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Public Speaking Tips: Speaking or Panic:Which Came 1st?Radio Interview part2

Public Speaking Tips: Speaking or Panic:Which Came 1st?Radio Interview part2

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Published by Kerrie Espuga
Speaking or Panic: Which Came First? PART 2

Radio Interview explores reasons we fear public speaking and ways to conquer it!

Tips to Overcome Your Fear when you're suddenly public speaking
Speaking or Panic: Which Came First? PART 2

Radio Interview explores reasons we fear public speaking and ways to conquer it!

Tips to Overcome Your Fear when you're suddenly public speaking

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Published by: Kerrie Espuga on Apr 03, 2009
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08/10/2015

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The “Winning in Life Now” Radio Show By Michelle Prince

To Speak or Not to Speak….. Public Speaking 101 Interview with Kerrie Espuga
Founder and Marketing Director Corporate Trendsetters Highpowerpres.com March 2009

Part 2: • Tips to Practice for Free • Audience Engagement • Self Reflection

Michelle Prince:

If you fear public speaking, you may get some of those "Ah ha" moments too. Like, "Gosh, this really isn't so difficult. I don't know why I'm so terrified to be up here." One gentleman said, "This is so much easier than I thought" and at the end, he wrote a nice e-mail and said that the class changed his life, personally and professionally. I believe it. There's something about being able to get up in front of other people and look them in the eye, and come across with authority and confidence. It does build your own internal confidence, and it's something I think everybody wants to do and wants to work on. So, while the listeners are contemplating… (I'm sure many of you out there are considering whether or not you need professional assistance with presentation skills or not), what would you suggest they do in the meantime? How could they practice? Starting today, what could they do to practice to get better at this?

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

One suggestion is for any teleconference or meeting, that they speak in the first five to ten minutes. The first five to ten minutes of any meeting or any teleconference, just say something, because the perception that other people will have of them will improve. Others will think they're confident; they've got conviction, as long as it's appropriate. We don't want to cut off the leader of a teleconference. But, at the first appropriate moment, chime in, because lots of folks who fear public speaking think about, "When am I going to chime in. Wait, I'm going to chime in now." And then, while they're thinking about it, somebody else says the same thing.

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

That's so true. They miss their golden opportunity. At the first appropriate moment, chime in because then, they could focus on the meeting instead of thinking about when they're going to talk. That is a great point, get it over with basically, but then it also gives the perception that you are involved and engaged, and listening and confident. Yes, engaged, listening, and then whoever the person who is conducting that meeting or teleconference, it almost helps them make their meeting run more smoothly, because you're helping with that engagement and the interaction.

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Very, very true. They will be seen as a team player as well, because they're helping the one conducting the meeting. I know you offer all the things that we're talking about in your services. Are there any other tips you wouldn't mind sharing with the listeners as far as anything else they could do to get better at the art of public speaking? Practice, practice, practice, and one way to do that is by asking their boss if they can present at the next meeting, or getting more involved in the community. Whenever they get a chance to practice, that's going to build their confidence. There are plenty of opportunities in the local community: Chamber of Commerce or different associations where you can get practice presenting. The biggest advantage is practicing. That's the way people get better, and either they could sign up for a class or they could practice in their community, or ask their boss to present at their next meeting…maybe an update on a project they're working on, for example. As far as tips for actual presenting in addition to practice…while they're presenting, they should glance at a visual, but then only speak to the audience. Lots of presenters make the mistake of talking to the screen.

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Oh yes. Or, talking to the laptop, and the proper way is to glace at the laptop and speak to the audience. As soon as you have eye contact with someone, that's when you should be speaking. Then, after that thought, look at somebody else and tell a thought. After that thought, look at somebody else and tell a thought. People have the habit of scanning the audience similar to the Brady Bunch way back in the day. "Look over their heads, just scan, look over their heads." But instead, try to really connect with one person at a time. That is a great tip. Avoid scanning over their heads, because there wouldn't be that connection that there is with eye contact. And everybody in the audience, they want to connect to that speaker. I've been in the audience many times and can recall the speaker catching my eyes, and then immediately you're more drawn into what they're saying. It just keeps people engaged with you.

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

And it has to be appropriate. Saying one thought per person is the actual recommended length of time. Have you ever been in an audience where the speaker looks too long at one person and then it's uncomfortable? Yes. There definitely has to be a balance. Just a sentence per person; not a story per person, because then it could get a little awkward. A little creepy depending on who it is. That's funny. Another mistake that presenters always make is they hold something in their hand. They call it the "comfort prop", so we suggest, avoid holding anything in your hand. If it's a marker and you're about to flipchart, that's fine as long as you're flipcharting. But, some people hold a marker when they're not about to flipchart within the next hour. And it's so distracting. Everybody notices it. Right, so they just want to hold onto the marker for comfort and then guess where the whole audience looks?…at the marker. Right, and not hearing a word they're saying probably. They were looking at the marker thinking, "What is she going to do? Is he going to use the market or is he just holding the marker? Why is he holding the marker?" People use markers, pens, cups, bottles, so anything that's in the speaker's hand, that's where the audience looks. So true. We ask people to keep their hands empty unless they're using it as part of their message. (If they need a prop for example, or if they need that marker because they're flipcharting). So, hands are empty unless it's a prop being used. These are great tips. I'm actually writing them down myself for my own benefit. Once, working for Zig Ziglar, I remember we would get calls on a daily basis saying, "I want to be a public speaker. I want to be doing what you're doing. How do I do it?" Have you seen that? Have you seen other people really wanting to not be afraid of this, but really want to pursue public speaking?

