild back when he
beat Niemi with a backhand on a breakaway
off a nice feed from Jason Pominville, but
Havlat restored the two-goal lead late in the
period with help from his linemate Couture.
Couture leaped to knock down Niklas
Backstrom’s clearing attempt behind the net
and quickly fed Havlat in front for the easy
goal with Backstrom scrambling to get back
in position.
Torres and Pavelski then broke the game
open when they teamed up for a pair of goals
in a 22-second span early in the third period.
The first came when Torres forced a turnover
from Jonas Brodin and then skated around the
net to beat Backstrom on a wraparound for his
first goal with the Sharks on an assist from
Pavelski.
They stayed on for the ensuing faceoff
scored again to end Backstrom’s night. Torres
shot was blocked and went right to Pavelski in
the slot, who scored his 14th goal of the sea-
son.
Couture added his second against Darcy
Kuemper on an assist from Havlat midway
through the third.
The Sharks took a 1-0 lead after the first
period when Niemi stopped Jason Pominville
on a breakaway shortly before San Jose capi-
talized on a fortuitous bounce. Havlat’s cen-
tering pass to Logan Couture deflected off the
stick of back-checking Mikko Koivu and into
the net to give the Sharks a 1-0 lead.
Sharks rout the Wild
Sharks 6, Wild 1
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Peyton Manning back in
Indianapolis — in a Broncos uniform.
Peyton vs. younger brother Eli in another
Manning Bowl.
Andy Reid returning to Philadelphia: Let
the booing begin now?
The NFL schedule is filled with return visits
and intriguing matchups, beginning with a
road game for the defending Super Bowl
champions.
And Peyton Manning will be part of that
too, as the Baltimore Ravens travel to Denver
for the now-traditional Thursday night opener
on Sept. 5. The Orioles are home that night
and Major League Baseball could not move
their game.
So $121 million quarterback Joe Flacco and
his fellow champs were sent to Denver — to
face Manning and the team they beat in dou-
ble overtime on their way to the Super Bowl.
“It still bites on everybody,” Broncos receiv-
er Eric Decker said. “It’s tough to kind of
relive that game, especially the opportunities I
think we left on the field. It’s going to defi-
nitely fire us going into this year.”
New York Jets coach Rex Ryan, who spent
10 years as an assistant in Baltimore, seemed
most interested — and was annoyed by — the
Ravens being forced to kick off the season on
the road.
“I think that the world champs can open up
at home and that’s where I think they should
open, at home,” Ryan said. “I think it is com-
mon courtesy. I don’t know what gets involved
in that. I am not in charge of it, but if I would
have been, the Ravens would be opening at
home.
“If baseball had only 16 games, I might
understand it. But just as common courtesy
maybe (the Orioles) say, ‘I’ll play this one on
the road.” Just from a fan perspective of
sports.”
In Week 2, Peyton visits Eli’s house.
Both Manning brothers often have said it’s
uncomfortable yet memorable playing against
each other; it’s only happened twice, with
Peyton and the Colts winning. Even though
Peyton now is a Bronco, the dynamic is
unchanged for the star quarterbacks.
“We haven’t talked about it a whole lot,” Eli
said. “More kind of joking and jabs at each
other, but obviously anytime you play your
brother it is special. It is unique and I cherish
those moments whether before the game or
looking across during the national anthem and
seeing my big brother and seeing him at the
coin flip; those are great moments that we’ll
cherish.”
The folks in Indy cherished having Peyton
Manning as their record-setting quarterback
for 13 seasons; he sat out 2011 after several
neck surgeries, then was released by the Colts
and signed with Denver. The reception he
almost certainly will receiver at Lucas Oil
Stadium will be warm and loud.
“It’s always fun when you spend time at a
place and then go back,” said Colts kicker
Adam Vinatieri, who has done that in
Foxborough four times. “I’m sure he’ll get a
standing ovation right when he comes out.
Hopefully, it will be loud and the fans will
make it hard for him (to call plays).”
Like they do in Philadelphia — for both
teams.
Reid jokingly acted surprised about the
Chiefs’ Week 3 trip to the City of Brotherly
Love — and, at times, venom for the coach of
the Eagles, which Reid was for 14 seasons.
Reid and the rest of the Chiefs knew about it
long ago, and they got the Thursday night
spotlight.
“We’re playing Philly?” said Reid, hired by
Kansas City days after being fired in Philly.
“Nah, it’ll be an exciting atmosphere. It
always is at Lincoln Financial Field there. But
right now, I’m a Chief, so we’re going to get
ourselves ready to play, whenever and wher-
ever we have to play this season.”
Other high-profile games:
—The Sunday night season opener is the
Giants at the Cowboys, and the Monday night
doubleheader has Philadelphia at Washington
— with or without Offensive Rookie of the
Year Robert Griffin III, who is rehabilitating a
major knee injury — then Houston at San
Diego.
“I will say this: Here comes the challenge
again,” Giants coach Tom Coughlin said. “We
didn’t play as well last year on the road as we
had in previous years and so that’s a great
challenge for our team.”
—Thanksgiving Day has Detroit hosting
Green Bay — once an every-year occurrence
— and Dallas at home for Oakland.
“It’s an incredible tradition, playing on
Thanksgiving Day,” Packers coach Mike
McCarthy said. “It’s a blessing for everyone
involved. We’re fortunate enough to still be
home in time to share in the importance of the
day.”
The holiday night game features one of
football’s most intense rivalries: Pittsburgh at
Baltimore.
—Rematches of 2012 championship games
come on Sunday night, Dec. 22, with New
England at Baltimore, and the next night, with
NFC winner San Francisco at Atlanta in the
final Monday nighter of the season.
—Buffalo’s annual home game in Toronto
will be against the Falcons on Dec. 1.
—London will host two previously
announced matches: Minnesota hosting
Pittsburgh on Sept. 29, and Jacksonville host-
ing San Francisco on Oct. 27.
NFL releases schedule
SPORTS 15
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BASEBALL
Sequoia17, SanMateo3
SanMateo1000020— 336
Sequoia142433x— 17121
WP — Crowell. LP — Kawahara. 2B — Noriega,
Sanft (SM); Crowell, Ortiz, Gelphman 2, rodriguez,
Tweedy(S).Multiplehits—Gelphman3,Rodriguez
2,Tweedy 2 (S).Multiple RBIs — Sanft 2 (SM); Ortiz
2, Gelphman 3, Rodriguez 2,Tweedy 2 (S). Records
—Sequoia6-1PALOcean,11-8-1overall;SanMateo
2-6.
BOYS’TENNIS
Burlingame4, SanMateo3
SINGLES — Taggart (B) d.D.Pantuso 6-3,6-3; Miller
(B) d. Krishna 6-0, 6-1; Anderson (B) d. S. Pantuso;
Yee (B) d. Kudo 6-4, 6-0. DOUBLES — Hu-Bhamdi-
pati (SM) d.Stevenson-Zhang6-2,4-6,6-3;Lowe-Yeh
(SM) d. Battat-Martinucci 6-3, 6-1; Ghosh-Huang
(SM) d.Yu-Resnick 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.
Aragon7, Woodside0
SINGLES— Hughes(A) d.Jor.Lopez6-1,6-4;I.Wang
(A) d. Jos. Lopez 6-1, 6-1; Liu (A) d.T. Newcomb 6-1,
6-2; Fowler (A) d.P.Newcomb 6-3,6-3.DOUBLES —
Joshi-Bellon (A) d. Martinez-Tuttle 7-5, 6-4;
Ngrichemat-Ilyin(A) d.J.Song-Yuen6-1,6-4;T.Wang-
Miyahara (A) d. S. Song-Mendelsohn 6-4, 6-3.
Records — Aragon 11-3 PAL Bay, 14-6 overall;
Woodside 3-11.
Menlo School 7, Harker 0
SINGLES —Lechly (MS) d.Chui 6-1,6-1; Morkovine
(MS) d. Depota 6-0, 6-3; Chari (MS) d. Xue 6-0, 6-0;
Boyd(MS) d.Yang6-0,6-1. DOUBLES—Matta-Miller
(MS) d. Desera-Yang 6-3, 6-0; Safran-Morgan (MS)
d.Burke-Leong6-4,6-3;Lam-Rudolph(MS) d.Scram-
Dai 6-3, 6-0. Records —MenloSchool 12-0 WBAL,
19-1 overall.
BOYS’ SWIMMING
Capuchino102, SanMateo61
200 medley relay — Capuchino (Schiller, PAvis,
Mendieta, Tinkham) 1:58.69; 200 free — McCall
(SM) 2:08.15; 200 IM — Schiller (C) 2:26.80; 50 free
— Liu (SM) 24.51; 100 fly — Halet (SM) 1:01.61;
100 free — McCall, Liu (SM) 55.96; 500 free —
Schiller (C) 5:57.66; 200 free relay — San Mateo
(Lagapa, Liu, McCall, Halet) 1:40.37; 100 back —
Halet (SM) 1:02.36;100breast — Huans(C) 1:09.39;
400 free relay — San Mateo (Halet, Ken, Liu, Mc-
Call) 3:50.97.
GIRLS’ SWIMMING
SanMateo126, Capuchino47
200 medley relay — San Mateo (Hansen, Grimes,
Low, Law) 2:09.76; 200 free — Cerda (SM) 2:25.77;
200 IM — Grimes (SM) 2:42.37; 50 free — Hansen
(SM) 26.51; 100 fly — Low (SM) 1:09.54; 100 free —
Su (SM) 1:05.25; 500 free — Low (SM) 6:35.62; 200
free relay — San Mateo (Su, Scheinman, Grimes,
Low) 1:58.76; 100 back — Su (SM) 1:17.00; 100
breast — Hansen (1:10.82); 400 free relay — San
Mateo (Oey, Su, Law, Hansen) 4:24.54.
SOFTBALL
NotreDame-Belmont 7, St. Francis 0
St. Francis 0000000— 044
NotreDame304000x— 751
WP — Mifsud. LP — Heslop. 2B — Delfino (SF).
