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Metro Weekly - 05-02-13 - Swimsuit

Metro Weekly - 05-02-13 - Swimsuit

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Metro Weekly presents the swimsuit issue.

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White House Wish
As ENDA returns to Congress, Obama administration remains a key component
Obama
by Justin Snow
W
HEN THE WHITE
House puts its full
weight behind a piece
of legislation it wants to
see become law, that push is hard to miss.
Immigration reform and gun con-
trol have so far dominated the start of
Obama’s second term, and the focus
on those issues has seen the president
deliver a number of speeches, hold
meetings at the White House and dis-
patch Vice President Joe Biden to lobby
former colleagues on Capitol Hill.
With the Employment Non-Discrim-
ination Act (ENDA) being reintroduced
in the Senate and House of Represen-
tatives April 25, however, few expect
to see the same fervent push from the
Obama administration as has been seen
on immigration and gun control.
Despite Obama’s place in history
as the nation’s most pro-gay president
— the first sitting president to openly
endorse same-sex marriage and who
then called for full equality for gay
people in his second inaugural address
— expectations remain low for White
House involvement in ENDA.
Although the president has endorsed
ENDA, which would prohibit work-
place discrimination on the basis of
sexual orientation and gender identity
nationwide, the White House has been
mum on what, if anything, it plans to
do to build support for a bill that has no
clear path to passage in the House.
As recently as April 23, White House
press secretary Jay Carney deflected
questions on what Obama has done to
build support for ENDA, instead direct-
ing reporters to his broader record on
LGBT rights.
“He will work with like-minded
lawmakers who support movement on
this legislation to see it passed and
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hopefully signed into law,” Carney said.
“That’s how this process works. This is
the approach the president thought was
the right one to take and he is encour-
aged by the progress being made.”
White House senior adviser Valerie
Jarrett recently said in an interview with
Reuters that ENDA is a priority for the
administration, adding, “Right now the
votes aren’t there, but that doesn’t mean
they won’t be.” According to Reuters,
congressional aides say they have seen
little evidence the White House is work-
ing to build support for ENDA.
What role the president should
play in the coming months as ENDA is
debated on Capitol Hill remains a point
of disagreement by supporters.
Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), the cham-
pion of ENDA in the Senate, told Metro
Weekly he sees endorsements from the
business community and a majority of
Fortune 500 companies as being critical
for securing Republican support.
“Quite frankly, I’m not sure the pres-
ident is the key to this. I think the key
is we have 15 states that have a track
record that has worked very well for
business and very well for the opportu-
nity of citizens,” Merkley said.
It’s a sentiment echoed by Mara
Keisling, executive director of the
National Center for Transgender
Equality, who questions if an aggressive
Obama on ENDA might do more harm
than good in the Republican-controlled
House of Representatives. “I’m certain
the president will be there when we
need the president to be there,” she
said. “But it would not help this bill for
it to be the president’s top priority.”
Expectations for some kind of
White House involvement still remain.
According to Michael Cole-Schwartz, a
spokesman for the Human Rights Cam-
paign, “As the bill gets introduced and
brought up in the Senate, we expect the
White House to play a key role in advo-
cating for the legislation.”
Nevertheless, vague promises have
left some advocates rankled, particu-
larly as the White House continues
L
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News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Poliglot: Student-aid update & Rhode Island’s
path to marriage
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
5 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
As ENDA returns to Congress, Obama administration remains a key component
LGBTNews
6
With ENDA’s reintroduction, Merk-
ley says he predicts little action from the
White House on the executive order. “My
sense is they have chosen not to and now
with this pending debate my sense is they
are not proceeding on a fast track, I guess
you could put it that way,” Merkley added.
Nearly $300 billion in federal contract
dollars is funneled into states that have
no LGBT workplace protections each
year, according to a recent study.
“I still think the president should
fulfill his campaign promise on the
executive order right away, but ENDA’s
introduction gives the White House the
opportunity to put some action behind
their words,” said Tico Almeida, presi-
dent of Freedom to Work, adding that
Obama could deliver a high-profile
speech explaining how ENDA benefits
America’s businesses and LGBT employ-
ees, and he could publicly challenge both
chambers of Congress to hold an ENDA
vote this year.
In April 2012 after the White House
announced no action would be taken on
an executive order, advocates, includ-
ing Winnie Stachelberg, the executive
to delay on a long-called-for executive
order that would prohibit federal con-
tractors from LGBT workplace discrimi-
nation – a move that would protect 20
percent of the civilian workforce.
It was a little more than a year ago
Jarrett informed advocates during a
meeting at the White House that Obama
would not sign such an order at that time,
despite promising to do so as a candidate
for president. Pressure has increased on
the White House to act since then, with
37 senators, 110 members of Congress
and 54 progressive organizations signing
on to letters calling for Obama to sign
the executive order and arguing such a
move would build momentum for ENDA.
However, the president hasn’t acted,
instead arguing through Carney that the
administration supports passage of an
inclusive ENDA that protects everyone.
“I’ve been urging the administra-
tion to do this, because it’s something
that could’ve been done six months ago,
could’ve been done a year ago,” Merkley
said. “Anytime there is discrimination that
is affecting the opportunity of citizens, it’s
wrong. And wrongs should be righted.”
vice president for external affairs at the
Center for American Progress, were
told the White House would conduct a
study on LGBT workplace discrimina-
tion. One year later, with ENDA on the
verge of reintroduction, no study has
been released.
When asked for an update on the
reported study, White House spokes-
man Shin Inouye stated, “We continue to
study the issue.”
As the focus on workplace protections
shifts back to Capitol Hill, where many
are confident a Senate vote on ENDA
will happen – for the first time in 17 years
– advocates insist an executive order
remains necessary. But for a president
who has already done so much for LGBT
equality and who seems sincerely proud
of those accomplishments, his limited
role on workplace protections remains
puzzling.
“The president has been there every
time the community has asked him to be
there on ENDA,” Keisling said. But on
the executive order, “That’s a mistake on
the White House’s part. They should just
sign it and move on.” l
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Collins Takes
Center Stage
Gay NBA player’s historic coming out prompts
outpouring of support
by Justin Snow
P
OLITICIANS AND ADVOCATES
are hailing Jason Collins as a
hero after the NBA player made
history by coming out as the first
openly gay male athlete playing in any of
the four major American sports leagues.
In a piece penned for Sports Illustrat-
ed, Collins, who has played for the Bos-
ton Celtics and Washington Wizards, an-
nounced to the world April 29 what few
knew before: “I’m a 34-year-old NBA cen-
ter. I’m black. And I’m gay.”
“I didn’t set out to be the first openly
gay athlete playing in a major American
team sport. But since I am, I’m happy to
start the conversation,” Collins continued.
“I wish I wasn’t the kid in the classroom
raising his hand and saying, ‘I’m different.’
If I had my way, someone else would have
already done this. Nobody has, which is
why I’m raising my hand.”
Collins’s announcement comes as
there has been increased attention in re-
cent months on the possibility of a pro-
athlete coming out in the four biggest
sporting leagues in the nation: the NFL,
NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball.
“Jason Collins has forever changed the
face of sports,” declared Human Rights
Campaign President Chad Griffin, in an
April 29 statement. “His actions today tell
LGBT young people that what will define
our success in life is our character and
dedication, not our sexual orientation. At
a moment when millions are reflecting on
the life and legacy of Jackie Robinson, Ja-
son Collins is a hero for our own times.”
President Barack Obama was on his
way out of an April 30 press conference
at the White House when he stopped and
returned to the podium to address a ques-
tion about Collins.
“I had a chance to talk to him yester-
day. He seems like a terrific young man
and I told him I couldn’t be prouder of
him,” the president said, walking back
to the microphone after spending more
than 45 minutes fielding questions from
reporters. “One of the extraordinary
measures of progress we’ve seen in this
country has been the recognition that the
LGBTNews
8
Collins for his decision to come out. Dur-
ing an Interview with ABC’s Good Morn-
ing America, Collins said the president
called him shortly after the announce-
ment and was “incredibly supportive.”
“It’s incredible. Just try to live an hon-
est, genuine life and the next thing you
know you have the president calling you,”
Collins said. “He was incredibly support-
ive and he was proud of me and said this
not only affected my life but others’ going
forward.”
Also among those praising Collins
was Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.), who
has known Collins since they were room-
mates at Stanford. According to Collins,
he realized he needed to come out public-
ly after Kennedy, who is straight, marched
in Boston’s 2012 Gay Pride Parade.
“I’m seldom jealous of others, but
LGBT community deserve full equality,
not just partial equality. Not just toler-
ance, but a recognition that they’re fully
a part of the American family.”
Obama continued, “For, I think, a lot
of young people out there who are gay or
lesbian who are struggling with these is-
sues to see a role model who is unafraid, I
think it’s a great thing. And I think Amer-
ica should be proud this is just one more
step in this ongoing recognition that we
treat everybody fairly and everybody’s
part of family and we judge people on the
basis of their character and their perfor-
mance and not their sexual orientation.
So, I’m very proud of him.”
Obama is one of several political fig-
ures, including first lady Michelle Obama,
former President Bill Clinton and some of
the out members of Congress, to applaud
hearing what Joe had done filled me with
envy. I was proud of him for participat-
ing but angry that as a closeted gay man
I couldn’t even cheer my straight friend
on as a spectator,” Collins wrote. “If I’d
been questioned, I would have concocted
half truths. What a shame to have to lie
at a celebration of pride. I want to do the
right thing and not hide anymore. I want
to march for tolerance, acceptance and
understanding. I want to take a stand and
say, ‘Me, too.’”
Taking to Twitter, Kennedy wrote,
“I’ve always been proud to call [Jason
Collins] a friend, and I’m even prouder to
stand with him today.” l
Sentencing for
FRC Shooter
Delayed
Man who pleaded guilty to shooting
at conservative group’s headquar-
ters gets July date
by John Riley
A
U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE
has rescheduled the sentenc-
ing of Floyd Lee Corkins II,
the Virginia man who pleaded guilty
to attempting to commit a mass shoot-
ing at the Washington headquarters of
the Family Research Council (FRC), a
conservative Christian organization and
lobbying group.
Corkins, of Herndon, Va., pleaded
guilty in February to committing an act
of terrorism while armed, assault with
intent to kill while armed, and interstate
transportation of a firearm and ammu-
nition for the Aug. 15, 2012, shooting
incident, during which he injured secu-
rity guard Leonardo Reno “Leo” John-
son of Washington. Corkins is the first
defendant to be charged and convicted
under the District of Columbia’s Anti-
Terrorism Act of 2002, which prosecutes
actions committed with the intent to
“intimidate or coerce a significant popu-
lation of the District of Columbia or the
United States.”
Corkins remains held without bond
as he awaits sentencing, which has been
rescheduled from April 29 to July 15.
At the April 29 status hearing at the
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Local Leaders Applaud Collins
From Ayanbadejo to Barry, player’s coming out gets
warm welcome
A
S NEWS OF JASON COLLINS’S SPORTS ILLUSTRATED COMING
out circulated, Washingtonians took particular interest. After all,
although he’s now a free agent, the last jersey Collins sported was that
of the Washington Wizards.
On Monday, D.C.’s pro basketball team released a statement.
“We are extremely proud of Jason and support his decision to live his life
proudly and openly,” Wizards President Ernie Grunfield said in the state-
ment. “He has been a leader on and off the court and an outstanding teammate
throughout his NBA career. Those qualities will continue to serve him as both
a player and as a positive role model for others of all sexual orientations.”
D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray (D) sent a message of support to Collins via
Twitter, posting, “@jasoncollins34 Kudos 2 you 4 taking a stand that will help
untold numbers of kids and athletes. As a longtime LGBT ally, I salute you!”
Councilmember Marion Barry (D-Ward 8) also commented on Collins’s
coming out in a series of tweets, writing, in part: “I commend Jason for his
