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Anna Brandon

Math Lesson: Combination of Numbers


Name: Anna Brandon School: Rogers Elementary School Grade: 1st Grade Date: 09/30/11 Cooperating Teacher: Ms. Hudson Estimated Time (minutes): 40 Minutes Lesson Prerequisites & Pre-Assessment of Students: From FAI questions students have experience solving story problems involving combination of numbers up to ten. They have had practice using manipulatives and drawings to solve story problems in previous lessons. Last week they explored and practiced combinations of numbers up to 10. They can write numerals correctly. Lesson Objectives: -Find and explore relationships among combinations of numbers up to 12 and 15 -Find as many 2-addend combinations of a number as possible -Use counting on or counting all to find total of two quantities -Work with partners and manipulatives at the same time -Prove that all of the possible combinations have been found -Use a t-Chart to help organize and record data National Standards: -Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems -Use mathematical models to represent and understand quantitative relationships State Standards: 1.1.1 Count, read, and write whole numbers up to 100. 1.2.1 Show the meaning of addition (putting together, increasing) using objects. 1.2.3 Show equivalent forms of the same number (up to 20) using objects, diagrams, and numbers. 1.2.4 Demonstrate mastery of the addition facts (for totals up to 20) and the corresponding subtraction facts. CCSM: 1. OA. 1. Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. Materials needed: -White paper

Anna Brandon

-Markers -Pre-made poster with group problem and t-chart -Counting chips (multi-colored ones): 10 of each color (2 colors/groups) 12 groups -Unific cubes (optional, but some studens may find them easier to use because the colors are different) -Worksheet: Combination of Numbers: 12 and 15! Launch (5 minutes) Last week students explored and practiced relationships among combinations of numbers up to 10. The objective was to find as many 2 addened combinations of 10 as possible. This week we are going to review the combinations of numbers that add up to 10 and then have students explore relationships among combinations of numbers up to 12 and 15. This week we will introduce a method of organization for data and have students practice using a t-Chart to record their data. We will start the lesson by introducing the students to the t-chart as a method for organizing and recording their data. We will use the t-chart in order to review a combination of 10 problem as a class. One of the lead teachers will ask the students if they remember what we did last week in class with regards to combinations of 10. They will present a story problem to the students. Suzy has 10 toys. Some are dolls and some are toy cars. How many of each could she have? How many dolls and how many toy cars? Who can come up with an idea? The teacher will explain that there are a certain number of different combinations that we need to find and will then demonstrate how to record them on the t-chart using one of the students answers. Discuss the strategies the students may use to come up with answers like counting on or all. The teacher will make sure to address and discuss every students strategy for solving the problem in order for students to see different possibilities for strategies. After this we will introduce the worksheet and explain to students that they will be finding combinations for 12 and 15 this time using a t-chart. Investigation: (25 minutes) The teacher will pair up the students based on their knowledge of their ability levels and behavior. This is so that students will be less likely to be off task while working in partners and could benefit from working with students at different ability levels. complete a worksheet. Each student will get his or her own worksheet. The worksheet is called Combination of Numbers: 12 and 15! and will guide students as well as help them to explore relationships of combinations of 12 and 15. The students will be provided with manipulatives with which they can use to help them solve the problems. The students will read the first problem in which they are asked to find as many combinations of numbers as possible that make 12 and record it using a t-chart provided. The student will then read and complete the second problem in which they are asked to find as many combinations of numbers as possible that make 15 and record it using a tchart provided. All of the six PSTs will walk around the room and work with student pairs. They will help students who do not understand the worksheet or are having difficulty with the exercise. They will also ask students questions that stimulate their thinking about how they are working through the problem and coming up with an answer. (e.g. How did you

Anna Brandon

solve the problem? How did you know what to solve for? Is there another way you could solve the problem? Do you find the t-chart helpful?) PSTs will observe their FAI students and focus on how they are working through and thinking about the problems. If students complete the first two problems and there is time left, they can complete the bonus questions at the end of the worksheet. The bonus questions ask students to find combinations of numbers up to 20 and 24. Summarize/ Wrap up: (10 Minutes) After students have finished their work, the class will come sit together in front of the board to discuss what they have learned today and the strategies they used like counting on or all. The teachers will make sure that the students different strategies are discussed in depth so that other students are exposed to potential new ideas for how to solve the problems and to have a better understanding of those strategies. Discussion Questions: How did you solve the problems? Did you use counters? Did you see any patterns when you were solving the problem or filling out the t-chart? Did you find any of the problems difficult? Why? Was the t-chart helpful for you? Did you find all the possible combinations? How do we know? What are some other ways to organize the answers that we found? This allows the students to reflect on what they have learned and allows them to see other approaches to solving the problems. We hope the t-chart helps the students organize their data they collected using their own individual strategies so they do not repeat combinations they may have already written. The t-chart was one way for them to record their information rather than write their answers all over the page. It also gives them practice with writing using standard notation like + and =. After discussion questions are posed if there is enough time, we will summarize what we hope that the students have learned today. Scaling up: We can increase the values of the total number in the problems to make larger and more complex combinations. For example, we provided bonus questions that involve higher numbers like finding the different combinations to make 20 and 24, for students who worked through the other problems quickly and are fluent in combinations up to 15. We can also have the students write equations to represent the problems as well.

Scaling down: We can provide problems that involve lower numbers. We will provide a worksheet that asks students to find combinations up to 8 and then review combinations up to 10. This is so that they can work on building an understanding of combinations of lower numbers before involving higher numbers. We will have the worksheet prepared for the lesson and make sure to pair students with lower abilities so that they can work on the same worksheet together. Differentiation:

Anna Brandon

Jake is in first grade and he has a learning disability in reading and writing. He struggles with writing and has poor handwriting. A good way to help meet his specific needs are to have someone read the problems out loud to him and make sure that he can correctly write numerals in the t-chart. Teachers can also create word problems that reflect his interests such as plants, trees and animals in order to keep him engaged. References Investigations in Number, Data, and Space; 2nd Ed (2008). Unit 3 (24-71).