Multiple hits — Delfino 2 (SF); Vierra 2 (ND). Multi-
ple RBIs — Vierra 2,Villanueva 2 (ND). Records —
Notre Dame-Belmont 2-5 WCAL, 11-10 overall.
WEDNESDAY
MenloSchool 196, Pinewood201
At PaloAltoHills CC, par 35
SHP — Buchanan 35; Garnick 37; Hsieh 39; Wong
42; Herr 43; Burgess 44.
BASEBALL
SacredHeart Prep4, MenloSchool 0
SHP1001002— 370
Menlo0000000— 051
WP — VauDell (2-0, 4-1). LP — Redman. HR —
March (SHP). 2B — Sinchek 2, March (SHP);
Diekroeger (MS).Multiple hits — Sinchek 3,March
2 (SHP); Diekroeger (MS). Multiple RBIs — March 2
(SHP).Records — Sacred Heart Prep 3-0 WBAL,11-
7 overall; Menlo School 2-1, 12-7.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
FRIDAY
BASEBALL
Pinewood at Menlo School, 3:30 p.m.; Serra at St.
Ignatius,Terra Nova at Aragon, Burlingame at Half
MoonBay,Menlo-Athertonat Capuchino,Carlmont
at Hillsdale, Harker at Sacred Heart Prep, 4 p.m.
SOFTBALL
Crystal Springs vs. Mercy-SF at Sunset Park, 3:30
p.m.; South City at Woodside, El Camino at Mills, 4
p.m.
TRACKANDFIELD
CCS Top 8 Classic at San Jose City College, 3 p.m.
BOYS’ LACROSSE
Menlo School at Sacred Heart Prep, 4 p.m.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
Menlo School at Menlo-Atherton, 4 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASEBALL
Mills at Sacred Heart Prep, 11 a.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
vs. Denver
6:30p.m.
vs. Stars
7 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Wild
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/18
vs.Columbus
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
Endof
Regular
Season
at Coyotes
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/24
at Kings
7:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
@Denver
2:30 p.m.
4/20
vs. Denver
7:30p.m.
vs. Denver
7:30p.m.
vs. Kings
7:30 p.m
CSN-CAL
4/16
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/17
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/16
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/17
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/16
vs.Padres
7:15p.m.
NBC
4/19
@Brewers
10:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/18
vs.Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/21
vs.Padres
6:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/20
D-backs
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/22
at Rays
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/20
at Rays
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/19
at RedSox
3:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/22
at Rays
10:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
at RedSox
3:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
4/23
4/26 4/28
@Denver
TBA
if necessary
4/30
vs. Denver
TBA
if necessary
5/2
@Denver
TBA
if necessary
5/4
NFL
BUFFALO BILLS—Signed DE Jamie Blatnick, DE
Kourtnei Brown, PK Chris Koepplin, P Brian Sta-
hovich and FB Frank Summers.
CHICAGOBEARS—Signed OT Eben Britton and
OT Jermon Bushrod.Waived G Chris Riley.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed DE Pannel
Egboh.
KANSASCITYCHIEFS—Signed LB Orie Lemon.
SEATTLESEAHAWKS—ReleasedLBDexter Davis.
BASEBALL
National League
CHICAGOCUBS—Sent RHP Matt Garza to Kane
County (MWL) for a rehab assignment. Assigned
LHP Hiranori Takahashi outright to Iowa (PCL).
CINCINNATI REDS—Recalled LHP Tony Cingrani
from Louisville (IL). Optioned RHP Justin Freeman
to Louisville.
LOSANGELESDODGERS—Placed LHP Chris Ca-
puanoonthe15-dayDL.RecalledCTimFederowicz
from Albuquerque (PCL).
MIAMI MARLINS—Reinstated 1B Joe Mahoney
from the 15-day DL.Optioned C Kyle Skipworth to
New Orleans (PCL). Selected the contract of INF
Nick Green from New Orleans (PCL). Placed SS
Adeiny Hechavarria on the 15-day-DL, retroactive
to April 17. Transferred RHP Nathan Eovaldi from
the 15- to the 60-day DL.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Reassigned RHP Mike
Fiers to Nashville (PCL).
NEWYORKMETS—Optioned RHP Greg Burke to
Las Vegas (PCL). Recalled RHP Jeurys Familia from
Las Vegas. Sent RHP Frank Francisco to St. Lucie
(FSL) for a rehab assignment.
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIES—PlacedLHPJohnLan-
nan on the 15-day DL.Sent RHP Charlie Morton to
Bradenton (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
AmericanLeague
HOUSTONASTROS—Selectedthecontract of INF
BrandonLairdfromOklahomaCity(PCL).Optioned
INF Brett Wallace to Oklahoma City. Designated
LHP Xavier Cedeno for assignment.Sent LHP Travis
Blackley to Oklahoma City for a rehab assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Assigned OF Scott
Cousins outright to Salt Lake (PCL).
OAKLANDATHLETICS—Sent 2B Adam Rosales
to Stockton (Cal) for a rehab assignment.
TRANSACTIONS
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Derek Jeter will be
sidelined until after the All-Star break
because of a new fracture in his bro-
ken left ankle — a blow to a New York
Yankees team already reeling from
injuries and one that raises long-term
questions about
the 38-year-old
s h o r t s t o p ’ s
future.
Yankees gener-
al manager Brian
Cashman said
Jeter should be
able to resume
his rehabilitation
when the new
crack heals, in
about four to eight weeks. Cashman
has repeatedly maintained the 13-time
All-Star should be able to return at his
previous level of play.
Jeter will not require surgery for the
break, Cashman said after speaking
with Dr. Robert Anderson, who oper-
ated on the Yankees’ captain on Oct.
20.
“He told me 95 percent of the peo-
ple that have this, they come back
from it fine. You just have to back off,”
Cashman said.
“But it’s a setback, so it’s not a good
situation,” he said.
Then again, the Yankees and Jeter
repeatedly said all winter that he
would be ready to play on opening
day. And Jeter, whose range already
has declined, turns 39 on June 26.
Major setback
for Yanks’ Jeter
Derek Jeter
16
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
3 for 4 with a pair of doubles, collecting three
RBIs and scoring three runs. Chris Ortiz was
2 for 4, with a two-run double in the four-run
second. Drew Tweedy, batting in the No. 9
position, was 2 for 3, with a pair of RBIs and
two runs scored. Gonzalo Rodriguez came off
the bench in the fifth inning and still managed
to collect two hits, two RBIs and a run scored.
“We’re winning games as a team,” Uhalde
said.
Taylor Sanft was San Mateo’s most produc-
tive hitter. His sacrifice fly in the first inning
drove in Sergio Noriega, who had a one-out
double and moved to third on Melvin Brown’s
single. He then jump-started the Bearcats’
two-run sixth inning after Crowell had been
lifted for a reliever. Sanft crushed a one-out
double, went to third when Anthony
Valenzuela reached on an error and scored on
a Memo Gomez groundout. Valenzuela would
eventually score on a balk.
When a team is facing an obviously over-
matched opponent, it’s not uncommon for the
superior team to start getting away from their
approach at the plate because suddenly every-
one is looking to pop one. Uhalde said it was
easy for his players to maintain their focus
because the Sequoia coaching staff is always
evaluating its players.
“We have two or three guys at every posi-
tion. We’re so deep as a team. It doesn’t mat-
ter what the score is. They’re working for
playing time,” Uhalde said. “Opportunities are
precious. The scoreboard doesn’t matter.”
With the win, Sequoia remains one game
behind Ocean Division leader Mills. Uhalde
and the Cherokees know that if they stumble
now, winning a title becomes remote. But
Uhalde believes he doesn’t have to worry
about his team overlooking any opponent.
“The only pressure is self imposed by the
simple fact we started (the season) 0-5,”
Uhalde said. “These guys like playing with
each other and they know they’re not good
enough to sleep on any team.
“If we don’t come to play, anyone can kick
our [butts].”
Continued from page 11
SEQUOIA
coach Joe Sparaco. “She keeps hitters off bal-
anced and that’s what we asked her to do. She
did a fabulous job.”
For a moment there, it looked like it was a
fabulous job that might earn her the win. An
error to start the fourth allowed Nicole Horita
to reach first and Cerreta homered to deep
center field. Annalise Di Santo followed with
a single up the middle, and she’d score when
the Burlingame defense tossed the ball around
for a moment in the frame. Just like that, the
Dons were up 3-1.
“These girls have a lot of heart,” Sparaco
said. “We had our share of drama during the
week and for them to come back and play as
well as they did is a tribute to them as athletes.
And the school needs to understand how
proud they need to be of these girls when they
put forth the kind of effort they did today.”
Unfortunately for Aragon, Burlingame’s
talent was just too much.
With one out, Lunghi walked to start a
three-run rally, punctuated with RBI knocks
by Rachel Topper and a two-out, two-run sin-
gle by Melissa Guevara to give the Panthers
the lead, 4-3.
Aragon came back in its half of the fifth and
got the equalizing run on a Courtney Ching
single, but back came the Panthers behind
Raine Armanino and Lunghi singles to retake
the lead and never let it go.
Armanino took over for Ailand after four
innings of work.
“The first couple of innings, she was on
fire,” McKeever said of Ailand. “The heat I
think got to her a little. Sometimes, these girls
don’t hydrate and they started putting a heavy
bat on the ball. Raine came in and finished the
game nicely.”
“I think our defense was pretty solid,”
Lunghi said. “I think all around, when we
needed the out, we got it and I think that was
important in keeping the game close because,
with the amount of runners they put on, they
could’ve scored more runs.”
Burlingame tacked on three more runs in
the seventh behind Sydney Oliver, Kat
Marcan and Lunghi singles.
“It’s really big because against Sequoia, we
kind of overlooked them,” Lunghi said. “We
decided the next day at practice that we need
to treat ourselves like the underdog in every
game. And we have to go out there every
game like we’re going to get killed. And we
have to have that mentality that we need to
fight until the end. I think this win today real-
ly helped.”