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

Yes. People come in for different reasons, and one of them is to become a paid speaker. Some folks will come in and say, "I've spoken now for years for free, and now I want to become a paid speaker, so I just want to hone those skills a little more professionally." And the other folks, they just want to remove their fear completely, so they just want practice. And depending on where they are too, you could meet them at that level, whether it be their wanting to be more professional, they've been doing this for a while, maybe they've been in Toast Masters or people that have never done anything. You could really meet them wherever they're coming in. Yes. We have eight different classes, all different activities and exercises at different levels. Well, let's talk about that. Let's talk about your classes. How do you do them? Where do you do them? How can people get in touch with you to try to get going on something like this? If they're in the New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut area, we offer live Instructor-Led classes, usually held in Midtown or the Upper West Side. We also have Webinars for those folks not in the Metro area. Clients can be coached over the phone or coached via webcam (through Skype or Oovoo video conferencing). Some folks don't want to leave their home and some folks would rather have live classroom training. As far as getting in touch with us, we have free tips for public speaking in our newsletter. If they wanted to visit www.highpowerpres.com, they could sign up for our free newsletter. And if they're looking for more tips or video testimonials, or just to hear other folks going through the same thing, they can go to www.corporatetrendsetters.com. So again, there are video testimonials on there, more tips, and class descriptions. That one's a little more in depth.

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Great. For the listeners out there who are driving, we are recording this, so if you're not able to get out a pen and paper and write this down, just listen to the recording at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/WinninginLifeNow/2009/03/30/PublicSpeaking-101. Now Kerrie, you didn't ask me to mention this, but I do know from just talking with you. Are you also offering some consultation for those that go to your Website and sign up for your newsletter, possibly those that are looking to

hire you for your services? Are you doing any kind of free consultation for people like that? Kerrie Espuga: Yes. We offer 20 to 30 minutes over the phone in case they're not sure if they want professional help, or they're not sure how long they want to go for the training. So, we give them a ballpark, an idea of what would be appropriate for their level, and that's free. So, it's 20 to 30 minutes over the phone and we're running that free for a limited time. Awesome, that is great. And for people who are out there thinking, "Well, I don't really ever have to get up in front of a group" or "my job doesn't require me to have to worry about these kind of things," this is the kind of skill that anybody needs to learn. Speaking, with or without the public is really any time you have an exchange with any person, whether it's 1 person or 2,000 people, it's extremely important to have those presentation skills, because you're presenting yourself every single day that you've talked to anybody. So, if you're not presenting yourself in a way that comes across as competent and capable, I highly encourage you, (even if you're not in a position to where you have to do daily presentations to a big group), to tap into that potential. Kerrie Espuga: And they say if there are two candidates who have the same credentials, the one with the better presentation skills will get the job. I believe that. And usually, interviews are one-on-one, so we even have people who come in for one-on-one training, because they want one-on-one help expressing themselves. Sometimes they want to work on difficult conversations with their colleagues or their bosses. They just want help expressing themselves and communicating more effectively so they can find that fine line between not being passive and not being aggressive, but they want to be appropriately assertive. We coach to appropriately assertive. That is awesome. Again, definitely seek out Kerrie; definitely leverage what she knows. She's been doing this for so long that her experience can help anybody, and especially with all these free reports and newsletters. Go there, again at highpowerpres.com or corporatetrendsetters.com.

Michelle Prince:

Michelle Prince: Kerrie Espuga:

Michelle Prince:

Kerrie, before we wrap up, is there anything else that you want to share with my listeners in terms of tips or other information about you, your business, anything at all? Kerrie Espuga: If they feel inside that they know they have more potential than what people see, that's the typical client who comes to us and sees the most success. Those folks who really want to express themselves more: They feel a little bit nervous, feel a little bit fearful, they know they have more to share, they know they have untapped talent. Those are the ones who do extremely well and come out feeling like a million bucks. So, if they're looking to be trained on their presentation skills and they really want to have some fun in the meantime, then they should definitely enroll in one of our classes. Guaranteed fun…that's for sure. Michelle Prince: That is awesome. And practice, practice, practice. Nothing comes easy and you can look at a speaker on a stage and think to yourself, "That just must come to them naturally." I can guarantee, public speaking doesn't come naturally to anyone. Anyone who's out there today doing a good job has likely gotten coaching with people like Kerrie or has taken classes, so get out there. Do it, and you won't regret it. Kerrie, I am so glad you joined us today. Thank you so much. I know your schedule is so busy and I really appreciate your taking the time to be on here. And, I'd love to have you on here again. We'll see about setting that up. Kerrie Espuga: Michelle Prince: Excellent. Thanks for having me. This is Michelle Prince with the Winning In Life Now Radio Show. If you would like to reach me, I can be reached at www.winninginlifenow.com. Until next time, make it a great day. END TRANSCRIPT [Kerrie Espuga is Founder and Managing Director of Corporate Trendsetters, LLC, a NY professional training consulting company. Her expertise includes Public Speaking, Team Building, and Sales/Management Training. Kerrie has extensive experience in Corporate America at Fortune 500 companies, including facilitating/training, selling, and coaching/managing in the Pharmaceutical industry. She’s an exciting innovative Facilitator, who enjoys keeping groups engaged to enhance the learning. To sign up for her free public speaking newsletter, visit http://highpowerpres.com/Test/gen-step1.php which includes monthly specials. To enroll in a sales/mgt class, visit www.corporatetrendsetters.com]

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