Care for your Lowden Guitar 2013 Reference guide

George Lowden Guitars Ltd

34 Down Business Park Downpatrick, Co Down BT30 9UP T 02844619161 F 02844617043 www.georgelowden.com

Table of Contents

Welcome About Us Making a Lowden Guitar... Product Range Keeping the Faith Cleaning and Care Travel Climate and Humidity Symptoms of a Dry guitar Symptoms of a Wet Guitar Acclimatisation Adjustments Re-stringing your Lowden Guitar Neck profile adjustments Action Adjustments Pick Up Systems and set up When Was My Lowden Made? Serial No. 0-143, Rectangular light blue (occasionally white) Serial No. up to 5000, Rectangular light beige Serial No. (re-started)- 0001-1306, Oval cream with green edge, new Lowden Logo Serial No. 1307-1846 and 1847-15000, Oval cream with green edge Serial No. from 15001, Large white rectangle Where to find a Lowden Model Dimensions and Neck Specifications Body Shape Comparison

2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 10 11 11

2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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Welcome
Welcome to the 2013 reference guide! Lowden guitars are hand crafted in Ireland by a dedicated team of craftsmen working with George Lowden. Every Lowden guitar across the range is shaped and voiced by hand from the finest materials, to exacting specifications. We would love to hear from you. You can view galleries of Lowden guitars *here* and please connect with us and explore the range in more detail using the links below. Original Series | 35 Series | 50 Series | Signature Series | Jazz Series Specialty: 32SE Stage Edition | The Baritone | The 38 Connect: >Facebook >Twitter >Pinterest >Instagram > Linkedin

About Us
George Lowden has been designing and making his acoustic guitars in Ireland since 1974 and exporting them worldwide through specialist retail stores since 1981. A team of 13 craftsmen, including 2 of his sons, work under his direct supervision building Lowden guitars by hand in Downpatrick, Co Down. It is the complete package of unique design and building techniques using only highest quality tonewoods which makes the Lowden guitar so unique. Making a Lowden requires a passionate commitment to no compromise. Time-honored traditional methods used by fully trained craftsmen in their field make these genuinely hand-made guitars. Lowden guitars have recorded on albums by internationally recognised artists such as Eric Clapton, Foy Vance, and Damian Rice. They continue to be the instrument of choice for musicians, from popular bands such as Snow Patrol to the world’s most respected guitar players such as Paul Brady, Richard Thompson, Pierre Bensusan, Alex DeGrassi, and Thomas Leeb. 

Making a Lowden Guitar...
“The journey began in earnest in 1974 when I began the design and building of the first Lowden guitars in my workshop in Bangor County Down, Northern Ireland. From the very beginning I was determined to develop unique designs and not just copy well known makes.” The Lowden guitar is the result of unique design, workmanship and assembly techniques along with our choice of woods. Design: “ Curvy, smooth soundbox shapes combined with carefully voiced internal bracing and soundbox profiles, and use of natural wood decorations with our unique hand rubbed satin finish all combine to make the Lowden guitar what it is today” Workmanship: “ Introducing unplanned for stress into any musical instrument deadens the tonal response. Our assembly techniques involve the use of hand tools to improve the quality of all joints and enable the “Dolphin Profile” voicing of the soundboard bracing. This and much much more ensures that sustain, volume and balance are not hindered in any way. No short cuts are possible, just great workmanship and attention to detail!” Wood: We still hand split our bracing stock, re-grade soundboard wood and scour the world for the best (and often most decorative) tonewoods. These are the real ‘stars’ of our guitars, and not man made. It is this combination of many details which determines how our guitars sound, feel, and play. Today more than ever, I am constantly evaluating our guitars and striving to further adjust the voicing, the feel and the playability.  To make Lowden guitars we need a team of individuals with “talent for focus and an eye for detail” plus a passionate commitment to no
2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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compromise.  So far I have built a team of real craftsmen who build Lowden guitars by hand using Japanese chisels, planes, knives and spokeshaves. It would have been much more economical to make our guitars with assembly workers and machines, but our choice is to build skills and understanding of wood, and in so doing the guitars feel and sound like individual ‘works of art’".

