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Public Speaking Tips: Speaking or Panic:Which Came 1st? Part 1Radio Interview

Public Speaking Tips: Speaking or Panic:Which Came 1st? Part 1Radio Interview

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Published by Kerrie Espuga
Speaking or Panic: Which Came First?

PART 1 Radio interview explores reasons for fear and how to overcome it.

Tips to Overcome Your Fear when you're suddenly public speaking
Speaking or Panic: Which Came First?

PART 1 Radio interview explores reasons for fear and how to overcome it.

Tips to Overcome Your Fear when you're suddenly public speaking

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Published by: Kerrie Espuga on Apr 03, 2009
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Public Speaking 101 Page 1 of 8

The “Winning in Life Now” Radio Show By Michelle Prince

To Speak or Not to Speak….. Public Speaking 101 Interview with Kerrie Espuga
Founder and Marketing Director Corporate Trendsetters Highpowerpres.com March 2009

Part 1: • Confidence • Tips for Interviewing • Tips for Standing Out

Public Speaking 101 Page 2 of 8

Michelle Prince:

Hi, this is Michelle Prince and welcome to the “Winning in Life Now” Radio Show. As you're host, I will be bringing you live interviews each week with some of the most notable and successful authors, speakers, trainers, and entrepreneurs in the self-growth industry. My goal is to motivate you and inspire you to take action, to live your best life, and to do it now. I am so excited to introduce you to my guest, Kerrie Espuga. Thank you for joining us Kerrie:

Kerrie Espuga: Michelle Prince:

Thank you for having me. Let me tell you a little bit about Kerrie. She is the founder of Corporate Trendsetters, a New York professional training firm. Her expertise includes training individuals in public speaking and sales management. Kerrie has 16 years experience at Fortune 500 companies, including training, selling, and managing in the pharmaceutical industry. In the role of Supervisory Associate Director in Sales Training, she won a Training Excellence Award. In the sales arena, she won three annual National Winner Circles Awards, including two President Club trips, and ranked No. 1 in the country two consecutive years at a sales representative. As a Sales Manager, she led her team from last in the nation to No. 2 in the country. Coaching her team on presentation skills is the secret to her success. Wow, what an impressive background.

Kerrie Espuga: Michelle Prince:

Thank you very much. That is fantastic. How long have you been teaching presentation skills? Since 2001. That's when I originally became a trainer. Then I managed for a 3 years, then supervised in sales training, and now have my own business focusing in on professional development. I

Kerrie Espuga:

Public Speaking 101 Page 3 of 8 just absolutely love it. I love seeing people go from average to really excelling in this skill set. Michelle Prince: That's amazing. I was just at a conference this weekend and the speaker that was on the stage said that the No. 1 fear of people all over the world is public speaking, and her point was, "So you would rather be dead than being up here in my shoes on the stage?" Have you always been confident when speaking? Kerrie Espuga: No. Actually, I remember avoiding certain situations where public speaking would be involved, like in high school. I would never go for student council positions that did have public speaking, and I remember even in college and the work world, if there were meetings, I would be the last one to speak up for example. Or, if we had a workshop with different flipcharts, I would rather scribe than present. I really was quite afraid of taking that risk for fear of others judging me. And then, after I built the confidence and got over that, I thought, "Hey, I could help other people who are in the same shoes I was in. I could definitely help them come out of their shell and really show the true potential that they do have." Michelle Prince: It always amazes me that everybody seems to have that fear across the board. You talk to anyone; most people don't like to get up in front of a group of people. Right. One topic we discuss in our public speaking classes, is to remember that the audience would rather be in the audience than in front of the room. So if somebody's doing a presentation for example, all they have to remember is that the audience is thinking, "Better them than me!" That's right. Most of the time, the audience wants the speaker to do well. They really want to find value, whether it's a meeting or a Webinar or a training class. They're not hoping that people do poorly. They're hoping they get something out of it. That is so true. The person doing the speaking is actually thinking about all those things that probably no one else is.

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Public Speaking 101 Page 4 of 8 Kerrie Espuga: Michelle Prince: Exactly. So, when people are wanting to learn how to be a better public speaker, how do they know if they need help like what you're doing, or if they should just read up on some tips? They can always ask their audience. For example, if they're in a meeting, they can always say, "How did I do in that meeting? Did I participate enough? Did I participate too much? Did I sound confident? Was I really conveying my message well? Was I convincing?" The more often they get feedback from their peers and their colleagues, the more they'll better assess their public speaking ability. The other way is to really take a true self-reflection. Sometimes people don't take the time to commit to themselves for professional development and just really take the time to judge themselves. "Am I getting the proper help that I need? Am I reaching my potential?" Because, on a daily basis, we hear that people know they have it in them. They know they have the talent, but because it's an unused resource, so to speak, they really haven't tapped into their true potential. Michelle Prince: That is so true. What do you think are the biggest challenges people face when they're presenting to a group? We always hear that they want to calm their nerves. That's the biggest one; calming nerves, reducing the jitters. They want to learn how to not freeze on stage. "If somebody arrives late at my meeting, how do I just not stop what I'm doing and still keep on track?" So, it's really about calming the nerves and building confidence. Those are the top two that we hear every day. I almost wish prospects and clients could hear each other so they know they're not alone, because the conversations we have with different people, are the same every day. Michelle Prince: Absolutely. I even know really famous, well-know speakers that still get the jitters before they go out in front of a group, but they've learned how to manage that, how to take that energy and create it into positive energy rather than negative.