Continued from page 11
BGAME
“Every series I’ve ever been a part of, the
best team has won,” he said. “Phil Jackson
didn’t, to me, outcoach Larry Bird. He won.
He did an incredible job. (The Lakers) had the
two baddest boys on the floor in Shaq and
Kobe.”
Meager expectations also are keeping the
Warriors loose.
Lee posted a photo on Twitter in the after-
noon of ESPN magazine’s preseason predic-
tion, which gave Golden State a zero percent
chance to make the playoffs. Even though the
Warriors finished 47-35 and made monumen-
tal strides on defense and rebounding this sea-
son, they are still treating themselves as the
underdogs in this season.
Then again, the Nuggets won an NBA fran-
chise-best 57 games and became just the 11th
team in league history to lose three or fewer
home games in a season. They finished 38-3 at
the Pepsi Center, part of the reason Golden
State left a day early to adjust to the altitude in
the Mile High City.
“I don’t think anybody expected us to be
in this position,” Lee said. “We were talk-
ing last night, most of us were deciding
(last year) which beach we were going to
this weekend, are we going to ship the car
out for the summer or leave it here for
another week. Last night felt like it was just
another game we were finishing with and
beginning our new journey. I’m the most
excited guy in this gym right now.”
Getting too anxious is also part of the con-
cern, especially in a series where both teams
like to push the pace.
Denver led the league with 106.1 points per
game this season. Golden State was seventh
with 101.2, including Stephen Curry’s NBA-
record 272 3-pointers this season.
Veterans such a Bogut, Richard Jefferson,
Jarrett Jack, Carl Landry and Andris Biedrins
— the only player still on the roster when
Golden State upset top-seeded Dallas in 2007
— have tried to offer advice to teammates
about what to expect in the playoffs. Mostly,
it’s just to keep doing what got them to this
point.
“It’s not like you can tell them, ‘It’s this or
it’s that,”’ Bogut said. “At the end of the day,
it’s 5-on-5 basketball. You still have to get
stops to win games. It’s just everything is
magnified because there’s more media atten-
tion and the games are all sold out. I don’t
think the game changes. I think the environ-
ment around the game changes.”
Curry watched his dad, Dell Curry, in the
playoffs growing up. The last time he attend-
ed a playoff game was in his hometown of
Charlotte, N.C., when the Orlando Magic
swept the Bobcats in four games in 2010.
While he has never played in the NBA play-
offs, Curry has often been at his best in the
biggest games of his career.
Curry dazzled at Davidson, leading the tiny
college to the regional finals in 2008. He has
also scored a career-high 54 points in a loss to
the Knicks at Madison Square Garden on Feb.
27 and had 47 points in a loss at the Lakers
last Friday.
Continued from page 11
WARRIORS
WORLD 17
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sebastian Abbot
and Munir Ahmed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD — Former
Pakistani military ruler Pervez
Musharraf fled court in a speeding
vehicle Thursday to avoid arrest
after his bail was revoked in a case
involving his decision to fire senior
judges while in power over five
years ago.
The harried escape broadcast live
on Pakistani TV marked a new low
in Musharraf’s troubled return from
exile last month to seek a political
comeback in the May 11 parliamen-
tary election.
Musharraf made his exit with the
help of bodyguards, who pushed
him past policemen and paramili-
tary soldiers and helped him into a
black SUV that sped off with a
member of his
security team
hanging on the
side of the vehi-
cle. Lawyers
taunted the 69-
year-old as he
roared away,
yelling, “Look
who is running!
Musharraf is
running!”
The car carrying the former mil-
itary strongman dashed to his lux-
ury farmhouse, which is protected
by high walls, razor wire and
guard towers. Dozens of police
and elite commandos blocked the
main road that runs to the com-
pound on the outskirts of
Islamabad, keeping a crowd of
journalists and onlookers at bay.
About 20 Musharraf supporters
held banners and shouted slogans.
None of the security forces pro-
tecting the compound made any
move to arrest Musharraf, likely
because they were awaiting orders
from senior officials trying to figure
out how to deal with a delicate situ-
ation. Musharraf’s legal team said
they would appeal the arrest warrant
in the Supreme Court.
“A lot of people are going to
demand to know why he escaped
the custody of the security forces,”
said Rasul Baksh Rais, a political
science professor at Lahore
University of Management
Sciences.
Pakistan’s government seems
reluctant to wade into the controver-
sy surrounding Musharraf, especial-
ly given his connection to the army,
considered the most powerful insti-
tution in the country.
Pakistan’s Musharraf flees court to avoid arrest
Pervez
Musharraf
By Atif Raza and Munir Ahmed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KARACHI, Pakistan — When
Bindiya Rana, a transgender candi-
date in Pakistan’s elections, went
door to door in the Karachi slum she
hopes to represent, few people
seemed to care about which gender
she identifies with. They were more
interested in what she was going to
do to combat the street crime and
electricity outages in their neighbor-
hood if elected.
For the first time in Pakistan’s his-
tory, transgender people are running
as candidates. The development
marks a sign of progress for trans-
gender people in this conservative
country, where they have long been
met by abuse.
Transgender refers to people who
present themselves to the world in a
way that does not correspond with
their sex at birth. In Pakistan, that
usually means people born as men
who now dress like women and
wear makeup. They identify as a
“third gender” rather than as male or
female but usually ask to be referred
to by the feminine pronoun since
there is no third-gender pronoun.
Transgender Pakistanis
running in next election
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the sleek sci-fi thriller
“Oblivion,” Tom Cruise plays
flyboy repairman Jack Harper,
a patroller of the drone-con-
trolled skies over Earth. From
a sparse dock where he lives
with his supervisor and girl-
friend, Victoria (Andrea
Riseborough), Jack makes
daily flights in his spacecraft
to the Earth’s barren surface.
“We’re the mop-up crew,” he
says.
He tells us that it’s been 60
years since aliens invaded,
leading to a devastating
nuclear war. Though humans,
he says, won out, they had to
abandon the planet’s surface
(New York is buried up to the
Empire State Building’s nee-
dle), taking refuge on a moon
of Saturn. On a desolate Earth,
the only beings remaining are
hiding bands of Scavengers
(“Scavs”) that look something
like a cross between the
Tusken Raiders of “Star Wars”
and Milli Vanilli.
Monitoring the land are
white, round drones that
appear like giant, floating cue
balls from afar, but menacing
robot killers up close.
Occasionally, they need serv-
icing from Jack. He avoids
their blasters by authenticat-
ing himself, but as they bleep
and blork, he cowers anxious-
ly — not entirely certain
they’re on the same team.
His faith is greater with
Victoria, who guides his
movements from her comput-
erized desk. Her superior
(played with a folksy
Southern accent by Melissa
Leo) is seen only in scratchy
video communiques.
We have seen many of the
elements of “Oblivion” in
countless science fiction tales.
‘Oblivion’ a beautiful sci-fi thriller
See SCI-FI, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
By Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Twitter has launched a
service that lets people find music they like and
tweet songs from iTunes, Spotify and Rdio.
Twitter said in a blog post that an app will be
available for download from Apple’s online
store Thursday. A Web version also rolled out
Thursday. Twitter said the service will eventu-
ally be available on Android devices as well.
The service uses information from Twitter
chatter to detect popular tracks as well as new
artists. Users who follow musicians can see
other artists those musicians follow and can
listen to 30-second clips of songs by them.
Tapping the play button on an image of an
artist plays a clip from one song picked to rep-
resent them. In the case of Gotye, for example,
a tap plays a preview of “Eyes Wide Open.”
Users can tap another button that opens iTunes
where they can buy the track. Or they can play
full songs by signing up for a $10-a-month
subscription from Spotify or Rdio.
While users can tweet what they’re listening
to and add a few characters of comment, they
have to go back to the regular Twitter app for
normal Twitter functions. However, the people
you’re following and who’s following you are
integrated across both apps.
The music app is strikingly more visually
appealing than the regular Twitter app. Squares
of photos of artists fill the screen and bounce
around in response to swipes. The app also
starts a turntable spinning with a little picture
of album cover art when playing a song.
Twitter launches music app
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
º 0reat food º Hicroorews
º full ßar º Sports TY
º fool º ßanquet facilities
º family friendly Ðining since 1995
EXPIRES: April 30, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
By David Bratman
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Conductor Eric Kujawsky likes big, heavy,
complicated modern symphonies. That’s
why the Redwood Symphony, of which he is
music director, performs composers like
Mahler and John Corigliano. Last Saturday
at Cañada College, it was the turn of
Christopher Theofanidis, a contemporary
American composer whose Symphony No. 1
Kujawsky heard on CD and decided to pro-
gram.
This symphony is a large, sometimes bru-
tal work with weird and fascinating combi-
nations of sounds. The first movement fea-
tures a recurrent theme that seems Native
American in style. It’s first played by an
unearthly combination of massed oboes and
clarinets, and later reappears all over the
orchestra. But the most captivating part of
the movement, and the work, is an interlude
of slowly cohering fragments for brass and
percussion.
The second movement begins with a string
theme that Benjamin
Britten might have writ-
ten, and then transmutes
into something like fanta-
sy adventure movie music
— 1960s Japanese
Godzilla flicks, perhaps.
Then comes a quick rough
scherzo.
The finale begins, and
ends, with a timpani solo
and, in between, features much gruff rum-
bling and growling for the lowest-pitched
instruments in the orchestra, as if it had been
composed by a bear.
At times, huge walls of dissonance roll out
toward the audience. Even when it’s quiet,
the music is never ingratiating, though the
weird sounds are mesmerizing. Kujawsky
told the audience that he expected we would
like this work. I don’t think it’s capable of
being liked, exactly. You have to be friendly
and approachable for that. But it sure is awe-
inspiring.
All four movements end quizzically, with-
out big bangs. So Kujawsky
capped the symphony with an
encore of the angular “Dance
of the Knights” from
Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet.
This famously harsh dance fit
perfectly with the mood,
though next to the
Theofanides it felt almost
meek.
That comparison will
give you an idea of what
the symphony sounded
like. On the noisy scale in
which Aaron Jay Kernis is
a 10, this gets an eight.