Product Range
Lowden Guitars are now recognised worldwide for their combination of unique design, quality of workmanship and tone and structural integrity. In recent years George has developed the 50 series and new Signature models which have now become more established and represent a larger proportion of our guitars sold. There are four ranges: 1. Original series 2. 35 Series 3. 50 Series 4. Signature models - Paul Brady, Pierre Bensusan, Richard Thompson, Alex DeGrassi, and Thomas Leeb. 5. Special models - these include the popular 38 and Baritone.

Keeping the Faith
Your Lowden guitar is handcrafted from solid tonewoods selected for their responsiveness and beauty. It’s a sad fact that many very fine guitars are not being used, simply because they are in need of tender loving care! When a guitar is subjected to climatic stress or long term wear and tear  it is very unlikely that the guitar will have good playability or sound as good as it should. The action may have become high over time, the tuning may not be accurate anymore and there may be fret buzz. Regular care, controlled humidity storage and the occasional check over by a qualified luthier will help to keep your guitar in great working order.

Cleaning and Care
CLEANING YOUR LOWDEN GUITAR A great deal of attention and care goes into each and every Lowden guitar and the unique satin finish is no exception. Ideally, we recommend that you wipe down your guitar with a clean, soft dry cloth every time you play. Regular cleaning with a soft polishing cloth, dampened in warm mild soapy water, then dried off with a dry soft cloth will prevent build-up of sweat and grime as well as remove any potentially harmful chemicals to keep your guitar looking great. POLISHING YOUR LOWDEN GUITAR Ensuring that you guitar is clean is an important step to keeping your Lowden hand rubbed finish looking its very best. However, you may occasionally wish to use a polish. In order to keep your satin finish looking natural, it is important to select a non-silicone matt polish which will not build-up and risk changing the look of your Lowden guitar. CARING FOR YOUR FINGERBOARD For care and cleaning of your Lowden guitar’s fine ebony fingerboard we recommend that you thoroughly clean it (as above)
2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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when re-stringing and periodically use a fine, specially formulated fingerboard oil to keep it nourished and feeling great. In order to keep your Lowden guitar in optimal playing and tonal condition, it is advisable that it be serviced by a recommended luthier /technician at least once a year. Things that may require attention are the nut slots, saddles and neck profile, and it is also valuable for an experienced professional to give your guitar a ‘check-up’ to ensure that it is not suffering from any environmental stress. Your Lowden is designed for a long and active life and is built with extraordinary care and attention to detail. Many of its features are innovative, designed to give unique tonal properties and superior long-term stability. We are always happy to advise you should you have any queries.

Travel
By car: Never leave your guitar in a car on a sunny day. The rapid increase in temperature will cause softening of the glue,  and wood shrinkage compromising the integrity of your instrument and potentially causing damage. If you must travel with your guitar in a hot vehicle, ensure that the case is not directly in the sun; the best place is in the back seat. A rule of thumb is: if you wouldn’t leave your dog in the car – don’t leave your guitar there either. By Air: Prior to leaving prepare your instrument by de-tensioning the strings and ensuring that there are no loose items in the case. You may also wish to place some soft padding material under the headstock area to provide extra support. Your Lowden guitar is supplied with a hard shell case that will provide protection, however this is not infallible. The best place to have your guitar when travelling by air is of course on-board in the overhead compartment or the suit locker. However,the airline may insist that you check-in your guitar. Special services are available for valuable items, (special handling and identification) please make sure to ask about these at the check-in counter. Avoid signing, if at all possible, any document that limits the airline’s liability for damage.

