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Claremont

PARKING WAR: LOCAL EATERY FILES SUIT AGAINST CITY/PAGE 3
Friday, May 3, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

A great run...
CHS boys volleyball ends undefeated season/PAGE 18

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Lane Giammalva emerges from a tunnel created by fellow students as the boys varsity volleyball team is introduced on Tuesday during the Packʼs game against Burroughs High at CHS. After an undefeated season and winning the first set, the Pack unfortunately lost 3-1.

Where and how to celebrate Mother’s Day in Claremont/PAGE 10

Kindergartners go wild!
Read about the adventure/PAGE 20

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 15

SPORTS/ PAGE 18 CALENDAR/ PAGE 22

More news and photo galleries every day at: claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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Liquidambar trees

READERS’ COMMENTS
College creep

ADVENTURES
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[Editor’s note: The following letter was sent to Claremont City Manager Tony Ramos, with a copy forwarded for publication. —KD]

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Dear Mr. Ramos: We have lived on West 11th Street for 5 years and are deeply concerned about the dangerous, as well as unsightly, yearround drop of seed balls from the liquidambar trees lining the street. During the time we have lived here, we have had several incidents of pedestrians losing their footing as a result of accidentally stepping on one or more of those seed balls. One of our friends recently fell and injured her hip as a result of inadvertently stepping on one of those seed pods. They are a constant and treacherous danger. While investigating this problem we learned that many cities have blacklisted liquidambar, not only because of the hazardous seed balls but also because of the damage to sidewalks, streets and home foundations from their rapidly spreading and invasive root system. In a peer-reviewed research article in the publication California Agriculture, March-April of 1994, researchers Ed Perry and Allen Lagarbo identified the fruit of liquidambar as hazardous to public safety and reported the results of the city of Modesto using Ethepohn spraying to eliminate the spiny balls—with no noticeable negative effects to the trees or surrounding vegetation. Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo has also conducted research on the problems associated with liquidamber trees. We would strongly recommend the city not pursue further planting of these trees. In addition, we would like to request the city actively explore solutions to this problem, propose various methods of eliminating the seed pod hazard, and

Dear Editor: I much enjoyed reading Mr. David Cressy's recent letter [CGU Master Plan far reaching, COURIER, April 26]. He sagely raises points which deserve very serious consideration by Claremont residents, Claremont's city planners and the Claremont Colleges themselves. I’ll not repeat here the points Mr. Cressy made, since his points are very ably described in his own letter. However, if I may condense it to its most basic essence, the issue regarding the Colleges (the 7Cs) is this: How big is big enough? Claremont is, after all, a town of fewer than 40,000 residents. Most of us realize that in the Claremont Village area, space is already at a premium. Claremont is not Westwood, nor is it downtown Los Angeles. Nor should it strive to become like either of those 2 places. Yet, if the Colleges persist in pursuing a policy of endless, pointless growth, Claremont will incrementally develop into an unpleasant place indeed. Mr. Cressy either coined or used a phrase that struck me as supremely apropos, namely “college creep.” A very appropriate description for the Colleges’ nasty habit of encroaching on surrounding neighborhoods. According to one source, the Colleges have 6300 students, 700 faculty and 1600 other personnel. Now, that’s a big enterprise—more than big enough for downtown Claremont. I suggest that the Colleges just focus on providing the very best education they can to those 6300 students already attending, and eschew any more “college creep.” Douglas Lyon
Claremont

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, May 7 Planning Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 8 Community & Human Services Commission Special Meeting Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m.

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City says... ”Park free and spend the night at the Wilderness Park.”
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Claremonters applaud Golden State’s latest water rate hik e.
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Walmart plans new super store in Village West

Claremont Colleges will have free tuition in 2014-15

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 24

Owners of longtime restaurant file lawsuit against city

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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reliminary litigation is underway between the city of Claremont and a longtime Village eatery.

Mike and Sue Verbal, owners of Pizza ‘N Such restaurant in the Claremont Village since 1979, recently filed a complaint against the city of Claremont alleging city officials violated an agreement made in regard to more than $150,000 of in-lieu parking fees paid by the Verbals to the city. The Verbals first filed a complaint last August, asserting that the city misused money paid for development of parking for use by customers dining at their restaurant. Mr. Verbal paid $9000 a piece for 17 parking spaces under the impression that the money was going to be used to create additional parking in the Village area. At the time of the agreement, the Village included businesses from Fourth Street south to First Street and from Indian Hill east to College Avenue, according to Mr. Verbal. According to the complaint, Mr. Verbal later learned that his money was used for the 4-story parking structure just west of the Packing House on First Street in Village West. He approached to the city in hopes of an explanation. Instead, Mr. Verbal said city staff peremptorily told him that if he sued, he would be liable for the city’s attorney fees. Not originally envisioning a lawsuit, Mr. Verbal now says he will do what it takes to ensure the city holds true to its “obligation.” “I want my money back,” Mr. Verbal said. “[The city] didn’t do what they said they would do. If they had just explained why they used, I might not have sued.” Mr. Verbal says it is a final effort to get

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

The owners of the Verbal Building and Pizza ʻN Such restaurant in the Claremont Village have filed a lawsuit against the city of Claremont over parking assessments they thought would help fund parking improvements in the old Village but went to build the parking structure in Village West instead.

some answers and to solve a wrong. “We’ll let the courts decide,” he said. Matters date back to the early 2000s, according to the complaint. For years Mr. and Ms. Verbal assert they had been encouraged by city management to expand their business because of the pizza restaurant’s popularity. However, the business owners never formally considered an expansion until the early 2000s. With their lease about to expire in June 2002, the Verbals finally decided to consider an expansion after encouragement from then City Manager Glenn Southard. As they explored an expansion, the Verbals learned that city law dictates that business expansions include additional

parking spaces to accommodate the growing business. The Verbals claim they were first told an additional 32 spaces would be needed, but eventually the city agreed upon 12 additional parking spaces. Though a fixed number of spaces were agreed upon with city staff, city law created other issues. According to the complaint, city staff determined that “the location of the business, and the configuration of the Village, did not afford [the Verbals] the ability to provide for additional parking.” But that didn’t mean the end to the negotiations for an expansion. If the area immediately surrounding an expanding business does not have room for additional parking—such as Pizza ‘N

Such in the already built-out Village area—the business may pay “in lieu parking fees” to the city for use in creating more public parking throughout the city. The city established its in-lieu parking fees in the early 1980s with the vision of the high-density Village that Claremont residents and visitors have come to know over the years. Instead of requiring every business to provide a certain amount of designated parking, particularly in those areas like the Claremont Village that already have a high density, a city may allow its business owners to pay the city a fee “in lieu of” that required parking. “The idea was the fees could be used to provide ‘district parking,’ in a sense,” explained Brian Desatnik, director of community development. “In a downtown where you want buildings to be tightly grouped together, it makes more sense to try and consolidate parking facilities.” With the economic downturn, in 2010 in-lieu parking fees were cut from $9,000 a parking space to $1,000 a parking space in order to assist businesses with moving into the increasing vacancies in the Village area at that time, according to Mr. Desatnik. The Verbals formally agreed to pay inlieu parking fees in the summer of 2002, before the rate change, to the tune of $108,000 for the previously agreed-upon 12 spots. According to the contract, “such fees are placed in a fund, which can only be spent for the acquisition and development of off-street parking for the Claremont Village, or reimbursement of private providers of such parking.” The Verbals signed an agreement with the city to pay $108,000 with 5 percent interest over 10 years. They ended up payPIZZA LITIGATION continues on the next page

COURIER photos/ Steven Felschundneff

The 1927 AT & SF steam locomotive 3751 zooms past the Claremont Depot on Saturday on its way to the 2013 San Bernardino Railroad Days held at the Santa Fe Depot in San Bernardino. For train fans, Railroad Days were celebrated Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and the 3751 passed back through Claremont about 3:45 p.m. that same day.

CITY NEWS
PIZZA LITIGATION continued from the previous page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

4

ing the full amount plus interest by October 2006, bringing the total to $119,333.66. A few years later, the Verbals sought to expand again after an upstairs tenant went out of business. They eventually decided against expanding after learning from the city that they would need to provide 30 spaces at $9000 per space, or $270,000, for in-lieu parking fees. However, the Verbals did opt to pay a fee in order to rescind a previously imposed occupancy restriction. In order to dissolve that contract, the city and the Verbals agreed to $45,000 in-lieu parking fees, worth 5 parking spaces. Similar to their first in-lieu parking agreement, the second contract stated that the fees would be placed in a fund, which can only be spent for use in creating more off-street parking for the Claremont Village. If not used for that specific purpose, the agreement promised “reimbursement of private providers of such parking.” After discovering their money was used for the Village West parking structure, the Verbals filed a claim last August, hoping for an explanation and possible reimbursement. With their request denied, Mr. Verbal felt driven to take matters a step further in filing a complaint leading toward possible litigation. “We need a transparent government,” he said. City Manager Tony Ramos confirmed on Wednesday that the city has responded to the Verbals’ complaint. Because it’s a matter of litigation, Mr. Ramos would not comment further. “The city will respond through litigation,” he said. —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

El Roble student hones leadership skills in Washington, DC
Kudos go to El Roble 7th grader Camille Rose C. Ylagan, who represented Claremont at the April 2013 Junior National Young Leaders Conference (JrNYLC) in Washingon, DC. The 6-day JrNYLC aims to offer “mature, high-achieving middle school students the opportunity to learn about leadership by studying the leaders of the past and by focusing on social advocacy to make a positive impact in their homes and communities.” The students, who ranged in age from 5th through 8th graders, delved into leadership traits such as character, communication, goal-setting, problem solving, respect and teamwork. They also embarked on a number of sight-seeing expeditions that underscored the JrNYCL, including the White House, Capitol Hill, the Washington Monument, the Maryland Science Center and the National Memorials for Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Martin Luther King Jr. and veterans of the Vietnam and Korean wars. One particularly interesting jaunt was a trip to Harper’s Ferry, the sight of abolitionist John Brown’s failed slave revolt of 1859. The students were asked to ponder the ramifications of using violent means to attain a positive end. The conference involved Camille’s first time flying, which was a little nerve-wracking for her and her family. “She is the baby—my youngest, and so she was scared,” her mother Melissa Cruz Ylagan said. “She was crying, I was crying.” It ended up being a bast, though, and Camille returned with stories and photos to share with her schoolmates. “It turned out to be an amazing experience, and my friends thought it was really cool. They wanted to know about all the places I visited,” she said. Camille, who cites the trip to the Lincoln Memorial as a conference highlight, said that she and her peers were asked to create an organization that could make a difference. Her group envisioned a disaster relief organization called “We Are the World.” Camille, whose favorite subject is math and hopes to someday “be a businesswoman of some sort,” was nominated to be a conference delegate by her 6th grade teacher at Condit Elementary School. Camille, whose older sister Clarissa was also a Junior Leader, now has her sites set on attending an alumni session, to be held in Boston for attendees of the JrYLC. The experience has

Photo courtesy of Melissa Ylagan Camille Rose C. Ylagan, a 7th-grader at El Roble, visited Washington, DC recently to attend the Junior National Young Leaders Conference.

changed her daughter and made her more confident, Ms. Cruz Ylagan noted. “We really wanted her to go, because traveling is a very good teacher,” she said. “And now, we just want to congratulate her for all her good effort and want to let her know that we are so proud of her.”
—Sarah Torribio

Thursday, April 25 A little too much indulging at Sushi Cruise left 21-year-old Molly Mcilhargey digesting her meal behind bars Thursday night. Police spotted the Glendora resident stumbling outside the Foothill Boulevard eatery and determined she was unable to care for herself, according to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. Ms. Mcilhargey was arrested for public intoxication.

POLICE BLOTTER

Friday, April 26 Luck ran out for a pair of burglars who successfully evaded arrest twice last week. Claremont police believe they nabbed the suspects in a set of burglaries at the Chevron gas station at Indian Hill and Arrow Highway right before they committed another commercial burglary Friday morning. A Claremont police officer was patrolling a retail business complex in the 1300 block of Towne Avenue at about 3:25 a.m. when 2 subjects were spotted near a vehicle backed into the front of a business. Abraham Lopez, 35, of Whittier and Benny Gutierrez, 38, of Chino were found in possession of burglary tools, gloves, a hammer and flashlight included. Police also discovered that Mr. Lopez and Mr. Gutierrez were already on active probation for burglary through Los Angeles County. Both suspects’ homes were searched and additional evidence and

stolen property linking them to the Chevron gas station burglaries and other recent commercial burglaries in Claremont over the last several weeks was located. Mr. Lopez and Gutierrez are being held at the Claremont city jail for $500,000 bail. **** “Like father, like son” rings true when it comes to Johnny and Michael Walker, a father-son duo arrested for residential burglary in Claremont on Friday morning. Claremont Police dispatch received a 9-1-1 at 4:45 a.m. from a woman who stated that her house alarm had activated while she was upstairs asleep. At about the same time, the Claremont Police Department received a call from the resident’s alarm company advising the same. Officers immediately responded to the residence and found that the rear glass sliding door had been shattered with a large chunk of concrete. After further investigation, it was a confirmed burglary. Once they shattered the glass sliding door, the suspects entered the residence and stole the victim’s purse, which she had left on the kitchen table. Suspect and vehicle information obtained by Claremont detectives were sent to surrounding law enforcement agencies and the vehicle was located traveling northbound on the 15 freeway near the 215 interchange by a deputy from the San Bernardino Sheriff’s Department, according to a news release. The Hespe-

ria residents were stopped and found to be in possession of the Claremont victim’s stolen property. Forty-three-yearold Johnny and 20-year-old Michael were taken into custody. Saturday, April 27 A day of alleged rattlesnake and quail hunting ended early for 2 Upland residents looking for game near San Antonio Dam and Mt. Baldy Road. Not because there weren’t rattlesnake or quail to hunt, but because 22-year-old Ryan Pena and 24-year-old Kenneth Covington failed to read municipal restrictions prohibiting the purpose of their expedition, according to Lt. Ciszek. Two pellet guns and a long knife were confiscated. The pair received a notice to appear in court instead of their quarry. Sunday, April 28 A Pomona College student received an unexpected wake-up call early Sunday morning. The student awoke around 4:55 a.m. to find a strange man in his room. He was alert enough to take off after the stranger who tried to flee with stolen property and was able to recover some, but not all of his stolen goods. The stranger ran off with the rest. The crook is described as a Hispanic male, about 20 to 25 years old, with a thin build and dark curly hair cut close to his scalp. **** A Claremont resident has a pending court date and all because of a run-in involving a “Poo Log” and a pop-up book, according to Lt. Ciszek. Twenty-four-

year-old Elizabeth Hinton attempted to leave Rhino Records late Sunday afternoon with the unpurchased books in tow. The security alarm sounded and the items, worth an estimated $20 total, were returned to the store while Ms. Hinton left the shop in handcuffs.   Monday, April 29 A wanted man took it upon himself to aid police in his own arrest Monday morning. According to Lt. Ciszek, 31year-old Kristian Urquieta of Orange got out of the passenger seat of a car and approached officers, identifying himself and asking for directions. Police discovered that not only was Mr. Urquieta wanted for an outstanding warrant, but the car he and his friend were traveling in had license plates revealing the car had been stolen out of Fullerton. Police quickly arrested Mr. Urquieta for the warrant and for possession of a stolen vehicle. While Mr. Urquieta might have been slow on the uptake, his friend hightailed it out of the car and away from police before he could be arrested. Tuesday, April 30 The sunny weather is a little less bright for a member of the Claremont Colleges’ student body whose long board was reportedly stolen. As the sun continues to shine, perhaps it is a blessing in disguise when it comes to the victim’s finals preparation.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

5

Walgreens pharmacy to move from corner to corner

C

laremont officials are preparing for the development of a new Walgreens pharmacy as the drug store ditches its current digs on the northwest corner of Towne and Foothill in Pomona. Its new resting place? The southeast corner of Towne and Foothill.
The company is making preliminary plans to build a new store a matter of yards from its current location in order to take advantage of vacant space nesteled between Marie Callenders and the 76 Gas Station. As opposed to its currently restrictive quarters, the vacant space will allow the company to develop a proposed 14,550 square-foot structure with an adjoining drive-thru and room to spare. Such a small move might seem a little silly, but there are no complaints or questions coming from Claremont’s development team. It’s a prime move as far as the city’s concerned. “A full-service pharmacy is something that’s really needed in the city,” Mr. Desatnik said. The new Walgreens will be the first full-service drug store within city limits, according to Mr. Desatnik, who notes the arrival has been long-awaited. The city originally hoped to see the drugstore chain move into the Peppertree Square Shopping Center at Indian Hill and Arrow several years ago, but in a disappointing turn of events, the drug store pulled out in 2010. Officials say there are no solid plans as of yet for another drug store to fill vacant space within the Peppertree center, which is currently undergoing renovation. In the meantime, Mr. Desatnik be-

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff This empty lot on the south side of Foothill Boulevard adjacent to Towne Avenue in Claremont is the planned location for a Walgreens pharmacy that will be built within sight of its current location in Pomona. The lot is nestled between Marie Callendarʼs restaurant and the 76 gas station.

lieves adding the large store to the Foothill Corridor will help fill the void in the meantime. “It’s a prime corner, between 2 major arterials in the city and with the freeway interchange there is a lot of traffic coming that way,” he noted. “It’s a good location for this kind of store.” While filling a need for residents, the store will provide some extra sales tax incentive for the city. A pharmacy of this

size can be expected to generate somewhere between $15,000 and $20,000 per year in local sales, Mr. Desatnik estimated. Architectural commissioners did note several suggestions to ensure the new business does not impede on neighboring residential communities. Among their suggestions was creating a taller wall and landscaping features to the rear of the complex to buffer the homes from

the business. While the project is still in the preliminary phase of development and will need several reviews before groundbreaking begins, including council approval, overall Mr. Desatnik and the development team are pleased with the proposal. They look forward to continuing to fill vacancies along one of the city’s main thoroughfares.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

TBI hosts memorial golf tournament at Sierra Lakes
Temple Beth Israel’s annual Ralph and Goldy Lewis Memorial Golf Classic is coming up on Monday, May 13. Enjoy an afternoon of golf at the Sierra Lakes Golf Club with a 1 p.m. tee off with a shotgun start. Come to play, volunteer or even sponsor a hole. Sign up as a single for $150 or as a foursome for $500. A rewards reception and opportunity drawings will take place following the tournament. For further information or to sign up, contact Temple Beth Israel at 626-1277.

OUR TOWN
contact Joanne Hwang, associate planner, at 399-5470, or by email at jhwang@ci.claremont.ca.us. A copy of the proposal can be downloaded from the city’s website, www.ci.claremont.ca.us. Proposals must be submitted to the Community Development Department, City Hall, 207 Harvard Ave., by Thursday, May 16 at 6 p.m. to be eligible for consideration.

VNA to honor family caregivers
On Tuesday, May 7, the VNA Hospice and Palliative Care of Southern California will celebrate its 61st anniversary by recognizing family caregivers and VNA staff who have provided extraordinary care to a loved one or patient in 2012. Local legislators, the VNA Board of Directors, donors, community members and staff will participate in acknowledging the agency’s accomplishments and honoring the “Extra Mile” caregiver and employee recipients. The celebration takes place at noon at the DoubleTree hotel in Claremont. For information, call Steve Lama, VNA’s public relations manager, at 447-7243.