Only the denizens of rock
arenas would remain
unimpressed.
Being ingratiating at
this concert was the job of David Garner, a
professor at the San Francisco Conservatory
who recently arranged Six Persian Songs —
that’s the piece’s title — for soprano and
orchestra. The soprano was Iranian expatri-
ate Raeeka Shehabi-Yaghmai, Garner’s for-
mer student, who brought the songs to his
attention.
A professional opera singer used to per-
forming in Italian, Shehabi-Yaghmai looked
delighted to be bringing us songs familiar to
her, sung in her own native tongue, for a
change (English supertitles were provided).
The four traditional and two modern
melodies were well served by Garner’s
orchestration. He provided graceful counter-
melodies in a light scoring that did not inter-
fere with the clarity or audibility of the
voice, except deliberately in the concluding
bouncy paean to the attractions of Kurdistan.
Much of the backing was for harp or light
winds, giving a bit of a French sound to the
music. The cultural mixture of Persian and
traditional Western is just what Shehabi-
Yaghmai was looking for when she enlisted
Garner. Their goal, as they explained in a
pre-concert talk, was to mix the two styles
thoroughly as artistic rapprochement
between Iran and the Western world.
The six songs varied in mood; dancing,
romantic and sad. Most successful was “My
Homeland,” an exile’s lament by Davood
Sarkhosh. Garner’s scoring was at its best
here. The orchestra builds up strongly, with-
out either covering the soprano or feeling like
it’s only popping up when she stops to take a
breath. Shehabi-Yaghmai sang with passion.
The French sound made a further appear-
ance in the concert in Claude Debussy’s
Petite Suite. This is an early work of
Debussy’s, tuneful and charming. The
Redwood Symphony performance was fine
in the winds. The strings betrayed more of
the orchestra’s amateur status. Yet they gave
the music the gentle lilt that makes it work.
Redwood Symphony’s next show is a con-
cert performance of Stephen Sondheim’s
classic grisly operatic musical, Sweeney
Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street,
June 1 and 2 at Cañada College. Tickets and
information at www.redwoodsymphony.org.
Redwood Symphony mesmerizing and awe-inspiring
No matter how you slice it...
Our pizza is the BEST!
Menlo Park
1001 El Camino Real
324-3486
San Carlos
560 El Camino Real
486-1487
Pizzza-2-Go
989 El Camino Real
328-1556
We Deliver!
Online ordering available
www. applewoodbistro. com
Lunch Special 11am-2pm
Personal Pizza, Salad & Soda
Burger, Fries & Soda
Your choice $9.00 +tax
H
A
P
P
Y

H
O
U
R

M
-F 4-7pm
Sa-Su
Noon-7pm
2011
B E ST OF
2011-2013
Eric Kujawsky
Raeeka
Shehabi-
Yaghmai
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
STUCK ELEVATOR AT
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATER COMPRESSES 81
TERRIFYING HOURS INTO
81 ELECTRIFYING MINUTES.
In 2005, a Chinese deliveryman
was trapped in a Bronx elevator for
81 hours, hoping for help, yet
afraid of what being rescued by the
authorities might mean, because he
was an undocumented immigrant.
Stuck Elevator, in its world pre-
miere at A.C.T., transforms his
ordeal into a completely sung
series of solo and ensemble per-
formances that vividly depict both
his mental and physical deteriora-
tion as well as his life outside his
temporary cage. An unflinching
and entirely mesmerizing look at
one man’s search for the American
Dream. Directed by Chay Yew.
Libretto by Aaron Jafferis. Music
by Byron Au Yong. One hour and
21 minutes with no intermission.
Through April 28.
STAGE DIRECTIONS: A.C.T.
is located at the Geary Theater,
415 Geary St., just off Union
Square in the heart of downtown
San Francisco. Parking is available
one block away at the
Mason/O’Farrell Garage, 325
Mason St. Show your theater tick-
et stub to receive a discount. The
theater is a relatively level four-
block walk from the Bart-Powell
Street Station (Market Street).
TICKETS: Tickets from $20 -
$85 are available at act-sf.org or
(415) 749-2228.
AN ASIDE: A.C.T. Artistic
Director Carey Perloff said, “I dis-
covered this remarkable piece at
the Sundance Playwrights Lab,
where it leapt to the fore because
of its astonishing originality. Who
would have thought you could turn
the true story of a frightened
Chinese deliveryman stuck in an
elevator into a hilarious and heart-
breaking musical about hunger,
immigration, family, dreams and
duck sauce? This richly imagined
piece of musical theater is a won-
derful tribute to San Francisco’s
vibrant Chinese culture and a
thrilling example of a commitment
to new work that defies the bound-
aries and uses all the tools of the-
ater to create something entirely
new.”
A.C.T.’S COMING ATTRAC-
TIONS: National Theatre of
Scotland’s Black Watch makes its
highly anticipated Bay Area pre-
miere May 9. Inspired by inter-
views with soldiers who served in
Iraq with Scotland’s 300-year-old
Black Watch regiment, this power-
ful depiction of war takes over the
long-dormant Drill Court at San
Francisco’s historic Mission
Armory. Splicing together choreo-
graphed marches and Scottish bal-
lads with searing video news
footage, Black Watch captures the
layered state of being at war.
Through June 9. A.C.T. completes
its 2012-13 season with a new pro-
duction of Tom Stoppard’s
Masterwork “Arcadia,” whose
story moves between the 19th cen-
tury and the present through a
series of love stories, as characters
from both eras discover connec-
tions, unearth mysteries and unrav-
el hidden truths. May 16 - June 9.
And it’s not too early to start think-
ing about A.C.T.’s 2013–14 sea-
son, which includes the West Coast
premiere of Tony Award-winning
director Frank Galati’s new stag-
ing of 1776; BD Wong ((M.
Butterfly, Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit) in The Orphan of
Zhao; and Emmy Award winner
David Strathairn starring in
Underneath the Lintel.
***
YOSHI’S SF PRESENTS
PIANIST LARA DOWNES. The
theme for the night is the music
and memories of exile as Pianist
Lara Downes performs at Yoshi’s
SF on Wed. April 24. Part CD
release concert for Downes’s
Exiles’ Cafe and part kick off of
The Artist Sessions. Rik Malone of
KDFC and Quartet San Francisco
joins Downes, who gives an artist
talk. 8 p.m. $24. 1330 Fillmore St.
San Francisco. www.yoshis.com.
***
FALSTAFF AT THE
A F R I C A N - A ME R I C A N
SHAKESPEARE COMPANY.
Celebrating one of Shakespeare’s
most beloved characters and infa-
mous skirt-chasers, The Merry
Wives of Windsor reunites audi-
ences with the ever-merry, ever-
scheming Sir John Falstaff from
Shakespeare’s history plays King
Henry IV, Part 1 and King Henry
IV, Part 2. The Merry Wives of
Windsor chronicles the exploits of
Falstaff who, down on luck and
money, tries to swindle two seem-
ingly simple housewives. But the
joke’s on him when the Mistresses
Ford and Page catch on to
Falstaff’s seduction scheme and
teach him a lesson with some mis-
chief of their own. African-
American Shakespeare Company’s
production, reset in the 1960s in
the shared backyards of a city
neighborhood, adopts the style of
the popular urban black theater
movement style known as the
“Chitlin Circuit.” May 4 – 26.
Buriel Clay Theatre African-
American Art & Culture Complex.
762 Fulton St. (at Webster) San
Francisco. Complimentary parking
on site. www.african-american-
shakes.org.
***
FEINSTEIN’S AT THE
NIKKO. Michael Feinstein brings
the Great American Songbook to
San Francisco with Feinstein’s at
the Nikko. Opening headliners are
Two Time Tony Award-winner
Sutton Foster – Wednesday May 8
through Sunday May 12, and Stage
and Screen Legend Mitzi Gaynor –
Wednesday May 15 through
Sunday May 19. In The Hotel
Nikko. 222 Mason St. San
Francisco. www.hotelnikkosf.com.
Susan Cohn is a member of American
Theatre Critics Association and San
Francisco Bay Area Theatre Critics
Circle. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
KEVIN BERNE
Julius Ahn,right,as trapped deliveryman Guang,tries to get the attention of Joel Perez,as fellow employee Marco,
in Stuck Elevator, in its world premiere at American Conservatory Theater through April 28.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Now Open!
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
856 North Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
$5 Mondo
BURRITO
Steak Extra
But we’ve seldom seen them more beautiful-
ly rendered.
Director Joseph Kosinski, who based the
film on the ideas of his unpublished graphic
novel, is an expert in 3-D modeling and com-
puter graphics. His “Tron: Legacy” was a
critical flop for its muddled story but was
remarkable for its elegant digital architec-
ture.
This carefully organized world is thrown
when a NASA shuttle crashes with an astronaut,
Julia (Olga Kurylenko), who seems to recog-
nize Jack. His own memory has been scrubbed
but flickers with images from his past.
As the film builds, it plays with familiar
sci-fi themes of identity, memory, faith in
institutions and human nature. Little can be
said about Morgan Freeman’s character
without giving much away, but suffice to say
that he enters the film in shades, lighting a
cigar and wearing a cape. Yes, a cape.
Kosinski could have chucked all his visual
effects and just gone with a cape-clad
Freeman.
Analyzing the substance of “Oblivion,”
which declines — as so many science-fiction
films do — as the puzzles are solved,
inevitably diminishes the film. But for those
who enjoy the simple thrill of handsomely
stylized image-making, “Oblivion” is mostly
mesmerizing.
PG-13 for sci-fi action violence, brief
strong language, and some sensuality. 124
minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.
Continued from page 18
SCI-FI
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
One minute, life is perfectly happy. The next
minute, everything comes crashing down.
That’s what happens to Walter Wells (Liam
Craig) in Julie Marie Myatt’s “The Happy
Ones,” presented by Magic Theatre.
It’s 1975 in Garden Grove. Walter has a
beautiful wife and two great kids, a boy and a
girl. They live in a lovely home and have good
friends and neighbors. He owns a successful
appliance business.