courage to stand up and speak out!”
Barry, a longtime member of the D.C. Council and former D.C. mayor who
long supported LGBT rights but also opposed marriage equality in the Dis-
trict, also wrote, “It took a tremendous amount of courage to do what Jason
did, and as a result of his efforts, others will find comfort being who they are.”
Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie (D-Ward 5) re-tweeted a post by the
national office of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) supportive of
Collins’s coming out.
In the Sports Illustrated feature, Collins wrote, “I’m glad I’m coming out
in 2013 rather than 2003. The climate has shifted; public opinion has shifted.
… I’m impressed with the straight pro athletes who have spoken up so far
– Chris Kluwe, Brendon Ayanbadejo. The more people who speak out, the
better, gay or straight.”
Ayanbadejo, a free agent and former linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens,
who has been very supportive of LGBT rights and the need for professional
athletes who are gay to come out, posted a message of support via his Twit-
ter account: “By @jasoncollins34 opening doors and doing it his way on his
time he has helped shape a more accepting America. May many more follow
#courage.” –John Riley
marketplace
9 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
LGBTNews
10
tified FRC as an anti-gay organization
from a list of “hate groups” on the web-
site of the Southern Poverty Law Center
(SPLC).
Corkins’s April 29 status hearing fol-
lowed the FRC posting two videos last
week on YouTube, one showing foot-
age of Corkins shooting and struggling
with Johnson; and another showing FBI
investigators questioning Corkins, in
which Corkins mentions SPLC. Follow-
ing the release of the videos last week, as
it had in August following the shooting,
FRC singled out the SPLC as being “con-
nected” to the Corkins case due to the
organization’s categorizing of the FRC as
a hate group.
When FRC first linked SPLC to the
shooting, SPLC President Richard Cohen
responded in a September post on the
SPLC website.
“Contrary to what the FRC has repeat-
edly claimed, we do not list the FRC as a
hate group because of its opposition to
gay marriage or because of its religious
beliefs,” Cohen wrote. “Instead, we list
the FRC because it engages in baseless,
incendiary name-calling and spreads
demonizing lies about the LGBT com-
munity.” l
9-millimeter firearm, and planned his
trip to FRC headquarters.
On Aug. 15, Corkins entered the Fam-
ily Research Council offices at 801 G St.
NW posing as a prospective intern. He
then pulled the pistol from his back-
pack and pointed it at Johnson, the secu-
rity guard. Johnson charged Corkins
and the two struggled as Corkins fired
three shots, striking Johnson in the arm.
Johnson eventually subdued Corkins and
handed him over to law enforcement. For
his actions in protecting the FRC staff,
Mayor Vincent Gray (D) awarded John-
son with the inaugural Mayor’s Medal of
Honor at an Oct. 22 ceremony.
Police later discovered two fully
loaded magazine clips, 50 rounds of
ammunition, a handwritten list of anti-
gay organizations, including FRC, and
15 wrapped Chick-fil-A sandwiches on
Corkins’s person or in his backpack. Cor-
kins later told investigators he was an
activist and had planned to “kill as many
people as I could” and smear the Chick-
fil-A sandwiches on their faces after-
ward. Chick-fil-A has received attention
for supporting anti-gay organizations
through an affiliated foundation.
Corkins told investigators he iden-
U.S. District Court for the District of
Columbia, Judge Richard Roberts heard
a motion from Corkins’s defense attor-
ney, David Bos, calling for an order that
would authorize the probation office
to release records related to Corkins’s
mental health. According to a sentencing
memorandum submitted by the govern-
ment April 19, Corkins has been receiving
ongoing mental health treatment, which
includes prescription medications and
periodic counseling sessions.
“Although the defendant appears
to suffer from bouts of severe depres-
sion and unidentified ‘psychosis,’ there
is absolutely nothing to indicate that
the defendant did not fully comprehend
what he was planning and sought to
accomplish in the shooting perpetrated
at the FRC,” prosecutors argued in the
sentencing memorandum. “Instead, the
detailed nature of his planning and exe-
cution reveal the deliberate and clear-
headed manner in which the defendant
acted in this case.”
Corkins – who briefly volunteered as a
receptionist at The DC Center, the city’s
LGBT community center – purchased a
semiautomatic pistol that he later con-
verted from a 22-caliber pistol into a
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
marketplace
11 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
12 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
GLAA Awards
Thursday, April 25
Washington Plaza
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
marketplace
13 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
14
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 8
moderate miles on Sugarloaf Mountain near
Frederick, Md. Bring beverages, lunch, sturdy
footwear, sunscreen, bug spray and about $5. 8:30
a.m. Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro. David, 240-
938-0375. adventuring.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of
the LGBT community, holds Saturday morning
Shabbat services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush
luncheon. Services in DCJCC Community Room,
1529 16th St. NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For
location/time, email braziliangaygroup@
yahoo.com.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk;
or 10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors
Mass for LGBT community, family and friends.
6:30 p.m., Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill,
3606 Seminary Road, Alexandria. All welcome.
dignitynova.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave.
NE, 2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or
straight. teamdcbasketball.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV
testing in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire
Ave., Suite 411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For
appointments other hours, call 301-422-2398.
SUNDAY, MAY 5
NATIONAL GAY AND LESBIAN TASK FORCE
holds Pink & Purple Awards Brunch. 10:30 a.m.–2
p.m. Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Ave NW.
$125 advance, $150 door. thetaskforce.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BETHEL CHURCH-DC progressive and radically
inclusive church holds services at 11:30 a.m. 2217
Minnesota Ave. SE. 202-248-1895, betheldc.org.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service,
945 G St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
FRIDAY, MAY 3
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by “oneg” social hour. 8-9:30
p.m. Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529
16th St. NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30
p.m. The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-
2245, gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION
(GAMMA) is a peer-support group that meets in
Dupont Circle every second and fourth Friday at
7:30 p.m. gay-married.com or GAMMAinDC1@
yahoo.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
TRANSGENDER HEALTH EMPOWERMENT
“Diva Chat” support group. 6-8 p.m., 1414 North
Capitol St. NE. Snacks provided. 202-636-1646.
SATURDAY, MAY 4
PFLAG PRINCE WILLIAM kickoff and open
house offers support for parents, families and
friends of LGBT community. 3-5 p.m. Bull Run
Unitarian Universalist Church, 9350 Main St.,
Manassas, Va. 202-638-3852, pflagdc.org.
SPRING SOCIAL hosted by NoVa Gay and
Lesbian Professionals. 6-8 p.m. Kora Lounge,
2250 Crystal Drive, Arlington. gogaydc.com.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay-volunteer
organization helps at Food & Friends, with the
Lost Dog & Cat Rescue Foundation at Falls
Church PetSmart, and with the Around the World
Embassy Tour. burgundycrescent.org.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Registration has opened for the 22ND ANNUAL
MARYLAND SWIM FOR LIFE, July 13, hosted by
the DC Aquatics Club as a fundraiser for several
nonprofit organizations working in HIV/AIDS,
and for the Chester River Association. Several
registration options are available at swimforlife.
swimdcac.org.
THURSDAY, MAY 2
The DC Center’s Crystal Meth Working
Group holds CRYSTAL METH TOWN HALL
MEETING. 7-8 p.m. 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-2245,
thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian
square-dancing group features mainstream
through advanced square dancing at the
National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle
NW, 7-9:30 p.m. Casual dress. 301-257-0517,
dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia
social group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in
Reston, 11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-floor
bar, 7-9 p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-
745-7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and confidential HIV
testing in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave.,
and in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave.,
Suite 411. Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments
other hours, call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or
Takoma Park, 301-422-2398.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and
younger. 202-567-3155 or testing@smyal.org.
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center,
410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3163,
catherine.chu@smyal.org
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in the
gay community, from alternative social events to volunteer opportunities.
Event information should be sent by e-mail to calendar@metroweek-
ly.com; by fax to 202-638-6831; or by mail to Metro Weekly, Attn:
Community Calendar, 1012 14th Street NW, Suite 209, Washington, D.C.
20005. Deadline for inclusion is noon on the Friday before publication.
“Announcement” submissions that are not date-specific may run for two
weeks, with the option for listing organizations to resubmit if appropriate.
Questions about the calendar can be directed to the Metro Weekly office
at 202-638-6830.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Onetta Brooks. Children’s Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,
8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas
Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
“interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community”
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-232-
0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF SILVER
SPRING invites LGBTQ families and individuals of all
creeds and cultures to join the church. Services 9:15
and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.
MONDAY, MAY 6
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. No appointment needed. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1012
14th St. NW, Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE
SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 1318 U
St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a program
of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green Lantern, 1335
Green Court NW. No cost, newcomers welcome. 202-
682-2245, thedccenter.org.
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
testing@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a black gay men’s evening
affinity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-
0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets
7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
TUESDAY, MAY 7
ADVENTURING outdoors group bikes 12 miles
on paths/residential streets of Arlington. Dinner
follows. Bring helmet, beverage, $2. Meet 6:25 p.m.,
Clarendon Metro, elevator entrance. Scott,
572-289-4369. adventuring.org.
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) holds panel
discussion on its new publication, INVISIBLE IN
THE CITY, regarding LGBTI refugees in Ecuador,
Ghana, Israel and Kenya. RSVP by May 2 at bitly.
com/invisibleinthecityDC. 6:30-8 p.m. DCJCC,
1529 16th St. NW, enter on Q Street. 202-821-6939,
invisibleinthecity@hias.org.
The DC Center hosts a FOSTER PARENT
INFORMATION NIGHT. 6 p.m. 1318 U St. NW. 202-
682-2245, thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
A COMPANY OF STRANGERS, a theater chorus,
meets 7:30-9:30 p.m. A GLBTA and SATB looking
for actors, singers, crew. Open Hearth Foundation,
1502 Massachusetts Ave. SE. Charles, 240-764-5748.
ecumenicon.org.
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/
Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.
Whitman-Walker Health’s GAY MEN’S HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available for
fee. whitman-walker.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
hosts “Packing Party,” where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy
Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black gay
men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 8
THE LAMBDA BRIDGE CLUB meets for Duplicate
Bridge. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE.
Partner needed. lambdabridge.com.
BIG GAY BOOK GROUP discusses A Horse Named
Sorrow by Trebor Healey. 7 p.m. 1155 F St. NW, suite
200. Newcomers welcome. biggaybookgroup.com.
15
LGBTCommunityCalendar
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
marketplace
The DC Center hosts a NAME & GENDER
CHANGE FREE CLINIC. 6:30-8 p.m. 1318 U St. NW.
202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454.
THURSDAY, MAY 9
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay-volunteer
organization helps at Food & Friends.
burgundycrescent.org.
POINT FOUNDATION holds Cornerstone
Reception to hear from scholars and alumni. 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Room & Board, 1840 14th St. NW. $75,
students $25. pointfoundation.org/dc2013.
FRIDAY, MAY 10
Metro Weekly celebrates the 5TH ANNUAL NEXT
GENERATION AWARDS. 6-8:30 p.m. Beacon Bar
& Grill, 1615 Rhode Island Ave. NW. 202-638-6830,
MetroWeekly.com. l
16 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