City accepting proposals for community block grants
The city of Claremont is seeking proposals from individuals/firms interested in and qualified for implementation and administration of the city’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program. The city of Claremont participates in the US Department of Housing and Urban Development’s CDBG Program through the County of Los Angeles Community Development Commission (CDC). For fiscal year 20132014, the city’s allocation is approximately $137,204. These funds are used for a variety of projects and activities, which currently include the Housing Rehabilitation Program, Senior Case Management Program and Job Creation & Business Incentive Grant Program. For more information on how to submit a proposal,

Foothill Philharmonic sends students to LA Symphony
The Foothill Philharmonic Committee, a local member group of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Affiliates, has once again committed $4000 to purchase 200 tickets for local students to attend the Toyota Symphonies for Youth. Tickets are distributed to Claremont After School Program, the Upland elementary music program, the gifted program in the Pomona Unified School District and the Claremont School of Music. The Claremont area group, which is celebrating its 55th year, is a volunteer group which supports the LA Philharmonic through audience development, fundraising, and service. Claremont students, ages 5 to 11, will attend a concert at Walt Disney Music Hall.

Delve into corporate politics with the Democratic Club
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its monthly luncheon on Friday May 10. Will Barndt, who is currently a professor of politics at UC Riverside and will be joining the faculty at Pitzer College this summer, will discuss “Corporations and the Future of American Political Parties.” Mr. Barndt teaches and writes about democracy, political parties and social movements in the Western hemisphere. The event will be held at Casa de Salsa with lunch from noon to 1 p.m. and the speaker following. The cost for the meal, including taxes and tip, is $16. Everyone is welcome.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

6

The world’s passing by, again, in Claremont
by John Pixley

“N

ochella.” That’s what the sign said. The sign that was hand-printed and taped on a lamp post when I was going up College Avenue. The sign with the arrow, pointing over there. The sign that made me take a detour in my afternoon.

observer
our own! Or maybe “Nochella” meant something different, something better. I didn’t stay, so I don’t know if the bands were any good or if they kept to the tight schedule (when I left at about 4:20, the first band was still plugging in). But the intent was very much there. I was reminded, with the let’s-put-on-a-show vibe, of the Bottom Line Theater, which literally puts on a show. I have been quite impressed with the work of (and privileged to work twice with) this student-run theater company, based at Pomona College’s Seaver Theater, which puts on a number of high-quality productions for free or a couple bucks. (Never mind that when I arrived a few minutes before a recent 8 p.m. play, Varve, written and directed by a student, senior Bob Lutz, I was told to “come back in about 20 minutes” by a guy at the door who seemed surprised when he looked at his watch. This was the first time I’ve seen this happen, and these are, after all, kids who, when I once attended a meeting of their committee, the Druids, approved items by saying “sweeeeet!” and were planning a 5-college party featuring 100 bottles of wine.) The fact is that the BLT productions are at least as good as the theater department productions, and the one last weekend, a moody comedy called Lookyloo, again written and directed by a student (Alex Genty-Waksberg, a sophomore), was particularly good. There are also a remarkable number of student-run a capella groups on the campuses. Last Saturday, I happened across and ended up enjoying a nice alfresco concert featuring them, plus 2 other student groups from Los Angeles, again set up on the Smith Campus Center

It was Saturday afternoon of the first weekend that the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival was going on out in Indio. I suspect there were at least a few students from the colleges who had taken off to the desert for the weekend. Never mind that the end of the semester was in sight and that it was time to hit the books and write term papers and theses and study for finals. Never mind that it was crunch time at school. This was, after all, Coachella—the cultural phenomenon now so big that it is repeated for a second weekend. I imagine that, while it may not be noted in the official catalogues and brochures, the Claremont Colleges are now well-known—and popular—for being not far from the world-famous music festival in the desert. Still, there were plenty of students sticking around, or stuck on, the campuses, not able to go out to Coachella. For one thing, it was, after all, crunch time at school. Bummer. Thus, “Nochella.” Just as I suspected when I followed the arrow, this was a substitute music festival, with a stage and a couple food vendors being set up on the lawn in front of the Smith Campus Center near Bridges Auditorium on the Pomona College campus. There was a list, also taped on lamp posts, of bands playing every hour on the hour from 4 until after midnight, including “after hours” sets. This was clearly a homemade, DIY affair. While certainly not impromptu, this no doubt wasn’t an official college event—it wasn’t listed in the colleges calendar—and was put on by students with considerable planning and care. Even with schoolwork piling up, this was about coming together and “Let’s put on a show.” Big time. If we can’t go to Coachella, we’ll put on one of

and not officially listed or publicized. Then there are the ballroom dancers, in concert this weekend (and perhaps not completely student-run). I haven’t come across a performance by Without A Box in the last few years, but, for a while, this excellent, hilarious, student-run improv group was doing gigs in Hollywood. These are the same students who rally and march and even lock down buildings in support of the people who prepare and serve their food and clean their dormitories. They are also the students who tutor underprivileged kids and help people understand how to conserve energy. And, according to a flyer I recently saw, these students prepare food and write notes to give out to homeless gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youths. As the semester and school year comes to a close with a flurry of performances and activities, listed and unlisted, it is all the more evident that these students make up a whole world, their own world, here in Claremont. Even with papers and exams piling up, even with it being do-or-die time in their separate careers and lives, these students make the most of the community they have created together here. The closing of the school year each spring, culminating with graduation, making room for other students to join in and come together in the fall, is a sharp reminder of the worlds and communities created year after year on the campuses. While a few of these students may return to live in Claremont after their schooling here, these communities and worlds are in but very much separate from Claremont. I have heard some people over the years lament and complain that this is the case and wish that the students, with their energy and passion, were more involved in Claremont and its doings. I have done the same. But Claremont isn’t where the students live; it isn’t their community, isn’t their world. And guess what. During my years as a student at UC Riverside, except for when I was doing an internship in town, I barely acknowledged Riverside.
DEMYSTIFYING SUSTAINABILITY appears on page 9

Sally has a clever little game going. She brings several of the neighbors their papers to their doors and gets a lot of extra goodies for being a good puppy.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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A final run for Joe
Dear Editor: I have been a subscriber to the COURIER for many years and I have to say that no story has touched my heart as the one I have just read, “A Final Run for Joe.” I do remember seeing him run around Claremont and I wish I knew him. It is wonderful to read something heart warming come out of all the destruction that happened in Boston. I will be visiting Boston next month and it is good to know that there is a fellow friend from California watching over us in Boston.
Margaret Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS
these water sources are essential to providing drinking water to humans and for irrigating agriculture. A spill along the proposed route would put public health in danger. The US needs to focus on creating sustainable and clean sources of energy. Approving the KXL Pipeline will produce more dirty oil that will increase the threat of climate change and increase the world’s dependence on oil. If the US is serious about creating a clean energy economy, we need to lead the world towards the creation of clean energy production. Please pass your opinion to Secretary of State John Kerry since our opinions are important in this momentous decision. We hope he can take the opinions under careful consideration as he weighs the high risks that are associated with the building of the KXL Pipeline.
Ellen Taylor VP of Advocacy LWV of Claremont Area

Opposition to KXL Pipeline
Dear Editor: The League of Women Voters opposes the Keystone XL (KXL) Pipeline. Please join us and write to Secretary of State John Kerry and ask that as he considers the project he will also keep these comments in mind. The Canadian tar sands that will be carried by the KXL pipeline are the dirtiest oil on the planet. Producing synthetic oils from this substance will generate three times the global warming pollution of conventional production. The US should be a leader on fighting the effects of climate change, not facilitating the creation of additional pollution to harm the planet. The proposed pathway for the KXL pipeline goes through the Yellowstone River and the Ogallala Aquifer. Both of

Hiding behind the Constitution
Dear Editor: Reading Douglas Lyon’s letter of April 19, someone could get the impression that Moses brought down from the mountain the Constitution and Bill of Rights along with the 10 Commandments. According to Mr. Lyon, these 2 documents are never to be changed or altered.

This is ridiculous, as they have constantly been amended and interpreted over the years. In fact, the Constitution which was approved in 1789 was a replacement of the original constitution The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union which was approved in 1777. To the issue at hand, gun controls, Mr. Lyon appears to be trying to make the argument that these documents are proof that unrestricted gun ownership is a right from God. Of course the framers of the Constitution could not have foreseen that guns would eventually become as powerful as they are today. Back in the 1700s the musket was the most technologically advanced weapon capable of shooting one bullet before it had to be reloaded by hand. Today’s military grade rifles can kill dozens of people in the span of a few seconds, reloaded and ready to kill dozens more in a moment. The right to own such a weapon is certainly not guaranteed by the Constitution. The truth is that gun restrictions lead to less violence and less deaths by guns. This is a proven fact. The vast majority of We The People want to have, at the very least, a background check of everyone that wants to own a weapon. Something that is already required for 60 percent of gun purchases. Yet the will of the people is being thwarted by powerful lobbyists including the NRA. Those that advocate for unrestricted gun ownership argue that unless the solution is complete and 100 percent perfect that it shouldn’t be implemented.

Those of us that believe otherwise only look for these restrictions to improve safety; we don’t require them to overcome an unrealistic threshold. We know that gun restrictions will reduce the threat that currently exists. They also argue that these restrictions will not eliminate criminals from getting weapons illegally. In other words, why write a law that criminals will break? Isn’t breaking laws the very definition of criminal behavior? I lock my car when I leave it parked despite the fact that a car thief can find a way to get inside and steal it. Prevention of a crime by a law doesn’t have to be perfect for it to be effective. Mr. Lyon warns of the slippery slope. Give away one right and the next thing you know all rights will be taken away! This is, of course, idiotic and to use his own word, bloviating. Passing sensible gun restrictions does not in any way limit a law abiding citizen from owning a gun. It would make it more difficult for a criminal or potential criminal to get a weapon. It would make it more difficult to shoot as many bullets and kill as many children as we saw at Sandy Hook Elementary. If you have heard the parents of the 20 children slain at Sandy Hook speak, how could you not want to do everything possible to help prevent such an act of violence from happening again? They call on all of us to stand up for sensible gun restrictions. Shame on you, Mr. Lyon, for hiding behind the Constitution and standing with those that advocate for more violence.
William Stevenson Claremont READERSʼ COMMENTS continue on page 8

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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Water issue remains major concern for residents
Covering the water bases
Dear Editor: Before the city of Claremont moves forward on the water issue I have a question. Has the city sought a remedy to our problems with Golden State by going to the parent company for redress? Golden State Water is a subsidiary of American States Water Company. Perhaps American States is unaware of what Golden State has been doing especially regarding the surcharge on water usage if you happen to have used less water and you were charged money for having saved on your water usage. The city if they have not contacted American States needs to do so, so Claremont can claim that they have exhausted all potential remedies before any potential eminent domain proceeding which may or may not occur. The city has a burden of proof, and that is whether or not what is being charged to customers for their use of water from Golden State is unreasonable and out of line with what others are being charged. What has the PUC said about what Claremonters are being charged? If they, the PUC, has stated that what is being charged is proper and reasonable, the city will have a heavy burden of proof to overcome. This is not an attempt to decry the city's intent on going after Golden State Water, but just an effort of my part to encourage patience and caution before Claremont commits itself any further in the battle to make sure the residents of Claremont are

READERS’ COMMENTS
being treated fairly regarding their water rates. It might be possible that the parent company would recognize that changes need to be made and have better oversight over their subsidiary and rectify the wrongs that Golden State has done. We look forward to hearing some answers on where we are on the hot issue of the year in the city of Claremont.
Gar Byrum Claremont

The critical question
Dear Editor: Others have spoken more eloquently on the Golden State Water mailing of April 16, but I’ll weight in anyway. At the suggestion of GWS I looked at the study by Dr. Smith. There is food for thought there and, not surprisingly, some things I didn’t understand. Here are just a couple of questions for GWS. In Table 2 the Revenue Requirement increases from $13.4 million in 2007 to $16 million in 2011, an increase of just 19 percent. For that same period my water cost increased by 61 percent, while my water usage declined. If I am correct for usage, the increase is about 100 percent. How can my costs go up 5 times as much as yours? Your figure, Figure 2, is certainly graphic but I don’t understand the Capital Charge. Assuming a $104 million purchase price, Table 7 suggests a real capital cost of $128 million and Table 9 a Capital Charge of $15.8 million a year to pay for it. For a 30 year loan. that’s $474 million. That’s a lot for the initial loan. What am I missing? Of course, studies have to cut off somewhere, so Dr. Smith’s does not include the rate increase for 2012 and the pending request to the CPUC for another 24 percent increase. The important question is not, will I pay more than I am now if Claremont buys the water system, but rather, will I pay more to Claremont or to GWS over the 30 years, the bond period. The study does not address this crucial question.
Ed James Claremont READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand-delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission is Tuesday at 5 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

Comparing water systems
It’s good to see the Readers’ Comments in the COURIER on the possible acquisition of Claremont’s water system. The community needs a forum such as this for reasoned discussion of the issues involved. Today let’s consider the validity of comparing the municipally owned water system in La Verne with the system in Claremont, owned by Golden State Water Company. According to the comments from the League of Women Voters in the April 26 COURIER (and the opinion of the Editorial Board at the Daily Bulletin), it makes sense to compare the 2 systems. To the contrary, Dan Dell’Osa finds such a comparison to be a “False concept.” He sees similarity in comparing

water rates with comparing mortgage rates between newly purchased and older homes. But is that a valid comparison? Water rates do not equate with the cost of acquiring the system. Rates and purchase costs may be related, but they are quite different financial considerations. The La Verne and Claremont water systems are quite similar in age, size and quality of management and service, but they have different managers. So a more reasoned question would be “With 2 similar properties, one managed by a forprofit management team and the other by a non-profit team, which would have the lower management fee for similar quality of management?” Most would agree it would likely be the non-profit management. Actual rate comparisons by the League show the average La Verne customer pays about $52 per month less than in Claremont for the same amount of water, or about $7 million per year summed over all the customers in Claremont—very likely enough to pay for the water system with a 30-year bond, without raising water rates or increasing taxes. Whether or not there is validity in comparing the system in La Verne and Claremont is important. Claremont is fortunate to be able to compare our water system with a municipal system in a similar neighboring city, for it gives us a clear idea what it would be like if we too had a municipally owned and managed water system. If Claremont does acquire its water system, La Verne is likely to be willing to cooperate in its management. We would not be alone in this venture. I hope others who support or differ on this, or other acquisition issues, will make their reasoning known so together we can find the best possible result.
Freeman Allen Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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Saving and celebrating our historic places
by John Neiuber

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ay is Preservation Month and preservation organizations across the nation will focus their efforts on celebrating history and historic places. The theme this year, as designated by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is See! Save! Celebrate! and in Claremont we have much to celebrate when one considers our history and historic places.

Edward Durell Stone, known for his designs for Radio City Music Hall, the US Embassy in New Delhi, India, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, crafted the Harvey Mudd College Master Plan, and designed the Claremont School of Theology and local masterpiece, Kresge Chapel. When reviewing the above, it is apparent that the A simple walking tour of the Village reveals the ophistory of architecture in Claremont was written by a portunity to celebrate such historic treasures as the who's who of some of the most influential architects City Hall, The Santa Fe Depot, the Packing House, of the early to mid-twentieth century. And for the the Post Office and the Ice House Office (now The Back Abbey). Throughout the city there are the Pitzer most part, these architects did not design just one Ranch stone buildings that are being incorporated into building, they are responsible for many of the most a new housing development, the Padua Hills Theatre, enduring buildings in the city. However, the above and much of the campuses of the Claremont Colleges. list is missing one architect, and this one architect did design only one building in Claremont. His name is From the very beginning, the city has enjoyed A. Quincy Jones and he designed the Huntley Bookbuildings and master plans developed by some of the leading architects of their day. Myron Hunt, a founder store of the Claremont Colleges. A. Quincy Jones (1913-1979), on this the 100th of the Southern California School of Architecture, year of his birth, is the subject of a major museum retwas one of the most influential architects of the early rospective at the Hammer Museum, May 25, 2013 twentieth century. His master plan for Pomona ColSeptember 8, 2013, presented as part of the Getty lege guided the development of the school well into sponsored, Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern the 1920s. Some of the college’s best loved gardens Architecture in LA. and buildings were designed by Hunt: the Greek Jones, a modernist and architecture professor at Theater, Rembrandt Hall, the Pomona Gates, and USC, brought a high standard of design to the growBridges Hall of Music, thought to be one of Hunt's ing middle class after World War II. He redefined best buildings. postwar housing and used cost-effective, innovative Scripps College’s initial plan and buildings were and sustainable building methods long before it was designed by pioneering architect Gordon Kaufmann. fashionable or responsible to do so. He is well known, Millard Sheets and architect S. David Underwood, who also worked on the Sheets studio with him, were along with his partner, Frederick Emmons, for his work in designing innovative tract homes for builder, the architects of the Garrison Theater. Joseph Eichler. He was one of the first architects to Sheets also designed the Pomona First Federal look at developments as an opportunity to build a Bank, now the US Bank, at Foothill and Indian Hill. Theodore Criley Jr. and Fred W. McDowell formed a community through shared open spaces, a variety of home models and non-grid site planning. successful partnership that produced Scott Hall and Jones was known for designing from the inside out. Mead Hall at Pitzer College. Fred McDowell deHis interiors are recognized for their expansiveness signed a number of homes for well-known artists, and efficient layouts. His designs integrated the home among those the residences of Karl Benjamin and into the gardens and landscape, still a hallmark of Harrison McIntosh. Criley designed the Claremont contemporary design today. United Church of Christ and a number of homes inKnown mostly for his single-family residences and cluding the Hollis Allen and the Hillard residences. residential housing developments, Jones also deRichard Neutra, one of the most celebrated archisigned churches, commercial buildings, university tects of the modern movement, designed the Clareprojects, apartment buildings, civic spaces as well as mont United Methodist Church and the doing extensive planning work. His many projects inNinneman/Paglia House. Cliff May, known as the “Father of the California Ranch House” designed and clude such varied works as the Case Study House built homes in Claremont. Foster Rhodes Jackson de- Program, the USC Annenberg School of Communications, the expanded headquarters for Herman Miller, signed the Hendrick's Pharmacy building, now Walter’s Restaurant, as well as the Lindley Mixon Studio. St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Studio City, the Northridge Congregational Church, Warner Bros Records in Burbank, the Carillion Tower at UC Riverside, and the Palm Springs Tennis Club. Jones is credited with over 5000 built projects, making him one of the most prolific architects of the past century, however, in her definitive book on the architect and his work, author Cory Buckner chose just 65 that illustrate the breadth and depth of his work. Contained within the pages of A. Quincy Jones (Phaidon) is the Huntley Bookstore of the Claremont Colleges. Buckner writes: “Jones’ use of an exposed structural system is unusual in a commercial project and expresses his interest in modularity and rationalized building systems. At the entrance to the store, trellis beams are hung from an exposed beam supported by thin steel columns, creating a rhythm and horizontal Photo courtesy of Claremont Heritage focus that appears to reduce the overall mass of The original architectʼs rendering of Huntley Bookthe building. The main level has an open plan, store, designed by noted architect A. Quincy Jones.