Then a phone call changes his life. His wife
and children have been killed in a traffic acci-
dent caused by a wrong-way driver. He plunges
into grief.
Among others, his best friend, Unitarian
minister Gary Stuart (Gabriel Marin), and
Gary’s new girlfriend, Mary-Ellen Hughes
(Marcia Pizzo), try to cheer him up, but he just
wants to be left alone.
When he goes to the hospital to confront the
injured driver, Bao Ngo (Jomar Tagatac), who
killed his family, Walter rejects the Vietnamese
refugee’s requests to kill him.
Bao later shows up at Walter’s store begging
to give Walter something or to do something
for him, like cooking or cleaning. Walter reluc-
tantly relents, unknowingly setting both him-
self and Bao on a path toward recovery.
Like Walter, Bao has suffered the loss of his
wife and two children. When Bao fled Vietnam
during the fall of Saigon, they stayed behind,
only to be killed a few days later. Bao also lost
his livelihood as a pediatrician and now works
nights in a bakery.
Director Jonathan Moscone skillfully leads
his four well-cast actors along the emotional
road that Myatt has laid out for them. Craig
embodies Walter’s initial near-catatonia as he
somehow gets himself to work every day.
Tagatac is sympathetic as the guilt-ridden
Bao, who has his own losses to overcome.
Marin and Pizzo as Gary and Mary-Ellen, both
of whom are insecure but well-intentioned, are
good foils to Walter and Bao.
Erik Flatmo’s set and Christine Crook’s cos-
tume design recreate the time and place, aided
by Cliff Caruthers’ sound design, highlighted
by popular music of that era.
The two-act “The Happy Ones” is a fascinat-
ing, memorable study of grief and recovery,
leavened by humor. It’s well worth seeing.
It continues at Magic Theatre, Building D,
Fort Mason Center, San Francisco, through
April 21. For tickets and information call (415)
441-8822 or visit www.magictheatre.org.
Grief turns to recovery in ‘The Happy Ones’
JENNIFER REILEY
Mary-Ellen (Marcia Pizzo) tries to cheer up Walter (Liam Craig) in ‘The Happy Ones’ at Magic
Theatre in San Francisco.
DATEBOOK 23
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, APRIL 19
AARP Sponsored Driver Safety
Class. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.The San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. $12 AARP
members, $14 non-members. For
more information call 616-7150.
How does your car fit? 10 a.m. to
2:40 p.m. Doelger Senior Center, 101
Lake Merced Blvd., Daly City. Come
enjoy the 12-point check list that will
be used to observe your ‘fit’ within
your vehicle. Free. For reservations or
more information call 991-8012.
Special Presentation at Filoli: Tony
Duquette — LegendaryDesigner. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Hutton Wilkinson will
speak. $25 for members and $30 for
non-members. For more information
and for tickets go to www.filoli.org.
Keeping Kids Safe Project. 3 p.m. to
7 p.m. Autobahn Motors, 700 Island
Parkway, Belmont. Free FBI digital
fingerprint and photographs from
one of the top child safety programs
in the country. The Keeping Kids Safe
Project will take a child’s fingerprints
and sent them home with parents.
Parents can use the records to turn
directly over to authorities anywhere
in the world to instantly aid in an
investigation. There will also be
community organizations present to
provide safety information and
entertainment for families. For more
information email
Danielle@sipkids.com.
Burlingame Library Foundation
Spring Book Sale. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Lane Community Room, Burlingame
Main Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. There will be a wide
variety of books available and new
stock will be added daily. There will
also be various media for sale. All
proceeds will support library
programs. Free admission. For more
information call 558-7474.
St.Timothy School Spring Carnival.
4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Third Avenue and
Norfolk Street, San Mateo. There will
be barbecue, a live band, rides,
entertainment, rides and more. Free
admission. All-day wristband $20.
Each ride requires three to five
coupons. For more information call
342-6567 or 222-4792.
Spring Gallery Art Show. 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. San Carlos Adult Community
Center, 601 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
Free. For more information call 400-
8623.
Carlmont K.I.L.T.S. Improv Show.
6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Free. For more information call 591-
8286.
Roy Cloud School and the San
Carlos Children’s Theater present
‘Twinderella.’ 7 p.m. McKinley School
Auditorium, 400 Duane St., Redwood
City. $10 and up. For more
information or for tickets go to
http://roycloudtwinderella.eventbrite
.com.
The Sound of Improv. 7 p.m. Aragon
High School Theater, 900 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. $10 for
students and general admission is
$15. This improvised musical will be
performed by the Aragon High
School Improv Team. For more
information contact
rachelvanhet@sbcglobal.net.
San Carlos Kiwanis Club Variety
Show. 7 p.m. Central Middle School
Auditorium, 828 Chestnut St., San
Carlos. There will also be a pre-show
at 6:40 p.m. with Arthur Murray. The
show will be a musical journey from
the ’30s up to Lady Gaga. Tickets will
be available online or an hour before
performance time at the auditorium.
$25 for balcony and $20 for orchestra.
$10 for students. For more
information call 590-4440 or go to
www.sancarloskiwanis.org.
New Millennium Spring Concert.
7:30 p.m. Trinity Presbyterian Church,
1106 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Carlos. There will be a performance
of ‘Soliloquy’ by San Carlos based
composer Daniel Léo Simpson.
Suggested donation $10 per person.
Students free. For more information
call 281-6669.
Shakespeare’s ‘Twelfth Night.’ 7:30
p.m. Notre Dame de Namur University,
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. $10. For more information
or for tickets call 508-3456.
‘Opera Rocks!’ 7:30 p.m. Taube
Center, Notre Dame de Namur
University, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
‘Opera Rocks!’ Draws from 400-year
tradition of operatic repertoire and
mixes up familiar stories with their
contemporary musical theater
counterparts. General admission $10.
Tickets can be purchased online at
brownpapertickets.com.
Broadway By the Bay Presents
‘Cats.’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Starting
ticket price $35. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Fox
Theatre Box Office, 2219 Broadway,
Redwood City. Tickets may also be
ordered by phone at 369-7770. For
more information go to
www.broadwaybythebay.org.
‘Les Liaisons Dangereuses.’ 8 p.m.
Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show will run until
May 12. Shows at 8 p.m on Thursdays,
Fridays and Saturdays. Shows at 2
p.m. on Sundays. Ticket prices range
from $10 to $35. For more
information and to purchase tickets
go to
www.dragonproductions.net/lesliais
ons.html.
SATURDAY, APRIL 20
Downtown Spring Cleanup. 8 a.m.
to Noon. The Downtown San Mateo
Association (DSMA) is sponsoring the
First Annual Downtown Spring
Cleanup in partnership with the City
of San Mateo and local businesses. To
help keep downtown clean volunteer
teams are joining forces to remove
graffiti, wash windows, pick-up litter
and plant and weed planter boxes.
For more information go to
www.dsma.org.
Belmont Earth Day Celebration. 9
a.m. to noon. Twin Pines Park, 1225
Ralston Ave., Belmont. There will be
document shredding, e-waste
recycling, information booths, water
pollution prevention, a creek cleanup,
household battery drop-off, prizes
and more. For more information go
to www.sustainablesanmateo.org.
Cancer Survivors’ Breakfast. 9 a.m.
Atria Daly City, 501 King Drive, Daly
City. Free. Atria Daily City will honor
members of the community and their
families who are fighting or who have
beaten cancer. For more information
go to www.atriadalycity.com.
Packing Workshow at Edward’s
Luggage. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Edward’s
Luggage, Hillsdale Shopping Center,
San Mateo. Learn how to maximize
your wardrobe and travel light on
your next trip. For more information
call 345-2220.
Earth Day @ Shoreway. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. 333 Shoreway Road, San Carlos.
Raffle, arts, tours, music, food, free
compost and lots more. Trash to Art
winners recognized. For more
information visit
www.rethinkwaste.org.
Keeping Kids Safe Project. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Autobahn Motors, 700 Island
Parkway, Belmont. Free FBI digital
fingerprint and photographs from
one of the top child safety programs
in the country. The Keeping Kids Safe
Project will take a child’s fingerprints
and sent them home with parents.
Parents can use the records to turn
directly over to authorities anywhere
in the world to instantly aid in an
investigation. There will also be
community organizations present to
provide safety information and
entertainment for families. For more
information email
Danielle@sipkids.com.
Burlingame Library Foundation
Spring Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Lane Community Room, Burlingame
Main Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. There will be a wide
variety of books available and new
stock will be added daily. There will
also be various media for sale. All
proceeds will support library
programs. Free. For more information
call 558-7474.
Gold Coast Cymbidium Growers
Annual Orchid Show and Sale. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Woodside Road United
Methodist Church, 2000 Woodside
Road, Redwood City. Free. Take
advantage of presentations on basic
orchid care, orchid experts ready to
be asked questions, awarded plants
for sale and much more. For more
information visit
goldcoastcymbidiumgrowers.com.
Earth Day on the Bay 2013. 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Marine Science Institute, 500
Discovery Parkway, Redwood City.
Family activities and events. Free. For
more information go to
http://sfbamsi.org/earthday.html or
call 364-2760.F
Twitter Class. 10:30 a.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
call 591-8286.
75th Annual Millbrae Nursery
School Open House. 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Millbrae Nursery School, 86
Center St., Millbrae. Free, but donation
are appreciated. For more
information contact
millbraenursery@sbcglobal.net.
LaNebbia Winery Craft Faire &
Wine Tasting. 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
12341 San Mateo Road, Half Moon
Bay. Free. For more information call
591-6596.
St.Timothy School Spring Carnival.
Noon to 11 p.m. Third Avenue and
Norfolk Street, San Mateo. There will
be barbecue, a live band, rides,
entertainment, rides and more. Free
admission. All-day wristband $20.
Each ride requires three to five
coupons. For more information call
342-6567 or 222-4792.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
limitations.