marketplace
17 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
18 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
GMCW Spring Affair
Saturday, April 27
Grand Hyatt
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
19 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
MAY 2, 2013
VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 1
PUBLISHERS
Sean Bugg, Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
POLITICAL REPORTER
Justin Snow
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER
Julian Vankim
CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS
Scott G. Brooks, Christopher Cunetto
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Chris Heller, Rhuaridh Marr, Troy Petenbrink,
Richard Rosendall, Doug Rule,
Kate Wingfield
WEBMASTER
David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
Aram Vartian
ADMINISTRATIVE / PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim
ADVERTISING & SALES
DIRECTOR OF SALES
Randy Shulman
NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Rivendell Media Co.
212-242-6863
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Dennis Havrilla
PATRON SAINT
Paul Myatt
COVER PHOTOGRAPHY
Julian Vankim
METRO WEEKLY
1012 14th St. NW, Suite 209
Washington, DC 20005
202-638-6830 fax: 202-638-6831
MetroWeekly.com
All material appearing in Metro Weekly is protected by federal copyright law and may not be
reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publishers. Metro Weekly assumes no
responsibility for unsolicited materials submitted for publication. All such submissions are subject
to editing and will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
Metro Weekly is supported by many fine advertisers, but we cannot accept responsibility for claims
made by advertisers, nor can we accept responsibility for materials provided by advertisers or
their agents. Publication of the name or photograph of any person or organization in articles or
advertising in Metro Weekly is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation of
such person or organization.
© 2013 Jansi LLC.
LGBTOpinion
ANYONE FAMIL-
iar with my writ-
ings round these
parts already
knows that I am
solipsism central,
so I’ll just jump
right to the point
and say what a
special and impor-
tant time of year spring is for me. Seri-
ously, most of the good things in my
life aside from my winter birth have
happened as the tulips bloom and the
trees turn green.
Naturally, the first up is my sixth
anniversary this weekend. We had our
ceremony on May 5 because, obviously,
the best way to celebrate a Vietnamese-
Buddhist, white-Southern-Christian
gay wedding is to have it on Cinco de
Mayo. No matter when we get our real,
legal, honest-to-God marriage license
later this year, as planned, the 5th of
May will always be the day Cavin offi-
cially became my husband.
And while I’m creeping up on 10
years together with him — we waited
three years before forcing friends and
family to buy us wedding presents —
I’m also celebrating another anniver-
sary, my time at Metro Weekly. While
I’ve written for the magazine since its
launch, it wasn’t until 2000 that I joined
full-time as editor-in-chief. Here I am
13 years later, now the co-publisher and
writing a column that sits underneath
a picture of myself in a tie looking all
respectable. Time changes everything.
Coming up next week we have
the Metro Weekly Next Generation
Awards, which will mark their own
fifth anniversary. You’ll learn more
about that in the next issue, but I have
to say that I’m incredibly proud and
honored to be a part of something that’s
brought so many talented, energetic
and dedicated LGBT people into my life
as friends and colleagues.
Which brings me to the big one:
This is the issue when Metro Weekly
turns 19, when we enter our 20th year
of publication. Since our Sweet 16 cel-
ebration we haven’t done any special
issues on our anniversary — there’s no
need to throw a super-special party for
ourselves every year. We want to save
up our fun ideas for a big blowout next
year on our 20th anniversary.
Don’t worry, I’m sure you’ll all be
invited.
Still, turning 19 as an LGBT news-
magazine that’s gone through so many
evolutions and revolutions, whether
internal with our content and design
or external with expanding our scope
online, is something to celebrate. It’s
awe-inspiring to live in Washington and
experience LGBT history in the making
— marches and protests, heroes and vil-
lains, defeats and victories. It’s an honor
to play some role in recording that his-
tory to share with our readers here and,
more than ever, across the world.
If you look to the left you’ll see the
masthead of all the people who make
Metro Weekly happen — every day, not
just every Thursday — and they are some
of the most talented individuals I’ve ever
worked with. I’ve said similar things over
the past 13 years because we’ve been
incredibly fortunate to keep hiring some
of the most talented people I’ve ever met.
The work we do today is made possible
by the work so many of them did in the
past, some of them still with us in the
world, too many now gone.
I’m not going to do a list of everyone
I owe a debt of gratitude to for making
Metro Weekly so special because I’ll be
doing that next year. Right now I just
want to say thank you to anyone and
everyone who’s ever read the maga-
zine, whether to find out the news of
the community or to find their friends
in our Scene photos or look for an
LGBT-friendly business. A magazine
and website without readers is like an
empty bus: It doesn’t matter where it
goes because it’s not taking anyone any-
where.
We’ve gone to amazing places at
Metro Weekly and I’m glad we’ve had
you along. l
Annuals of Spring
Spring is the time to celebrate some significant LGBT
anniversaries, both at home and at Metro Weekly
by Sean Bugg
20 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
21
LGBTOpinion
W
HEN I MET MY HUS-
band, Kelly Vielmo,
almost 11 years ago, nei-
ther of us did anything
that might be labeled “activism” on
behalf of gay rights. Our lives had been
fairly low key. Not our jobs, our friends,
our hobbies, nor our volunteer activities
screamed “activist.” If we were a flavor,
it was vanilla. In a cosmopolitan city like
D.C., we could just blend in.
Then we had kids.
Ten years into our relationship Kelly
and I opted to foster and adopt through
D.C.’s Child and Family Services Agency.
The act of adopting kids or growing a
family in itself is not something that one
would chalk up to activist behavior. But
now we are conspicuous. We are two
white men with three black children, and
that stands out. We’re not the invisible
couple we once were, instead turning
heads on almost every occasion. First
glimpses of our family seem to start some
questioning process, with many trying to
connect the dots.
“Are those their kids? Is that okay?”
This is where the accidental activism
began.
Kelly and I are probably as boring as
ever, if not more so as we are neck deep
in the daily routines of parenthood. But
now we are boring people who are very
conspicuous. For countless neighbors,
co-workers, friends and strangers, we
have become the faces of the debate
around same-sex marriage.
At times it can be exhausting being the
public face of a debate that every passer-
by seems to be trying to figure out on the
spot. Then I stop and think: I have done
absolutely nothing in my life to help fur-
ther any human-rights agenda, to legalize
gay adoption or same-sex marriage, or
worked on any other LGBT issue. Yet
more than anyone, I benefit from the
hard work of the many who have made
our family possible. The least I can do
is be visible, especially with the national
debate happening in my backyard at the
Supreme Court.
been featured on several media outlets
including the Huffington Post and The
Advocate and read by tens of thousands,
if not more.
I am not sure if my letter or video will
ever reach any of the Supreme Court
justices. But as a result of just show-
ing up and posting a single blog entry,
I became an accidental activist. I have
learned from the experience that just
being present and visible matters. I have
received countless messages thanking us
for simply telling our story. Co-workers
who have gay children have approached
me to say they now have role models to
tell their kids about. Supporters with gay
family members feel we are paving the
way for other families like ours.
So my simple message to anyone read-
ing this – especially those who may not
relate to activism – is that it’s not so bad
being an accidental activist. Just live your
life as positively as possible, and allow
your life to be seen.
Jack Montgomery lives with his husband
and children in D.C.’s Capitol Hill
neighborhood. Reach him at
dearscotus@gmail.com or follow
him on Twitter @dearscotus. l
The night before the argument in
the Proposition 8 case, Hollingsworth v.
Perry, was being heard, Kelly, our three
kids and I handed out candy to those
camping out at the court to thank them.
The next morning we kept the kids out of
school to walk down to the pro-marriage-
equality rally and, as conspicuous as we
are now, were surrounded by press pho-
tographers. Our 4-year-old daughter was
quoted on NPR to contrast a representa-
tive from the Westboro Baptist Church.
Kelly got a call from Sacramento, Calif.,
saying he was just seen on the news. I
received emails with innumerable links
to blogs with our photos.
I ended up penning an open letter
to the Supreme Court about my experi-
ence and bought the domain dearscotus.
com to host it. To put our conspicuous
image with the words I wrote, I also
posted a YouTube video with me read-
ing the letter. A week later the letter had
Accidental Activism
How I found myself on the steps of the Supreme Court
by Jack Montgomery
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
22 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Behold,
the
pleasures of
summer. Ice
cream cones…. Men
in swimsuits…. Huh?
We got there awfully
fast, didn’t we? And, well,
why not? One of summer’s
gayer pleasures is to let our eyes
wander across the sea of men
lounging by the sea – or pool – in
their swimwear. Swimwear with style.
Swimwear with sex appeal. Swimwear
that is less about getting wet and more
about looking good. But what of that
frozen confection? It surely doesn’t hurt
matters when the man wearing said
swimwear is blissfully enjoying an ice
cream cone. But he’d best eat it
fast, because it looks like we’re
in the midst of a…
Sauvage
$59.50
23
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
Photography
by
Julian Vankim
Behold,
the
pleasures of
summer. Ice
cream cones…. Men
in swimsuits…. Huh?
We got there awfully
fast, didn’t we? And, well,
why not? One of summer’s
gayer pleasures is to let our eyes
wander across the sea of men
lounging by the sea – or pool – in
their swimwear. Swimwear with style.
Swimwear with sex appeal. Swimwear
that is less about getting wet and more
about looking good. But what of that
frozen confection? It surely doesn’t hurt
matters when the man wearing said
swimwear is blissfully enjoying an ice
cream cone. But he’d best eat it
fast, because it looks like we’re
in the midst of a…
W
a
rm
in
g T
ren
d
Sauvage
$59.50
T. Christopher
$169.50
24 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
C
arlos
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oh
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Christian
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Board Shorts
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Andrew
Christian
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Diamonds
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Andrew
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All
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available at
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1529 14th St NW
Washington, DC
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30 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
MAY 2 - 9, 2013
SPOTLIGHT
A STAR IS BORN
Landmark’s E Street Cinema presents this Judy
Garland classic, in which the gay icon plays a young
singer who saves a famous star — an alcoholic
whose career is on the wane — from making a fool
of himself on stage. Guess she didn’t take that lesson
to heart. George Cukor directs. Friday, May 3, and
Saturday, May 4, at 11:30 p.m., and Sunday, May 5,
at 10 a.m. Landmark’s E Street Cinema, 555 11th St.
NW. Call 202-452-7672 or visit
landmarktheatres.com.
Compiled by Doug Rule
A
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MANNING UP
Ross Mathews has grown from his early days as
a “big gay cartoon clown”
I
THINK THERE WASN’T SOMEONE LIKE ME ON
TV before, so maybe it was a little culture shock. Like,
who’s this big gay cartoon clown?”
Everyone remembers his first time seeing comedian Ross
Mathews, who got his start as the all-caps GAY intern on The
Tonight Show with Jay Leno over a decade ago. Not everyone
was as enraptured as actress Gwyneth Paltrow, who writes
in the foreword to Mathews’s new memoir, “I fell in love
with Ross Mathews the first time I saw him.” That was for
his first assignment, covering the 2002 Winter Olympics in
Salt Lake City.
But at the very least, surely you’ve warmed to the funny
and sweet man over the years. For several years Mathews
has been one of the funniest regulars — and a regular guest
host — on the E! Network’s Chelsea Lately. Show host
Chelsea Handler calls Mathews her “favorite gay person”
in the afterword to his book Man Up — which in fact
Handler published. Handler is also producing Mathews’s
debut talk show, to begin airing this fall on E. The comic
describes the pop-culture-obsessed Hello Ross! as “the
ultimate fan forum” and a nighttime version of all those
daytime talk shows the 33-year-old grew up on, from The
Phil Donahue Show to Sally.
Next week Mathews stops in town for what he calls “an
interactive, one-man show,” in which he’ll share stories
from his memoir. The book documents Mathews’s ascent from his humble roots “growing up in a small farm town [in
Washington state] as a totally gay kid with dreams of Hollywood,” to his adventures with celebrities in Tinseltown. “When
you ‘man up,’” Mathews describes the book’s title and premise, “you accept: you are what you are what you are. You have