Kerrie Espuga:

Kerrie Espuga:

Public Speaking 101 Page 5 of 8 Kerrie Espuga: They say we have 60,000 thoughts per day, so how many of those are positive? As we're putting our head down on the pillow and we had 60,000 thoughts for the day, how many were positive, how many were negative, and that's really a true reflection of those thoughts. Because most of the time, the nerves on stage are from negative thoughts. That is so true. "How am I going to do? Will I do well? What will they think?" And "they're going to judge me. What if they find out I'm really not an expert? What if they outwit me up on the Q&A portion? What if they know something I don't know? What if they don't like my outfit?" Whatever it is, they're all negative thoughts. They should be thinking about the audience getting value. They should be thinking how much the audience is going to get out of it. Maybe the speaker's going to teach something the audience didn't know. Perhaps they'll have some "ah ha" moments. So, if they replace the negative thoughts with positive thoughts, that's half the battle. Then the other half, of course, is practice. Michelle Prince: There's a story that – I hope I get it right – my mentor Zig Ziglar once told “it's okay to feel nervous”. It's okay to have fear, just like a thoroughbred in the gate about to do the Kentucky Derby. They're jittery in that little station waiting to get out, and you'd much rather be a thoroughbred than a mule who doesn't have one ounce of fear in their body. The point is, is even the best of the best have fear, and it's okay. Feel the fear and do it anyway. That's a really interesting point, because I bet they do get nervous, because they get so excited to run. Then, the other portion is they've had so much practice. Right. So, that's how people really become the best, just like the horses. They may still get some of the jitters, but they're thinking positively and they've had a ton of practice. Absolutely. Do you have any advice for people or candidates that are interviewing to present themselves more effectively?

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Public Speaking 101 Page 6 of 8 Right now, a lot of people are out there looking for jobs, interviewing. Any tips you can share with them? Kerrie Espuga: Yes, especially in this economy right now. I do have a couple of tips for them. In their interview, try not to say the word "I" too often, because then it sounds like it's all about them. Try not to say the word "We" too often, because it sounds like they don't have a lot of initiative, if it's always about the team. (They have to show leadership, too). So if they said "I" just the right amount of times and "We" just the right amount of times, a nice balance of 50/50, then they'll come across as not only someone who has initiative, but somebody who can also strive for team results and cares about the team. Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga: That is really interesting. Another suggestion is to tell stories. People remember stories. Interviewers remember candidates who told great stories. Just make sure they're short. After dealing with a lot of candidates, thousands and thousands over the years, the ones who stood out were the ones who told short stories. The No. 1 mistake candidates make is rambling. If candidates can learn to balance "I" and "We", and tell short stories that have a great point and a positive ending (some candidates tell stories that don't have a great ending. So, make sure all the stories have a positive ending), they will do really well. So, tell short stories and balance "I" and "We". Michelle Prince: That is really interesting. I had never heard the "I" and "We" part of that, but that makes total sense. Because, if somebody is up there saying, "I did this and I did this," you immediately think the candidate is thinking "Alright, what's in it for me? Enough about you; let's talk about me.” Some analogies are Dancing with the Stars or Athletes after a win: Instead of dancers/players saying, "I was born with this talent”, "I", "I", "I", they should say, “we did this together”, “I've had a lot of support,” “I was able to grow," so there's a balance of "I" and "We." The latter are the ones fans follow.

Kerrie Espuga:

Public Speaking 101 Page 7 of 8 Michelle Prince: Absolutely, you're right. Great tips…very good tips. Do most people prefer one-on-one coaching would you say, or do they prefer group classes so they can practice and get in front of an audience? Kerrie Espuga: It all depends on the level of talent, but a lot of folks like to do a combination of one-on-one and group practice, especially if they're new to public speaking. Because, they feel comfortable one-onone, and after they've gotten some experience on their feet and they've gotten some tips, and they've been able to practice, then they want to practice in front of groups. So, a combination of both one-on-one to get the specialized attention for a full day or two for example, and then, to get group practice. The good part about group practice is that it helps with calming the nerves. The only flip side to that is that there is that much less attention individually. Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga: Michelle Prince: Good point. So, a combination of both is probably the key. Yes. So, when people have taken your classes, where would you say they've grown the most or what comments have you gotten from some of your clients? Definitely building confidence. 99% of the feedback forms that we get back, those two words "build confidence" or "built confidence" or "built much confidence that was needed" are in our form. It's really quite rewarding on our end to see at the beginning of Day 1, their chins are down, they're eyes are down, they're hands are quivering, or they're playing with their jewelry. (I just saw that one in a class). By then end of Day 2, they feel like a million bucks. They're using big gestures, they're animated, they're chins are up, strong eye contact…it's really quite rewarding on our end to see these folks come out of their shell and to really tap into that potential so they can express themselves well. {Please go to part 2}

Kerrie Espuga:

Public Speaking 101 Page 8 of 8 [Kerrie Espuga is Founder and Managing Director of Corporate Trendsetters, LLC, a NY professional training consulting company. Her expertise includes Public Speaking, Team Building, and Sales/Management Training. Kerrie has extensive experience in Corporate America at Fortune 500 companies, including facilitating/training, selling, and coaching/managing in the Pharmaceutical industry. She’s an exciting innovative Facilitator, who enjoys keeping groups engaged to enhance the learning. To sign up for her free public speaking newsletter, visit http://highpowerpres.com/Test/genstep1.php which includes monthly specials. To enroll in a sales/mgt class, visit www.corporatetrendsetters.com]

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