Prior to his 2007 arrest, Ayres was
well-known as president of the
American Academy of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry and for hosting
the sex education series “Time of Your
Life.” Ayres received juvenile court
referrals up through 2004 even as San
Mateo police continued its investiga-
tion. Police began looking at him in
2002 after a former patient accused
him of molestation during the 1970s
when he was 13. After a U.S. Supreme
Court ruling on the statute of limita-
tions nixed criminal prosecution, the
victim and Ayres reached a confidential
settlement in July 2005. In a deposition
for the lawsuit, Ayres reportedly admit-
ted conducting physical exams of
patients as part of his care.
A 2009 criminal trial on nine felony
counts of child molestation ended with
a hung jury. A subsequent trial on his
competency launched before a second
criminal prosecution also ended with a
mistrial and prosecutors agreed he
could be committed to Napa State
Hospital. Last year, the case took an
unexpected turn when hospital doctors
concluded he was faking or exaggerat-
ing his condition and returned him to
San Mateo County. The defense fought
the move but, after a multi-day hearing,
a judge reinstated criminal charges.
But before a second criminal trial
begins in May — minus the charge
stemming from a former patient now
thought to have lied or exaggerated his
earlier testimony — defense attorney
Jonathan McDougall has previously
indicated a desire for a venue change or
removal of McKowan.
McDougall did not return a call for
comment but, in an earlier court filing,
claimed McKowan had indications that
the former patient lied and is herself a
witness to how others like parents and
a victims’ advocate “injected them-
selves into the evidence.”
On Thursday, Judge Beth Freeman
denied McDougall’s efforts to subpoe-
na California State Bar records about
its investigation into McKowan that
was spurred by the case.
Bar spokeswoman Laura Ernde said
there is “no public information” on the
disciplinary investigation.
However, McKowan stipulated to
committing an “act of professional
misconduct” and was ordered “private-
ly reproved” by a State Bar Court
judge, according to a letter sent from
the Bar to the victims advocate who
made the complaint over the prosecu-
tor’s alleged failures such as contacting
doctors who trained with Ayres to show
he was never taught to administer
physical exams. McKowan was also
ordered to send the advocate, Victoria
Balfour, a letter and attend a one-day
ethics course through the California
Bar.
Wagstaffe also conducted an internal
investigation into McKowan but
declined to disclose its conclusions cit-
ing personnel matters.
He said adding a lawyer to an impor-
tant case is not unusual and pointed to
an ongoing murder trial in which a sec-
ond defense attorney joined just before
it started.
Ayres remains free from custody on
$900,000 bail.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9
a.m. Tuesday, April 23 in Board
Chambers, 400 County Government
Center, Redwood City.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
AYRES
Padreddii joined the San Mateo
County Harbor District, which runs both
Pillar Point Harbor in Princeton and
Oyster Point Marina/Park in South San
Francisco, in 1997 when appointed to fill
a vacancy. He was elected to a full term
the following fall and was last re-elected
in November 2012 for what he said
would probably be his last term. He told
the Daily Journal during the campaign
his goal was to make both harbors in 10
years “the best it’s every been.”
Padreddii helped establish ferry and
water taxi services at Oyster
Point/Marina Park and wanted to see it
expanded to Redwood City.
Every time fellow commissioner
Pietro Paravanno said he’d enter a meet-
ing, Padreddii greeted him the same way
— “Where’s my fish?”
It was a joke between just them, two
avid fishermen who sat on the same
board, and Paravanno always had a
reply. “Leo, the ocean is getting bigger.”
According to those who knew
Padreddii and his lengthy commitment
to public service, the commissioner’s
legacy is also pretty big. So was his
commitment to family, Paravanno said.
“He was a real model for family life
and public life in terms of serving the
residents of the county in such a pas-
sionate way,” Paravanno said.
Padreddii’s passion for getting the
ferry service running is fellow
Commissioner Robert Bernardo’s fond-
est memory of him.
“His big dream was for additional
direct service to San Francisco from
South San Francisco. Unfortunately, he
never got to see his dream come true,”
Bernardo wrote in an email, adding that
Padreddii’s “tremendous service” will
not be forgotten.
The lifelong South San Francisco res-
ident spent more 30 years of public serv-
ice, including four years on the South
San Francisco City Council when it
planned and developed Oyster Point. He
was intensively involved in the initial
development and helped draft the joint
powers agreement between the city and
harbor for its administration. Padreddii
also served nine years on the South San
Francisco school board, served on the
San Mateo County Fair Board and had
32 years of city and state law enforce-
ment experience including FBI training
at the California Highway Patrol
Academy and as an Alcoholic Beverage
Control investigator.
“Basically he has been continuously in
public service all these years. He was
very well-known and will be missed by
many people,” said Harbor District
General Manager Peter Grenell.
Outside of service, Padreddii enjoyed
golf, deep sea fishing and hunting.
Commissioner Sabrina Brennan, who
ran in the same November election as
Padreddii said, while she did not have
the opportunity to serve with Padreddii,
she will “never forget his dedication to
public service.”
Padreddii is survived by his wife, son
and stepson.
Grenell said the call for applications
will happen in May.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
LEO
COMICS/GAMES
4-19-13
Friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
4
-
1
9
-
1
3
aCrOss
1 Je ne sais --
5 Vagrant
8 Libya’s loc.
11 Bridge call
13 Santa -- winds
14 Extinct bird
15 Make catty remarks
16 Tall and graceful
18 And others (abbr.)
20 Church part
21 Tartan skirts
23 Novelist -- Rand
24 Wrigley product
25 Heroic tale
27 Pantyhose shade
31 Mont. neighbor
32 Designer label
33 Entrance
34 Vincent Van --
36 Regretted
38 Leo mo.
39 Between ports
40 “-- --, old chap”
41 Not sm. or med.
42 Kind of meditation
44 Grind, as teeth
46 Lassoed
49 Conduct
50 Alfresco
52 Tunnel makers
56 Cool -- -- cucumber
57 Kid’s game
58 Fiery gems
59 Highest degree
60 Med. plan
61 Silly person
dOwn
1 Gallon divs.
2 Coffee brewer
3 Yes, in Paris
4 Goad
5 Wail
6 Verse lead-in
7 Kuala Lumpur native
8 Major -- Hoople
9 Rooster or hen
10 Zany Martha
12 Caressed
17 Like notebook paper
19 Headache remedy
21 Accolades
22 Refection
23 Land
24 Prefx with byte
26 Debtors’ notes
28 Embers
29 Coarse
30 Natural impulse
35 Mists
37 Go-getter
43 Bunker or Piaf
45 Take in a stray
46 Dappled horse
47 Overthrow
48 Egyptian god
49 Construction toy
51 Barrier
53 Ordinance
54 Yalie
55 Fast fier of yore
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
FUTUrE sHOCk®
PEarLs BEFOrE swinE®
GET FUZZy®
Friday, aPriL 19, 2013
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- It looks like many
of your endeavors will turn out favorably, and
something special might develop through an old
friend repaying a favor.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t lower your
expectations regarding something that you’re hoping
to acquire. Conditions are far more favorable than
you may realize.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- It might appear that
one of your recent ideas is too grand to effectively
realize. It’s OK to modify it a little, but don’t change
its root.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- A partner in a joint
endeavor is likely to need some reassurance
regarding his or her share of the payoff. Clarify your
intentions.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You are in an unusually
good cycle for achieving your objectives. This is
likely to be true even if someone else is calling the
shots. Don’t rock the boat.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Because you have all
of the right things going for you, such as motivation,
ambition, tenacity and luck, a number of your
objectives are attainable when you put forth your
best effort.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You’re likely to be in for
some pleasant surprises, all because you may be
given some additional chances to succeed. Don’t
waste them.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Certain joint ventures
can be especially promising if you focus on the
facets that offer you the greatest potential for
growth and reward.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- One of your
greatest assets is your ability to unite divergent
interests for benefcial purposes. When you put
arrangements together, everyone will gain.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- This is the right
day to begin implementing changes that you
believe would improve working conditions and/or
proftability. At least it’s worth a try.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- A partnership
arrangement could work out to be quite fortunate
for you today, provided this common objective is
given prominence over any and all other secondary
interests.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- It looks like you could
be luckier if you fnalize some important matters
now instead of tomorrow. Don’t leave any loose
ends dangling.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
AUTO REPAIR SERVICE WRITER
wanted with 5 years experience. Apply
in person at 704 N. San Mateo Dr., San
Mateo. (650)558-8530, (650)863-0898.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
COOKS, CASHIERS, DRIVERS, Avanti
Pizza. Menlo Park. (650)854-1222.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SOFTWARE QUALITY Assurance Engi-
neer. MS & 1 yr; or BS & 5 yr exp reqd.
Redwood City, CA job. Send resume to
Endurance Intl Group-West, 8100 NE
Parkway Dr, #300, Vancouver, WA
98662.
110 Employment
JOB TITLE:
ENGINEERING MANAGER
Job Location: San Mateo, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in CS, Engg,
etc.+ 2 yrs. exp. reqd. (or BS + 5). Exp.
w/ VoIP, Oracle SQL, ASP, C/C++, Java
& Javascript reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc. Attn: HR
Dept.1400 Fashion Island Blvd, 7th Floor
San Mateo, CA 94404.
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
SOFTWARE ENGINEER. MS & 1 yr; or
BS & 5 yr exp reqd. Redwood City, CA
job. Resume to Endurance Intl Group-
West, 8100 NE Parkway Dr, #300, Van-
couver, WA 98662
110 Employment
TRADES -
Structured Cabling Technicians,
and Electricians wanted
All Levels Needed
San Jose, Bay Area
Start Immediately
Contact: Holly Andrews
415-513-4187
We pay for referrals
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520928
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Vidit Martin Khilani
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anil Khilani filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Vidit Martin Khilani
Proposed name: Marty Vidit Khilani
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 17,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/03/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 4/03/13
(Published, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 4/19/13,
04/26/13)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255167
The following person is doing business
as: Pfeifer Insurance Brokers, 533 Air-
port Blvd. 4th Flr., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Alexander Pfeifer, 835 N.