Climate and Humidity
Acoustic guitars are carefully constructed from thin pieces of solid wood joined together by glue and these are directly affected by changes in temperature and humidity; the more extreme the change, the greater the reaction. It is important to understand and be mindful that in climates where there are extremes in temperature and humidity additional precautions must be taken to ensure the proper care of your instrument. Lowden guitars are built in a carefully controlled humidity environment that varies between 45% and 55% relative humidity, providing optimum worldwide stability. Maintaining your guitar’s humidity environment within this range will ensure optimal performance, playability and durability. Humidity levels can be monitored with a hygrometer, ask your dealer for advice and availability. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY Temperature has a direct affect on the moisture content in the air. In general, in warmer weather the air can absorb more moisture – which results in higher relative humidity, causing the wood to swell. In the winter months, the air holds less moisture and additional factors such as central heating will dry the air even further, lowering relative humidity and causing the wood to shrink. Rapid changes are the most hazardous for your guitar, in order to avoid damage; it is best to keep your guitar insulated in its case. Should your guitar be exposed to extreme cold – let it warm up to room temperature before opening its case to avoid any potential damage.

2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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Symptoms of a Dry guitar
The consequences of low humidity conditions are arguably more severe than those of humid conditions and it is important to be aware and mindful of the symptoms to look out for. In dry conditions (less than 40% relative humidity) wood will shrink. The following are signs that you need to immediately remedy and seek advice about the humidity environment of your guitar: •The soundboard begins to drop, lowering the action, which may cause buzzing of the strings against the frets. •The fingerboard shrinks leaving the fret ends feeling sharp and protruding from the edge of the fingerboard. •Lacquer checks can begin to appear where the wood is joined, and is a warning sign that your guitar is suffering from environmental stress. In the more severe cases – cracks in the wood itself may appear; an authorised technician should attend to these as soon as possible. •The Bridge begins to separate from the soundboard: in a severely dried out guitar, the bridge may lift off completely. PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES INCLUDE (BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO): •Keeping your guitar in its case – this will help safeguard it not only from damage but will also provide a more stable humidity environment by insulating your guitar.

•Humidifying your environment – purchasing a room humidifier will help towards maintaining acceptable humidity levels. Humidifying your guitar –purchasing a guitar humidifier will help increase your guitar’s humidity content whilst in its case.  Please note: It is very important to carefully adhere to manufacturer’s instructions to avoid any possibility of water damage. Alternatively, you can place some humidifiers in the accessory pocket of your case. Do not hesitate to ask us (or your dealer) for advice.

Symptoms of a Wet Guitar
High humidity situations (above 75%) are more difficult to control but the consequences are arguably not potentially as severe. In high humidity, your guitar will absorb excess moisture, swell and expand. The following are signs that you need to immediately remedy and seek advice about the humidity environment of your guitar: •The sound of your guitar may begin to sound ‘tight’, restricted with a possible loss of bass and volume. •The soundboard begins to rise, raising the action making it unwieldy or even unplayable. •The lacquer to check •The bracing may become apparent where the top is glued to the internal structure of the guitar. •The glue can weaken and the bridge and/or bindings can lift and separate.

PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES INCLUDE (BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO): •Keep your guitar insulated in its case However, please note that the lining of your case can also soak up moisture so it is important to air it out regularly –NEVER leave it or your guitar in the direct sun or too close to a source of heat. •Air conditioning can help dry the air and reduce humidity in your home. Common sense precautions and paying attention to your guitar will ensure that you notice any changes and act upon them before damage can occur.

2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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Acclimatisation
Your guitar is most susceptible to the affects of changes in humidity and temperature during the first several months of its life. Every guitar settles in with time and small changes can take place to the action and neck profile whilst your guitar is settling into its new environment.  Being mindful of your guitar’s environment during this ‘settling in’ period will minimise the impact of unfavourable conditions and keep your guitar playing and sounding its best.

Adjustments Re-stringing your Lowden Guitar
Strings should be regularly changed in order to ensure optimal tone and enjoyment. If your guitar has an under-saddle pickup it is best to change strings one at a time. This helps to stop any small movement in the saddles that may affect pickup balance.  Your Lowden guitar is fitted with a pinless bridge and a little care is required to avoid damage to the soundboard caused by the ball end of the string. In order to protect your soundboard place a piece of card on the soundboard behind the bridge. A bend made at the tip of the string will help navigate it through the bridge.