Photo courtesy of Claremont Heritage Huntley Bookstore shortly after its completion.

with only one column supporting the mezzanine above.” Unlike many commercial buildings, Jones created a welcoming and open feel one would find in his residential buildings such as exposed masonry concrete, exposed timber post-and-beam construction and floor-to-ceiling glass to harmonize the interior with the outside. Some of the original character-defining features of the bookstore have been removed, including the trellis and exposed beam. The Claremont University Consortium (CUC) currently owns the building, however the Claremont Graduate University (CGU) is considering taking ownership and including it in its new master plan. One tentative plan calls for demolishing the bookstore and building a new 4-story building in its place. CGU has recently held hearings to gain input about its proposed master plan. The loss of the Huntley Bookstore would be a loss not only to the colleges and the city, but to the legacy and history of the renowned and respected architects who created here, and as the lone contribution of A. Quincy Jones. Once a building is gone, it is gone forever, and how many times have cities and citizens mourned the loss of something iconic that cannot be regained. Years later, you hear people talk about how much they loved and enjoyed this or that particular building and how they wish it still existed. Yes, buildings are built for specific purposes and those purposes change, but the building embodies the history, creativity and energy of the past and can enhance and contribute to the future. The Packing House no longer processes the fruit of the citrus industry, but contributes to our city, its culture and its economy today. Padua Theatre no longer stages productions by the Mexican Players, but enriches our lives through the events held there, both personal and civic in nature. The First National Bank is no longer a bank, but serves well as a vibrant commercial property now known as the Verbal Building. Truly, adaptive reuse has proven to be the friend of historic preservation in Claremont and has contributed immensely to our civic and economic well-being. Bookstores may soon be a thing of the past. It is not a pleasant reality to face to those of us who like the smell of paper and ink and the feel of a book in our hand. We now download our books, research online or log into a library. Books as we know them may disappear, but the buildings that house those bookstores still have life and can be adapted for other uses. As we look to the future, we must honor the past, we must preserve that which is good and we must recognize the contribution these architects made to our built environment and history. It is time to See! Save! and Celebrate! A. Quincy Jones and the Huntley Bookstore.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

10

Ideas for Mom
Mother’s Day is just a week away but don’t fret, options in Claremont abound

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ooking for some way to treat mom on Mother’s day can sometimes be stressing while looking for something that pampers. With the date fast approaching a couple local businesses have already started making plans for mom’s special day on Sunday, May 12.
Going simple would include buying a certificate or basket for a discounted spa day to help her unwind. If you are looking for a deal then check out Essentials day spa and salon or Ceilo Mio. This year Essentials is offering 2 deals to those looking for an escape. The first package includes a 60-minute massage with a choice of body scrub or polish for $100. The second deal includes a massage, facial, shampoo and blow dry, make-up touch-up and a lunch for $199. “Usually, we promote gift certificates and we wanted to do something a little different this year,” Essentials spa supervisor Joanna Prologo said. “We have a couple of the ladies there that we asked if you were to get something for Mother’s day what would you prefer, so the packages were suggested by mothers that work here.” Cielo Mio is also offering a Mother’s day special of a 60-minute massage, 60-minute vitamin C facial, Rose and champagne scrub, Pedicure and Manicure package for $199. Guests will also get a gift bag with a spa robe, slipper, bath salt and your very own rose and champagne scrub to take home. For those moms that like to be pampered in the comfort of their own home check out The Bath Workshop for a

custom made bath salt. Some custom packages will be selling for $15 leading up to Mother’s day. Owner Susan Pearson makes it a point to have snacks laid out for customers so they can celebrate with their customers. The Bath Workshop also offers free gifts for customers without requiring a purchase. “We spend Mother’s Day down here, that’s why we have food here so people can bring their moms and share the day with us,” Ms. Pearson said. Those looking to just go out on Mother’s day should look into Brunch and Lunch at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden or at the McKinley’s Grille at the Sheraton Fairplex. The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden will feature live music by Seth Greenberg and a free ticket to the butterfly pavilion for groups. The price of tickets is $48 for members and $30 for children. Call 625-8767 ext. 224 for details. Brunch will include dishes of ricotta and orange blintzes with strawberry sauce, artichoke and mushroom quiche and grilled chicken and apple sausages. Desserts will include petite sweets such as lemon and kiwi tartlets and mini chocolate truffle cakes. For lunch, the menu calls for chicken breast rolled in prosciutto, sage and parmesan all served in a marsala wine sauce. Sides include rice pilaf and julienne vegetables. At the McKinley Grille, enjoy either breakfast or lunch for $35.95 adults and $15.95 for children. Call for reservations at 868-5915. Breakfast includes classics like pancakes, bacon and omelets made to order with choice of toppings. Roasted turkey with garlic gravy and black pepper thyme-seasoned beef will also be offered.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff In addition to fresh flowers Claremont Florist also offers silk arrangements like this one on display in their Foothill Boulevard showroom. A full feature on the local floral shop is on page 11 of this edition.

Lunch will feature pan-roasted chicken breast or marjoram poached steelhead trout. Sides include roasted potatoes and seasonal roasted vegetables. Local favorite Walter’s Restaurant (310 Yale Ave., 624-4914) will offer their traditional brunch, which includes brunch staples like scrambled eggs and bacon alongside the restaurant’s signature Afghan dishes. Tutti Mangia (102 Harvard Ave., 625-4669) will host a brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The brunch includes a complimentary glass of prosecco, mimosa or orange juice. For pricing, call the restaurant during regular hours. If mom has a sweet teeth try out the custom baskets at A Kline Chocolatier or one of the Mother’s Day packages from I Like Pie.

Using pre-selected sweets or a given price-range, A Kline can construct a basket out of their homemade chocolates to build the perfect gift. They also encourage customers to come in and select the chocolate they would like to build their own gift. I Like Pie bakeshop will feature three special packages that take care of both dinner and dessert. Customers can select from 3 holiday packages: one 10inch savory pie plus a 10-inch sweet pie for $50; one 10-inch savory pie plus 4 small jelly-jar sweet pies for $45; or one 10-inch savory pies and 4 large jelly-jar pies for $50. Deals are being announced every day, but make sure to check out these pampering deals while on the search for the perfect gift this week.
—Christina Burton

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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Ideas for Mom: Floral shop owner gets back to her roots
Julie Maxson, owner of Claremont Florist on Foothill Boulevard, lives by the words of pioneering Luther Burbank, attesting that flowers are “the medicine of the soul.” She finds working with blossoming buds and Mother Nature’s whims to be literally enlivening. “Mother Nature is never the same, no 2 stems are alike,” she explained. “It’s always surprising you.” Next weekend Ms. Maxson will get her fill of Mother Nature’s surprises as she turns hundreds of blossoms into blooming tributes for Mother’s Day. She estimates that around 150 assortments will be assembled at her store for the occasion. Though it does mean more work and less play on a day meant for pampering from her husband and 3 kids, her original purpose for purchasing the business was with family in mind. “I knew the holidays were hectic, but what eased my mind was that I’d be available for my children and be able to make my own hours,” Ms. Maxson explained. While Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day often signify 24-hour shifts with barely enough time for a quick shower, it also means having the shop bustling with family members lending a helping hand in addition to taking part in family traditions, like her youngest child’s personal favorite. “My 9-year-old enjoys coming in to visit because we are a big group that day...and because we order pizza,” Ms. Maxson shared. The flower shop has provided some extra perks for the Maxson kids, like playtime with cousins and an occasional slice of pepperoni pizza. But it’s also figured heavily in other aspects of their daily life, from the routine chores about her former boss. When she was told the business would be up for grabs, she took the opportunity to take her floral hobby full-time. More than a decade later, she still finds the same excitement in creating floral displays as she did during her first days of employment. Every flower is handpicked with Ms. Maxson’s help from a market in the City of Industry and brought to her shop on a daily basis throughout the week. Assortments are then assembled on site with painstaking care by Ms. Maxson and her assistant Maggie Guananja. Ms. Maxson welcomes customers’ hands in creating bouquets, but relishes the opportunity to have the reigns let loose in order to add a little of her own flair. “It’s not like a T-shirt you get off the internet,” Ms. Maxson said referring to her displays. “Everything is handmade.” She suggests lilies and roses as hot COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff items for Mother’s Day and would be Claremont Florist owner Julie Maxson started working at the store as part of her amiss to not mention that spring is the ROP training following high school. After a time working for larger corporations perfect time to indulge in her beloved she bought the florist in 2001 in an effort to make her own schedule. tulips. Though she hasn’t had enough the shop to indulging themselves in the ernment class, a school counselor sug- time to plant a few of the spring buds in creativity of putting together a fancy gested signing up with ROP to meet her own garden, Mother’s Day will find bouquet for a teacher. graduation requirements. Ms. Maxson her surrounded by the flowers she fanWhen looking for a job that allowed heeded the recommendation and signed cies and the people she loves, family and flexibility for child care, it wasn’t by up for a floral design course and accom- customers alike. happenstance that Ms. Maxson, an asso- panying internship at the Claremont “Maggie and I really enjoy getting to ciate of Lewis Homes, fell upon entre- Florists. She stayed on another 15 years know our customers, those that come in preneurial work through Claremont following graduation. and those I visit for deliveries,” she said, Florist. Though she purchased the busiWhile she helped with routine admin- adding that even decades later surprising ness in 2001, Ms. Maxson was no novice istrative items like answering phones, Ms. a customer with a handful of flowers never to floral work. She got her start in floral Maxson’s favorite assignment was putting gets old. “I love to see their reactions.” art decades earlier through a class pro- together the shop’s spring assortments— Claremont Florist is located at 226 W. vided by Baldy View’s Regional Occu- piecing together carnations and asters and Foothill Blvd. Check out floral displays pation Program (ROP), offering tulips, her favorite, into beautiful, lush dis- or make custom orders by visiting the vocational training to students. The class plays. Creating spring arrangements re- store or stopping by their website at was a lifelong career-starter for the mains her favorite task today. www.claremontflorist.com. Ms. Maxson young Ms. Maxson, though she didn’t Though Ms. Maxson eventually left can also be reached by calling 621-1879. know it at the time. the flower shop to pursue work in the —Beth Hartnett Struggling with her high school gov- corporate world, she kept in contact with news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

12

Ideas for Mom:
Floral designer brings ‘Element’ of surprise to her creations

H

igh-end blooms, plenty of texture and a touch of the rustic: These are the ingredients in Jackie Girard’s floral designs.
Her creations, which grace events ranging from weddings to corporate and college functions, teem with striking and unexpected pairings, making them look more like the subjects of a Dutch master still life than your average bouquet. For a recent wedding, Ms. Girard pulled out all the stops. Two of her arrangements used up-cycled containers, a carved piece of found wood and a well-aged wooden bucket, to house a riot of plants and posies. There were purple hydrangeas, lavender Amnesia Roses, ruffled ranunculus, purple-hearted kale, cascading amaranths, climbing Bells of Ireland, delicate scabiosa pods and fist-sized artichokes. The vibrant selection, which provides the inquiring viewer with a veritable education in horticulture, is par for the course for Ms. Girard. “I particularly love this one,” she said, indicating the bucket arrangement Ms. Girard, the mother of 2 boys, has dabbled in freelance floral design over the years and has always thrown herself into home gardening. At her Upland home, her current spring garden features an array of shrubs, herbs and flowers including a mass planting of purple irises. It wasn’t until September of 2011, however, that she decided to give flowers her full attention. She set up her business, Element

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger An example of floral designer Jackie Girardʼs work featuring hydrangeas, roses, kale, succulents and more. Ms. Giradʼs shop, Element Home and Garden, is located within the Ivy House at 216 Foothill Blvd.

Home and Garden, renting a space amid Ivy House Antiques and Home Décor on Foothill Boulevard. It is far enough from the Claremont Village that customers don’t have to jockey for parking spaces, Ms. Girard notes. Along with providing headquarters for her flower arranging, it has room for

wares such as silk flowers, dried lavendar by the scopp, old silver- and copperware, antique furnishings, garden décor and entertainment-themed gifts ranging from $5 to $150. Her husband also contributes, collaborating on projects such as a chandelier light fixture housed in a vintage birdcage.

Ms. Girard adores her shop, which is bathed in light and features a pitched wood ceiling, concrete floors and a patio. “It inspires me,” she said. “And it’s been a wonderful fit with the Ivy House because we complement each other.”
ELEMENT HOME & GARDEN continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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ELEMENT HOME & GARDEN continued from the previous page

Her enthusiasm is the hallmark of someone who came into her calling later in life. “I took the step and I love it. I feel it’s what I should be doing,” she said. “My number-one passion is horticulture, and making relationships has been so gratifying.” One such relationship has been with Ivy House proprietor Jackie Dunn, who has become one of her biggest boosters. Ms. Dunn is an interior designer and she often asks “the other Jackie” to create silk floral designs as a finishing touch for a client. Ms. Girard has been a real asset to the Ivy House and its customers, she said. “I think she’s the best florist,” Ms. Dunn enthused. “No event is ever the same. She’s got a great work ethic and she’s fun to be around.” Ms. Girard’s floral design business has grown steadily over the last 2 years until she now does about 5 events a month. Most customers come to her through word-of-mouth. Sometimes she will leave a lovely arrangement at Wolfe’s Market with a card, a symbiotic arrangement that enhances the store’s décor and gives her exposure. She’s ready to expand further, although she admits she relishes the rare weekend when she doesn’t have a wedding so she can get to work in her garden. Other than a touch of floral snobbery (Ms. Girard notes with pride, “I’ve never worked with a carnation in my life”), she is a down-to-earth person who draws endless happiness from helping plants do beautiful things. “It’s intuitive—it’s God using my hands,” she said of her process. “I just get out of the way and let God take control.” Operating her own retail space has involved a bit of a learning curve. Ms. Girard has learned not to panic on days when she doesn’t make a sale, because inevitably someone comes along who makes a bigger purchase that helps the bottom line. She is a classic, self-taught artisan, with her only training including a weekend gig at a florist shop at age 18. Ms. Girard has a hand in every aspect of a client’s event. She likes to see the venue first in order to ensure that her designs complement the space, and hand-picks her blooms from Mayesh Wholesale

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger For a recent wedding, Jackie Girard of Element Home & Garden created lush floral arrangements featuring hydrangeas, roses, kale, succulents and more. She has been running her business from a space in the Ivy House antique and home design shop on foothill Boulevard since fall of 2011.

Florist in Los Angeles, which specializes in highquality cut flowers from around the world, to hand pick her blooms. Like most women, she has a favorite flower: hydrangeas. Ms. Girard is equally drawn, however, to unusual elements with an emphasis in texture. For instance, she is always looking for a way to incorporate artichokes and succulents into her designs. She particularly enjoys the holidays, when she has a chance to dress up her shop and events with the rustic beauty of gleaming birch branches, snowy cotton pods and burlap with lots of pops of red. “I find inspiration wherever I go, I buy anywhere and everywhere,” she said. “I just really love what I do.” For more information, call 482-0727 or visit www.elementhomeandgarden.com. —Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY
architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

architect
WHEELER & WHEELER
A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street Claremont, CA 91711

attorney MIKE F. OʼBRIEN
Attorney at Law

attorney Kendall & Gkikas LLP
Attorneys at Law 134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711

100 West Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

212 Yale Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

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(909) 624-5095
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(909) 626-9999
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla español

Building a better Claremont since 1985

attorney PAUL L. BRISSON
Attorney at Law 112 Harvard Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation

child & family therapy
ANN BINGHAM NEWMAN, PH.D., MFT
Child Specialist
Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

chiropractor
DR. MARTIN S. McLEOD
411 N. Indian Hill Blvd.

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Bankruptcy, Civil Litigation, Wills & Living Trusts, Mediation

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(909)398-1984 dentist
PETER T. IGLER, D.D.S. D. INGRID ROJAS, D.D.S.
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Certified Public Accountants 675 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 300 Claremont, CA 91711

design/build SRS GENERAL CONTRACTOR, INC.
909-621-1559
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• Residential Remodel • Restoration of Unique & Vintage homes • Room additions.

financial consultants
SUZANNE H. CHRISTIAN
CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® Professional Securities offered through LPL Financial Member of FINRA/SIPC 419 Yale Ave. Claremont

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optometry
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real estate broker Geoff T. Hamill
Broker Associate, ABR. CRS. GRI, E-PRO, SRES, D.R.E. #00997900
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty

tax preparation D. PROFFITT, E.A.
Claremont, CA 91711

OPTOMETRY
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Payroll Service • Accounting

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#1 in Claremont sales & listings since 1988

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NEW CAR GUIDE
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Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

15

Franklin Wiemann
Franklin “Frank” Roy Wiemann, a longtime Claremont resident, died on Thursday, April 18, 2013 from complications associated with esophageal cancer. He was 79. Mr. Wiemann was born on January 26, 1934 in Exira, Iowa, the fifth of 11 children born to John Henry Wiemann and Lula Francis Murray. He grew up on the family farm, helping to tend crops and livestock. Mr. Wiemann was a graduate of Exira High School, where he excelled in science and math and was a member of the football and wrestling teams. The only child in his family to go to college, he continued his studies at Mankato State University in Minnesota where he played college football. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1956 and then joined the US Army, serving for 2 years as a technician. He was honorably discharged and then went on to earn a postgraduate degree from UCLA. Mr. Wiemann worked in the aerospace industry for 40 years, starting his career at 3M. Business kept him shuttling between Washington and New York and he met his wife Judy while she was working as a flight attendant for American Airlines. The couple was married in Palatka, Florida on June 30, 1962. They had 2 children, Jonathan and Denise. Mr. Wiemann next moved to Honeywell, where he spent 30 years in marketing positions, culminating in vice presidency of marketing. Mr. Wiemann’s job promoting defense systems took him far and wide, including many trips throughout Asia. In addition to 40 years in Claremont, he and Mrs. Wiemann lived in Sunnyvale, California; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Huntington Beach,

OBITUARIES
After 11 years in Europe, Mr. Wiemann retired again. He and Mrs. Wiemann came back to live in Claremont in 1999. When Ms. Wiemann died in 2002, Mr. Wiemann went back to work, this time for Northrop Grumman and coincidentally was sent back to Brussels. “He was a quintessential airport expert,” Jonathan said of his globetrotting father. Mr. Wieman retired for the final time in 2004. He spent the rest of his life living in his home at 430 Redlands Avenue in Claremont. Mr. Wiemann had many friends that he kept in contact with over the years. He spent his days planning and going on trips to visit them. He also enjoyed spending time with his family and grandkids. Although a longtime Independent, he drifted toward the Republican Party and worked as an advocate of various groups determined to keep the price of water low. As far as sports affiliations go, Mr. Wiemann, a fan of professional football, was a longtime booster of the Minnesota Vikings. An avid fitness enthusiast, Mr. Wiemann golfed at the Glendora Country club 3 or 4 times a week, regularly worked out at the Claremont Club and enjoyed long walks in the foothills above Claremont. Mr. Wiemann also loved playing bridge and was a regular member of a group that played on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Mr. Wiemann’s greatest passion may have been wine. He had an extensive wine collection, and he even made wine. He would routinely meet a bunch of fellow wine enthusiasts at “Tuttis” to celebrate happy hour. “He just loved life,” Mr. Wiemann’s family shared, adding that he will be deeply missed. Mr. Wiemann is survived by his son, Jonathan Roy Wiemann of Rancho Santa Margarita; by his daughter, Denise Lynn Wiemann of Claremont; and by 3 grandchildren, Jessica Denise Washington, Jefferson Logan Wiemann and Keaton James Wiemann. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 40-plus years, Judith Irene Dunn. Services were held on April 26 at Forest Lawn in Covina Hills.