Humboldt St., #309, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Alexander Pfeifer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255140
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Express Moving Co, 337 S.
Fremont #304, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Xiao Feng Xu, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Xiao Feng Xu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255114
The following person is doing business
as: Ferrari Investment Co., 1054 Arbor
Rd. Unit A, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
David Ferrari, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ David Ferrari /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255151
The following person is doing business
as: Custino, LLC, 2133 Pullman Ave.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Custino,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Mayya Bruisilovskaya /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254974
The following person is doing business
as: Pillar Point Inn, 380 Capitrano Rd.,
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Dover
Crest, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/01/2007.
/s/ Keet Nerhan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/29/13, 04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255312
The following person is doing business
as: Sheehy Contractor Services, 456
Moana Way, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Kyle James Sheehy, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kyle Sheehy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255135
The following person is doing business
as: LaMond Interiors, 122 Walnut St.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Gabrielle
Marie LaMond, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Gabrielle Marie LaMond/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254723
The following person is doing business
as: Niles College, 553 Pilgrim Dr., Ste B
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Niles Col-
lege. LLC., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ FE B. Borrillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255122
The following person is doing business
as: Bayshore Plumbers, 3158 Rolison
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Miguel L. Moreno, 2224 Menalto Ave.,
East Palo Alto, CA 94303. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Miguel Moreno /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255091
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Magic Labyrinth, 724 Laurel
Ave., #401, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Bogdan Zayats and Ana Maria Gon-
zalez, same address. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Bogdan Zayats /
/s/ Ana Maria Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/05/13, 04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255037
The following person is doing business
as: Ethelbop5016 230 San Antonio Ave.,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ma-
ria Alma O. Poblete, and Pepito Joves,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/10/2012.
/s/ Maria Alma Poblete /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255428
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: New World Beauty Salon, 410
A-E 1st Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Susana Flores, and Cesar Brandan,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Susana Flores /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255339
The following person is doing business
as: 002Design 2038 S. Delaware St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kurin Vi Tu,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 02/05/2009.
/s/ Kurin Vi Tu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255115
The following person is doing business
as: NK International Trading Company
USA, 37 Cymbidium Cir., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jiun Zhou,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Jiun Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255412
The following person is doing business
as: Kristen Turner, 851 Old County Rd.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Kristen
Turner, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Kristen Turner /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255434
The following person is doing business
as: JF Consulting, 1035 Woodland Dr.,
HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owner: BE
HATA YOGA, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jordan Funk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255385
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Coastside Legal Research, 2)
DMV For You, 8231 Pescadero Creek
Rd., LOMA MAR, CA 94021 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ria
Gomes, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Ria Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/12/13, 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255469
The following person is doing business
as: 24/7 Mobile Notaries, 955 Fremont
St., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Laura
Hawkins, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Laura Hawkins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255181
The following person is doing business
as: El Amanecer Envios, 1714 El Camino
Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Martha Gonzalez, 349 S. Mathilda Ave.,
Sunnyvale, CA 94086. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Martha Gonzalez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
26 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255100
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Woodside Tree Service, 2) Hills-
borough Tree Service, 3) Portola Valley
Tree Service, 4) Redwood City Tree
Service, 5) Atherton Tree Service, 6)
Menlo Park Tree Service, 7) San Mateo
Tree Service, 8) Belmont Tree Service,
9) San Carlos Tree Service, 10) Burlin-
game Tree Service, 2995 Woodside Rd.,
Ste. 400, Woodside, CA 94062 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Golden State Tree Service, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Mark Feathers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255246
The following person is doing business
as: Sylvia’s Styling Salon, 18 24th Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: MSJ 18`
Enterprise Corp, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Maria S. Jacobo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255189
The following person is doing business
as: Travelers Inn, 100 Hickey Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Travelers Inn, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/01/1995.
/s/ Pankaj Patel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255259
The following person is doing business
as: Jeminix Research, 923 Emerald Hill
Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Julie Doostzadeh, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/27/2013.
/s/ Julie Doostzadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Lois Loretta Burton
Case Number: PRO123215
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Lois Loretta Burton. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by Ri-
chard C. Harrington. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that Ri-
chard C. Harrington be appointed as per-
sonal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests that the decedent’s
will and codicils, if any, be admitted to
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
203 Public Notices
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: May 1, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Ctm 2F, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Robert C. Borris Jr., Esq., 85415
21550 Foothill Blvd.,
HAYWARD, CA 94541
(510)581-7111
Dated: March 28, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on April 12, 19, 29, 2013.
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
File No. 7037.99289
Title Order No. 7466241
MIN No. APN 094-271-440-3
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/06/10.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO
PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY
BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. A public auction
sale to the highest bidder for cash,
cashier's check drawn on a state or
national bank, check drawn by state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, or savings association, or sav-
ings bank specified in §5102 to the Fi-
nancial code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state, will be held by du-
ly appointed trustee. The sale will be
made, but without covenant or war-
ranty, expressed or implied, regarding ti-
tle, possession, or encumbrances, to sat-
isfy the obligation secured by said Deed
of Trust. The undersigned Trustee dis-
claims any liability for any incorrectness
of the property address or other com-
mon designation, if any, shown herein.
Trustor(s): SARA MOGOS OGBAMI-
CHAEL, A MARRIED WOMAN AS
HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROP-
ERTY Recorded: 06/01/10, as Instru-
ment No. 2010-059264,of Official Re-
cords of SAN MATEO County, California.
Date of Sale: 04/25/13 at 12:30 PM
Place of Sale: At the Marshall Street en-
trance to the Hall of Justice, 400 County
Center., Redwood City, CA The purport-
ed property address is: 1299 MARLIN
AVE, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 Asses-
sors Parcel No. 094-271-440-3 The to-
tal amount of the unpaid balance of
the obligation secured by the property
to be sold and reasonable estimated
costs, expenses and advances at the
time of the initial publication of the Notice
of Sale is $380,280.66. If the sale is set
aside for any reason, the purchaser at
the sale shall be entitled only to a return
of the deposit paid, plus interest. The
purchaser shall have no further re-
course against the beneficiary, the
Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO PO-
TENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are consider-
ing bidding on this property lien, you
should understand that there are risks
involved in bidding at a trustee auction.
You will be bidding on a lien, not on the
property itself. Placing the highest bid at
a trustee auction does not automatically
entitle you to free and clear ownership of
the property. You should also be aware
that the lien being auctioned off may be a
junior lien. If you are the highest bidder
at the auction, you are or may be respon-
sible for paying off all liens senior to the
lien being auctioned off, before you can
203 Public Notices
receive clear title to the property. You
are encouraged to investigate the exis-
tence, priority and size of outstanding
liens that may exist on this property by
contacting the county recorder's office or
a title insurance company, either of
which may charge you a fee for this infor-
mation. If you consult either of these re-
sources, you should be aware that the
same lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER:
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 877-484-9942
or 800- 280-2832 or visit this Internet
Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or
www.Auction.com using the file number
assigned to this case 7037.99289. Infor-
mation about postponements that are
very short in duration or that occur close
in time to the scheduled sale may not im-
mediately be reflected in the telephone
information or on the Internet Web site.
The best way to verify postponement in-
formation is to attend the scheduled sale.
Date: April 3, 2013 NORTHWEST
TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee
Bonita Salazar, Authorized Signatory
1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa
Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website:
www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auc-
tion.com Automated Sales Line: 877-
484-9942 or 800-280-2832 Reinstate-
ment and Pay-Off Requests: 866-387-
NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING
TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY IN-
FORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER #
7037.99289:04/05/2013,04/12/2013,
04/19/2013
210 Lost & Found
FOUND YOUNG female Rottweiler 85lbs
ish on Skyline Blvd in Woodside call
(813)418-2884
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
294 Baby Stuff
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., SOLD!
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
298 Collectibles
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo SOLD!
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
303 Electronics
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 SOLD!
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) , SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ANTIQUE BANKER'S floor lamp Adj.
Height with angled shade: anodyzed
bronze $75 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
27 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Their first parts
are geog.
indicators
5 Her last film was
“Two-Faced
Woman”
10 Newspaper page
14 Injure, in a way
15 __ dome
16 Denpasar’s island
17 __ mentality
18 *Celebrating the
big five-oh, say
20 __-Locka, Florida
21 Sum, sometimes
22 Country across the
sea from Eritrea
23 *Small museum
piece
27 Oil-rich African
country
29 City on the Rhone
30 “__ Theme”:
“Doctor Zhivago”
song
32 Tram contents
33 Hog : sow ::
rabbit : __
35 Freak (out)
36 Court cry
37 What the answers
to starred clues
end in, in more
ways than one
40 Pigeon-loving
Muppet
42 Fjord cousin
43 __ Victor
44 Bargainer with
GM
45 LeVar’s “Roots”
role
47 Bender
51 Icky coating
53 *Dancer with
many fans
55 Its young are
called crias
57 Rock’s __ Lobos
58 Touch clumsily
59 *Profit factors
62 Siouan tribe
63 __ d’amore
64 Terse observation
65 W.S. winner in
four of the last
five years
66 Flex
67 Leafy recess
68 Pirate played by
Laughton
DOWN
1 Art movement
2 Elude
3 Code talkers’ tribe
4 5-Across’s home:
Abbr.
5 Lose it
6 Member of a
large kingdom
7 Clear
8 Spa specimen
9 Lacking siblings
10 President with a
B.A. from
Columbia
11 Shoulder-length
hair styles
12 The “you” in the
1968 lyric “Gee I
think you’re swell”
13 Imitated
19 Brain tests, briefly
21 “Put up your
dukes, then!”
24 Break up
25 Statistician’s input
26 Common folk
group
28 __ Perce tribe
31 Seaweed extract
34 Beige relative
36 Atheist activist
Madalyn
Murray __
37 Dennis the
Menace
neighbor
38 German opener
39 Super Fro-Yo
sellers
40 Eat at
41 Drop zone?
45 Dole’s running
mate
46 Put forth without
proof
48 City SE of Roma
49 Ate (at)
50 “__
Scissorhands”
52 Checked for the
last time?