Neck profile adjustments
Your Lowden guitar is fitted with an integral truss rod that provides greater neck stability. The adjustment of this rod is to obtain optimal neck relief (not action adjustment) and we recommend that a professional technician make these adjustments. NECK PROFILE AND TRUSS ROD ADJUSTMENTS (RECOMMENDED SETTINGS) Before having a string action adjustment it is important that the neck relief is checked and corrected if necessary. First check neck relief: To do this, press bass E string onto 1st and 13th frets simultaneously and observe the tiny hairline gap between the bottom of the string and the crown of the 6th fret- this gap is the amount of neck ‘relief’  For most playing styles relief should be between 0.15mm and 0.25mm. If the relief is too large the action may be too high and/or buzzing may occur when playing around the 5th to 10th frets. If the neck is too straight, the action may be too low and buzzing may occur when playing 1st to 4th frets. NB: It is very common for new guitars to develop a high playing action during the first 6 months as the string tension begins to take effect. Often the truss rod will need tightened in new guitars after a few months to correct neck relief and action. If neck relief is less than the above measurements ( ie; almost straight or even slightly convex ) then the truss rod needs turned anti-clockwise using a 5mm allen key. While string tension has been slackened off, turn the truss rod adjustor (located in the internal neck block approximately under the 16th fret) a little at a time and re-tune until the correct neck relief has been achieved. (note, doing this will likely raise the action and therefore it may be necessary to lower the bridge saddles afterwards.) If neck relief is too much (ie; the neck is more than 0.25mm concave along its length) then the truss rod should be turned clockwise until the neck has straightened sufficiently. Doing this will lower the action and it may be necessary to raise the saddles afterwards. NB: Lowden guitars made between 1976 and 1993 and from 2004 to date have been fitted with single action aluminum channel type truss rods. Lowden guitars from 1994 to 2003 were most often fitted with a dual action truss rod. For these, there is a “mid-point” of adjustment where the truss rod is neutral and where the adjustor will feel slack.

2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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Action Adjustments
The height of the strings above the fingerboard is known as the action and directly affects the ease and enjoyment of playing your guitar. Although your Lowden guitar leaves the workshop with optimal action height, it is possible that after some ‘settling in’ period adjustments need to be made. We strongly advise that these only be undertaken by a qualified technician. Ask us (or your dealer) for advice. Workshop standard action settings are considered “low/medium” and are 2.5mm (bass E) and 2.0mm (treble E) ... measured between the crown of the 12th fret and the underside of the string.

Pick Up Systems and set up
While it is true that no pick up system has yet been developed which is as natural as a good mic, systems are improving all the time and the best are now very good indeed and in addition provide much more flexibility for the player than having to be restricted to keeping close to a mic on stage. We now recommend the LR BAGGS ANTHEM on new Lowden Guitars. Here is a video of George speaking about the Athem There are broadly four types: Under saddle transducers Under saddle transducers blended with a tiny mic inside soundbox Acoustic magnetic pick ups Under bridge transducers ( sensors ) For loud volume and reasonably good acoustic tone acoustic magnetic is best For tonal accuracy either the under-bridge or blend type systems are best.

For versatility and good general use the under-saddle types work very well if fitted correctly NB: For almost all types of pick up and in particular the under saddle types, it is vital that the saddle is fitted very accurately in its slot ie; it must not be either a loose or tight fit ( a sliding accurate fit is best ) Once a good string balance and tone has been achieved through careful fitting of the saddle, it is important to maintain this through changing strings one at a time rather than all at once ( which would allow the saddle to move and likely create string balance problems ) If a saddle tilts forward under string tension, balance problems are likely. Sometimes, tapping the saddle back into a good vertical alignment is all that is required to restore good balance. Anything which restricts the natural vibration of the saddle is likely to affect string balance.