Salesman, world traveler, avid golfer

California; Brussels, Belgium and London, England. Mr. Wiemann retired for the first time from Honeywell in 1988. He quickly went back to work for TRW and was sent to Brussels. Mr. Wiemann loved Brussels and its vibrant ex-patriot community. He served as president of the American Business Club, which annually put on an elaborate Fourth of July celebration, complete with fireworks. After several years, the office was moved to London, England, another locale that Mr. Wiemann found delightful. During their time in Europe, the Wiemanns traveled extensively, often attending major air shows in sites like Paris, Spain and Italy. Other memorable destinations including the Netherlands and Scandinavia, and an unforgettable trip on the Orient Express.

Esther ʻPearlʼ Van Hook
Esther “Pearl” Van Hook, a longtime proctor at Claremont High School, died on Wednesday, May 1, 2013. She was 88. A celebration of Ms. Van Hook’s life will be held on Saturday, May 4 at 2 p.m. at San Dimas Community Church, 216 N. San Dimas Ave. in San Dimas. A viewing will be held at Todd Memorial Church, 570 N. Garey Ave. in Pomona, from 5 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 9.

Conrad Casler

Friends and acquaintances of the late “Connie” Casler, who died recently at the age of 83, are all invited to attend a gathering in his honor on Friday, May 10 at 2 p.m. at the Sanctuary for Spiritual Living church at 5446 N. Citrus Ave. in Covina (an approximate one-half mile south of the 210 Freeway). Following a service in honor of the longtime journalist and Claremont resident, participants will take part in a potluck meal. All are welcome. Additional information is available from the Rev. Kris Collins at the church at (626) 332-6838 or from Carol Bliss at 445-0645.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 19, 2013

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Mother and daughter team Yesenia Huff, left, and Anna Huff have recently opened Salad Farm on Bonita Avenue in the Claremont Village. Their menu includes a large selection of salads as well as paninis, baked potatoes and grilled dishes. Below, cook Mike Trujillo helps get ready for the lunchtime rush on Wednesday at the new restaurant.

New eatery focuses on flavorful, healthy foods

M

aking the switch from deep-fried to leafy greens wasn’t a difficult choice for Anna Huff, but it’s not to say she doesn’t know temptation. Fried foods slathered in mayo were not an uncommon or unwelcome sight at many a family gathering throughout her childhood.  

“It’s all about moderation,” she insists. With moderation in mind, Ms. Huff helms Claremont’s newest eatery, Salad Farm, which blends organic goodness with robust flavor in heaping but healthy portions. It’s not about skimping on all the good stuff, she asserts. At her new establishment, Ms. Huff encourages incorporating all the trimmings—bacon, avocado and her personal favorite, barbecue sauce— while fitting in the “good stuff,” a wide selection of farm-fresh fruits and organically-grown vegetables. Ms. Huff knew Salad Farm, a choice conscious franchise that prides itself on quality, would be at home in Claremont, a city known for its globally-minded citizenry. “I knew people in Claremont would appreciate what we had to offer,” said Ms. Huff, who began buying organic for her own family about 10 years ago. The move away from fried foods was an easy transition for Ms. Huff, a woman with an outdoor inclination and a steadfast love for the grill. She seizes any opportunity to marry a homemade marinade with

chicken and vegetables. “Even when our kitchen was being remodeled, she wouldn’t go out and buy fast food,” her daughter Yesenia Huff recalled. “She was always in the backyard coming up with something new to make.” It’s earned her quite the reputation as her relatives’ go-to chef, always ready with the makings for a delicious roast or other seasoned specialty at parties and family gatherings. And her passion ignited an excitement in her children over the possibilities of creating in the kitchen. Her daughter, Yesenia Huff, is a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena and is thrilled to be partnering with her mother for their first culinary venture. “I work 16-hour shifts, but it feels like barely 8,” she maintains. Ms. Huff encouraged her children at an early age to engage in a healthy lifestyle

to prevent illnesses that plagued many of her own siblings because of their bad eating habits. As a widowed mother of 4, Ms. Huff admits seeing her children adopt those creative and healthy culinary choices are what bring her the most joy. “Wherever I go, people are amazed to see my kids eating Brussels sprouts or asparagus,” Ms. Huff said. “Instead of asking for French fries they always asked for protein.” She hopes to help others instill the same healthy impulses in their dining choices by offering choices that highlight the decadent side of diet and nutrition. Cool, crisp dishes like the California salad,—crunchy romaine brimming with seasonal fruit, baked rice noodles, sweet raisins, roasted walnuts, fresh avocado and tangy honey mustard dressing leave customers full, yet

satisfied. The options don’t stop at salads. There are baked potatoes filled with melted cheese, steamed broccoli and other veggies or chicken and oven-baked Paninis like the Turkey Avocado made with smoked turkey, pesto mayo and creamy Swiss cheese. Ms. Huff offers her personal favorite, which is not surprisingly the barbecue chicken salad. “I just love barbecue sauce,” she laughed. “It goes well with everything.” While familiar with the way of the barbecue, she looks forward to delving into the uncharted territory of restaurant ownership. Turning hobby into career was a welcome change after years of working as a tax preparer and bookkeeper for couples going through divorce. “I got tired of the sadness that surrounded my previous work,” Ms. Huff said. “I love to see the happy faces on people when they have a nice salad they enjoy. It brings with it a warm feeling.” After 20 months of going through paperwork and working with corporate to get the restaurant up and running, she is basking in the opportunity to finally see her labor of love at work. “A couple days ago I took a moment and sat down and looked at everything and just thought wow, it’s all finally a reality,” Ms. Huff said. “This is my American dream come true.” Salad Farm is located at 373 Bonita Ave. For more information, call 621-1770 or visit www.saladfarmrestaurants.com.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

17

The Gypsy Sisters arrive with new art, sisters and brothers
It is time for spring art and the Gypsy Sisters and their brothers are sure to bring pleasure to the new season, and just in time for Mother’s Day. New Gypsies are being included bringing with them a bright look at creative work not yet seen in this area. They will be parking their wagons in front of the UCC Church on Harrison Avenue, between Harvard and Yale Avenues, in the spacious basement area. Doors open on Friday, May 3 from 4 to 9 p.m., on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Come enjoy Gypsy creativity and be pleasured by the amazing colors and ideas that they bring with them.

OUR TOWN
ing, sustainable sources of housing for currently homeless people. The group also seeks to help the Claremont homeless population to obtain food stamps, general relief, medical and psychological examinations, SSI, etc. The group believes that only the pairing of a homeless person with a committed, volunteer “homeless advocate” has resulted in ending homelessness for that person. The purpose of the group’s work this summer is to connect each identified homeless person in Claremont with a pair of dedicated, volunteer homeless advocates. The advocates will be trained to guide and support the homeless person through the process of obtaining necessary services, which already exist and, for the most part, can be obtained locally. The ultimate goal of the volunteer advocates will be to get each homeless person into a sustainable source of housing during the 90day period of the program, which is June 8 through September 8, 2013. The core team meets each Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the Friends Meeting House, 727 Harrison Ave., Claremont. All those interested in working on this concern are invited to the May 11 meeting. For more information, contact Mary Cooper, volunteer coordinator, at maryclaremont@aol.com or Paul Wood, project coordinator, paul_f_wood@yahoo.com or by phone at 367-5011.

projects that could be considered are city streets and county highways, sewage collection and treatment, water treatment, water supply and flood control, educational facilities, parks and recreation facilities and solid waste collection and disposal.

Girl Scouts donate cookie revenue to local food pantry

Claremontʼs Summer to end homelessness projects kick off
Claremont’s Summer to End Homelessness will hold a kickoff meeting Saturday, May 11 at 10 a.m. in the Grove Room of the Hughes Center. Members of local churches, “Claremont Elders For the 99%” and other community members have developed this project with the cooperation of the city of Claremont, Occupy Claremont and other citizens. The project’s core group consists of David Levering, Karl Hilgert, Mary Cooper, Rev. George Silides, Charles Bayer, Deborah McKean, Karen Chapman Lenz, Andrew Mohr and Paul Wood. The purpose of the kickoff meeting is to attract potential volunteers, who will do much of the vital work. The group needs volunteers and financial contributions to make its goals a reality. The goals and “core principles” of Claremont’s Summer to End Homelessness are: To provide Claremont’s homeless with more than just temporary measures, e.g., the occasional meal, shower, motel voucher or cash handout. These are lovely gestures but do not alleviate the core problem. To end homelessness for as many of Claremont’s homeless people as possible. “Ending homelessness” is defined as securing ongo-

Photo courtesy of Girl Scout Troop 2634

Holdenʼs local-state investment partnership program, approved by assembly committee
Assemblymember Chris Holden’s bill to promote economic development and revitalize communities has been approved in the Assembly Local Government Committee. AB 294 creates a Joint Investment Partnership Program whereby the state can partner with local governments to invest in up to 25 critical infrastructure projects that an economic analysis determines will result in a net gain of general fund revenues over the life of the investment. “California lacks an economic development plan and strategy to revitalize communities,” Mr. Holden explained. “This bill creates a pilot program to reform the way public works projects are financed. It’s part of the discussion on how best to revitalize California’s communities.” All financing for public works projects would have to be approved by the Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank (I-Bank). Among the public works

Every year, Girls Scouts across the country take part in selling America’s favorite cookies for a good cause. Part of the proceeds benefits the Girl Scout Organization in providing programs for all girls regardless of financial status. The second graders of Our Lady of the Assumption’s Troop 2634 took their giving to a new level this year. At the end of every cookie season the Girl Scouts of Greater Los Angeles keeps $0.75 cents for every dollar sold for providing programming. The rest is kept by the Girl Scout troops for saving or enjoying. This year, the girl scouts of Troop 2634 decided on their own to donate 60 percent of their personal profits for the needy in their community. Late last month, the scouts visited the Inland Valley Hope Partner’s pantry in Claremont to present their $318.40 check. “I want everybody to have stuff that we have,” said second grade scout Tabitha Soto. “I want to make them very happy.” “My hope is that the girls of Troop 2634 will always remember the day they chose to put others needs before their wants and continue this journey the rest of their lives,” said troop leader Rosalie Swiatek.

Claremont United girls Select wins championship
Claremont United girls under 10 won the Select Soccer Championship last weekend with a nailbiting shootout victory over Rowland Heights. Coaches PJ Minaie and Ron Yeung led the team through an undefeated 9-game regular season. United won their semifinal, and then met their match in the final game. Coach Minaie gave a testament to the team’s resilience. “The girls have hustled and played with heart all season. They were picked from different AYSO teams in the fall and were a little nervous playing with new team members, but they got it going very quickly. After the first 2 games, the rest of the season was a breeze.”

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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Strong start fizzles for Wolfpack boys volleyball

A

packed house inside Claremont High’s east gymnasium watched the Wolfpack boys volleyball team battle the Burbank Burroughs Indians on Tuesday evening.
The Indians sought to avenge an early-season loss to the undefeated Wolfpack in the Pacific League’s ultimate regular season match. Claremont took the first set, but could not keep the momentum and fell to Burroughs, 3 sets to one. Claremont’s unbeaten run has been impressive. The Pack posted a league record of 11 wins and no losses, having swept Arcadia in 3 sets last Thursday. Burroughs has kept right on Claremont’s heels, however. With a 10-1 record, the Indians’ only loss of the season was a 5 set loss to the Wolfpack back on March 29. This match would determine who would finish atop the Pacific League standings. Coach Bernie Wendling commented on the history between the teams. “It is always a great game when we play Burroughs. Last time it was a 5-setter and we edged them. Their best player won co-MVP with ours. But we are a top 10 team in the division and I will always feel that we can win.” The atmosphere was absolutely electric, as the starting lineups were announced. Claremont came out on fire in the first set. The Pack’s pairing of Stephen Zetterberg and Lane Giammalva proved tough to stop for the Indians. With the score tied at 17, Zetterberg served 8 straight points and Claremont took the set 25-17. “The crowd was amazing, so much energy. Our team is mostly seniors so they have that sense of urgency that I love. We started off so well and then lost a little momentum in the second set, then started to make mistakes, especially serving,” said coach Wendling. Claremont kept the pressure going in the second set, jumping out to a 21-18 lead. Burroughs took a much-needed time-out. This proved to be a turning point in the match. The Indians tied the score at 23, and then battled to score the necessary 2-point margin to win the set. Claremont’s Hunter McIntyre and Stan Reeder kept a vital point alive with important blocks up front. At 25-25, Burroughs then rallied to win the set 27-25 when outside hitter Daniel Jacobs smashed a kill into the ground. The Indians’ defensive specialist Danny Casillas and hitter Daniel Marbach began to find their groove, while the 6 foot-5 inch tall Shayne Beamer and the high-flying Jacobs picked up important kills in the closing sets. The third set featured 15 tie-

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremontʼs Stan Reeder spikes the ball past Burroughs High Schoolʼs B.J. Lagmy on Tuesday during their conference match at CHS.

scores. It seemed as if Claremont picked up momentum when Donovan Robinson blocked a strong smash by Beamer to make it 17-16 to the Pack. Not to be outdone, the Indians won 4 straight points thereafter and took a closely-fought set 25-23. The third set proved key, and the Indians showed they had the impetus needed to secure Claremont’s first league loss of the season. With the score tied at 12, Burroughs hitters Beamer and Jacobs continued to pound the ball into the ground. Burroughs pulled away and took the fourth and final set 25-17. Wendling was specific about areas of improvement. “We need to get better defensively. We need to get better at digging the ball and serving, as we looked weak today at those 2 things. Our team has the weapons to get to at least the quarterfinals of CIF.” Claremont had secured a playoff spot approximately a month ago, so both teams await their fate. The CIF-SS playoff draw will take place this weekend, and knockout matches will commence early next week. Rest assured, the Wolfpack’s progress will be tracked closely as they battle for a CIF title.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

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SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

19

Three Burroughs High School players stretch to keep the ball alive after a shot was blocked by Claremont High Schoolʼs Donovan Robinson and Stephen Zetterberg on Tuesday during their conference match at CHS. Despite strong play, and winning the first game, the pack lost 3-1.

Below, Claremont High School players Lane Giammalva, Stan Reeder and Hunter McIntyre celebrate winning the first game in their match against Burroughs High School on Tuesday at CHS. Unfortunately this was the only game they won and eventually lost the match 3-1. COURIER photos by Steven Felschundneff

The stands at the CHS gym are full of students cheering for the boys varsity volleyball team as they score a tough point during their conference match against Burroughs High on Tuesday at Claremont High. The Wolfpack played a tough game but eventually lost 3-1, their only conference loss all season.

CHS WEEKLY ROUNDUP
BASEBALL The Wolfpack batted their way to a 101 shellacking of Charter Oak on Tuesday. Josh Chua and Nick Costello each had 3 RBIs, while Tyler Witt threw a complete, 3-hit game. With 3 games to go in the regular season, Claremont needs to win out to retain the #2 spot in the Sierra League. BOYS TENNIS Claremont closed out the 2013 regular season with a 10-8 victory over Ayala last

weekend. Stay tuned for results from the Sierra League Finals, to be posted in next Friday’s COURIER. SOFTBALL Wolfpack softball notched their second league win of the season with a 9-3 victory over St. Lucy’s. Claremont is out of the Sierra League cellar, but it looks as if the team will not make the playoffs this season.

WEBB SCHOOLS
Webb golf finished first at the Prep

League Finals, and are champions for the first time. The Gauls will await their CIF playoff draw. Gauls baseball continued its march toward the playoffs with a 12-2 win over visiting Chadwick on Tuesday. Two more wins will lock in Webb’s #1 spot in league. Vivian Webb softball used a 13-run 6th inning to beat Flintridge 15-4. The Lady Gauls still have some work to do, as they are one game behind a playoff position with only 3 games to go. Gauls swimming raced in the Prep League Finals this week. Adrian Hui

won a League Finals MVP title and the 200-free relay team of Ivey Dahlstrom, Shannon Torrance, Maddie Gaumer and Shannon Fei set a school record. Webb track and field competed in the Prep League Preliminaries this week. Highlights were provided by Nick Pankratz, who set a school high jump record.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

Sports updates on Twitter @COURIER91711

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

Kindergartners take a walk on the
Lou Rojo points out a duck to his grandson Noah Smelser on Monday during a trip to the Los Angeles Zoo. Mr. Rojo volunteers in his grandsonʼs class at Chaparral Elementary School.

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n a “scale” of one to 10, lizards and snakes are a 10, according to Chaparral Elementary School kindergartner William Roby Unkovich.
One of 85 Chaparral students who took part in a kindergarten-wide trip to the Los Angeles Zoo on Monday, April 29, William was delighted to stop by the Living Amphibians, Invertebrates and Reptiles habitat, better known as the LAIR. Noah Smelser and James Butz, 2 other aficionados of cold-blooded critters, also savored the sight of animals basking and paddling in the LAIR, which opened its doors just last year. “There’s 5 of those!” Noah said, counting up the Iranian Harlequin Newts arranged on rocks in one water-filled tank. “He’s camouflage,” James noted of a Southwest Speckled Rattlesnake, which was nearly indistinguishable from the gravel on which he was coiled. It was a day of firsts for the local students. William said he had never been to the zoo, while his classmate Bruno Portillo said he’d never ridden a school bus before. “It was bumpy,” he said of the ride from Claremont to Griffith Park, which is also home to the Los Angeles Observatory, the train-themed Travel Town Museum and the Autry National Center of the American West. If the kids thought their bus ride was bumpy, it’s nothing compared to the adventure Noah’s grandfather Lou Rojo had when he embarked for the zoo and various other destinations as a kid. “They didn’t make you wear seatbelts in those days, and every bump it felt like you bounced about a foot above the window,” he said. Mr. Rojo, who joined his daughter Audrey Smelser in escorting Noah and 2 pals around the zoo, was just one of many chaperones assisting the classes of Annette Reed, Cyndi Simpson, Julie Upshaw and Kristen VanKouwenbert. Teams of one to 3 adults split off with groups of 3 or 4 kids, a sage move considering that traveling through a zoo with 5- and 6-year-olds can be a bit like herding cats. “There are 20 kids in my grandkid’s class and 16 parents present,” Mr. Rojo said. “How’s that for parental involvement?” It was a busy day at the zoo, making it easy for a child to get lost amid crowds of schoolchildren from across the county. The LA Zoo is a perennially popular field trip because it caters to kids’ love of animals and it’s cheap. The delegation’s admission, $3 per student and $5 for the chaperones, was paid for by the Chaparral Parent Faculty Association, which also sprang for the bus rental. Two phenomena made the trip’s timing ideal—the perfect 80-degree weather and the very recent arrival of a 2-week-old giraffe. Jesse Fisher cited the giraffes as her favorite zoo attraction, which was unsurprising considering that she was dressed for the occasion in giraffe-print shorts and a shirt emblazoned with whimsical giraffes, as well as coordinating spotted bow.