54 Like one who is
52-Down
56 Fast horse
59 Pen’s mate
60 Brief
commitment
61 Crow’s croak
62 Pen filler
By Gareth Bain
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/19/13
04/19/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA TABLE good condition top 42"/36"
15" deep 30" tall $60 (650)393-5711
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TALL OUTSIDE BISTRO TABLE -
glass top with 2 chairs $45 (firm)
(650)871-7200
304 Furniture
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, good condi-
tion, ht 50", with 30", deep 20". carry it
away for $75 (650)393-5711
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 (650)593-8880
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PANAMA HAT; Tequilla Reed (Ecuador)
superb. Traditlional, New. Was $250
asking $25 (415)585-3622
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
310 Misc. For Sale
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VIDEO POKER MACHINE - from Las
Vegas, $450., (650)592-3545
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
28 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
AIR RIFLE, Crossman, 2200 Magnum,
vintage perfect condition. Must be 18 or
over to purchase. $65.00 SOLD!
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
318 Sports Equipment
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
MOVING SALE
Saturday April 20th
Sunday, April 21st
From
10am to 4pm
Dinette set, end tables,
and much more!
888 Foster City Blvd. #U1
Franciscan Apt.
cross st. Bounty Dr.
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE SALE
SAN MATEO
905 Barneson Ave.
April 19, 20, 21
Friday - 10 am - 3 pm
Sat. - 9 am - 2 pm
Sun. - 11 am - 1 pm
(415)412-8221
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. 650 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Building/Remodeling
CONSIDERING A
HOME REMODEL
OR ADDITION?
Call (650)343-4340
for Drafting Services at
Reasonable Rates
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Concrete
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
ART'S MARTIN DOORS
Sales Installation Service
Call (650) 878 1555
for all your garage door
needs.
BEST PRICE GUARANTEE:
$100 off
any other company's
written proposal on a
garage door-and-opener
package. Bring this ad to
our showroom and get $50
more on the above offer!
1000 King Drive, Suite 200
Daly City, CA 94015
BBB Rating: A+
www.arts-martindoors.com
State License #436114
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your
electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
29 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
FAMILY HOUSE SERVICE
Green products
Residential & Commerical
Monthly, Weekly, Bi-Weekly
Free Estimates
(650)315-6681
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING
& STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray
(650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.soleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo -
(650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -
(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
30 Friday • Apr. 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
650-701-9700
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Body $40/hr
Open 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
Massage Therapy
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank
Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Real Estate Services
Seniors
LOCAL/WORLD 31
Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
— charges to which she pleaded not
guilty. In March, the prosecutors dis-
missed charges against Bogdis after
school aides who made the allegations
backed off their claims.
The situation has resulted in numerous
lawsuits. This week, the second family
of one of the children involved filed a
lawsuit against the district, Bogdis and
five of the aides.
Within the lawsuit, filed by attorney
Heather Sweeney of the San Francisco-
based Dolan Law Firm, the family
claims that their 5-year-old non-verbal
autistic son was abused by Bogdis
through forced feedings, withholding of
food and water, kicking, forceful
restraints, general neglect and being
made to stand in one place for long peri-
ods of time. In addition, the family
claims their son was emotionally abused
and that the school knew of the parents’
concerns prior to the February 2012 inci-
dent when the family was contacted by
police about abuse of their son.
Among the allegations are charges of
assault, child abuse, battery, intentional
infliction of emotional distress, neglect
infliction of emotional distress, neglect
supervision, neglect hiring, training,
supervision and retention, neglect failing
to recognize and report child abuse and
negligence.
Naomi Hunter, Redwood Elementary
School District spokeswoman, said the
district has yet to be served and cannot
comment on the case.
The latest suit joins six others filed in
October — one from the parent of a boy
allegedly kicked and deprived of food,
the others from five instructional aides
who lost their jobs after the case came to
light.
Bogdis, a five-year employee of the
district, was accused of slapping a stu-
dent, twisting a student’s wrist and kick-
ing the back of a chair, causing a desk to
move forward and strike a student. She
was also accused of depriving a child of
food and kicking a child in the stomach.
The two victims alleged in the crimi-
nal case were her students at Roosevelt
Elementary School where she taught a
group of 3- to 5-year-old developmental-
ly challenged children. The day after
Bogdis’ initial arraignment in March,
district officials said an independent
investigation showed six employees
knew of the possible abuse but did not
alert anybody as mandated by law.
After Bogdis’ arrest, she was placed
on administrative leave and has a court
order barring her from campus, its
employees and all students.
“Ms. Bogdis is still an employee of the
Redwood City School District, and is
serving in a non-classroom position.
Due to our obligation to protect the pri-
vacy of staff, we are not able to share
further details of her employment,” said
Hunter.
Continued from page 1
BOGDIS
ly members of the suspects,” he said.
“Though it may be difficult, the nation is
counting on those with information to
come forward and provide it to us.”
They looked much like typical college
students, but DesLauriers described them
as armed and extremely dangerous, and
urged anyone who sees or knows them to
tell law enforcement and “do not take any
action on your own.”
The break in the investigation came just
three days after the attack that killed three
people, tore off limbs and raised the
specter of another terrorist attack on U.S.
soil. FBI photo-analysis specialists have
been analyzing a mountain of surveil-
lance footage and amateur pictures and
video for clues to who carried out the
attack and why.
The volume of information is likely to
grow, joined now by a torrent of tips from
people who think they might know the
suspects. In releasing the images, the FBI
gambled that useful clues will emerge,
not just time-wasting leads.
Authorities are selective in putting out
images of suspects because doing so risks
tipping off the hunted and losing the ele-
ment of surprise. But it can be a last resort
when authorities hit a wall trying to iden-
tify or capture someone.
Within moments of the announcement,
the FBI website crashed, perhaps because
of a crush of visitors.
The images were released hours after
President Barack Obama and first lady
Michelle Obama attended an interfaith
service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in
Boston to remember the dead and the
more than 180 wounded in the twin blasts
Monday at the finish line of the 26.2-mile
race.
The FBI video is a compilation of seg-
ments, altogether about 30 seconds long.
The planting of the backpack, as
described by authorities, was not part of
the footage made public.
The man in the dark hat was dubbed
Suspect 1 by the FBI and appeared to be
wearing sunglasses. The other, in the
white hat, was labeled Suspect 2. Both
appeared to be wearing dark jackets. The
FBI did not comment on the men’s
height, weight or age range and would not
discuss their ethnicity.
“It would be inappropriate to comment
on the ethnicity of the men because it
could lead people down the wrong path
potentially,” said FBI agent Greg
Comcowich, a spokesman for the Boston
FBI office.
The enlarged pictures of white-hatted
Suspect 2 in profile and head-on were
blurry but still remarkable in their detail
— and more revealing than those of
Suspect 1.
While authorities said the information
on the men began coming together over
the previous day or so, agent Daniel
Curtin said the FBI did not release the
photos earlier because “it’s important to
get it right.”
Distribution of the images brought both
encouragement and unease to some
Bostonians.
Jennifer Lauro of Topsfield, Mass.,
worried that the photos might breed fear
and suspicion.
“It just looks like a college kid, so I
think that’s going to make people feel
vulnerable,” she said. “Because it could
be anybody. It looks like any kid from
Boston College or Boston University or
any other school.”
Judy and Marc Ehrlich watched the
marathon from a spot between miles 25
and 26 on Monday and felt the ground
shake when the bombs exploded. The
couple said it was creepy to see images of
the suspects who were there at the same
time, walking around. But they were
comforted that the FBI had come up with
suspects.
“Unless they kill themselves, they’re
going to get found,” Marc Ehrlich said.
He added: “There’s nowhere in the world
to hide.”
James Kallstrom, who headed the FBI
office in New York City in the 1990s, said
“you get a million phone calls” when the
public is asked for help. But “that’s why
you have 1,000 people working for you.”
“The key is to have a good filtering sys-
tem. There’s going to be a whole bunch of
these things you just disregard,” he said.
At the Cathedral of the Holy Cross ear-
lier in the day, Obama saluted the resolve
of the people of Boston and mocked the
bombers as “these small, stunted individ-
uals who would destroy instead of build
and think somehow that makes them
important.”
Continued from page 1
BOSTON
Obama honors victims
of Boston bombings
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Called upon to console a grieving city and reas-
sure a shaken nation, President Barack Obama on Thursday
promised that Boston would “run again”
after deadly twin bombings at its famous
marathon. More than 2,000 people rose in a
standing ovation in the Cathedral of the
Holy Cross and sang “America the
Beautiful.”
Obama’s message of resolve in time of
tragedy was echoed by Mayor Thomas
Menino and Gov. Deval Patrick at a packed
interfaith service.
“Nothing will take us down because we
take care of one another,” Menino said.
“Even with the smell of smoke in the air and blood in the streets
and tears in our eyes, we triumphed over that hateful act.”
Three people were killed and more than 170 others were
injured, some of them grievously, in Monday’s bombings near
the race’s finish line.
Obama spoke just hours before the FBI released photographs
and video of two suspects and asked for the public’s help in
identifying them.
In the midst of an emotional and trying stretch for the country
and his presidency, Obama vowed to track down those respon-
sible and lauded Boston’s “undaunted” spirit.
“Your resolve is the greatest rebuke to whoever committed
this heinous act,” he told the gathering.
Indeed, Obama’s words underscored the stark reality that has
left many Americans jittery. Even as authorities narrowed their
search to two men captured on video, the suspects remained at
large and their motives were still a mystery.
For Obama, the bombings began a week consumed not only
by terror but also disaster and political defeat. Letters sent to
Washington officials, including Obama and Sen. Roger Wicker,
R-Miss., were found to contain traces of poisonous ricin in tests,
evoking eerie parallels to the anthrax attacks that followed the
terror of Sept. 11, 2001.
Barack Obama
32 Friday • April 19, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
rolex oyster perpetual and explorer are trademarks.
oyster perpetual explorer 11

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->