to love what makes you different, and use it to make you stand out, as opposed to hating it.”
“For some reason I locked into that at a really young age,” he continues, “where it was just like, ‘I don’t care what they
say, I like myself. I’d rather be me.’” — Doug Rule
Ross Mathews appears Thursday, May 9, at 7 p.m., at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $30.
Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.
BOOM TIC BOOM
Lesbian jazz drummer Allison Miller, raised in Olney,
Md., leads this jazz quartet, which was one of NPR’s
“Top 5 Bands to Discover” in 2012. Miller stops by
Strathmore for a hometown show and album release
party for new set No Morphine, No Lilies, performing
with bassist Todd Sickafoose, pianist Myra Melford
and cornetist Kirk Knuffke. Friday, May 3, at 7:30
p.m. Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman
Lane, North Bethesda. Tickets are $25. Call 301-581-
5100 or visit strathmore.org.
CITYDANCE’S THE DREAM CELEBRATION
Lar Lubovitch, Clifton Brown, formerly of the Alvin
Ailey dance company, Joseph Phillips of American
Ballet Theatre and Rasta Thomas’s Bad Boys of Dance
are just a few of the top ballet and contemporary
dance artists from across the country featured in this
program benefiting CityDance’s after-school DREAM
program, a youth development and arts education
program. Saturday, May 4, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, May
5, at 4 p.m. Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U St. NW. Tickets
are $20 to $35, or $150 for Saturday night VIP access.
Call 202-328-6000 or visit thelincolntheatre.org or
citydance.net.
HELLO, DOLLY
At the top of every month Shirlington’s Signature
Theatre presents Page to Stage Monday: Popcorn and
Movie Night at the Arlington Public Library branch
located below the theater. The May edition features
a screening of the popular film version of Jerry
31 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
32 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
Herman’s musical currently being staged at the
Ford’s Theatre in a co-production with Signature.
Yes, we’re talking about the movie directed by Gene
Kelly and starring Barbara Streisand and the original
Phantom of the Opera Michael Crawford. Well, hello.
Looking swell, Shirlington — and gay! Monday, May
6, at 6:30 p.m. Arlington Public Library, Shirlington
Branch, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington. Tickets are
free. Call 703-820-9771 or visit
signature-theatre.org.
ONCE WILD: ISADORA IN RUSSIA
Dancer Isadora Duncan is the focus of this
multidisciplinary production from gay, Helen
Hayes Award-winning playwright Norman Allen
(Nijinsky’s Last Dance) and choreographer Cynthia
Word, who stars as Duncan. Derek Goldman directs
the play, which weaves in Duncan’s own dances with
an original score by Dominik Maican. The piece is
a co-production by Word Dance Theater and the
Davis Performing Arts Center. Friday, May 3, and
Saturday, May 4, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, May 5, at
2 p.m. Davis Performing Arts Center, Georgetown
University, 3700 O St. NW. Tickets are $25. Visit
performing arts.georgetown.edu.
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NIGHT AT
THE BALLET
NPR’s Ari Shapiro’s “surreal opportunity” to
sing with The Washington Ballet
D
ID YOU HEAR THE ONE ABOUT NPR CORRESPON-
dent Ari Shapiro performing with The Washington Ballet?
“I’m not a dancer, and I do not dance,” Shapiro says, “but
I get to sing this song while everybody dances around me.” He’s not
joking. In fact, the song Shapiro sings during his “little cameo” in the
company’s new ballet, based on Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also
Rises, is in French.
“It’s a crazy, fun, surreal opportunity,” Shapiro says. “I imagine it
will be sort of this one-off, once-in-a-lifetime thing, but who knows?
That’s what I thought Pink Martini was going to be too.”
Four years ago, the quirky cocktail band Pink Martini, founded
by pianist Thomas Lauderdale and based in Shapiro’s hometown of
Portland, Ore., asked him to record a song. That begat a performance
with the band at the Hollywood Bowl, which begat more songs and
more shows as a guest, including a couple at the Kennedy Center.
Next up this summer, in addition to a return to the Hollywood Bowl:
Shapiro’s debut with Pink Martini at Wolf Trap.
“Pink Martini’s music is sort of old-fashioned, classic, interna-
tional,” Shapiro says. “It just sort of dovetails very nicely with the
aesthetic of The Sun Also Rises, which is set in Paris and in Spain in
the 1920s.” Superb Helen Hayes Award-winning actress and powerhouse vocalist E. Faye Butler portrays Josephine Baker as
part of the show from the company’s Septime Webre, developed with Hayes Award-winning playwright Karen Zacarias.
“It’s some sort of crazy fantasy come true,” says the 34-year-old Shapiro, who prior to Pink Martini hadn’t performed since his
musical theater days in college, where he studied English. But ballet is new turf, which is naturally making him a little anxious.
“I do have movements I have to learn — just enough that, if it goes poorly,” he says, “I could be a total bull in a china shop
and knock over some really incredible dancers.” — Doug Rule
The Washington Ballet’s Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises runs Wednesday, May 8, through Sunday, May 12, at the Kennedy
Center Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are $25 to $125. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
TACT BENEFIT:
AN EVENING WITH DANNY KAYE
Brian Childers portrays Danny Kaye in a performance
at this year’s annual benefit for The American
Century Theater. Stephen Nachamie directs, with
musical assist by Jeff Biering and accompaniment by
Franca Vercelloni. Childers won a 2002 Helen Hayes
Award as best musical actor in TACT’s production
of Danny and Sylvia: A Musical Love Story. Monday,
May 6, starting with a reception at 7 p.m., followed
by the performance at 8 p.m. Artisphere, 1101 Wilson
Blvd. Arlington. Tickets are $85. Call 703-875-1100 or
visit artisphere.com.
THE CLIKS
Lucas Silveira has revived her band after a years-
long hiatus that included the transgendered Silveira
completing his female-to-male transition. The band’s
new album Black Tie Elevator also offers a transition,
but maybe not what you’d expect: from a hard, almost
heavy metal sound to a gentler folk-oriented rock.
Eytan and the Embassy and The Ambitions open.
Sunday, May 5, at 8:30 p.m. DC9, 1940 9th St. NW.
Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. Call
202-483-5000 or dcnine.com.
WASHINGTON NATIONAL OPERA’S SHOWBOAT
The WNO’s artistic director Francesca Zambello
directs an opera version of Broadway’s original
masterpiece by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein
II. This is a big-budget co-production with opera
companies in Chicago, San Francisco and Houston.
When it was in Chicago, the Chicago Tribune raved
it was a “joyous, beautifully mounted entertainment
[that] should keep rolling along for a long while to
come.” Opens Saturday, May 4, at 7 p.m. To May 26.
Kennedy Center Opera House. Tickets are $25 to
$270. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
STAGE
4000 MILES
Tana Hicken stars in Amy Herzog’s play about a
21-year-old neo-hippie who, following his girlfriend’s
death, seeks refuge in the Greenwich Village
apartment of his 91-year-old leftist grandmother.
Studio’s former longtime artistic director Joy
Zinoman returns to direct the show starring local
stage veteran Tana Hicken, who is threatening this
may be her swan song, and Grant Harrison. Extended
to May 12. Studio Theatre, 14th & P Streets NW. Call
202-332-3300 or visit studiotheatre.org.
GILGAMESH
Part god, part man, King Gilgamesh goes on an
epic quest for immortality in the latest show in
Constellation Theatre Company’s seasonal focus on
33 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
34
THE PRESETS
It’s easy to get the gay appeal of the straight lads in
the Australian electronic duo The Presets, who’ve
performed at Sydney’s famed Mardi Gras and San
Franciso’s fetish bacchanalia Folsom Street Fair.
When the Depeche Mode- and Underworld-
reminiscent band stops for a late show at the 9:30
Club this Saturday, May 4, the energy should be
that of a dance party, complete with a sharp lighting
director. “Our show is like a DJ set,” the band’s
drummer Kim Moyes tells Metro Weekly, “in that
we’ve remixed a lot of our back catalog and found
partners with songs and mixed them together to
make a kind of seamless experience.” Saturday, May
4. Doors at 10 p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW.
Tickets are $30. Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.
com. Also visit 930.com/friends to sign up for the
club’s new Friends With Benefits rewards program
offering exclusive deals and discounts on tickets,
drinks and merchandise.
DANCE
ARACHNE AERIAL ARTS & IN-FLIGHT THEATER
Two area companies at the forefront of aerial
performance, D.C.’s Arachne and Baltimore’s
In-Flight, join forces to create a bold new piece on
the myth of Demeter and Persephone. The show
came about after two years of intense collaboration
and features an original script, music by Helen
Chadwick, even an 18-foot kinetic steel sculpture by
Tim Scofield. Bryce Butler directs. Friday, May 10,
and Saturday, May 11, at 8 p.m. Dance Place, 3225
8th St. NE. Tickets are $22. Call 202-269-1600 or
visit danceplace.org.
READINGS
PEN/FAULKNER AWARD F
OR FICTION CEREMONY
The Folger Shakespeare Library presents this 33rd
annual event with readings by this year’s winner,
Benjamin Alire Sáenz, for Everything Begins and
Ends at the Kentucky Club, as well as the finalists:
Amelia Gray for Threats; Laird Hunt for Kind
One; T. Geronimo Johnson for Hold It ‘Til It Hurts;
and Thomas Mallon for Watergate. The PEN Award is
America’s largest peer-juried literary prize. A seated
dinner reception follows the ceremony. Saturday,
May 4, at 7 p.m. Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol
St. SE. Tickets are $125. Call 202-544-7077 or visit
folger.edu.
GALLERIES
DOG FIGHTING: THE VOICELESS VICTIMS
The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Animals has created this exhibit, now at the
Crime Museum, offering an inside look at the tools
used by dogfighters, from treadmills to a “rape”
stand to breaking sticks to a copy of Michael Vick’s
indictment papers, all seized during dogfighting
raids by ASPCA. Clearly not for the faint of heart,
the exhibit is also unquestionably important in
raising awareness about the inhumane “sport”
of dogfighting, still prevalent after the Vick raid.
Through Sept. 2. The Crime Museum, 575 7th St.
NW. Tickets are $15 online, or $21.95 at the museum.
Call 202-393-1099 or visit crimemuseum.org.
BELTING IT OUT
Jewish Music Festival offers the opposite of a dry lecture
about showtunes
I
T’S A WONDERFUL WAY TO THINK ABOUT THE RICH TRADITION OF so
many Jews who were key to writing beautiful music for Broadway,” says Carole
Zawatsky, CEO of the DC Jewish Community Center. She’s talking about one
event at this year’s Washington Jewish Music Festival focused on the tunes and the
tunesmiths of the Great White Way.
But’s it not a dry, academic exercise, or even a standard song-and-dance show. In
“The Big Broadway Sing-Along,” everyone’s a performer — aided and abetted by a
cocktail reception beforehand.
“The glass of wine gets everybody loosened up for their kind of ‘Sing out, Louise!’
moment,” Zawatsky says.
Halley Cohen helped organize the event as the director of the DCJCC’s GLOE,
also known as the Kurlander Program for GLBT Outreach and Engagement. Cohen
was inspired by reading Stephen Sondheim’s two recent books of collected lyrics and
anecdotes from his many decades of work. “What if we could have him come,” the
Sondheim fanatic remembers pitching to festival director Lili Kalish Gersch. “That
ultimately turned into us sitting there in her office, singing showtunes, eventually
pulling in other people from other offices.” And an idea was born.
Local actor Joshua Morgan serves as musical director and accompanist for the
singalong, which will be lead by actors Will Gartshore and Bayla Whitten, with lyrics
projected on supertitles above the stage at the Goldman Theater.
“There will be a lot of songs, a little shtick,” says Cohen, who notes that tunes
from classic shows by the Gershwins, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Kander and Ebb
and Sondheim will be represented, as will those from newer shows, including Rent
and Avenue Q. The show will at least subtly track the evolution of gay and Jewish
identities in the songs of Broadway.
“If you think about how Broadway was built,” Cohen says, “people from all dif-
ferent backgrounds were trying to represent their stories, and maybe couldn’t talk
about being Jewish and the immigrant experience, so they were talking about other
groups’ experiences. That was also true for LGBT artists as well. It’s interesting to
see the way that that’s shifted in modern musicals.” — Doug Rule
The Big Broadway Sing-Along is Wednesday, May 8, at 7:30 p.m. The Aaron & Cecile
Goldman Theater at the DCJCC, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $20. Call 202-518-
9400 or visit wjmf.org or dcjcc.org/gloe.
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
heroes. As conceived by dramaturg Chad Garcia,
Gilgamesh features poetry by the Pulitzer Prize-
winning Yusef Komunyakaa and music by the Helen
Hayes-winning eclectic new age local musician Tom
Teasley. Constellation’s Allison Arkell Stockman
directs. Opens in Pay-What-You-Can previews
Thursday, May 2, and Friday, May 3, at 8 p.m. Source,
1835 14th St. NW. Tickets $50. Call 202-204-7760 or
visit constellationtheatre.org.
THE FULL MONTY
Keegan Theatre presents the Americanized musical
stage version of the 1997 British film, with a book by
Terrence McNally and a score by David Yazbeck. The
musical follows a group of unemployed steelworkers
desperately seeking employment — until they hatch a
plan to make money by stripping for the ladies. Opens
Saturday, May 4, at 8 p.m. To June 1. Church Street
Theater, 1742 Church St. NW. Tickets are $40. Call
703-892-0202 or visit keegantheatre.com.