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff A 2-week-old giraffe nuzzles with its mother on Monday at the Los Angeles Zoo. The baby was born on April 22 and was a very popular attraction on Monday. Chaparral Elementary School students Gavin Muñoz, left, Noah Smelser and James Butz brush a goat in the petting zoo on Monday during Chaparral Elementary Schoolʼs vistit to the Los Angeles Zoo.

“Awww!” she said at the sight of the 6-foot-tall baby. The children’s visit, which spanned from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., went by in a happy blur of animal impressions. Noah and James were able to brush some friendly goats in the petting zoo; spot the designated sentry perched high on a rock and looking out for predators in the meerkat exhibit; and scramble through a cave made atmospheric by dangling stalactites and colored lights. “Who goes there?” James called out to the figures of cave explorers, and then suggested to Noah that they pretend they were looking for dinosaur bones. “Ahhhhh! I’m getting superwet,” Noah said as he and his friend paused near the spray of a waterfall. It is this kind of wide-eyed enthusiasm that makes Ms. VanKouwenberg enjoy teaching kindergartners. “Everything’s fresh to them,” she said. Ms. VanKouwenberg was delighted to see her students take a day off from a school itinerary that, while it won’t include the rigorous state testing that characterizes today’s elementary school experience until 2nd grade, is jam-packed with learning. “It’s not just Play-Doh and eating paste anymore,”

Ms. Van Kouwenberg said. “We’ve got a list of standards of what the kids need to learn in writing, math, reading, writing, science and social studies.” Luckily, children that age have a genuine desire to be at school, she noted. “They love school and they love their teacher. They want to please you,” she said. The Los Angeles Zoo (5333 Zoo Drive in Los Angeles) is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Sunday, and is only closed at Christmas. Admission is $17; $14 for seniors; $12 for children ages 12 and younger; and free for kids under 2. Parking is free. While at the zoo, be sure to stop by the Tom Mankiewicz Conservation Carousel next to the Treetops Terrace. It features 64 hand-carved wooden figures. Rides are $3, with proceeds used to fund programs at the zoo. For information, call (323) 644-4200 or visit www.lazoo.org.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com Jessy Fisher, Emery Brandt and Catherine Hart watch a baby giraffe nuzzle with its mother on Monday during a field trip to the LA Zoo. The kindergartners were very fortunate to see the newborn giraffe as it was only one-week-old. Students in Kristen Van Kouwenbergʼs kindergarten class pose for a photo before their visit to the Los Angeles Zoo on Monday. The students spent about 3 hours seeing the animal exhibits and playing in the sunshine.

Friday, May 3 to Saturday, May 11

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CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

Nightlife
Friday Nights Live returns this week. See our listing for bands.

Galleries
Check out the Claremont Art Walk listing and walking tour map.

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the next day. Desserts, hors d’oeuvres and a champagne toast will be served. Included in the $35 registration is a complimentary ticket to CCBDC’s spring show, “Vintage Pop Revue.” 7:30 to 11:30 p.m, Pomona College Edmunds Ballroom in the Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. Register and purchase tickets (pre-sale only) at claremontballroom.org/gala. Contact leadership@claremontballroom.org.

May Friday

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INSIGHTS & OUTSIGHTS: The Collages and Cartoons of Paul Darrow will be on display May 3 through 5 and again May 8 through 12 from noon to 5 p.m. at the Claremont Heritage Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space in Memorial Park. The opening reception is tonight from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The exhibition will feature original sketches and recent work in mixed media. Mr. Darrow’s work has been featured in the Claremont COURIER for nearly 60 years. Today, the 91-year-old continues to draw, paint and collage at his home in Laguna Beach. Mr. Darrow is scheduled to attend the opening event. GYPSY SISTERS ART FAIR Friday, May 3 from 4 to 9 p.m., Saturday, May 4 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Claremont United Church of Christ on Harrison Avenue between Harvard and Yale Avenues. TIN PAN ALLEY Marlene and Her Friends present “Berlin’s Tin Pan Alley—Before the Nazis Killed It.”

May Saturday

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COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch Paul Steffen of Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty and Kathryn Dunn editor of the Claremont COURIER battle it out for the best score. Read the full story and see a slide show of the event at our Claremont After Hours blog located at the lower left-hand side of our homepage: www.claremont-courier.com.

Noon. Pomona College Oldenborg Dining Hall, 350 N. College Way, Claremont. For more information contact tammi.rendon@pomona.edu or visit http://oldenborg.pomona.edu/ and click on “Speaker Series.” AN ENCHANTED EVENING For-

mal gala and fundraiser for ballroom dance. Support the award-winning Claremont Colleges Ballroom Dance Company and dance the night away while enjoying exclusive performances, as well as special preview highlights from the “Vintage Pop Revue” opening

ANTIQUARIAN “Book Lovers” book sale. Find rare books priced at $2 and up. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902. VINTAGE POP REVUE Claremont Colleges Ballroom Spring Dance Concert. The award-winning Claremont Colleges Ballroom Dance Company presents its 15th annual spring concert, featuring the waltz, tango, salsa, lindy hop, foxtrot, jive, West Coast swing, cha cha and more, with an ensemble cast of more than 130 dancers. Tickets are $20 general admission and $10 for faculty,
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staff, alumni, seniors and children. Saturday, May 4 at 9 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 at 11 a.m. Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium, 450 N. College Way, Claremont. Purchase tickets at claremontballroom.org/concert. Contact leadership@claremontballroom.org. QUATRO DE MAYO FIESTA at Dale Bros. Brewery. Benefiting the Claremont Educational Foundation, from 5 to 9 p.m., Dale Bros. will offer special small batch beer releases, live music and food by Dragon Loco. $5 cover at the door, plus cost of food and beer. 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. Visit www.dalebrosbrewery.com for more information.

help bring a slave to freedom. Sundays, May 5 through June 16 at 9:45 a.m. Purpose Church meeting at First Baptist Church, located at 472 Mountain Ave., Claremont. 629-5277 ext. 3053 or tamikoc@pfblive.tv. SPRING GARDEN PARTY with socializing, music, refreshments, silent auction, door prizes, behind the scenes tours and the opportunity to learn about future plans for the garden. 4 to 7 p.m. $40 for members or $50 for the general public. For ages 21 and older. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. 625-8767.

Building Room 101, located at 420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. BEGINNER’S DANCE Learn Israeli folk dance in a 5-week series taught by Yael Steinfeld. No need for a partner. Wear comfortable shoes. 6:35 to 7:15 p.m. on Mondays beginning today. $20 for the entire series. Claremont Masonic Lodge, 272 W. Eighth St., Claremont. RSVP to 921-7115.

May Tuesday

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May Monday

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May Sunday

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BIRD WATCHING with Pomona Valley Audubon. A 2-hour walking tour led by Fraser Pemberton. Families are welcome. 8 a.m. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. LIVE JAZZ performance by Homero Chavez & Una Noche on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 946-1398. GOD’S HEART FOR JUSTICE Explore the issue of human trafficking from a biblical perspective. Read stories of trafficking survivors and learn how to

LECTURE “Importing Democracy: The Role of NGO’s in South Africa, Tajikistan and Argentina” presented by Julie Fisher of the Kettering Foundation. Noon. Pomona College Oldenborg Dining Hall, 350 N. College Way, Claremont. Email tammi.rendon@pomona.edu or visit oldenborg.pomona.edu. FOOD WASTE “Unlocking its Full Potential,” Sustainability Dialog with Andrew Jolin. Over 30 percent of Claremont’s waste that goes to landfills is food waste. It could instead be used to make soil amendments or fuel. Mr. Jolin, founder and president of GESS, is consulting with the city on how to more sensibly make use of this resource. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Pomona College’s Hahn

SOUTH ASIAAFTER 2014 “Prospects for Pakistan, Afghanistan and India” presented by Cameron Munter, former United States ambassador to Pakistan.

Now a visiting professor at Pomona College, Mr. Munter served in several diplomatic posts culminating in the ambassadorship to Pakistan. He grew up in Claremont and is a graduate of Claremont High School. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. HTML with David Briggs. Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488.
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May Wednesday

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SUSTAINABLE CLAREMONT Garden Club presents “Container Gardening, Increasing Your Plantable Space” with Steve Gerischer, an award-winning landscape designer, teacher and president of the Southern California Horticulture Society and president of Pacific Horticulture Society. He has appeared on HGTV’s Landscaper’s Challenge and teaches “Gardening with Less Water” at the Fullerton Arboretum. 7 p.m. Free admission. Pilgrim Place’s Napier Center, 660 Avery Road, Claremont. For more information, visit www.sustainableclaremont.org.

May Thursday

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GROWING THE CHINESE GARDEN The Fine Arts Foundation will

host a luncheon, art auction and lecture. The $25 luncheon beginning at noon will feature a silent art auction of 20 paintings from the estate of Corinne Gallman to benefit the FAF art scholarship fund. The program begins at 1:30 p.m. Suzy Moser, assistant vice president, advancement at the Huntington Library, will speak about the flourishing popularity of the Chinese garden and the challenges of developing phase 2 in a global recession. Malott Commons Hampton Room, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. Contact 732-9022. CANCER FIGHTING FOODS Learn about the best foods to eat to stay healthy, a program presented by Nancee Perez, RD. 6:30 p.m. Free event at Pomona Valley Hospital at the Robert & Beverly Lewis Family Cancer Care Center Community Room, 1910 Royalty Drive, Pomona. RSVP to 865-9858. www.pvhmc.org.

May Friday

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OLA FIESTA Family-friendly games, carnival rides, international cuisine, live entertainment, bingo and a drawing to support church ministries and community outreach. Entertainment includes Vietnamese dragon dancers, classic rock band The Answer (Friday), A.C.E. (Saturday) and Satisfaction Unlimited (Sunday). Friday, May 10 from 5 to 10 p.m., Saturday, May 11 from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday, May 12 from noon to 8 p.m. Free admission. Our Lady of the Assumption Parish, 435 Berkeley Ave., Claremont.

May Saturday

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CROSSROADS COMMUNITYWIDE YARD SALE 8 a.m. to noon at Claremont’s Cahuilla Park at the

corner of Indian Hill and Scripps. For more information, visit www.crossroadswomen.org or call 243-0018. MEMOIR WORKSHOP Everyone has a story worth telling from the poignant to the humorous, the sprawling family saga to the chance encounter at the check stand. But how do you craft your story for the page in a way that readers will find compelling? Award-winning author Ana Maria Spagna will provide an easy step-by-step approach for aspiring writers at any stage. Bring a pen and paper, or a laptop. $20 cost includes instruction, sandwich and chips and one beverage. Payment due at door, cash only. Noon to 2 p.m. at Claremont Craft Ales, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. #204C, Claremont. RSVP by May 4 to Yi Shun Lai at yishun@thegooddirt.org or call 625-7405.

NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursday: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Friday through Sunday: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. to closing. —Sunday: Mariachi San Pedro. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ESPIAUS RESTAURANTE Y CANTINA: 109 Yale Ave., Claremont. Cantina remains open until flow of customers slows down. 621-1818. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, May 9: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music featuring Los Whatevéros (Americana). THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Saturday, May 25: Fivacious perform at 7:30 p.m. $10. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —May 3 and 4: Jimmy Dore starred on several Comedy Central specials and is a writer and per-

former for the off-Broadway hit The MarijuanaLogues. He hosts his own weekly radio show on KPFK Los Angeles and co-hosts the popular podcast Comedy and Everything Else with Todd Glass and Stef Zamorano. —Sunday, May 5: Silly Sundays with open mic. 9 p.m. —May 10 and 11: Jackie Kashian is regularly seen on Comedy Central and has toured as a comic for over 14 years. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802. —Friday, May 17: Moheak Radio presents Sea Wolf. $13-$15. 7 p.m. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, May 3: Little Faith (jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, May 4: The Hollywood Hound Dogs (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, May 5: Groove Session (jazz). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, May 7: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, May 8: Open Jam Night with Geno’s Standard Band. (jazz). 8 p.m. —Thursday, May 9: Cuneiform Love Letters (jazz) at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, May 10: Gino Matteo (rock/roots/soul/ blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, May 11: Phat Cat Swinger (swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. —Saturday, May 25: Vahagni performs from 7 to 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808.

Friday Nights Live Free. 6 to 9 p.m.
Friday, May 3: Amanda Castro at the Public Plaza in front of Laemmle Theater and Lee Powers Combo at the Chamber patio, located at 205 Yale Avenue.

—Friday, May 3: Grant Langston and the Super Models (country). 10 p.m. —Saturday, May 4: Sigh Low. 10 p.m. —Sunday, May 5: Sunday night dinner music. 6 to 8 p.m. —Tuesday, May 7: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, May 8: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, May 9: Great Old Songs by Mark Ward at 9 p.m. and D.J. at 11 p.m. —Friday, May 10: The Black Tongued Bells (blues). 10 p.m. —Saturday, May 11: Stanley T. & the Homewreckers. 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. 767-2255. —Fridays: Gypsy Kings-style Spanish guitar. Enjoy the authentic sounds of Kimera during your dinner/appetizers and drinks in the VIP lounge. 7 to 10 p.m.

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

PERFORMING ARTS
BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, May 10: Friday Noon Concert featuring The Claremont Chamber Choir. 12:15 p.m. BOONE RECITAL HALL: 241 E. 10th Street, Claremont. —Tuesday, May 7: Scripps College student recitals. 7:30 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bridges. Military discounts are available through box office for most shows. —Saturday, May 4 at 9 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 at 11 a.m.: The nationally recognized CCBDC’s annual Spring performance “Claremont Colleges Ballroom Dance Company Spring Concert.” One of the largest shows of its kind in the country, showcasing over 100 dancers performing ballroom, Latin and social dancing styles. $20 general admission, $10 seniors/alumni/faculty/staff. For student or group pricing contact: leader ship@claremontballroom.org. —Saturday, May 11: Theater Experience of Southern California presents Annie. The performing group have been performing musicals since 1990, featuring an average cast of 150 actors for each show, professionally directed and supported by live musicians, musical directors and choreographers. The show is based on the popular Harold Gray comic strip Little Orphan Annie, with music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by Martin Charnin and the book by Thomas Meehan. A spunky orphan girl finds a home with a New York millionaire during the Depression, but must dodge the clutches of her evil orphanage mistress. 2 p.m. —Sunday, May 12: Emmy-nominated political comedian Bill Maher, called “one of the establishment’s most entertaining critics” by The New York Times, will perform at Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium presented by AEG LIVE. Mr. Maher, who has garnered 23 Emmy nominations over 18 years, is the host of HBO’s television series Real Time, which features Maher’s funny, sociopolitical commentary and a roundtable of guests, including Arianna Huffington, Ben Affleck, Michael Moore

and Robin Williams, among numerous others. He has described himself as a libertarian and “as a progressive, as a sane person.” Maher’s 2008 film Religulous (directed by Larry David), a satirical skewer of organized religion, is the seventh highest grossing documentary of all time. He is formerly the host of the Comedy Central and ABC late night talk show Politically Incorrect. Maher has written 4 bestsellers, most recently The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass (2012), Does Anybody Have a Problem with That? Politically Incorrect’s Greatest Hits (2010) and New Rules: Polite Musings from a Timid Observer (2005). His most recent HBO stand-up special was Bill Maher: But I’m Not Wrong (2010). Mr. Maher is a frequent commentator on CNN, MSNBC and HLN cable networks. Tickets cost $50.25 and $70.25, with additional online fees. Performance begins at 8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.pomona.edu/bridges or calling 607-1139. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Saturday, May 4: Pomona College Glee Club with chamber music from the sixteenth century to the present. Conducted by Donna M. Di Grazia. 1:15 p.m. —Saturday, May 4 at 11 a.m. to Sunday, May 5 at 8 p.m.: Pomona College Band featuring Stephen Klein performing the tuba conducted by Graydon Beeks. Music by Dickow, Ellerby and Grainger. —Sunday, May 5: “Austrian M&M (Mozart and Mahler).” Claremont Symphony Orchestra featuring soprano Laura Sage. 3:30 p.m. —Monday, May 6: Giri Kusuma, traditional and contemporary Balinese music and dance featuring Pomona College Balinese Gamelan, music director Nyoman Wenten and dance director Nanik Wenten. 8 p.m. —Saturday, May 11: The Claremont Young Musicians Orchestra and music director Roger Samuel present A Los Angeles Philharmonic Quartet including Rober Gupta (violin), Ben Ullery (viola), Jacob Braun (cello) and JinShan Dai (violin). 7:30 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: din-

ner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through May 5: Sweet Charity. Charity Hope Valentine, the girl who wanted to be loved, works at the seedy Fandango ballroom. Charity finds it difficult to find the man of her dreams, but being the eternal optimist, she stays sweet and hopeful that someday her ideal man will materialize. Familiar songs include “Big Spender,” “If My Friends Could See Me Now,” “There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This,” “I’m a Brass Band,” “Baby, Dream Your Dream,” and “Rhythm of Life.” —May 10 through June 16: The Full Monty, seeing how much their wives enjoy watching male strippers during their girls’ night out, unemployed steelworkers in Buffalo, New York come up with a bold way to make some quick cash. In the process they find renewed self-esteem, the importance of friendship and the ability to have fun. As the guys work through their fears, self-consciousness, feelings of worthlessness and anxieties, they come to discover that not only are they stronger as a group, but that the strength they find in each other gives them the individual courage to face their demons and overcome them. Due to subject matter, recommended for mature audiences. CLAREMONT HIGH SCHOOL DON F. FRUECHTE THEATRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS: 1601 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. 624-9053 x30463. —Friday, May 10: Medea by Euripides, adapted by Robinson Jeffers. Medea has long been considered one of the great masterpieces of classical Greek drama and has attracted attention in modern times as one of the first great works of feminist drama. This play pits Medea, a murderously passionate barbarian princess, against her husband, Jason, the leader of an expedition of Greek heroes who set out to capture the fabled Golden Fleece. Jason’s act of betrayal is the basis for one of the bestknown and most horrific plots in classical Greek drama. . 7:30 p.m. —Saturday, May 11: The Women of Lockerbie by Deborah Brevoort. A mother from New Jersey roams the hills of Lockerbie, Scotland looking for her son’s remains that were lost in the crash

of Pan Am 103. She meets the women of Lockerbie, who are fighting the United States government to obtain the clothing of the victims found in the plane’s wreckage. The women—determined to convert an act of hatred into an act of love—want to wash the clothes of the dead and return them to the victim’s families. 7:30 p.m. GARRISON THEATER: 231 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Scripps College Performing Arts Center. 607-2634 or visit www.scrippscollege.edu. —Saturday, May 4: Claremont Concert Orchestra and The Concert Choir perform at 8 p.m. —Sunday, May 5: Claremont Concert Orchestra and The Concert Choir perform at 3 p.m. LYMAN HALL: Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. —May 7 and 8: Student recital. 7 p.m RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 6258767 or www.rsabg.org. —Saturday, June 15: The 30th Claremont Folk Festival. There will be 2 stages featuring live music as well as workshops, kid’s activities, garden tours, art vendors, craft booths and gourmet food and libations. The musical line-up includes David Lindley, Henry Rollins, Janet Klein and her Parlor Boys, Moira Smiley and Voco, Leon Mobley with Da Lion and more. The festival will open at 10 a.m. Tickets are $25, children 12 and under are free. For further information, visit www.folkmusiccenter.com or www.facebook.com/ folkmusiccenter. Contact the Folk Music Center at 624-2928 or by email at info@folkmusiccenter.com or folkfesti val30@gmail.com. SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call 607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu. —Through May 5: Pomona College Spring Dance Concert with artistic direction by Laurie Cameron. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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GALLERIES
57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —May 10 through June 29: “Juxtaposition” featuring Desiree Engel, Mervyn Seldon, Fay Colman and Mark Upson. Receptions: Saturdays, May 11 and June 8 from 6 to 9 p.m. Art Walk: Saturdays, May 25 and June 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through May 5: “Friendship Forged in Fire: British Ceramics in America,” featuring British pottery in a thematic and chronological order, from the industrial potteries of the Victorian era, to the Arts and Crafts movement, to the traditionalist approach of Bernard Leach and his followers. Modern ceramic artists will be represented by the works of Lucie Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth. The largest segment of the exhibition will display contemporary innovations of “post-modern” ceramic art being created in Great Britain today. —May 18 through July 28: “The Clay Connection: Jim and Nan McKinnell,” celebrating their 5decade careers.

BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 626-3322. —Through May 31: “Namaste” by Nancy Macko explores issues related to eco-feminism, nature and ancient cultures. Ms. Macko is also interested in mathematics and makes connections between nature and technology. The “Namaste” suite prints combine techniques of lithography, etching and spit bite. Opening reception: Friday, May 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through May 31: Fifth Annual Claremont High School Student Art Show featuring students in advanced 2-D art classes (art production, AP studio art, IB visual art, computer graphic arts and advanced photography. Opening reception: Friday, May 3 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in The Packing House. 12 to 7 p.m. 6263066. —Through May 31: Photography by Harold Barnes. CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIVERSITY: 150 E. Tenth St., Claremont. 621-8000. —Sunday, May 5: “Open Studios.” Noon to 5 p.m. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204 : 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.loft204.com. —Through, May 25: Featured artist this month is fashion and portrait photographer Diane Lynn. The boutique features jewelry, scarfs, greeting cards, small prints and other original art. Participants in The Colony this month include paintings by Brooke Morrison, stained glass/mosaics by Jenifer Hall, watercolors by Arwen Allen, photography by Vicki, limited edition prints by Melody Grace Cave, “Dusty Road” collection photography by Barbara Sammons, a boutique by Clare Miranda and oddities by Sarah Toribbio and friends. Show your COURIER support—Claremont COURIER hoodies, mugs and recent editions of the newspaper are available exclusively at The Colony at Loft 204. Opening reception: Friday, May 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. Enjoy light refreshments and live entertainment by belly dancer Adina Dane. Come meet featured artist Diane Lynn and mingle with other art enthusiasts. —Tuesday, May 7: Beginning belly dance class with Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesday, May 8: Intermediate belly dance class. Time to get technical—work on isolation drills and movement combinations while diving deeper into belly dance technique. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Saturdays, May 11 and 18: “Planting Design Class: Matching Your Architecture,” a 2-part class on exploring specific architectural styles and how you can create the perfect landscape around them. HGTV featured designer Dominic Masiello of DP Environments will discuss planting and layout option in accordance with water-friendly design practices. Mr. Masiello will cover craftsman, mid-century modern, Edwardian, California ranch and Spanish Revival architecture in his landscaping seminar. Mr. Masiello’s projects have aired on HGTV shows including Landscaper’s Challenge and Get Out, Way Out. Part one will focus on conceptual design and planning and part 2 will tie it together with practical application and installation methods. —Saturday, June 1: “Enchantment Under the Sea” dance. Travel back in time for a silly 1950s prom complete with prom photo, party food, punch, paper decorations, party favors and live band. Dress in 1950s-style prom dresses and suits. $25 per couple

or $15 for an individual ticket. Tickets available only at The Colony at Loft 204, located upstairs in the Claremont Packing House. 8 to 10 p.m. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: 626-5455. —Through July 12: “Dialogs of Practice, Part II.” Artists for the exhibition have been paired together through a shared interest in content, humor, text or abstraction. Some of the art is the exhibition had been made in direct response to their partner’s work or in collaboration. Opening reception: Friday, May 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. Catering by Spaggi’s Restaurant. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GINGER ELLIOTT EXHIBITION CENTER: 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. Garner House. Claremont Heritage, 621-0848. —May 3 through 5 and May 8 through 12: “Insights and Outsights: The Collages and Cartoons of Paul Darrow.” The Claremont Museum of Art salutes Claremont cartoonist Paul Darrow with an exhibition of original sketches and recent work in mixed media. Darrow’s cartoons have amused Claremont COURIER readers for nearly 60 years. Today, the 91 year old continues to draw, paint and collage at his home in Laguna Beach. Paul Darrow came to Claremont to study art at Claremont Graduate School after serving in WWII. He began submitting cartoons to the Claremont COURIER when Martin Weinberger purchased the paper in 1954 and soon created a devoted fan base in the community. Mr. Darrow has created thousands of cartoons representing his interpretation of the social and political atmosphere of the time. He was professor of art at Scripps College from 1954 to 1992 and taught courses in drawing, filmmaking, printmaking and mixed media. Noon to 5 p.m. Opening reception: Friday, May 3 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. MAIN STREET GALLERY: 252C S. Main St., Pomona. 868-2979. —Through May 30: “Blissed!” oil paintings by Ken Sheffer and woodworking by Dave Holzberger. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 9800412, info@malooffoundation.org or www.maloof foundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. —May 30 through October 27: “With Strings Attached: Art in the Craft of Sound.” There are nearly 40 musical instruments in the exhibition, representing a broad cross-section of cultures and traditions. The performances give us an opportunity to bring to life for audiences a number of the instruments, some of which are not often heard. PEGGY PHELPS & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —May 6 though 10: “Bearing Likeness” MFA thesis exhibition by Christine Marie Salama. Opening reception: Tuesday, May 7 from 6 to 9 p.m.
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GALLERIES continued from the previous page

PERMADIRTY PROJECT SPACE: 532 W. First St., Unit 219, Claremont. Open Thursday through Sunday. For more information email itspermadirty@gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/permadirty. —Through May 3: “Intertwine Originals,” an exhibition celebrating 7 emerging artists who got their start in the Inland Empire and Chaffey College community. The artists exhibiting are some of the original resident artists of PermaDirty Project Space and intertwined in many different ways with each other and PermaDirty since it opened one year ago. Closing reception: May 3 from 6 to 10 p.m. with live performances by Scared Sounds, Savoll Isona and !Socorro! A video presentation by Life Love Regret Productions and photography by Blackant Photography. Drinks provided by Dale Bros. Brewery. —Wednesdays: Meditation group with Johnathan Thomas. 7 to 8 p.m. $5. RSVP to www.whole-personhealing.com. —Saturdays: Saturday Morning Cartoons, cartooning workshop led by resident artist Jimmy Purcell. Learn tips and tricks of cartooning while we watching cartoons. A donation is requested; bring your own supplies. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. —Sundays: Life drawing workshop with resident artist Quinn Salazar. Three hours of uninstructed drawing and painting of a nude model. Bring your own supplies to work with; seating will be provided. 3 to 6 p.m. $10. RSVP required: 618-4395. RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 6258767 or www.rsabg.org. —Through June 9: “Where They Grow Wild,” an exclusive display of original artworks from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s archival collections, complementing the “When they were

Wild” collaborative exhibition with the Huntington and the Theodore Payne Foundation. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., on 11th and Columbia, Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scripp scollege.edu/williamson-gallery/. —May 3 through 19: Scripps College Senior Art Show “Re/Fractions,” highlighting the final thesis projects of graduating studio art majors. The display features paintings, photography and mixed media works on the theme of the body and its surrounding environs and how both change, move and often fracture before mending to become whole again. In addition to creating the works displayed, the students conceptualize the show, install their pieces, write artist statements and design publicity. This year’s featured seniors are Sara Chun, Sophie Forman, Devin Grenley, Diana Orihuela, Camille Robins, Avantika Saraogi and Denise Tupper. The Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery is located at Eleventh Street and Columbia Avenue, adjacent to Baxter Hall. During the exhibition, the gallery is open to the public, free of charge. Opening reception: Friday, May 3 at 6 p.m. in the Bixby Courtyard. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through May 31: “College Campuses” by Patrick Dooley, a well known California painter with an ability to capture the essence of a scene in his watercolor paintings. His subjects vary including portraits, landscapes, marine life, wildlife and his depiction of life in the west. In this show, Mr. Dooley is featuring the college campuses in and around Claremont. He has spent the major part of his life in pursuit of creating and sharing his passion for painting. He is an award-winning artist, illustrator and instructor. Mr. Dooley’s works appear in private and corporate collections throughout the United States and Canada.

ART WALK

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Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine art. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this monthʼs participating galleries.

1. Buddhamouse Emporium
6 to 8 p.m. 134 Yale Ave., Claremont Meet the artist and enjoy light refreshments. Featured artist: Nancy Macko.

2. Claremont Forum/Prison Library Project
6 to 9 p.m. 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing House Artist reception with featured artist photographer Harold Barnes.

3. Claremont Community Foundation
5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Meet the student artists of Claremont High School arts programs.

4. The Colony at LOFT204
6 to 9 p.m. 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House A belly dance performance by Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill will take place at 8 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. Featured artist: Fashion and portrait photographer Diane Lynn.

5. First Street Gallery Art Center
6 to 8 p.m. 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont See the exhibition titled “Dialoques of Practice.” Catering by Spaggiʼs Restaurant.

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: 42 [PG13], Ironman 3 [PG13], Oblivion [PG13], The Big Wedding [R], The Place Beyond the Pines [R], The Company You Keep [R], Vivian Los Antipodas [NR].

6. Ginger Elliott Exhibition Center
Claremont Heritage Garner House in Memorial Park, located at 850 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. View the collages and cartoons of Paul Darrow. The artist is scheduled to attend the event.

7. PermaDirty Project Space
6 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #219, Claremont Packing House Live musical performances by Sacred Sounds, Savoll Isona and ¡Socorro!; live video footage by Life Love Regret Productions and photography by Blackant Photography. Brews provided by Dale Bros. Brewery.

8. Square i Gallery
6 to 8 p.m. 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont Artist reception and refreshments. Featured artist: Painter Patrick Dooley.

Trustee Sale No.: 20110187409785 Title Order No.: 110470297 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/05/2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 05/08/2003 as Instrument No. 03-1312300 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: PHILLIP JOHNSON, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 05/21/2013 TIME OF SALE: 9:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 23555 CANYON VISTA COURT, DIAMOND BAR, CALIFORNIA 91765 APN#: 8701-056-074 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $535,825.44. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder 's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for informa-

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
tion regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20110187409785. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: PRIORITY POSTING & PUBLISHING, INC. 17501 IRVINE BLVD., SUITE ONE TUSTIN, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www.priorityposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 04/17/2013 P1034161 4/26, 5/3, 05/10/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. 458995CA Loan No. 0677414021 Title Order No. 130010226 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07-06-2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 05-172013 at 11:00 A.M., CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 07-202004, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 04 1844850, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: BRENDA MONAHAN, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustor, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. Legal Description: LOT 15, BLOCK 1, OF TRACT NO 5706, IN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 126, PAGES 43 AND 44, OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDED OF SAID COUNTY. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $636,264.02 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 429 W 11TH STREET CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN Number: 8309-009-014 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 04-25-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee BRENDA BATTEN, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-5731965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales and Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting and Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for "Advanced Search" to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. A-4377910 04/26/2013, 05/03/2013, 05/10/2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013067755 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as MEETING TECH AV, POIGNANT AUDIO VISUAL SERVICES, 1407 Foothill Blvd. 17, La Verne, CA 91750. John Allen Jewell, 1101 W. McKinley Ave. #374, Pomona, CA 91768. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 04/01/13. /s/ John Jewell This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/04/2013. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013
it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: May 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 077290 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Pacific Advisors Employee Benefits, 333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. PA Warner LLC, 333 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 12/01/12. /s/ Kelly Kidwell Title: Manager This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/16/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: May 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013086823 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ICODE ENGINEERING, JD PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL, 249 Independence Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. John Duan, 249 Independence Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ John Duan This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/26/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: May 3, 10, 17 and 24, 2013

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (UCC Sec. 6105) Escrow No. 27467-PC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is about to be made. The name(s) and business address(es) of the seller(s) are: GOLDEN STATE PETROLEUM, INC, 30343 CANWOOD ST, STE 200, AGOURA HILLS, CA 91301 Doing business as: MISSION 76 All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s), is/are: NONE The location in California of the Chief Executive Office of the seller is: NONE The name(s) and business address of the buyer(s) is/are: SOUTH COAST ENTERPRISE, LLC, A CALIFORNIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, 14200 FOUR WINDS DR, RIVERSIDE CA 92503 The assets being sold are described in general as: LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENT, GOODWILL, AND FIXTURES AND EQUIPMENT and is located at: 1207 E. MISSION BLVD, POMONA, CA 91766 The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: CITYWIDE ESCROW SERVICES INC, 12501 SEAL BEACH BLVD, STE 130, SEAL BEACH, CA 90740 and the anticipated sale date is MAY 21, 2013 The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2. [If the sale is subject to Sec. 6106.2, the following information must be provided.] The name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is: CITYWIDE ESCROW SERVICES INC, 12501 SEAL BEACH BLVD, STE 130, SEAL BEACH, CA 90740 and the last day for filing claims by any creditor shall be MAY 20, 2013, which is the business day before the anticipated sale date specified above. Dated: 4/24/13 SOUTH COAST ENTERPRISE, LLC, Buyer(s) LA1296606 CLAREMONT COURIER 5/3/13 NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, CA, WILL RECEIVE UP TO BUT NOT LATER THAN 2:00 PM ON MAY 23, 2013, AT THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, 207 HARVARD AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711, SEALED BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING: SEWER MAINLINE AND MANHOLE REHABILITATION PROJECT CONTRACT NO. CS-13-02 A TRENCHLESS REHABILITATION OF VCP SEWER LINES BY USING A FOLDED AND REFORMED PVC PIPE LINING SYSTEM. BASIS OF AWARD WILL BE THE LOWEST COST. SPECIFICATIONS FOR THIS BID ARE ON FILE IN THE ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE CORPORATE YARD FOR INTERESTED BIDDERS. BID SPECIFICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE ON THE CITY OF CLAREMONT’S WEBSITE www.ci.claremont.ca.us. PAPER COPIES WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE CITY CORPORATE YARD AT A COST OF $8.50. BIDS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT AT THE ABOVE ADDRESS BEFORE THE ABOVE DATE AND TIME. Lynne Fryman ________________________________ CITY CLERK (909) 399-5460 Publish: May 3 and 10, 2013

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #209

Across 1. Sword handle 5. False god 9. Own (up to) 13. Pakistan language 14. Goat antelope 15. Instrument of Julian Bream 16. Crush 18. D'Artagnan weapon of choice 19. Las Vegas dancer accessory 20. The fruit of a rose plant 22. New arts education project, sponsored by the Claremont Museum of Art 25. Crusader opponent 26. Gentiles 27. Drops on blades 29. Hinder 30. Electric guitar hookup 31. Wealthy Phrygian king

33. "All My Children" vixen (first name) 36. ___ jacket 37. Chess game segment 39. Be soaking wet 40. Feeling of apprehension 42. Capital of Jordan 43. Prepare leather 44. Admirable 46. Always poetic 47. Moral weakness 48. "Zero Dark Thirty" group 50. Coin of Zambia 52. Claremont police philanthropy event 53. Cask 54. Turkish military leader 55. Places for abandoned kids 61. Brim 62. 1988 Olympics locale

63. Part in a play 64. Blows it 65. Falling flakes 66. Oxen's harness Down 1. "What's that?" 2. Live and breathe 3. Kind of approval 4. Superchargers 5. Christmas jeer, with "humbug" 6. Get off one's chest 7. Ancient assembly area 8. Strives 9. Con man 10. Substituting a milder term for an offensive one 11. Beer mug 12. Percolate 14. Double 17. Further 21. Bed sheet fabric 22. Lizard 23. Times New ____ 24. Compositor 25. Aussie wanderers 28. Tropical tuberous root 31. Kind of unit 32. Changeless 34. Tutor who helps one develop skills 35. Sleep ___ 38. Old money in Finland 41. Bows 45. Digital reading 47. Unexpected change 48. Clemson athlete 49. Martha Stewart wear 51. Benign tumor 52. London gallery 56. Supporting 57. Chop 58. Sticky stuff 59. Sport shoe leather 60. "I told you so!"

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #208

Claremont COURIER/Friday, May 3, 2013

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TRAIL BLAZING Word on the street is that Tim Donnelly is considering a run for California Governor. Mr. Donnelly is a Republican member of the California State Assembly, representing the 33rd district. On January 4, 2011, Mr. Donnelly was cited and released after carrying a loaded firearm while attempting to board a flight at Ontario Airport. WHERE IN THE WORLD ARE THE ROSENTHALS? Claremont residents Michael and Karen Rosenthal just completed a 33day trip covering nearly all of South America. According to sources, the couple journeyed from Buenos Aires south to Cape Horn, up the west coast through the Panama Canal and through the Caribbean. Their May 1 return came none too soon as it was reported the Rosenthals’ visiting graduate student has been concerned about mysterious peanut shells that recently appeared on their home patio—the shells were most likely left by visiting blue jays for these very active empty-nesters. START SPREADING THE NEWS Subtitled “serendipitous poetry from The New York Times,” the newspaper launched a Haiku blog concurrent with National Poetry Month on April 2, 2013. The brainchild of Michael Bever and Andrea Eldridge, the Claremont COURIER launched its weekly Adventures in Haiku in October of 2011. Jacob Harris, a senior software archi-

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tect at the New York Times, developed an algorithm that periodically checks the Times home page and scans each sentence looking for potential haikus by using an electronic dictionary containing syllable counts. An interesting approach by the Times. Call us old-fashioned, but the COURIER prefers non-digital poetry. For more on Mr. Harris’ project, visit http://haiku.nytimes.com/about. CLAREMONT ON WIKIPEDIA Claremont’s Wikipedia listing starts out okay. “Claremont is primarily residential, with a significant portion of its commercial activity revolving around ‘The Village,’ a popular collection of streetfront small stores, boutiques, art galleries, offices, and restaurants adjacent to and west of the Claremont Colleges.” When you get to the description of the expansion, however, the tone goes downhill. “The Village was expanded in 2007, adding a controversial multi-use development that includes a cinema, a boutique hotel, retail space, offices, and a parking structure on the site of an old citrus packing plant just west of Indian Hill Boulevard. Some critics say that the expansion negatively altered the original, small-town feel of The Village.”