2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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When Was My Lowden Made?
In order to find out the date your guitar was made and the workshop of origin, it is necessary to first identify the ‘era’ in which it was made. You can do this by looking at the interior label. Since we were true to our times and rather ‘laid back’ about everything other than the guitars themselves, we do not have extensive detailed serial number archives for the early years. However, since production numbers were so very small in those days, the math is not all that difficult. Please view the list below the design of your Lowden label or Serial Number to find out more about your guitar.

Serial No. 0-143, Rectangular light blue (occasionally white)
Era- 1974-1980 Origin- High Street, Bangor, Co. Down, Northern Ireland These guitars were built 1974 to 1980 in the very first workshop in Bangor, Northern Ireland by a hand picked and personally trained team of 4, under the direct supervision of George Lowden. Approximately 143 guitars were made during this period. The first guitars with A-frame bracing and the dolphin voicing profiles were made in 1976 and in many ways have established the Lowden guitar’s distinctive and unique sound. The Lowden guitar was born. “What is now called the O25 [L25]had arrived, along with another three models all of the same shape, bracing and simple cosmetics. I was happy with the voicing of the bracing, craftsmanship, general design and most of all, tone, of these guitars.”

Serial No. up to 5000, Rectangular light beige
Era- 1980-85 Origin- Guitars are built under License from George Lowden by the S Yairi, Nagoya workshops, Japan Guitars with this label were built between 1980-1985 in a small Japanese workshop under license to George Lowden. Approximately 1000 guitars were made per year.  In 1980, our Swiss dealer asked George if he could source a small and expert company to make his guitars under license, so they would be more widely available. “Thus began a five-year period when my guitars were made in Japan by a small, dedicated band of luthiers near Nagoya. I visited the S. Yairi workshop regularly to give the designs and check quality. I  learned about Japanese craftsmanship and their serious approach to work. I found the folk I worked with to be honourable and courteous, and I had the greatest of respect for their hard work and excellent guitars. I learned a lot about production and tools, they in turn were delighted to be able to make original design guitars to this quality level.”

Serial No. (re-started)- 0001-1306, Oval cream with green edge, new Lowden Logo
Era- 1985-89 Origin- Balloo Industrial Estate Workshops, Bangor, Co. Down, Northern Ireland As a result of the rampant fashion of this era for all things electronic in music, sales of acoustic instruments slumped worldwide. The owners of the Japanese factory decided to consolidate by closing their workshops  and moving production of Lowden guitars to a larger factory where other brands were made. George was concerned about this proposal and decided to try setting up a new factory in Ireland.  He managed to rent an empty shell of a building in Balloo Industrial Estate, Bangor, Co. Down and began to employ and train new craftsmen from scratch. Lowden Guitars of this period  between late 1985 and November 1988, were labelled with a slightly smaller version of the oval label.
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Serial No. 1307-1846 and 1847-15000, Oval cream with green edge
Era- 1989-2003 Origin- 1307-1846- Balloo Industrial Estate 1847-15000- Glenvale Industrial Estate Workshops, Newtownards, NI NEW MODEL NAMES:   At around the end of 1991, model designations changed. Previously the letter had indicated the botanical name of the wood used for the back & sides [eg. S = Swetenia = mahogany; L = dalbergia Latifolia = indian rosewood] . The new model names reflected the increasing range of body size/shape options. So O was introduced = Original body shape/size; F = the new mid size Flat-picker’s body shape/size; and in 1992 the S was introduced as the brand new Small body. The S when followed by a J  was the Jazz nylon string model. The License granted to the Lowden Guitar Company ensured that George Lowden retained personal ownership of the Lowden designs and trademark,and enabled him to provide quality control and new designs while remaining independent from the company. he continued to build his own guitars under “George Lowden ‘luthier’”