TWELFTH NIGHT
Lost lovers and unruly servants conspire in
Shakespeare’s beloved romantic comedy about
unconditional, unrequited and undeserved love, now
in a production at the Folger Theatre directed by
Robert Richmond. Now in previews. Runs to June 9.
Folger Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Call 202-544-
7077 or visit folger.edu.
MUSIC
FAIRFAX SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conductor Christopher Zimmerman ensures the
local symphony’s season ends with a bang in a
concert featuring soprano Joni Henson and tenor
Brennen Guillory in a program of overtures and arias
by Verdi and Wagner. Both musical giants would
have turned 200 this year. Saturday, May 11, at 8 p.m.,
with a pre-performance lecture at 7 p.m. George
Mason University Center for the Arts, 4373 Mason
Pond Drive, Fairfax. Tickets are $25 to $55. Call 703-
563-1990 or visit fairfaxsymphony.org.
LUCY KAPLANSKY
Hailed by the Boston Globe as the “troubadour
laureate of modern city folk,” Kaplansky offers a
concert celebrating release of her new roots-infused,
alt-country collection Reunion. Friday, May 10, at
8 p.m. Cellar Stage Faith Community UMC, 5315
Hartford Rd. Baltimore. Tickets are $20. Call 410-
521-9009 or visit uptownconcerts.com.
DOMESTIC, WILD, DIVINE: ARTISTS LOOK AT ANIMALS
Drawn from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ entire collection, this exhibition
examines the way artists have responded to the significant but often enigmatic
roles that animals have played in human life. Through Aug. 4. Virginia Museum
of Fine Arts, 200 North Boulevard. Richmond, Va. Call 804-340-1400 or visit
vmfa.state.va.us.
PALACES FOR THE PEOPLE
“Palaces for the People: Guastavino and America’s Great Public Spaces” pays
tribute to Rafael Guastavino Sr., arguably one of the most influential architectural
craftsmen working in America a century ago, designing tiles in New York’s Grand
Central Terminal, the Baird Auditorium of the National Museum of Natural
History and the Washington National Cathedral, among other venues. Through
Jan. 20. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Call 202-272-2448 or visit
nbm.org.
ABOVE AND BEYOND
IAN MACKAYE
Storied local punk musician Ian MacKaye, co-founder of Dischord Records and
the bands Minor Threat, Fugazi and The Evens — to name a few — speaks at
the Library of Congress on the topic of personal digital archiving and the need
to educate creators and users in ways to steward our digital cultural heritage.
Tuesday, May 7, at 6 p.m. Mumford Room of the James Madison Memorial
Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E. Tickets are free. Call 202-707-2603 or visit
loc.gov.
MC2 CONFECTIONS’ WINE AND CHOCOLATE TASTING
The Hill Center offers an evening of wine and chocolate truffles tasting with MC2
Confections owner Merideth Cohrs. Wednesday, May 8, at 7 p.m. Hill Center, Old
Navy Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Tickets are $29, or $53 for two. Call
202-549-4172 or visit HillCenterDC.org. l
35 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
FOR MORE OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
36
L
ET’S JUST GET THIS
out of the way: Rob-
ert Downey Jr. is, and
always will be, magnifi-
cent as Tony Stark. The charac-
ter’s cocky wit blends so pleasantly
with the actor’s anxious charm, it
seems impossible to pull one from
the other. He clearly relishes the
role, and races toward the spotlight
it creates with unmatched vigor
and enthusiasm. Stark has made
Downey millions, but Downey made Stark
a cultural icon. He is the reason people will
watch Iron Man 3, even when his charisma
occasionally fades to shtick. Everything that
surrounds him — or rather, encases him — is
polished, volatile window dressing.
At what point, however, does it all become
too bloated for him to carry on his own?
Iron Man 3 is in an endless race with
itself: more wisecracks, more arrogance,
more fantastical suits of armor and weapon-
ry, and with them, more explosions. More,
more, more. The movie is cursed with too
much, and an excess of everything ham-
pers what could have been a devilishly fun,
entertaining sort of action howler. What’s
left is an excellent lesson for aspir-
ing directors and chefs alike: When
you stuff a recipe with too many
ingredients, you’ll only taste the
strongest flavors.
Although this frustrating over-
abundance cancels out many of
Iron Man 3’s otherwise intrigu-
ing moves, it’s a lucky accident
that the film’s whiplash comedy
is what rises above it all. Direc-
tor Shane Black uses humor to
push back against the gritty, self-serious
superhero movies of the world, champion-
ing a mischievous playfulness in a genre
that ought to have a lot more of it. Black
knows a thing or two about writing funny
for Downey — they worked together on the
wonderfully neurotic, woefully underrated
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang — and when his dia-
logue is humming, it’s a perfect fit for the
ambitious story he wants to tell.
Iron Man 3 is a sequel twice over, taking
place after the events of The Avengers and
(obviously) Iron Man 2. Early on, we learn
that Stark is suffering from a severe case
of post-traumatic stress disorder from his
past battles. (Although, he’s never explicitly
CHRIS HELLER
diagnosed.) The billionaire play-
boy doesn’t live much of a playboy
lifestyle anymore; he rarely sleeps
or spends time with his girlfriend,
the lovely Pepper Potts (Gwyneth
Paltrow). Instead, he constantly
tinkers in his lab to construct new
and elaborate Iron Man suits.
After facing off against aliens and
gods from another dimension,
Tony Stark wants to be prepared
for anything and everything.
Meanwhile, a comically car-
toonish-looking villain named
the Mandarin (Ben Kingsley) is
threatening America with terror-
ist attacks. His motivations are
purposefully vague, his manner-
isms decidedly bizarre. Stark
challenges the Mandarin to face
him “like a man” at his oceanside
home — which is promptly blown
to bits, obviously — which forces
him to go on the run, sans nearly
all of his gadgets. And what of
Aldrich Killian (Guy Pearce), the
tech entrepreneur embarrassed
by Stark in the movie’s opening
scenes, who sleazily schemes to
win over Pepper? Well, he’s pre-
cisely as evil as his name suggests.
Despite Black’s inventive sto-
ryline, Iron Man 3 races through
an interminable two hours of low-
stakes action, rarely risking the
life and limb necessary to make
a movie like this work. (The sole
exception? An excellent scene
where Iron Man must save more
than a dozen people plummeting
through the sky after an explosion
on Air Force One.) What little
drama exists here isn’t plumbed
for anything meaningful.
Case in point: After Stark goes
on the run, he turns up in rural
Tennessee, where a precocious,
towheaded child (Ty Simpkins)
helps him rebuild his trashed suit.
Black’s pairing of the swaggering
genius and cute kid is a hilarious
riff on a classic trope, to be sure,
but it doesn’t amount to anything
more than a half-hour of unnec-
essary screen time. It instantly
burns away as the plot moves
forward, of course — just about
everything in this movie does the
same — leaving us few reasons
to understand why anything hap-
FILM
All of Iron Man 3’s potential for meaningful moments
goes up in a box-office bang
PTSD and a power suit; Downey
IRON MAN 3
HHHHH
Rated PG-13
130 minutes
Opens Friday
Area theaters
Flash over Substance
W
A
L
T