Is the expasion still controversial? If so, Sammy wonders where you come down on the issue, pro or con? EUREKA! THEY’VE GOT IT Claremont’s Eureka Burger was only the second location for the ever-expanding eatery, Redlands being the first. A recent look at their website revealed the addition of 5 more restaurants—in Bakersfield, Fresno, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, San Diego— with at least 3 more slated to open soon, including a tasting kitchen at the Hawthorne Airport and 2 full-service restaurants in Berkeley and Indian Wells. MIND BOGGLING Harvey Mudd College was the only university in the nation to earn a spot on Forbes’ top 100 schools list with students who “study most” while still placing on Fiesta Frog’s Top 100 Party Schools and Universities. Harvey Mudd placed 91st in the latter category. WE MISSED THIS A subscriber wondered, “Did you notice all of the hanging wood pieces on top of the light poles along Indian Hill in the Village section? Attached by a string, they differ at each intersection. I noticed a rabbit and eagle. Another one had a gun and immigrant sign.” The impromptu art appeared on a Saturday morning and, according to our source, were gone by the following Friday. Anyone who has information on

this should send it to sammy@claremont-courier.com. WHAT YOU’RE SAYING ABOUT THE COURIER • Whoever is doing the writing for the Police Blotter section of the paper (I see the name Beth Harnett on the byline) is doing a great job. Bravo! I actually find this section of the paper both informative and entertaining. She’s taking the “just the facts ma’am” and adding her own conversational style in just the right combination...reflecting the gravity of certain situations while, in others, injecting a balanced and fair amount of subtle irony/humor. Good job. • Wish you had waited for the Saturday mail’s final decision. I absolutely hate the new version. I have been a subscriber since the 1960s and a friend of Marty’s and Jan’s. The much higher price for seniors is unfair, as they will profit the least of all from the ads. Please keep articles, especially obits, shorter. • What you have done to the COURIER is simply amazing. Love the new weekly edition and really appreciate the digital updates. • Love, love history of Claremont, the Village, business, schools, founding fathers, anything. More please! • I HATE letters to the editor where wanna-be writers seize the opportunity to pontificate to excess. There should be a 3-paragraph limit so readers don’t have to die of boredom. A good writer can certainly express themselves in that time.
Until next time, Sammy

909.621.4761
Friday 05-03-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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CLASSIFIEDS
legals...............28 employment....30 services...........33 real estate.......36
RENTALS
Condo for rent
POMONA: 3640 Sumner Ave. Claremont schools. Two bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Remodeled kitchen and bathrooms. Looks like a model. $1595 monthly. Cornerstone Property Management, 596-9488. www.PropertyMang.com. MOUNTAIN View Sumner Condominiums. 3640 Sumner Ave. #103, Pomona. Claremont schools. Two bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Community pool and spa. One year lease security deposit to be $1350. Rent is $1350 a month. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty. Jeannette Ewing, 670-0322.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

RENTALS
Townhome for rent
CLAREMONT: Two bedroom, 2.5 bathroom townhome. Granite counters, vaulted ceilings, fireplace. Covered patio. Two master bedrooms. Near Claremont Colleges. $1850 monthly. CBTC, 621-6761. CLAREMONT townhome for lease. Two bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, washer, dryer, dishwasher, shared garage. $1345 monthly. Please contact Danielle at the Renken Company, 482-1060. GATED Claremont community with pool. Two bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathrooms. Washer, dryer. Central heating and air. Gas fireplace. No pets, smoking. Move-in special. $1595 monthly. Water and trash paid. 605 Colby Cr. 964-5954.

EMPLOYMENT
Help wanted
DRIVERS: Inexperienced? Get on the road to a successful career with CDL training. Regional training locations. Train and work for Central Refrigerated. 877-369-7091.
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.

EMPLOYMENT

Public Affairs Firm Seeks Senior Associate
VMA Communications is seeking a senior associate. The position calls for client management, extensive writing, media relations and governmental affairs for public and private clients in Southern California. Job candidates must be able to work independently, be organized, have strong communications skills, have basic computer competency and possess a BA in journalism, public policy, political PR or similar. Salary is commensurate with experience. Application deadline is May 15. Please email resume and three writing samples to valerie.martinez@vmapr.com. VMA Communications Inc. is a strategic communications firm that develops policy-driven public affairs programs.

(Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! ComboCalifornia daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) “MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure. elizabeth@cnpa.com. 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Apartment for rent
LA VERNE: Two bedroom, 1.5 bathroom, central heat, AC, full garage plus additional parking. Private laundry. Fresh paint and new carpet, furnished with refrigerator, washer and dryer. Great La Verne neighborhood, $1400. Call 593-5429. CLAREMONT: 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom apartment. $1600 monthly. $800 security deposit on approved credit. 6249958. CLAREMONT: One bedroom with garage. Near Village. Quite courtyard setting. $925 monthly. Nicole, 451-3203.

REAL ESTATE
House for sale
TWO 5 bedroom homes in pre-foreclosure starting at $1000 per month! Stop renting and own! Bad credit ok! Income verification only! Just take over payments! Call 1866-949-7345. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale in Claremont
Dates: May 3, 4 and 5 Days: Friday - Saturday - Sunday Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Daily 1474 Fergus Falls, Claremont Beautiful estate! There is a link to a video prepared to give you a complete tour of the home. Much of the furnishings are custom, using top of the line in fabrics. LG and Samsung major appliances. French door stainless steel refrigerator. Gym room with equipment by Hoist, Vision Fitness and Precore. Several HD TV's less than three years new, lots of lovely decor that is not pictured yet, books, linens, dishes, china, oil and acrylic paintings. Lovely wall art. Patio furniture and plants. I will update as necessary. For now, enjoy the video to preview. www.susannehayekphotography.net/14853

EMPLOYMENT
Help wanted
INSTRUCTOR/Attendant/CNA positions available. Seeking energetic individuals to assist disabled adults. Full-time, parttime, weekends and overnights available. Email resume to icr.job@icr3899.com or call 599-3184 ext. 540 for information. INTERNATIONAL Cultural Exchange Representative. Earn supplemental income place and supervising high school exchange students. Volunteer host families also needed. Promote world peace! www.afice.org/reps. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: One cent raise after 6 and 12 months. Three cent enhanced quarterly bonus. Daily or weekly pay, hometime options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com. (CalSCAN) DRIVERS: Freight up and get more money and benefits. New equipment and 401K. CDL Class A required. Call 877-2588782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN)

House for rent
CLAREMONT: 3 bedroom, one bathroom. Walk to Village, park. Detached garage, hardwood floors, fireplace. $1750 monthly. Call 6246547. ALTA LOMA: Four bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Living room with fireplace, kitchen, family room, vaulted ceilings, dual pane windows, skylights and a spacious floor plan. $1995 monthly. CBTC, 6216761.

Antiques
A barn and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628.

AUTOS

Studio for rent
SOUTH Claremont studio. Adjacent to mini-vineyard with garden privileges. $825 monthly, includes utilities. 851-1942.

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing. 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

Townhome for rent
CLUB Terrace, 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2-car garage. Fresh paint, community pool. No pets. $1850 monthly. WSPM 621-5941.

2003 Camry XLE V6. Taupe, fully loaded. 151,000 miles. Good condition. Power windows and seats. Six CD changer, moon roof, full-tint and cloth seats. $6000 or best offer. 909-851-1116.

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013065651 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THE HEART OF PLACEMENT, 292 W. Oak Park Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Rita Gale Salama, 292 W. Oak Park Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Rita Gale Salama This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/02/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 12, 19, 26 and May 3, 2013 APN: 8717-008-137 TS No: CA09000877-12-1 TO No: 7742-448065 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED May 23, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On May 21, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Vineyard Ballroom at Doubletree Hotel Los AngelesNorwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on May 29, 2007 as Instrument No. 20071286451 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by WAYNE LESKOSKY, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 394 SOUTH PROSPECTORS ROAD UNIT #98, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $286,295.10 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address www.Auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA09000877-12-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: April 12, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA09000877-12-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1033636 4/19, 4/26, 05/03/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 1192378-31 APN: 8735-055-030 TRA: 008442 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx2893 REF: Corona, Enrique IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED October 13, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On May 09, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded October 25, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 2561195 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Enrique E Corona A Married Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 3, 2013
or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 978 Barcelona Pl Walnut CA 91789-4346 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $832,622.90. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult ei-

31

ther of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1192378-31.  Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 920229004 Dated: April 04, 2013. (R-428782 04/19/13, 04/26/13, 05/03/13) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 074868 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Jon David’s Artistic Visions, 2058 N. Mills Ave., #340, Claremont, CA 91711. John David Dent, 2058 N. Mills Ave., #340, Claremont, CA 91711. Miriam G. Brownell, 12444 Benton Dr., Unit #3, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91739. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 03/28/13. /s/ Miriam Brownell This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/12/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 19, 26, May 3 and 10, 2013

MARKETPLACE
Financial
GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN) EVER consider a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home and increase cash flow! Safe and effective! Call now for your free DVD! Call now 888-6983165. (Cal-SCAN) PROTECT your IRA and 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free “gold guide.” American Bullion, 800527-5679. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
For Sale
BARN sale: Mt. Baldy Ranch. Two tennisball machines, 2 trucks, 3 tractors, 3 chippers, splitter, 2 golf carts, 20 chainsaws, wood working tools. 982-7719, 732-8964. CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections. Fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888-865-0271. (CalSCAN) DISH Network. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877-366-4509. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Education
ATTEND college 100 percent online. Medical, business, criminal justice, hospitality, web. Job placement assistance. Computers available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888210-5162. www.CenturaOn line.com. (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINES are hiring. Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance, 877-804-5293. (CalSCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
DO you know your testosterone levels? Call 888-9042372 and ask about our test kits and get a free trial of Progene All-Natural Testosterone Supplement. (Cal-SCAN) ATTENTION Sleep Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get CPAP replacement supplies at little or no cost, plus free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888699-7660. (Cal-SCAN) CANADA Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 90 en todas las medicinas que necesites. Llama ahora al 1-800-3852192 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratutio. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Personals
TIRED of being alone. Middle-age senior, attractive Italian widow woman seeking a senior man for traveling companion. Short or long trips. Claremont or nearby area. Movies, plays, theater. Preferred age 68-85. Sofia, 7201593. CHAT with local men. Local men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-291-3969. Women talk free! (Cal-SCAN) MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN)

Garage sales
MULTI-FAMILYClaremont garage sale. 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, May 4. On Spring at Green St. THE Club Terrace community will have their annual Springtime Neighborhood Yard Sale on Saturday, May 4 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Club Terrace is located at Trinity Lane and Shenandoah Drive, just off Monte Vista Ave. in Claremont.

Health
CANADA Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today, 1-800-273-0209, for $10 off your first prescription and free shipping. (CalSCAN)

ANIMALS
Found pet
FOUND: Medium hair cat with Siamese markings and blue eyes. No collar. Located on 400 block of Harrison. 621-1447.

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds.

DEADLINES
Classified: Monday & Thursday by 3:00 pm Real Estate: Wednesday by 3:00 pm Service Pages: Monday by 3:00 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $12 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing. All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013076586 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as AMPACTS, 112 Harvard Ave., #214, Claremont, CA 91711. Vero Palar, 1621 Wilson Ave., Upland, CA 91784. Solihin Taslim, 819 S. Golden West Ave., #B, Arcadia, CA 91007. Hendra Barudi W, 1308 E. Colorado Blvd., #585, Pasadena, CA 91106. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Vero Palar This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/16/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 19, 26, May 3 and 10, 2013 SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): EUREKA BURGER 1 LLC, a business entity, exact form unknown d.b.a. EUREKA BURGER; EUREKA BURGER CLAREMONT LLC, a business entity, exact form unknown d.b.a. EUREKA BURGER; EUREKA BURGER, a business entity, exact form unknown; SEAN RANALO, an individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive, YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): SARAH GIANAKOS, CALLIE SMITH, and ALLIE KING, each as an individual NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dfas, Ia corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea Ia información a continuación. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta par escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una 1amada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en Ia corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta.Puede encontrar estos formularies de Ia corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en Ia biblioteca del eyes de su condado o en Ia corte que le quede más cerca. Sino puede pagar Ia cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de Ia corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso par incumplimiento y Ia corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisites legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisíon a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisites para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un program a de servicios legales sin fines de luera. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de luera en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Par ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de Ia corte antes de que Ia corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012. CASE NUMBER (Numero del Caso): BC499258 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Michael F. Baltaxe (SBN 129532), SOTTILE BALTAXE, 4333 Park Terrace Drive, Suite 160, Westlake Village, CA 91361, 818-889-0050. DATE (Fecha): January 16, 2013, Clerk, by (Secretario): John A. Clarke, Deputy (Adjunto): Christina Grijalva. (For proof of service of this summons, use Proof of Service of Summons (form POS-010)(Para prueba de entrega de esta citation use el formulario Proof Of Service of Summons, POS-010). PUBLISH: 04/26/13, 05/03/13, 05/10/13, 05/17/13

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOYCE PENDLETON HAWK CASE NO. BP140721 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the WILL or estate, or both of JOYCE PENDLETON HAWK. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by GAVIN EVERETT HAWK in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that GAVIN EVERETT HAWK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The WILL and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act . (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/20/13 at 8:30AM in Dept. 9 located at 111 N. HILL ST., LOS ANGELES, CA 90012 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. In Pro Per Petitioner GAVIN EVERETT HAWK 1731 65TH WAY NORTH ST. PETERSBURG FL 33710 4/26, 5/3, 5/10/13 CNS-2476376# CLAREMONT COURIER NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN LESLIE NUCKOLLS AKA JOHN L. NUCKOLLS CASE NO. KP014491 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the WILL or estate, or both of JOHN LESLIE NUCKOLLS AKA JOHN L. NUCKOLLS. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JAMIE NUCKOLLS in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JAMIE NUCKOLLS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act with limited authority. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/16/13 at 8:30AM in Dept. A located at 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner PIERRE J. RODNUNSKY, ESQ. SBN 182888 SANTIAGO, RODNUNSKY & JONES 5959 TOPANGA CANYON BLVD #220 WOODLAND HILLS CA 91367 4/26, 5/3, 5/10/13 CNS-2476502# CLAREMONT COURIER NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE UNDER DEED OF TRUST LOAN: MADAD1 OTHER: 6757248 FILE:7800 JLP A.P. NUMBER 8713-028-003 ATTENTION RECORDER: THE FOLLOWING REFERENCE TO AN ATTACHED SUMMARY IS APPLICABLE TO THE NOTICE PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR ONLY. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED April 11, 2012, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NOTICE is hereby given that LENDERS T.D. SERVICE, INC., as trustee, or successor trustee, or substituted trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by SYED QAISAR MADAD AND MEHER TABATABAI HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY Recorded on 04/17/2012 as Instrument No. 20120571405 in Book Page of Official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded 06/13/2012 in Book , Page , as Instrument No. 2012-0878612 of said Official Records. WiLL SELL on 05/16/2013 at BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA, CA 91766 at 11:00 A.M. AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States), all right title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State hereinafter described: THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS GUARANTEE IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, CITY OF DIAMOND BAR, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL 1: LOT 118 OF TRACT NO. 30578, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 785, PAGES 1 TO 25, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPTING THEREFROM ALL OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES AND MINERAL NOW OR AT ANY TIME HEREAFTER SITUATED THEREIN OR THEREUNDER OR PRODUCIBLE THEREFROM, AS RESERVED IN THE DEED FROM TRANSAMERICA DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, RECORDED MARCH 29, 1968, IN BOOK D-3955, PAGE 185, OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY AND AS MODIFIED BY QUITCLAIM DEED RECORDED ON MAY 8, 1969 IN BOOK D-4363, PAGE 643, OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY, WHICH, RELINQUISHED ALL RIGHTS TO THE USE OF THE SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE TO A DEPTH OF 500 FEET FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND. PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER ALL THOSE AREAS SHOWN UPON THE MAP OF SAID TRACT NO. 30578, AS "PRIVATE STREETS", AND OVER ALL THOSE AREAS SHOWN UPON THE MAP OF TRACT NO. 30289 RECORDED IN BOOK 743, PAGES 42 TO 50, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY AS "PRIVATE STREETS", SAID EASEMENT TO BE APPURTENANT TO AND FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE LOT DESCRIBED ABOVE IN PARCEL 1. EXCEPTING THEREFROM ANY PORTION WHICH FALLS WITHIN THE LINES PARCEL 1 ABOVE DESCRIBED. The property address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: VACANT LAND: DIRECTIONS MAY BE OBTAINED BY WRITTEN REQUEST SUBMITTED TO THE UNDERSIGNED WITHIN TEN DAYS FROM THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the propertyaddress and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is; $414,403.78 In addition lo cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this stale. In the event tender other than cash is accepted the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee's Deed until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed, advances thereunder, with interest as provided therein, and the unpaid principal balance of the Note secured by said Deed with interest thereon as provided in said Note, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can re-

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 3, 2013
ceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, cither of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled lime and dale for the sale of this property, you may call 877-375-8174 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site: www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 04/20/2013 LENDERS T.D. SERVICE, INC., as said Trustee 24422 AVENIDA DE LA CARLOTA, #280 LAGUNA HILLS, CA 92653 (949)855-1945 By: JEFFREY L. PRATHER PRESIDENT A-4381217 04/26/2013, 05/03/2013, 05/10/2013 APN: 8293-045-152 TS No: CA05000026-13-1 TO No: 1365013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED May 2, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On May 17, 2013 at 09:00 AM, behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on May 15, 2007 as Instrument No. 20071176579 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by JAMIE CHRISTA A SARMIENTO, A SINGLE WOMAN, AND JOSE A SARMIENTO, AND REMEDIOS A SARMIENTO, HUSBAND AND WIFE, ALL AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor(s), in favor of COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. DBA AMERICA`S WHOLESALE LENDER as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 873 TERRACE LANE WEST #8, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $441,271.85 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary,

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Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA05000026-13-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: April 18, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA05000026-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Stephanie Hoy, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1034582 4/26, 5/3, 05/10/2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 080202 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as COLE DESIGN, 1419 Rust Ct., Claremont, CA 91711. Gina Lane, 1419 Rust Ct., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Gina Lane This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 26, May 3, 10 and 17, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 081991 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as The First Harvard Group, 107 Harvard Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Carol Curtis, 685 W. 10th St., Claremont, CA 91711. Sallie Curtis, 900 E. Harrison Ave., #37, Pomona, CA 91767. Peter Weinberger, 1030 Moab Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Leonard Munter, 900 E. Harrison Ave., #G-3, Pomona, CA 91767. David A. Stafford, 146 North Third Street, Raton, NM 87740. Gay Fisk, 803 Manchester Ct., Claremont, CA 91711. Susan B. Kennedy, 7075 High Meadow Way, Paso Robles, CA 93446. Helen-Jeanne Munter, 900 E. Harrison Ave., #G-3, Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in January, 1981. /s/ Carol Curtis This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 26, May 3, 10 and 17, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 077976 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as NICHOLE SKIN BOUTIQUE, 206 W. Bonita Ave., Unit G, Claremont, CA 91711. Nichole Vallone, 2563 Pointe Coupee Dr., Chino Hills, CA 91709. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Nichole Vallone This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/17/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 26, May 3, 10 and 17, 2013

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 05-03-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

33

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!
MPGeneral Contractors. House remodels, kitchen cabinets, flooring, plumbing and landscaping. Call 909-749-2572. General Contractor Lic.856372.