Serial No. from 15001, Large white rectangle
Era- 2004-present Origin- New studio workshops in Downpatrick, Northern Ireland All Lowden guitars are now built by our family - owned company, George Lowden Guitars Ltd. They are built under George’s direct supervision in new ‘studio’ (atelier) style workshops located close to our home in Downpatrick, Co Down. Ireland. The integrity and passion  – recently described  as “Olympic guitar making”  -  which goes into each and every Lowden guitar, has never been stronger, and we are very proud of our team. George has said, “I consider it fundamental to the integrity and future of the Lowden guitar that I continue to build guitars personally. By keeping my hands on the wood and designing new guitars for individual musicians, inspiration and the creative edge are constantly challenged” So in November 2002 George created a new small-bodied guitar which is about classical size, but not shape. “The new S shape is more ‘curvy’ than before, more feminine. That was my main aim, just to make it very attractive as a shape, but as always in design, other things come along as well.” His client asked about building a shorter scale and of course in terms of the overall scale of the guitar itself, a shorter string scale made sense. Many years ago he had used a 630mm scale and so he re-designed the S to be voiced for this shorter scale. The new S is more comfortable to play, especially for those with smaller hands, but the tone is not compromised in any way at all, due to the voicing choices within the construction details.” George has also further developed his original F series design (this is the mid sized Lowden) as he always felt he had not “finished with it”. The new versions of the  ‘F’ and the new ‘S’ are part of our current range, along with the re-designed Jazz (nylon string) model. Devotees of the ‘O’ (=original Lowden body shape) will be happy to know it remains unchanged. George has no plans to alter that one! We have added the Baritone model, Signature models and a Custom Shop to the Range. (Truly) Limited Editions also appear from time to time whenever some really special wood comes our way. All models since 2004 are built with the original ‘dolphin’ hand carved bracing. The current era of production is signified by the new rectangular interior label, each of which is personally signed by George. Every guitar is also accompanied by an individual provenance document which gives full details of the guitar specifications and year of building, in addition to the warranty booklet.

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Where to find a Lowden
Lowden Guitars have an established retail network in the UK and worldwide markets such as Europe, North America, and the Far East. For the most up to date information please visit our website: Uk and Ireland partners USA and Canada partners Europe partners Rest of World partners

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Model Dimensions and Neck Specifications

Model dimensions
BODY STYLE O F S JAZZ BARITONE STAGE EDITION
NECK WIDTH AT NUT NECK WIDTH AT

14TH FRET

SOUNDBOX WIDTH

SOUNDBOX DEPTH

SCALE LENGTH

1 3/4" (45mm) 1 3/4" (45mm) 1 3/4" (45mm) 1 7/8" (48mm) 1 3/4" (45mm) 1 11/16" (43.5mm)

2 1/4" (57mm) 2 1/4" (57mm) 2 1/4" (57mm) 2 3/8" (60mm) 2 1/4" (57mm) 2 13/64" (56mm)

16 17/32" (420mm) 15 7/8" (402mm) 14 3/4" (374mm) 14 3/4" (374mm) 16 17/32" (420mm) 15 7/8" (402mm)

5" (125mm) 4 3/4" (120mm) 4 1/8" (105mm) 4 1/8" (105mm) 5 3/16" (130mm) 3 3/4" (95mm)

25 1/2" (650mm) 25 1/2" (650mm) 24 51/64" (630mm) 25 1/2" (650mm) 27 9/16" (700mm) 25 1/2" (650mm)

Neck specifications
NECK TYPE STANDARD NARROW FINGERSTYLE
WIDTH AT NUT WIDTH AT

14TH FRET

SCALE LENGTH

FINGERBOARD RADIUS

1 3/4" (45mm) 1 11/16" (43.5mm) 1 3/4" (45mm) 1 7/8" (48mm) 1 7/8" (48mm) 1 3/4" (45mm)
DEPTH AT 1ST FRET (STANDARD)

2 1/4" (57mm) 2 13/64" (56mm) 2 3/8" (60mm) 2 3/8" (60mm) 2 3/8" (60mm) 2 1/4" (57mm)
DEPTH AT 9TH FRET (STANDARD)

650mm (S model 630mm) 650mm (S model 630mm) 650mm (S model 630mm) 650mm (S model 630mm) 650mm Variable 680mm bass 635 treble
DEPTH AT 1ST FRET (SHALLOW)