D
I
S
N
E
Y
continues on page 43
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
37 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
38 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
B
IOSHOCK INFINITE CARRIES A GREAT
deal of hype on its shoulders. The original
Bioshock is revered as one of the greatest
games of this generation, an example of
games as a medium not only for incredible story-
telling, but as interactive art. But to judge Bioshock
Infinite in comparison is a cruel belittlement of its
genius. It’s not merely a sequel — though, strictly
speaking, it isn’t that either — it’s a new game, a new
experience that merely draws inspiration from its el-
der sibling. Free from the backstory and loyalties of
the previous two games, Bioshock Infinite aims to of-
fer something that has it all: story, action, adventure,
character development, replay-ability and emotional
connectivity. It’s a lot to fit into one title, but Bioshock
Infinite, heavy with expectation and content, some-
how manages to stay afloat.
Words can’t do justice to the world that awaits
when you first load up Infinite. Taking place in a ste-
ampunk version of 1912, complete with retro-futuris-
tic technology, Infinite’s primary setting is the float-
ing city of Columbia. Yes, floating. Gone are the dingy
underwater corridors of Rapture; Infinite is bright,
open and endlessly expansive. The first few minutes
of gameplay see our protagonist, Booker DeWitt, a
RHUARIDH MARR
private investigator, sent to the city in search of a girl.
The opening sequence, and Booker’s (and the play-
er’s) first glimpse of the city, has to stand as one of the
greatest of any game. When you take your first steps
outside, and are able to freely explore the game’s lo-
cales, a breathtaking experience awaits. City blocks
drift all around, floating separately through the
clouds in ceaseless motion. Buildings of varying size
and shape hover between one another, docking and
undocking, moving randomly and gently swaying in
the breeze that constantly rustles lazily through the
city streets. Sunlight beats warmly across late 19th
century buildings; broad, cobbled roads teem with
the inhabitants of Columbia going about their daily
business; birds fly overhead; and posters touting
sales, events and propaganda fill the spaces between
shop signs and adorn building fronts.
This propaganda is the first hint that Columbia
is no normal floating city, and as you stroll through
the vibrant streets, two things become worrisomely
clear: Everyone and everything has heavy religious
tones, and every face is white. As you play through
the game, unlocking further backstory and detail, the
reason becomes clear. Columbia is a city established
as a new ark, a refuge for white, middle-class Ameri-
GAMES
Bioshock Infinite is one of the great games and you can’t call yourself
a true gamer until you’ve experienced it
Floating through life: Liz
BIOSHOCK
INFINITE
HHHHH
$59.99
2K Games
PS3, Xbox 360,
PC Download
Amazon.com
39
Infinite Joy
2
K