Electrician
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Hayden’s Services Inc.

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

Antiques
ANTIQUES wanted. Fair prices for the following old items: Hollywood, comics, toys, watches, medals, coins, badges, jewelry, postcards, books, magazines, military, photos, tools, sports, fishing, Disneyland, medical, historic documents, autographs, holiday decorations and other interesting items. 909-2389076. micklet@earthlink.net.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Drywall

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885. INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience. ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.
Claremont Handyman Service

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

Garage Doors

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606
SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Contractor
WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

SERVICES
Landscaping
GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

Friday 05-03-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

Pilates

Roofing
DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Tutoring
HELP your child achieve success in school. Family man, currently completing graduate work in education, available for homework help and tutoring in your home or in my Claremont home. Evenings or weekends. $20 hourly. 626-466-8391, rcmsangab@gmail.com. Free initial consultation. PRIVATE tutor. Reading, writing and vocabulary. Experienced teacher over 40 years. Contact Allen, agross91768@yahoo.com or 909-629-6007. AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Let us know when you move.
Call the COURIER at

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 * Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

621-4761
to update your mailing info.

Upholstery

Hayden’s Services Inc.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

Tile

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511. PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Weed Abatement
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Please call 909-989-9786.

Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

Don’t leave us in the dark!
We can publish your LA County legal.

Tree Care
MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960. Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-2318305. Claremont.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

Lic.839835

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

legalads@claremont-courier.com

Call Vickie 621-4761

Learn Japanese

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES

Advertise your business in our Services Directory!

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909-626-3066.

New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.

BAUER TREE CARE
40 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning available for your perennials. 909-624-8238

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Call Jessica 621-4761

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

ourier C
Claremont

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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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SERVICES
ADVERTISE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Selling, Buying or Renting?
Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-262-4633

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

SPECIALTY SERVICE

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most widely read real estate section in the area.

909-621-5626
SPECIALTY SERVICE

909.234.5766
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Kandi Ford

CALL JESSICA,

621-4761
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Best rates for LEGALS
Call us at: 909-621-4761

Claremont COURIER
10% OFF first-time customers & senior citizens!

909.621.4761
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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

REAL ESTATE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
1-3 p.m. 619 Occidental Drive, Claremont. Don Kendrick Real Estate. 1-4 p.m. 4176 New Hampshire Ave., Claremont. Century 21 Prestige Properties.

Sunday, May 5

Mason is a great real estate agent: knowledgable, patient, calm and persistent. He worked hard with us for over 5 months as we tried to find just the right home, and eventually we were successful. We looked at dozens of homes, made 5 offers and with Mason's help we have just moved into the right home in the Claremont Village. Without his guidance we would never have held firm to find this house. If you want a real estate agent who is neither pushy nor too laid back, who will spend time finding out what you want, then work hard to find it and show it to you before someone else gets it, give Mason a call.

—Kerry and Eda L.
To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

4176 New Hampshire, Claremont
SEPM U HO 1- 4 N E AY OP ND SU

®

abulous and rare single story listing! Elegant and comfortable living in beautiful Chanteclair Estates. Situated on a lovely cul-de-sac with great curb appeal and stacked stone accents. Wonderful 5 bedroom, 4 bathroom home. Four of the bedrooms have their own private bathroom. This home boasts beautiful natural light throughout. Accented ceramic tile flooring, over 9 foot ceilings with recessed lighting and plantation shutters. Living room is formal with a warm fireplace. Large formal dinning room for entertaining. Kitchen is a chef’s delight with numerous cabinets, granite counters, center island, built-in gas range, double ovens and walk-in pantry. There is a family room adjacent to the kitchen for easy conversation, built-in cabinets and cozy fireplace. Bonus room perfect as a media and pool table room for family fun. Open and spacious master bedroom has a separate retreat with a fireplace. Master bathroom includes custom tiled sunken tub, separate shower, double vanities and walk-in closet. Relax in the gorgeous serene lush backyard with covered patio and built-in barbecue. Pebble stone salt water pool and spa. This home also includes dual water heaters, air conditioner and heater units. 36,405 sq. ft. lot. Amazing and turnkey. $1,200,000. (N4176)

F

909.720.5652 • yo4homes@gmail.com

Y OLANDA M ALDONADO

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 3, 2013

37

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com
SAN ANTONIO HEIGHTS

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

Custom built home and studio of artist, John Svenson. Built by renown local builder, Don Hershey in 1979. Two bedrooms downstairs and one up. Upstairs balcony. Beautiful mountain view. Many shelves and built-ins. Living room features fireplace and wood beam ceiling. Studio has lots of windows and natural light, 3/4 bathroom, central heat and 2-story high ceilings. Sliding glass doors open to low maintenance yard and patio with fish pond. Art studio is approximately 1,247 sq. ft. and is in addition to the approximately 2,535 sq. ft. main house. $475,000. (V2480)

CLAREMONT CLUB TERRACE Immaculate 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom condo. Approximately 1563 sq. ft. with vaulted ceilings, sky lights, laminate flooring and private balcony off master bedroom. Lots of storage. Community pool and spa. $435,000. (A1831)

FOR LEASE...
• Claremont Village Cottage - 2 Bedrooms - $1,700 • 2 Bedroom Claremont Condo - $1,550 • Claremont Claraboya Condo - $2,350

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, May 3, 2013

38

GEOFF T. HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

909.621.0500
NEW LISTING

Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
JUST SOLD SALE PENDING

Tell a Friend...

"Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!"
FOOTHILLS CRAFTSMAN ESTATE. $1,250,000. Enjoy panoramic valley and mountain views in a picturesque setting on over an acre. Designed by Pasadena architect, Ivo Clarich. Original owner/builder. A high quality, one story, rambling residence with large bonus room upstairs. Recently renovated by Hartman Baldwin Design/Build. Open design with light wood and vaulted ceilings. Magnificent great room setting with handsome stone fireplace. Unique one-of-a-kind architectural details throughout. Long gated driveway leads to motor court, 3-car garage plus carport. Private well, comes with stock in Webb Oak Mutual Water Company. Zoned for horses plus additional agriculture if desired. Claremont School District. Standard sale. (L4825) CLARABOYA SHOWCASE, VIEWS. $1,250,000. Panoramic valley, city, canyon and mountain views! Newly rebuilt and expanded in 2001. This classic one story residence has an open floor plan with architectural built-ins. Brazilian maple floors, high ceilings, whole house speaker system and dual-pane windows. Double door entry formal foyer, library, formal living/family room with fireplace and built-in entertainment center, formal dining room, chef's kitchen with cook's island, stone counters, stainless steel appliances and eating area. Luxurious master suite with adjacent office/studio retreat with bathroom, spa jetted tub, separate shower and walk-in closet. Over 1/3 acre landscaped grounds and patio areas. (M2556) CUSTOM MID-CENTURY. $825,000. Mid-Century home with high volume ceilings, walls of glass and picturesque views. Over 1/3 acre of park-like grounds and large heated swimming pool. Approximately 3,150 sq. ft., featuring 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Dramatic entry through antiqued copper clad double doors leads into an impressive living room with atrium and extensive built-ins. Newer renovated kitchen with granite counters and breakfast nook. Adjacent formal dining room. Master suite with sitting area, newly renovated bathroom and walk-in closet. Prime locale on cul-de-sac street near Claraboya, foothills and hillside trails. (R4524)

COMING SOON:
• Amazing Newly Renovated Padua Hills Canyon Views 825,000. • Architect-Designed Mid-Century on Secluded 1/2 Acre $795,000. • 1-Story Executive Claremont Home on Large Lot $695,000. • Charming 4-Bedroom Claremont Home $425,000. • Quail Creek 2 Bedroom Condo $180,000.

NEW LISTING!

NEW LISTING!

SELLERS:
OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE FRENCH TRADITIONAL CLASSIC. $675,000. Absolutely gorgeous one story home plus guest quarters in a picturesque setting. Perfectly located on one of the nicest blocks and most coveted streets in the heart of the old Claremont Village. Unique architectural elements throughout. Three bedrooms, den and 3 bathrooms. Large living room with fireplace, formal dining room. Gourmet renovated kitchen. Beautiful oak hardwood flooring. Newer roof. Updated electrical and copper piping. Beautiful gardens in a private setting features custom patio areas, spa and numerous fruit trees. Convenient to Claremont Colleges, Village shopping, gourmet grocery stores and fine schools. (T545) MAGNIFICENT MID-CENTURY NEAR VILLAGE & COLLEGES. $635,000. Prime cul-de-sac locale adjacent to natural landscape within the Bernard Field Station grounds. Remodeled by Hartman Baldwin in 2007 with new doors, windows, insulation, electrical, home theater sound/lighting and tigerwood hardwood flooring throughout most of house. Additional recent improvements include copper plumbing, new roof and more. Unique inner patio/courtyard. Open kitchendining-family room with fireplace, vaulted ceiling and walls of glass. Private grounds include a great play yard and playhouse plus a serene picturesque setting in the newly resurfaced pool area. Large lot with mature landscaping and fruit trees. Close distance to coveted Chapparal Elementary School. (B252) CLARABOYA HILLSIDE PANORAMIC VIEWS. $875,000. Contemporary Mid-Century custom built - original one family owner. Perfectly sited on a quiet cul-de-sac offering picturesque valley, city lights and hillside vistas! Super 4 bedroom floor plan perfect for entertaining and family living! Formal dining room with bookcase. Inviting living room with handsome fireplace. Updated chefʼs kitchen with eating area. Fabulous family great room. Multiple built-ins throughout. Central air and heat. Dual-pane windows. Beautifully manicured, nearly 1/2 acre grounds, feature a swimming pool, covered patio and grassy yard areas. (V683)

“I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home”
Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property. Thank you!

D.R.E. #00997900

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

Your Local Real Estate Resource

YOU CAN SEE FOREVER
This spectacular single level Claraboya home is a work of art! Open the double entry doors to see a sweeping vista before you, from the impressive interior to the delightful outdoors that seem to go on forever as you take in breathtaking views. There is a library for reading, living room with ambient fireplace for formal gatherings and master suite with remodeled master bathroom. Gourmetʼs dream kitchen features granite counters and custom cabinetry with an antique finish. The kitchen opens to the intimate family room allowing for connection between those in the kitchen and the rest of the family and friends who have the opportunity to enjoy the magnificent views this home affords. Other luxurious appointments include the sparking pool and lovely patio areas. With more upgrades than can be listed, please call for an appointment to see this amazing home, 909-398-1810. $1,195,000. (V2272)

STONE CANYON VIEW ESTATE Stunning home on a cul-de-sac. Formal living room has high ceilings and custom floorings. The formal dining room and butlerʼs pantry are perfect for entertaining. Kitchen has granite counters, professional grade stainless steel appliances, roomy pantry and center island. Kitchen and nook adjoin the family room with a cozy fireplace. Master suite with retreat is generously sized and beautifully appointed. Be entranced by the captivating city light views in the evening and lush, rolling green hillsides by day. Enjoy the outdoors under the covered patio that is a perfect place to relax while overlooking the sparkling pebble tech, salt water pool and spa. The outdoor kitchen boasts a BBQ, gas burner, refrigerator and sink. Secluded courtyard in the front of the house. The 4-car tandem garage has epoxy floors and built-in cabinets. Hurry, this one won't last! 909-398-1810. $1,449,000. (T4441)

G IN D N PE   LE SA

G IN D N PE   LE SA

G IN D N PE   LE SA

G IN D N PE   LE SA

ONE-OF-A-KIND MASTERPIECE
Enter this resplendent northeast Claremont home through the iron and glass door entryway. Master bedroom has 2 fireplaces, crystal chandeliers and sconces. Great room includes gourmet kitchen with 2 islands. Yard has covered patio, outdoor kitchen, outdoor fireplace, salt water pool, spa, fire ring and orchard. Two separate garages. The home has solar. 909-398-1810. $2,200,000. (B808)

CLARABOYA MAGNIFICENCE
Understated elegance abounds in this home, perfectly situated to capture the panoramic views that have made Claraboya so highly desirable. High ceilings, ample windows and French doors are artfully placed to highlight the views. Natural landscaping and expansive deck. Bask in the elegance of the recently refurbished decorating. Hurry, this home will not last. 909-398-1810. $899,000. (V2748)

CLAREMONT CONTEMPORARY
Clean lines and bright open spaces connect the outdoors to the indoors in this home behind private gates of the Griswoldʼs community. Solid wood floors and plantation shutters accent the vaulted ceilings, cheery kitchen and master suite. Private yard offers relaxation in a tranquil environment. 909398-1810. $390,000. (V406)

ASHLEY PARK
Absolutely charming home in the desired community of Ashley Park, with it's private park, pool area and tennis courts. Step into this lovely property featuring high ceilings and an abundance of windows that allow in natural light. Open backyard with patio and BBQ area. 909398-1810. $439,900. (S2174)

PANORAMIC VIEWS
Stone Canyon Estate boasts extensive upgrades like the sweeping wrought iron staircase, designer glass windows, kitchen with black pearl countertops and cutting edge stainless steel appliances. Two master suite options, one upstairs and one downstairs. Fabulous yard encompasses panoramic mountain, valley and city light views. 909398-1810. $1,300,000. (C4471)

FRENCH CHATEAU
Embrace wood and travertine flooring, an elevator, game room, teen loft and more in this Brittany styled estate. Be the ultimate chef in the kitchen that Julia Child would have adored. Hand laid stone façade is the first blush of the exotic grounds which include a pool pavilion and guest casita. 5star energy rating with top efficiency for insulation, heating and cooling systems. 909-398-1810. $2,995,000. (S1015)

TIMELESS ROMANTICISM
Step into another world as you breathe in the elegant living room with custom designed fireplace and coffered ceilings, the spacious family room with wet bar, the billiard room, show stopper kitchen and so much more! Artfully manicured grounds are complete with pool and spa, patios plus an orchard. Call to schedule your appointment. 909-398-1810. $2,498,000. (B659)

SPANISH STYLE ESTATE
Enter leaded doors to find an open and sweeping floorplan where walls of windows and high ceilings showcase the magnificent valley and city light views. Fantastic architectural detailing include wall niches, wood beam ceilings and ambient fireplaces. Find multiple patio areas, built-in BBQ, large soaking spa and expansive grassy area accented by flowering shrubs and fantastic views! 909-398-1810. $1,075,000. (G821)

If you or someone you know are struggling with your mortgage don't wait until it is too late. There are options and solutions for you. Call me today!

w w w. c b t c s o c a l . c o m

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

The Real Estate Company
SALE PENDING

CLAREMONT Three bedroom, 2 bathroom custom home with 2,620 sq. ft. of living area. Built circa 1931. Dramatic entry to step-down formal living room with high ceiling and fireplace. Adjoining formal dining with built-in buffet and French doors to patio. Family room with builtin bookcases and built-in desk; used as an office. Remodeled kitchen with recessed lighting, tile counters and built-in cabinets. Five burner gas stove, double ovens, warming drawer, microwave, center island, built-in refrigerator and freezer drawers, adjacent pantry. Breakfast room with built-in cabinets and adjacent tiled patio. Separate laundry room with tile counters, sink and builtin cabinets. Downstairs bedroom and drawers. Full bathroom with original tiled flooring and tiled tub/shower. Second floor via spiral staircase, master bedroom with walk-in closet, separate dressing room with 2 closets (one cedar lined) and built-in vanity, tiled balcony. Adjoining full bathroom, original tile flooring, mostly original tile in shower. Bedroom with walk-in closet and ceiling fan, hall entrance to bathroom. Utility room with built-in cabinets. Additional features include: hardwood floors, copper plumbing plus central air and forced air heating system. Basement with built-in cabinets and extensive storage areas. Gorgeous private 18,731 sq. ft. lot with tile and cement patios. Beautifully landscaped with numerous mature trees and rose garden. Spanish tile roof, re-roofed approximately 10 years ago. Two-car garage with automatic opener, direct home access. $825,000. (Clar4434L)

LA VERNE Pending sale on this beautiful end unit, 2-story condominium pleasantly located in a quiet complex in northwest La Verne. With notable view of the foothills and mountains. This high quality home has been upgraded and lovingly cared for. You'll note a brand new custom bathroom upstairs, new flooring, a spacious layout, lots of storage and a peaceful courtyard and patio. San Dimas Canyon Park is very near with numerous amenities; softball and soccer fields, a dog park, a small zoo, complete horse accommodations and riding trails. $297,000. (LaV4676C)

SALE PENDING

SAN GABRIEL Beautiful 2 bedrooms, 2 full
bathrooms plus a den that can be used as a third bedroom! High ceilings and open floor plan. Gorgeous travertine tile and wood laminate throughout. Fireplace in the living room is beautiful! Sitting area next to dining room has perfect access to the front patio. Large master bedroom with walk-in closet. Extra large front patio with high walls that create a secluded and private extension of the home, great for entertaining. Large yard with concrete patio and grass area for summer relaxation, fenced all around. Walk to the association pool and Jacuzzi. You can have a pool without the cost of maintaining one. Entry has front gate and provides privacy when front door is open. Large 2-car garage with laundry hook-ups. Located near freeways and shopping centers, yet property is in a private residential area. This is a perfect home for first time home buyers, rental investment and for those who want a comfortable home without the costly maintenance of a single family home. Everything you need in a smaller home is in this property! This is a very nice condominium in a quiet neighborhood with low traffic. $192,500. (Mont11023S)

SAN GABRIEL Great opportunity! This quaint property features 2 bedrooms, one bathroom and has had many updates. It also includes a guest unit at the rear of the property. In the last 5 years this property has gotten a new roof, electrical updates, a bathroom remodel and updated flooring. The guest unit has a ton of potential for a buyer who is willing to put some work into it. $360,000. (San1841M)

SALE PENDING

SALE PENDING

ONTARIO Three bedroom, 2.5 bathroom townhouse in the well
manicured New Country complex. End unit overlooking the greenbelt and pool area. Enter past front courtyard into spacious living room with high ceilings and adjacent dining area. Downstairs has a half bathroom. The kitchen and family room with fireplace open up to the peaceful rear patio which offers shade, cover and planters. Upstairs master bedroom with vaulted ceilings and views. The master bathroom has an oversized tub and dual-sinks. Two additional bedrooms and a full bathroom upstairs. Two-car garage has direct access to house and backyard with built-in storage area and laundry hookups. Home contains alarm system. $225,000. (Ont2939P)

Property Management from a name you already trust. Call us today for a free market evaluation. 909-621-6761

ONTARIO Beautiful 2 bedroom, one bathroom home in historical north Ontario. Enter from covered front porch to the living room with hardwood floors and fireplace. Pass through the formal dining room with custom textured ceiling and adjacent reading nook to the extra large kitchen. Off the kitchen is the separate laundry room. A large backyard with separate one car carport. Property needs some TLC but is a perfect investment opportunity. $225,000. (Ont645P)

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April 2013
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April 2013

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909-621-6761 1-800-420-9939

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