16" (406mm) 16" (406mm) 16" (406mm) 16" (406mm) 20" (508mm) 16" (406mm)

12 STRING
JAZZ FAN FRET

NECK TYPE STANDARD NARROW FINGERSTYLE

DEPTH AT

9TH FRET (SHALLOW)

0.83" (21.3mm) 0.83" (21.3mm) N/A 0.83" (21.3mm) 0.83" (21.3mm) 0.83" (21.3mm)

0.9" (22.8mm) 0.9" (22.8mm) N/A 0.9" (22.8mm) 0.9" (22.8mm) 0.9" (22.8mm)

0.8" (20.3mm) 0.8" (20.3mm) 0.8" (20.3mm) N/A N/A 0.8" (20.3mm)

0.86" (21.8mm) 0.86" (21.8mm) 0.86" (21.8mm) N/A N/A 0.86" (21.8mm)

12 STRING
JAZZ FAN FRET

Body Shape Comparison
All body shapes except for the Jazz and Baritone are available as a cutaway or full body. The Baritone
George Lowden Guitars Ltd 34 Down Business Park, Downpatrick BT30 9UP Northern Ireland The Baritone was introduced in January 2008. It was originally designed by George for one of his personal customers and tel: +44 (0)28 4461 9161 he really wanted to make some more! It is tunable to A or B with ease, and is based on the O bodyfax: - just shade +44 a (0)28 4461deeper7043 www.georgelowden.com with the soundbox specially voiced to accentuate the baritone voice. The 700mm scale length provides a balance between

playability and tonal response. This extra length is offset by the bridge placement and therefore the neck is not over-long. Soundbox width:        420mm Soundbox depth:           130mm String scale length: 700mm

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The 'O' The ‘O’ is the most widely recognised Lowden shape having been the first of George Lowden’s designs and remains unchanged since the mid 1970‘s. It is the largest size and is sought after for its bass and overtones, and has traditionally been the preferred choice for fingerstyle and open tuning . It has a  deep and resonant tone. Soundbox width:        420mm [16 17/32”] Soundbox depth:           125mm [4 59/64”] String scale length: 650mm [25 19/32”]

The 'F' The ‘F’ is the mid-size body, and was originally designed with the flat-picker in mind. George re-designed it in 2004 as he “always felt it had further to go” and we are delighted with the result.  It is a great gigging guitar - punchy, with focussed projection and volume. Great for flat-picking of course, but also for finger-picking.  Works well for percussive  strumming  too - particularly in the rosewood/cedar combination. Soundbox width:        403mm [15 7/8”] Soundbox depth:            120mm [4 23/32”] String scale length: 650mm [25 19/32”]

The 'S' The ‘S’ is our smallest body, but arguably the loudest. Completely re-designed by George in 2003 when making one himself as a personal custom order, it now has a shorter scale length and is noted for its clarity and definition. In walnut/cedar it is very loud, warm and well balanced. In cocobolo it is perfect for versatile playing styles from strumming, percussive picking to fingerstyle. In rosewood with adirondack or sitka spruce it is superb as a pickers guitar. Soundbox width:        373mm [14 11/16”] Soundbox depth:            105mm [ 4 9/64”] String scale length: 630mm [24 51/64”]

The Jazz The Jazz body is  the ‘S’ shape with a cutaway, but the internal bracing is based on George Lowden’s concert classical design. Re-designed in 2003 to improve the acoustic voice, it has nylon strings and a pick-up fitted as standard, but is voiced for a really good acoustic response.  It is stiff enough for loud volume to be possible without the whole guitar overreaching when played loud through an amplification system.   The tone is very natural and full, with none of the over-bright tones sometimes found on too lightly built classical guitars. Soundbox width:     373mm [14 11/16”] Soundbox depth:    105mm [4 9/64”] String scale length: 650mm [25 19/32”]

2013 Lowden Owner’s Care Guide, George Lowden Guitars Ltd
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