G
A
M
E
S
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
+t


u
t u
40 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
cans to live a pure, faithful life free from
the worries and sins of those on land.
Originally launched as a floating world’s
fair demonstrating the best that America
had to offer, it quickly became a closed,
cult-like hotbed of zealotry, led by a self-
proclaimed prophet, Zachary Comstock.
The impact on the day-to-day lives of the
citizens is palpable, and Infinite’s incred-
ible graphics go a long way toward help-
ing bring the richness and character of
the city to life.
From the open, beautiful buildings
of Columbia and the opulent, finance-
driven residences of Emporia, to the gar-
gantuan, industrial factories and shan-
tytowns of Finkton, where the game’s
non-white communities live in squalor,
the visual onslaught that Infinite wreaks
on your eyeballs is almost overwhelm-
ing. I often found myself wandering away
from the main story just to stare at a sign,
or explore a building, or search for addi-
tional clues and places that would unlock
further information about my surround-
ings. Whether traversing streets filled
with shoppers, riding the city’s skylines
(which connect areas with roller-coast-
er style rails that goods and people can
travel on), walking through dilapidated
makeshift homes in the industrial sector
or exploring rooms and corridors of each
building, Bioshock Infinite offers a set-
ting dense with detail, color and vibrancy.
The world stretches almost endlessly as
you gaze over it, and levels are massive in
scope. Early in the game you visit Colum-
bia’s answer to a beach holiday — a float-
ing seaside resort — and watching sand
and waves mix with clouds and floating
buildings, all as people frolic in the water,
sunbathe and stroll along the promenade,
makes for a confusingly brilliant spec-
tacle. The physics of the world are mind-
boggling, but the city never feels unrealis-
tic, despite its obviously fictional setting
— such is the effort of the game’s design-
ers in crafting each nuance and detail.
Columbia feels like it could exist, with a
natural flow in its creativity and planning.
It’s not perfect, however. All too often
you’ll move to study something in detail,
and be met with a particularly ugly tex-
ture, or graphical glitch. During heavy ac-
tion scenes the game can noticeably slow
down, with screen tearing and frame-rate
drops. These are infrequent, fortunately,
and never detract from gameplay. What
does distract, however, is character mod-
eling. Main and secondary characters
look fantastic, with great animations and
excellent design. The people that fill the
streets and the enemies that bombard you
with gunfire? Not so much. Don’t be wor-
ried if you meet the same female and male
characters over and over as you walk
around — your game isn’t broken, that’s
just all the variety available. Aside from
different clothes, the same repeating fa-
cial features are an odd design choice that
act as a minor barrier to immersion. Too
often I’d approach a gathering of people
to listen to their conversation, and see
three men, all identical, talking to each
other. Enemies are even more repetitive
in design, but you’ll be too busy shooting
to really care.
Which brings us neatly into gameplay.
Infinite is a first-person game, and as such
relies on tried-and-tested Bioshock gun-
play, with a variety of customizable and
upgradeable weapons, “vigors,” which
offer supernatural abilities to the user,
and gear, which when worn offer similar
abilities and strengths to vigors.
At first, gun-fights can feel a little
clunky, especially with the weaker weap-
ons initially offered, but this decreases
with time. Once new weapons are un-
locked and upgraded, the sense of damage
each offers is greatly enhanced. It’s vigors
that offer the most fun. Relying on a sup-
ply of salts, they are collectible abilities
that unlock special powers and aids for
the player. One grants the ability to create
a magnetic shield that captures all bul-
lets fired at the player, which can then be
launched at enemies. Another summons
a flock of murderous crows, which strip
their victim’s flesh from the bone before
flying away. I favored lightning and fire,
setting electricity traps for unsuspecting
enemies to stumble into, before launch-
ing burning fireballs at them, which ex-
plode with devastating effect. Each is ac-
companied with gorgeous animation, and
when a new vigor is discovered, DeWitt’s
hands rise and transform as the new
power seeps into his being. Gaining the
ability to cast fire, for instance, sees his
hands temporarily turn to flame and ash,
all viscerally presented, and it’s fascinat-
ing to watch. At the midway point, when
several vigors are unlocked and guns can
be upgraded, fights and action sequences
can start to feel overly simple, as the play-
er has a lot of power over enemies. This
coincides with a lull in the story that feels
a little too much like padding. Gunfights
last longer, with each area entered trig-
gering a new encounter, and each level
throwing further assaults at you. Even on
normal, it occasionally feels like a slog just
getting through these, as the sluggishness
of the controls proves to be a tiresome
detriment. However, as the story picks up
steam again, the difficulty begins to ramp
up and the challenge switches from kill-
ing wave after wave to just trying to stay
alive, at which point gameplay retains its
former composure and the challenge of
using the game’s environment coupled
with the arsenal at your disposal to best
each foe becomes the primary focus.
What really binds the world of Bio-
shock Infinite together is its aural quality.
Voice acting is superb, with Booker not
only engaging other characters, but con-
stantly commenting on his surroundings
and actions. Cut scenes, which use the in-
game engine and occur seamlessly while
playing, are lavish acting exercises, and let
the character animations and vocal talents
of the two leads shine through. Secondary
characters are similarly well-rounded, of-
fering up stellar performances that bring
the pain, pleasure, good and evil of the cit-
ies’ inhabitants to life, and deepen the im-
mersion in the world. Even random char-
acters met on the street engage in mean-
ingful conversation with one another, and
one of the game’s delights involves walk-
ing through crowds and listening to their
social commentary, daily troubles, and
useful insights into current events and
“Bioshock Infinite is a
world, a lifestyle, an
entity so consuming,
it absorbs the player
and doesn’t relinquish
them until the final
credits roll.”
41 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
the history of the city. Background noise
is similarly well-rounded as crowds chat-
ter and bustle, buildings creak and groan
as they float, guns fill rooms and court-
yards with noise, vigors burst with energy
as they are used, enemies howl, citizens
scream and music from radios and pho-
nographs complement the in-game score
beautifully. The music of the game is a
particular highlight, with the score swell-
ing between dramatic and subtle where
appropriate, fitting the mood of each
scene perfectly. Radios play amusingly
time-appropriate covers of songs from
later decades, such as a ragtime cover of
“Tainted Love,” explained in-game as “the
music of tomorrow, today.” My favorite is
a barbershop-quartet remix of “God Only
Knows.” It’s sublime.
Infinite’s trump card, which makes the
game so memorable and enjoyable to play,
is its second lead character, Elizabeth, the
girl Booker is sent to Columbia to rescue.
Locked away by the prophet, the first part
of the game is spent trying to find her.
Once she and Booker meet, Infinite be-
comes a vastly better game.
The pair’s dynamic is real and emo-
tional, with Elizabeth interacting with
her environment — sitting on benches as I
studied a poster, cowering behind pillars
in firefights, or staring out at a spectacu-
lar vista as we passed a window. It makes
her feel less like a computer-controlled
addition and more like a second player,
assisting you in battle. She scours the en-
vironment, throwing Booker ammo, salts,
money and health, as she tries to keep
him alive and fighting. If you are killed,
Elizabeth will revive you — and this ties
into her supernatural powers. Elizabeth
is special. She can control the fabric of
time, creating “tears” in the world that
open windows to other places, and bring
objects into the game. In battle, she can
produce cover, ammo dumps or automat-
ed cannons for Booker to exploit. In later
levels, her abilities take on greater im-
portance and influence the world of the
game even further. The brief moments
spent without her company feel genu-
inely lonely, with her help in fights and
conversation as Booker advances through
areas sorely missed. That such an emo-
tional connection is formed with her is
testament to the writing and acting. She’s
not perfect, though. She occasionally
wanders off or fails to provide assistance,
though this is rare. One amusing mishap
in a late stage of the game sees Booker
and Elizabeth enter a jail cell, the lone
inhabitant of which has long-since suc-
cumbed to a grisly death. Blood coats the
walls, human waste soaks the bed and his
beaten body lies broken on the ground.
Elizabeth’s response? “Oh.” Not the most
sympathetic of reactions.
I completed Infinite in about 20 hours,
but I spent a lot of time wandering away
from the main plot. For those who choose
to barrel through the game, a lot of enjoy-
ment will be had. The story is incredible,
with more twists and turns than a twisty-
turny thing, gradually getting darker,
deeper, more emotional, more exciting,
more intriguing. It completely sucked me
in, and fighting through some of Infinite’s
more laborious firefights was justified
with further nuggets of plot or narrative.
Choose to explore the world, on the oth-
er hand, and you’ll be rewarded. Scattered
around locales are Voxophones, which are
recordings of certain characters voices, left
as notes which Booker can listen to, gain-
ing further insight into the motives and
actions of those in this world. Even more
enjoyable are the pieces of propaganda
known as Kinetoscopes, which offer a
short, silent film providing a fascinating —
if biased — glimpse into Columbia’s history.
Secret rooms, posters, signs, conversations
between citizens, songs played by certain
characters, news bulletins broadcast over
the radio, PA announcements to citizens
and side-quests all ensure that any further
exploration away from the game’s core plot
will be richly rewarded, and I strongly urge
you play the game at a slow pace, drinking
in Columbia. At one point, in the bottom of
a pub in the game’s poor district, Booker
finds a guitar and, as he plays, Elizabeth
starts to sing to a frightened, starving boy.
It offers no additional plot or reward, but
it’s a beautiful, emotional encounter that
less-thorough gamers will completely miss.
I’m finding it hard to quantify my feel-
ings for Bioshock Infinite. A game this
incredibly complex demands more than
mere adulation and criticism. It demands
in-depth analysis, long conversations
with friends who’ve also experienced it,
hours spent scouring Internet forums
trying to gain further insight into the
game’s backstory and plot. Infinite isn’t
just another FPS, and it isn’t just another
adventure game. It’s a world, a lifestyle,
an entity so consuming and engrossing
that it absorbs the player into its narra-
tive and doesn’t relinquish them to their
lesser reality until the final credits start to
roll. The last half hour, which is all story
and follows on from the game’s biggest
battle sequence, is astonishing. A mind-
blowing, gut-wrenching, puzzling, won-
drous, ruinous ending that left me staring
at the screen in disbelief. I finished the
game physically and emotionally drained,
and yet still I wanted more. I wanted to
return to the world that Infinite presents
and find more, do more, see more. It’s an
intoxicating elixir of rich backstory, deep
character development, incredible writ-
ing, beautiful graphics, exciting gameplay
and an ending that will continue to haunt
you long after you’ve turned off your
console or PC. Bioshock Infinite isn’t just
a great game, it’s one of the great games,
and you can’t call yourself a true gamer
until you’ve experienced it.
Go. Now. Columbia is waiting. l
42
T
HE NEW BROADWAY MUSICAL KINKY
Boots is hands down this year’s gayest — or
“most fabulous,” to go with Entertainment
Weekly’s coded description. You could
even think of it as an update on La Cage Aux Folles,
with a few heaping sprinkles of Priscilla, Queen of the
Desert’s good cheer and confetti, and even a nod to
the British working-class milieu of previous movie
musical adaptations Billy Elliot and The Full Monty.
In other words, it all but dares you to try and
resist it.
But no matter how weary and wizened you
might be, resistance to Kinky Boots isn’t just futile,
it’s ill advised. Because what Harvey Fierstein, the
Broadway book veteran, has managed to coax out of
Cyndi Lauper, the Broadway tunesmith newbie —
with direction by Jerry Mitchell — is worth seeing and
hearing and celebrating. Even Tony agrees: The show
just rounded up a whopping 13 Tony nominations,
more than any other show this season, including all
the major categories. You may have seen this story,
essentially, many times before, but you haven’t heard
original songs quite like this on the Great White Way.
We’re talking contemporary pop-rock, disco and
especially club beats. I told you it was gay.
The story, based on a small 2005 British film,
centers on a man, Charlie Price (Stark Sands), tasked
with running the floundering family shoe factory
after his father passes away. Initially Price doesn’t
want the job, since the Podunk business is beyond
down at its heels; the shoes just aren’t selling. He
eventually comes around, especially after he meets
Lola (Billy Porter) in London. Lola is a vivacious,
muscular, drag-queen showgirl who can’t find a
good pair of heels to withstand her force of gravity.
You can see where this is going, right? Lola puts her
heart and soul into designing new sturdy stilettos,
and, after some predictable tiffs and turf battles, as
well as literally coming to blows in a boxing ring, she
becomes the hero.
At its core, the secondary tale of a drag-queen
showman who finds more success behind the scenes
is Fierstein’s real life story brought to stage. As
written, Lola would certainly fit Fierstein perfectly,
should he ever decide to take on the role. Lola is
nearly as non-threatening and sexless a character
as Fierstein’s Tony-winning turn as Edna Turnblad
in Hairspray. Though in some novel stunt casting,
Lauper could also play the part. You can just
hear Lauper belting Lola’s big numbers, with the
Cyndi Lauper’s original songs go beyond the Broadway box in the new
Tony-nominated musical Kinky Boots
Doin’ the drag-boot boogie: Sands and Porter
KINKY BOOTS

Al Hirschfeld Theatre
302 West 45th St.
New York
$77 to $142
212-239-6200
telecharge.com
Heel Thyself
DOUG RULE STAGE
M
A
T
T
H
E
W

M
U
R
P
H
Y
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
43 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
13-piece house orchestra offering the
kind of support the pop star is used to
having in concert: The band is led by two
keyboardists, and the drummer is the first
main instrumentalist listed in the credits,
followed by a bassist and two guitarists.
It’s the rock orientation that makes
Kinky Boots so electrifying and powerful.
There are five towering anthems spread
out throughout the show and the songs
do a slightly better job than the script of
conveying the characters’ personalities
and motivations. The leads all seem to
take more relish in singing and dancing
(to Mitchell’s refreshing choreography)
than simply telling their stories. They all
knock you out in their own way. Sands,
probably heretofore best known for
playing the gay boy in Charles Busch’s
camp classic Die Mommie Die!, is the
irresistibly charming straight everyman,
just trying to do right and be happy. Even
more remarkable is Porter, who manages
to pull off quite the feat, camping it up
as the show’s drag star without over-
dramatizing or over-sentimentalizing the
role. In Porter’s hands and gams, Lola is
both larger than life and down to earth
— a living, breathing human being. Every
bit as stunning is Annaleigh Ashford,
who may remind you of Lauper in her
portrayal of the supporting character
Lauren. In particular, Ashford sings “The
History of Wrong Guys,” an incredibly
modern and hilarious number that gives
expression to the internal struggle of a
smart, self-aware woman trying in vain to
fight falling head over heels for a man, in
this case her boss Charlie.
As you would hope, given the show’s
title, costume designer Gregg Barnes
also deserves props for his truly fabulous
red lace-up boots, which you just know
drag queens are already clamoring for.
Ultimately, however, it’s the music that
struts with the most vigor. These boots,
you could say, were made for singing. l
FILM
continued from page 36
pens. Stark is a superhero, so he has to
defeat the Big Bad Guy. As for everyone
else? Their paper-thin motivations lack
even a hint of reason, sapping any dra-
matic tension from Iron Man 3’s chief
conflict.
“I’m just a man in a can,” Stark laments
midway through the movie. It’s not true,
of course, but it’s comforting to know that
he — or perhaps the actor who plays him
— is capable of humility, even when he’s
surrounded by chaos. l
NIGHT
LIFE
45 METROWEEKLY.COM
t
THURSDAY, 05.02.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • VJ • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Men in DC Eagle T-Shirts
get $3 Rail and Domestic,
9pm-midnight • Club Bar:
DC Boys of Leather
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour, 5-8pm • $15
All You Can Drink Rail
Highballs and Domestic
Drafts ($22 upgrade for a
step-up from rail), 4-8pm
• $5 Rail, $2 JR.’s drafts,
8pm to close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Active Duty Military Night
• Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Karaoke, 9pm • Drink
Specials • No Cover
LISTINGS
Destinations on page 52
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town
Bear Happy Hour, 6-11pm
• $3 Rail, $3 Draft, $3
Bud Bottles • Free Pizza,
7pm • Hosted by Charger
Stone • No cover before
9:30pm • 21+
DC EAGLE
New Happy Hour Specials,
$2 off regular prices,
4-9pm • Otter Crossing
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the Lounge
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Shirtless Thursday •
DJ Steve Henderson in
Secrets • 9pm • Cover
21+
FRIDAY, 05.03.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-7pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • VJ • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-7pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
For the Ladies • DJ Rosie
• Doors at 9pm • 21+
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half price burgers and
fries
TOWN
So You Think You’re a
Drag Queen? • Special
Guest Judge: Michelle
Visage of RuPaul’s Drag
Race • Upstairs: DJ
Wess • Downstairs: DJ
BacK2bACk • Go Go
Boys • Doors open 10pm
• Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Ba’Naka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SATURDAY, 05.04.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-7pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • VJ • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
DC EAGLE
$2 off for men with Club
Mugs, Leather Vests,
Harnesses or Chaps • All
colors on lock down night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
DJ Twin • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-7pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
For the Ladies • DJ Rosie
• Doors at 9pm • 21+

PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
47
For addresses, phone numbers and locations of individual clubs, bars, parties,
and special events, please refer to our Destinations on page 50.
t
Tracks Reunion
Saturday, April 27
Town
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scene
METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
TOWN
Crack, 10pm • $3 drinks,
9-10pm • Upstairs: DJ
Matt Bailer • Music and
video downstairs by Wess
• 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets •
DJ Spyke in Ziegfelds •
Cover • 21+
SUNDAY, 05.05.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
DC EAGLE
New Happy Hours
Specials: $2 off rail
and domestic, 4-9pm •
Cookout, 5-8pm
FIREPLACE
Skyy Vodka, $3 • $5 cover
with $1 off coupons
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Drag Show hosted by
Destiny B. Childs featuring
performances by a rotating
cast, 9pm • No cover •
Karaoke follows show
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5pm-till end of game •
No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
48 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
MONDAY, 05.06.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $1 Drafts
(Bud and Bud Light)
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUESDAY, 05.07.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • $2 Rail and
Domestic, All day • Free
pool till 9pm
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
Special Guest DJ Matt
Bailer • 2-for-1, all day
and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag BINGO hosted by
Shi-Queeta Lee, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 05.08.13
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
DC EAGLE
Open 4pm • New Happy
Hour specials, $2 off
regular prices, 4-9pm •
Wooden Nickel Night,
9pm-close • Receive
a wooden nickel for
every drink purchased •
Highwaymen TNT Hot
Jock Night • Men in
Jockstraps drink free at
club bar, 10-11pm • Hot
Jock Contest, midnight
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
49 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
THURSDAY, 05.09.13
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football on
Sundays • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
DC EAGLE
Happy Hour, $2 off regular
prices, 4-9pm • DC
Eagle T-Shirt Thursday,
$3 Rail and Domestic,
9pm-midnight
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Active Duty Military Night
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
50 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
51 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
52
DESTINATIONS
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
BARS & CLUBS
MARYLAND
CLUB HIPPO
1 West Eager Street
Baltimore, MD
(410) 547-0069
THE LODGE
21614 National Pike
Boonsboro, MD
(301) 591-4434
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855-N Washington, Blvd.
Laurel, MD
(301) 498-4840
VIRGINIA
FREDDIE’S
BEACH BAR
555 South 23rd Street
Crystal City, VA
(703) 685-0555
Crystal City Metro
m&w r
V3 LOUNGE
6763 Wilson Blvd.
Falls Church, Va.
301-802-8878

HRC
ACTION CENTER
& STORE
1633 Connecticut Ave. NW
(202) 232-8621
Dupont Circle Metro
THE FIREPLACE
22nd & P Streets NW
(202) 293-1293
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
FUEGO SALVAJE
Cafe Asia
1720 I St. NW
www.clubfuegodc.com
m d t
GLORIOUS
HEALTH CLUB
2120 W. VA Ave. NE 20002
(202) 269-0226
m o s
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court NW
(behind 1335 L St.)
(202) 347-4534
McPherson Square Metro
m l
JR.’S
1519 17th Street NW
(202) 328-0090
Dupont Circle Metro
m v
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave. NE
(202) 832-3888
w r d

MOVA
2204 14th Street NW
(202) 629-3958
U Street / Cardozo Metro
NELLIE’S
SPORTS BAR
900 U Street NW
(202) 332-6355
U Street / Cardozo Metro
m&w r
D.C.
18th & U
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th Street NW
(202) 265-7828
Dupont Circle Metro
r
9:30 CLUB
815 V Street NW
(202) 265-0930
U Street / Cardozo Metro
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th Street SE
(202) 546-5979
Eastern Market /
Navy Yard Metro
m d
COBALT/30 DEGREES
17th & R Street NW
(202) 462-6569
Dupont Circle Metro
m d t
CREW CLUB
1321 14th Street NW
(202) 319-1333
McPherson Square Metro
m o s
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave. NW
(202) 347-6025
Convention Center /
Gallery Place /
Chinatown Metro
m l
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th Street NE
(202) 529-0626
Brookland Metro
m d
NUMBER NINE
1435 P Street NW
Dupont Circle Metro
PHASE 1
525 8th Street SE
(202) 544-6831
Eastern Market Metro
w d
PHASE 1 of DUPONT
1415 22nd Street NW
(Formerly Apex)
Dupont Circle Metro
w m d
REMINGTON’S
639 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
(202) 543-3113
Eastern Market Metro
m cw d v
TOWN
2009 8th Street NW
(202) 234-TOWN
U Street/Cardozo Metro
m d v t
ZIEGFELD’S /
SECRETS
1824 Half Street SW
(202) 863-0670
Navy Yard Metro
m d v t gg
RETAIL
53 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
m mostly men w mostly women m&w men and women r restaurant l leather/levi
d dancing v video t drag cw country western gg go-go dancers o open 24 hours s sauna
I
CAN’T IMAGINE BEING 53 AND
working until 4 in the morning
every weekend night,” sighs
Shea Van Horn, “but I can’t
imagine myself not having some
type of creative outlet.”
As it turns out, the 43-year-
old has slowed down slightly in
the past year or two, dropping a
couple parties and reducing the
Cracking Up
54
Shea Van Horn may have slowed down ever so slightly,
yet he’s still D.C.’s leading multi-club promoter and DJ
by Doug Rule // Photography by Julian Vankim
MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM
frequency of others. But he’s
still the same-old Shea, the
leading multi-club promoter and
DJ on the gay D.C. nightlife
scene. He still throws, with
Matt Bailer, the mega-popular
monthly party Mixtape, which
turns five this year. And next
Sunday, May 12 — a day after
the next Mixtape at the Black
Cat — ushers in the third
season of the popular weekly
Sunday afternoon party Guil-
Tea on the roof deck at Nellie’s.
He’s also now at Number Nine
on a weekly basis, VJ’ing a
“Friday Night Videos” party
upstairs.
And of course there’s the
hysterical party that started
it all, Crack. This Saturday,
May 4, offers the first theater-
based Crack party in a year.
“When we first started Crack
we had a little more free
time,” concedes Van Horn,
who started the event seven
years ago with Karl Jones and
Chris Farris. But even though it
doesn’t happen several times
a year now, the focus is still
the same. Says Van Horn, “Our
whole approach is to put on a
show that feels like high school
theater.”
This round of Crack
will feature a Miss Crack
competition, in which 10
contestants — nine drag
queens and one drag king —
will compete to take over the
crown from Heidi Ho, otherwise
known as Duplex Diner owner
Kevin Lee. Lee won the only
other Miss Crack competition,
in 2006. Van Horn will host the
show as his drag alter ego,
Summer Camp.
Van Horn, who grew
up in eastern Washington
state, studied theater as an
undergraduate in Seattle,
where he also started dabbling
as a DJ. He moved to D.C.
to work for an international
health nonprofit, putting to use
his master’s degree in health
communications. But he didn’t
take to the decks again until
Crack, initially DJ’ing in drag as
Summer Camp. “It came back
as a way to promote Crack,” he
says, adding, “I still laugh when
I hear myself say that sentence.
“Promoting Crack,” it just
sounds kind of silly.”
Van Horn will miss one
Mixtape party this summer
when he’ll be on vacation in
Greece. He’s also lined up
guest DJs, including Bailer, to
play for him at Guil-Tea, which
he describes as “very open to
requests, really kind of friendly
and easygoing.”
Those are just a couple of
the ways, along with less Crack,
Van Horn has lightened his
party load. He recently bought
a house in the Bloomingdale
neighborhood of D.C. and is
enjoying being more domestic
with his “big fat cat” and his
boyfriend of a year. But he
doesn’t expect to end his work
in nightlife altogether.
“My love of living in D.C. is
really as a result of being able
to find a way to express myself
creatively,” Van Horn says, “and
bringing people together and
just doing all these things. So
something will be going on.”
Crack Drag: It’s All A Delusion is
Saturday, May 4, starting at 10
p.m., at Town Danceboutique,
2009 8th St. NW. Tickets are
$10. Call 202-234-TOWN or visit
towndc.com or crackdc.com. l
C
L
U
B
L
I
F
E
S
55 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013
56 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
Fuego
Friday, April 12
Phase 1 Dupont
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
57 METROWEEKLY.COM MAY 2, 2013

I’d vote differently these days. ... I do believe that if
there are children who are orphans who do not have a loving person or couple,
I think if a person wants to love and raise a child
they ought to be able to do that.
Period.

— Rep. PAUL RYAN (R-Wis.) responds to town hall questions about his anti-LGBT voting record by declaring
his changed position on adoption rights. He still opposes marriage equality.
(Think Progress)

But ultimately, if that issue is injected into this bill,
the bill will fail
and the coalition that helped put it together will fall apart.

— Sen. MARCO RUBIO (R-Fla.), the GOP point man on immigration reform, declares an amendment granting binational
gay couples the same rights as straight couples to be a poison pill for the already troubled legislation.
(Politico)
“Yesterday was an incredible day for athletes everywhere.
Jason Collins’ courage and leadership in coming out reminds me of how important it is for an athlete
to be able to be true to him or herself.

— Recently retired tennis star ANDY RODDICK in a statement announcing his signing on with Athlete Ally,
a group dedicated to fighting anti-LGBT attitudes in sports.
(Towleroad)

[A] gorgeous, straight football player stopped me to talk about his
very public support for LGBT athletes?
How cool is that?

— Women’s tennis legend and lesbian icon MARTINA NAVRATILOVA, who came out in 1981, on being approached by NFL player
Donté Stallworth and how the Jason Collins story is a watershed moment for men’s professional sports.
(Sports Illustrated)

[G]ay people can just
grow their own food.”
— An unidentified staffer for Washington state Sen. Sharron Brown (R), who has introduced a bill to grant businesses the right to
deny services to any individual for religious reasons, answers the question of what gays who live in rural areas and
are refused service by the only local grocery store might do.
(The Stranger)
58 MAY 2, 2013 METROWEEKLY.COM

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